• neurotransmitters
  • The signalling within the chemoreceptors is thought to be mediated by the release of neurotransmitters by the glomus cells, including dopamine, noradrenaline, acetylcholine, substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide and enkephalins. (wikipedia.org)
  • malignant
  • Although it is common in the lung cancer literature to refer to histologically mixed tumors containing significant numbers of malignant giant cells as "giant-cell carcinomas", technically a diagnosis of "giant-cell carcinoma" should be limited strictly to neoplasms containing only malignant giant cells (i.e. "pure" giant-cell carcinoma). (wikipedia.org)
  • Small-cell carcinoma (also known as "small-cell lung cancer", or "oat-cell carcinoma") is a type of highly malignant cancer that most commonly arises within the lung, although it can occasionally arise in other body sites, such as the cervix, prostate, and gastrointestinal tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Small-cell lung carcinoma can occur in combination with a wide variety of other histological variants of lung cancer, including extremely complex malignant tissue admixtures. (wikipedia.org)
  • When it is found with one or more differentiated forms of lung cancer, such as squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma, the malignant tumor is then diagnosed and classified as a combined small cell lung carcinoma (c-SCLC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Neoplasms of glomus cells are known as paraganglioma, among other names, they are generally non-malignant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Squamous
  • Eight major taxa of lung carcinomas are recognized within the WHO-2004 classification: Small-cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Adenocarcinoma Large-cell carcinoma Adenosquamous carcinoma Sarcomatoid carcinoma Carcinoid Salivary gland-like carcinoma The subclassification of GCCL among these major taxa has undergone significant changes in recent decades. (wikipedia.org)
  • often restricted to the cells of the alveolar epithelium (squamous alveolar cells and great alveolar cells) and alveolar phagocytes. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • gastrin-releasi
  • Immunohistochemically, prostatic small cell carcinoma are positive for thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), CD56, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, calcitonin and bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide, while lacking, or rarely and weakly expressing, androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • The asexual spores (conidia) occur in pycnidia from conidiogenous cells, without conidiophores. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytoplasm
  • 1. any of the protoplasmic masses making up organized tissue, consisting of a nucleus surrounded by cytoplasm enclosed in a cell or plasma membrane. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When associated with the lung, it is sometimes called "oat cell carcinoma" due to the flat cell shape and scanty cytoplasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the name implies, the cells in small-cell carcinomas are smaller than normal cells, and barely have room for any cytoplasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • spore-beari
  • The basidia (spore-bearing cells) are club-shaped with a narrow base, and have dimensions of 20-30 by 7-9 µm. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basidia (spore-bearing cells) are cylindrical, with dimensions of 20-25 by 3-4 µm. (wikipedia.org)
  • nerve fibers
  • Any of the cells that surround the axons of the peripheral nerves, forming the myelin sheath of myelinated nerve fibers and providing support for nonmyelinated nerve fibers. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The nerve fibers pick up the signals sent by glomus cells and transmit them to the central nervous system for treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • stratum
  • In mammalian skin, they are clear cells found in the stratum basale (at the bottom of sweat duct ridges) of the epidermis approximately 10 µm in diameter. (wikipedia.org)
  • carcinoid
  • In some endometrial neoplasms they are present in abundance, but tumours rich in such cells do not have any features suggestive of a carcinoid tumour and are morphologically identical to adenocarcinomas of similar grade which are devoid of argyrophil cells. (bmj.com)
  • secretory
  • Scanty argyrophil cells are present in a substantial proportion of normal endometria, particularly during the secretory stage of the cycle. (bmj.com)
  • Ileum
  • L cells are primarily found in the ileum and large intestine (colon), but some are also found in the duodenum and jejunum. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior pituitary
  • This area controls most anterior pituitary cells and thereby regulates functions in the entire body, like responses to stress, cold, sleep, and the reproductive system. (wikipedia.org)
  • At this site, these cells can release substances into small blood vessels that travel directly to the anterior pituitary gland (the hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal vessels). (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • Giant-cell carcinomas have been reported to be diagnosed in a significantly younger population than all non-small-cell carcinomas considered as a group. (wikipedia.org)
  • An embryonic stem cell derives from a group of cells, the inner cell mass, from a 4-5 day old embryo, called a BLASTOCYST . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This group of cells can be removed and cultured into embryonic stem cells. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A cell is a group of self-sustaining biochemical reactions that are isolated from the environment by a selectively permeable lipid membrane. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • endothelial
  • This edition includes over 100 new illustrations, more Clinical Correlation boxes on the histology of common medical conditions, and new information on the molecular biology of endothelial cell function. (google.com)
  • Endometrial
  • Argyrophil cells are also present in the various types of hyperplastic endometria and are found in more than half of endometrial adenocarcinomas. (bmj.com)
  • Endometrial adenocarcinomas containing argyrophil cells tend to be well differentiated and tend not to invade deeply into the myometrium. (bmj.com)
  • origin
  • any of the cells of ectodermal origin that make up the neurilemma. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A generic term for an elonged and/or fusiform cell, regardless of origin. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • An adult stem cell is an undifferentiated cell occurring in differentiated tissue, such as that of BONE MARROW , BRAIN , SKELETAL MUSCLE , LIVER , SKIN , PANCREAS or the BLOOD , with the capacity to yield specialized cell types of the tissue of origin. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The origin of Merkel cells has been debated for over 20 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • The open type cells may in addition receive regulatory signals from luminal molecules The developmental origin of these cells is as yet unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • carcinomas
  • Giant-cell carcinoma of the lung (GCCL) is a rare histological form of large-cell lung carcinoma, a subtype of undifferentiated lung cancer, traditionally classified within the non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). (wikipedia.org)
  • For several decades, primary lung cancers were consistently dichotomously classified for treatment and research purposes into small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), based on an oversimplified approach that is now clearly outmoded. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment is similar to small cell lung cancer, but survival rates are much higher than other small-cell carcinomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • characteristic
  • The characteristic feature of this highly lethal malignancy is the distinctive light microscopic appearance of its extremely large cells, which are bizarre and highly pleomorphic, and which often contain more than one huge, misshapen, pleomorphic nucleus ("syncytia"), which result from cell fusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anichkov's cell a plump modified histiocyte in the inflammatory lesions of the heart (Aschoff bodies) characteristic of rheumatic fever. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • mammalian
  • for mammalian cells, typical internal concentrations include 140 mM K+, 5-15 mM Na+, 5-15 mM Cl-, and a pH of 7.2, which can be significantly different from their concentrations outside the cell. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • illustration Individual mammalian cells are usually microscopic, typically ranging from 5 µm to 50 µm in diameter. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • type
  • a type of cell occurring in the region of the nerve fibres of the peripheral nervous system of vertebrates. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Embedded in the cell membrane are a wide range of molecules that vary with the cell type and are typically composed of proteins or glycoproteins that have a cytoplasmic transmembrane and external domains. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This is an extremely rare type of small cell, and there has been little information in the scientific community. (wikipedia.org)
  • A glomus cell (type I) is a peripheral chemoreceptor, mainly located in the carotid bodies and aortic bodies, that helps the body regulate breathing. (wikipedia.org)
  • widely
  • Small-cell carcinoma is most often more rapidly and widely metastatic than non-small cell lung carcinoma (and hence staged differently). (wikipedia.org)
  • arise
  • All living cells arise from other cells, either by division of one cell to make two, as in mitosis and meiosis, or by fusion of two cells to make one, as in the union of the sperm and ovum to make the zygote in sexual reproduction. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • nucleus
  • Eukaryotic cells have a true nucleus, which contains the genetic material, composed of the chromosomes , each of which is a long linear deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule associated with protein. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Prokaryotic cells, the bacteria, have no nucleus, and their genetic material, consisting of a single circular naked DNA molecule, is not separated from the rest of the cell by a nuclear membrane. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • band cell a late metamyelocyte in which the nucleus is in the form of a curved or coiled band. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Cell division involves two major processes: karyokinesis, the division of the nucleus, and cytokinesis, the division of the remainder of the cell. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • lung cancer
  • However, in a more recent series of 4,212 consecutive lung cancer cases, only one (0.024%) lesion was determined to be a "pure" giant-cell carcinoma after complete sectioning of all available tumor tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is estimated to account for 1,000 new cases a year in the U.S. Histologically similar to small-cell lung cancer, therapies for small-cell lung cancer are usually used to treat EPSCC. (wikipedia.org)