• central
  • This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about central venous access devices, particularly for children with lysosomal storage disorders. (gosh.nhs.uk)
  • To do this, we will put a central venous access device into one of your child's veins. (gosh.nhs.uk)
  • A central venous access device (CVAD) is made from a non-irritating material such as silicon and titanium, which means that it can be left in place in a vein for long periods of time. (gosh.nhs.uk)
  • A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC or PIC line), less commonly called a percutaneous indwelling central catheter, is a form of intravenous access that can be used for a prolonged period of time (e.g., for long chemotherapy regimens, extended antibiotic therapy, or total parenteral nutrition) or for administration of substances that should not be done peripherally (e.g., antihypotensive agents a.k.a. pressors). (wikipedia.org)