... is the use of estrogen in women without a uterus and estrogen plus progestin in women who have an intact uterus.[70] ... assuming that they have a uterus and are not pregnant or lactating.[46] In women without a uterus, menopause or postmenopause ... Vagina and uterus[edit]. During the transition to menopause, menstrual patterns can show shorter cycling (by 2-7 days);[16] ... Removal of the uterus without removal of the ovaries does not directly cause menopause, although pelvic surgery of this type ...
Uterus. .mw-parser-output .nobold{font-weight:normal}. general:. *Genitoplasty. *Hysterectomy. *Hysterotomy ...
The medial ends of the fallopian tubes on the side closer to the uterus are then connected to the back of the uterus itself.[27 ... Once applied and fastened, the clip blocks movement of eggs from the ovary to the uterus.[25] The ten year pregnancy rate is ... While both hysterectomy (the removal of the uterus) or bilateral oophorectomy (the removal of both ovaries) can also accomplish ... the surgeon will remove part or all of the fallopian tubes after the infant has been delivered and the uterus has been closed.[ ...
... it is a form of adenomyosis that forms a mass or growth around the tissue of the inner uterus. ...
... disruption of normal hormonal regulation of periods or disorders of the endometrial lining of the uterus. Depending upon the ...
Adhesions form as a natural part of the body's healing process after surgery in a similar way that a scar forms. The term "adhesion" is applied when the scar extends from within one tissue across to another, usually across a virtual space such as the peritoneal cavity. Adhesion formation post-surgery typically occurs when two injured surfaces are close to one another. This often causes inflammation and causes fibrin deposits onto the damaged tissues.[2] The fibrin then connects the two adjacent structures where damage of the tissues occurred. The fibrin acts like a glue to seal the injury and builds the fledgling adhesion, said at this point to be "fibrinous." In body cavities such as the peritoneal, pericardial, and synovial cavities, a family of fibrinolytic enzymes may act to limit the extent of the initial fibrinous adhesion, and may even dissolve it. In many cases, the production or activity of these enzymes are compromised because of injury, however, and the fibrinous adhesion persists. If ...
Blood loss per vaginam (Latin: through the vagina) (PV) typically arises from the lining of the uterus (endometrium), but may ... often the uterus. Generally, it is either a healthy physiologic response during the non-conceptional menstrual cycle or is ... are benign tumors of the uterus that cause bleeding and pelvic pain in approximately 30% of affected women. Adenomyosis, a ... occlusion of the blood vessels supplying the uterus), laparotomy (surgical opening of the abdomen), occasionally leading to ...
This type can form when ovulation doesn't occur, and a follicle doesn't rupture or release its egg but instead grows until it becomes a cyst, or when a mature follicle involutes (collapses on itself). It usually forms during ovulation, and can grow to about 7 cm in diameter. It is thin-walled, lined by one or more layers of granulosa cell, and filled with clear fluid.[citation needed] ...
... (BV) is a disease of the vagina caused by excessive growth of bacteria.[6][9] Common symptoms include increased vaginal discharge that often smells like fish.[2] The discharge is usually white or gray in color.[2] Burning with urination may occur.[2] Itching is uncommon.[2][6] Occasionally, there may be no symptoms.[2] Having BV approximately doubles the risk of infection by a number of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS.[8][10] It also increases the risk of early delivery among pregnant women.[3][11] BV is caused by an imbalance of the naturally occurring bacteria in the vagina.[4][5] There is a change in the most common type of bacteria and a hundred to thousandfold increase in total numbers of bacteria present.[6] Typically, bacteria other than Lactobacilli become more common.[12] Risk factors include douching, new or multiple sex partners, antibiotics, and using an intrauterine device, among others.[5] However, it is not considered a sexually transmitted ...
hymenal remnants, vaginal septa,[9] thickened undilatable hymen,[9] hypoplasia of the introitus [9]retroverted uterus[7] or ... Cancer of the reproductive tract, including the ovaries, cervix, uterus, or vagina. ... retroversion of the uterus, urinary tract infection, lack of lubrication, scar tissue, or abnormal growths. Some cases may be ...
While the oocyte (later the zygote if fertilization occurs) traverses the Fallopian tube into the uterus, the corpus luteum ... of the uterus and providing an area rich in blood vessels in which the zygote(s) can develop. From this point on, the corpus ...
After completion of surgery, the patient is transferred to the post anesthesia care unit and closely monitored. When the patient is judged to have recovered from the anesthesia, he/she is either transferred to a surgical ward elsewhere in the hospital or discharged home. During the post-operative period, the patient's general function is assessed, the outcome of the procedure is assessed, and the surgical site is checked for signs of infection. There are several risk factors associated with postoperative complications, such as immune deficiency and obesity. Obesity has long been considered a risk factor for adverse post-surgical outcomes. It has been linked to many disorders such as obesity hypoventilation syndrome, atelectasis and pulmonary embolism, adverse cardiovascular effects, and wound healing complications.[11] If removable skin closures are used, they are removed after 7 to 10 days post-operatively, or after healing of the incision is well under way. It is not uncommon for surgical ...
Reynolds E, Logani S, Moller K, Horowitz I (2006). "Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterus in a postmenopausal woman. Case ...
The portions which lie in the genital cord[citation needed] fuse to form the uterus and vagina. This fusion of the ... About the fifth month a ring-like constriction marks the position of the cervix of the uterus, and after the sixth month the ... A ring-like outgrowth of this epithelium occurs at the lower end of the uterus and marks the future vaginal fornix. At about ... The gubernaculum later becomes the proper ovarian ligament and the round ligament of the uterus. ...
Uterus. .mw-parser-output .nobold{font-weight:normal}. General:. *Genitoplasty. *Hysterectomy. *Hysterotomy ...
Fibroids (leiomyoma) - fibroids in the wall of the uterus cause increased menstrual loss if they protrude into the central ... Adenomyosis - extension of the endometrial tissue into the wall of the uterus tries to shed causing painful and abnormal bleeds ... A definitive treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding is to perform hysterectomy (removal of the uterus). The risks of the ... Endometriosis - extension of the endometrial tissue outside of the uterus tries to shed causing painful and abnormal bleeds ...
... s are tumours that arise from granulosa cells. They are esterogen secreting tumors and present as large, complex, ovarian masses. These tumours are part of the sex cord-gonadal stromal tumour or non-epithelial group of tumours. Although granulosa cells normally occur only in the ovary, granulosa cell tumours occur in both ovaries and testicles (see Ovarian cancer and Testicular cancer). These tumours should be considered malignant and treated in the same way as other malignant tumours of ovary. The ovarian disease has two forms, juvenile and adult, both characterized by indolent growth,[1] and therefore has high recovery rates.[2][3] The staging system for these tumours is the same as for epithelial tumours and most present as stage I.[4] The peak age at which they occur is 50-55 years, but they may occur at any age. Juvenile granulosa cell tumour is a similar but distinct rare tumour. It too occurs in both the ovary and testis. In the testis it is extremely rare, and has ...
When released, this travels down the fallopian tube into the uterus, where it may become fertilised by a sperm. There is an ... The part of the broad ligament of the uterus that covers the ovary is known as the mesovarium.[4] ... The ovaries lie within the pelvic cavity, on either side of the uterus, to which they are attached via a fibrous cord called ... Progesterone prepares the uterus for pregnancy, and the mammary glands for lactation. Progesterone functions with estrogen by ...
Vaginal tumors are neoplasms (tumors) found in the vagina. They can be benign or malignant.[1][a] A neoplasm is an abnormal growth of tissue that usually forms a tissue mass.[2][3][4] Vaginal neoplasms may be solid, cystic or of mixed type.[5] Vaginal cancers arise from vaginal tissue, with vaginal sarcomas develop from bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels or other connective or supportive tissue.[6][7] Tumors in the vagina may also be metastases (malignant tissue that has spread to the vagina from other parts of the body). [8][7] Cancer that has spread from the colon, bladder, and stomach is far more common than cancer that originates in the vagina itself.[9] Some benign tumors may later progress to become malignant tumors, such as vaginal cancers.[10][11] Some neoplastic growths of the vagina are sufficiently rare as to be only described in case studies.[3] Signs and symptoms may include a feeling of pressure, painful intercourse or bleeding.[12] Most vaginal tumors are located during a ...
In veterinary medicine, the removal of ovaries and uterus is called ovariohysterectomy (spaying) and is a form of sterilization ... The formal medical name for removal of a woman's entire reproductive system (ovaries, Fallopian tubes, uterus) is "total ... The Uterus, Physiological and Clinical Considerations Human Sexual Response 1966 p.111-140 ... ". "Hysterectomy" is removal of the uterus (from the Greek ὑστέρα hystera "womb" and εκτομία ektomia "a cutting out of") ...
... is a liquid which fills the follicular antrum and surrounds the ovum in an ovarian follicle. This fluid is rich in hyaluronic acid, which are being recently used in a modified ICSI called physiological ICSI (PICSI), semi-viscous and yellow in colour.[1] ...
The curette is used to gently scrape the lining of the uterus and remove the tissue in the uterus. This tissue is examined for ... of the cervix and surgical removal of part of the lining of the uterus and/or contents of the uterus by scraping and scooping ( ... A curette, a metal rod with a handle on one end and a sharp loop on the other, is then inserted into the uterus through the ... Infection of the uterus or fallopian tubes is also a possible complication, especially if the woman has an untreated sexually ...
... s are often the result of trauma during childbirth (in which case it is known as obstetric fistula), with increased risk associated with significant lacerations or interventions are used such as episiotomy or operative (forceps/vacuum extraction) deliveries[2] or in situations where there is inadequate health care, such as in some developing countries. Rectovaginal fistula is said to be known as the leading cause in maternal death in developing countries.[3] Risk factors include prolonged labour, difficult instrumental delivery and paramedian episiotomy. Rates in Eritrea are estimated as high as 350 per 100,000 vaginal births. Fistulas can also develop as a result of physical trauma to either the vagina or anus, including from rape.[4] Women with rectovaginal fistulae are often stigmatized in developing countries, and become outcasts.[5] Rectovaginal fistula can also be a symptom of various diseases, including infection by lymphogranuloma venereum,[6] or the unintended result ...
While the cilia of the inner lining (endosalpinx) of the fallopian tube beat towards the uterus, tubal fluid is normally ... into the uterus, or production is curtailed by damage to the endosalpinx. This tube then is unable to participate in the ... distal to the uterus). The blocked tube may become substantially distended giving the tube a characteristic sausage-like or ... fused with sperm and the resulting fertilized ovum is reinserted into the uterus. ...
For women, problems with fertilisation arise mainly from either structural problems in the Fallopian tube or uterus or problems ... in which the doctor or WHNP introduces sperm into the uterus during ovulation, via a catheter. In these methods, fertilization ...
Another, less commonly performed method is an "ovary-sparing spay"[3] in which the uterus is removed but one (or both) ovaries ... Emergency removal of the infected uterus carries a much higher degree of risk of death than a routine 'spay' operation. The ... Traditional spaying (removal of uterus and ovaries) is performed commonly on household pets (such as cats and dogs) as a method ... This lifts the ovary and uterus safely away from other organs. The surgeon then removes the grasping instrument and replaces it ...
Uterus lining *Estrogen together with progesterone promotes and maintains the uterus lining in preparation for implantation of ... Estrogens are responsible for maturation and maintenance of the vagina and uterus, and are also involved in ovarian function, ... The ER is expressed in specific tissues including the ovary, uterus and breast. The metabolic effects of estrogen in ... fertilized egg and maintenance of uterus function during gestation period, also upregulates oxytocin receptor in myometrium ...
A caesarean hysterectomy consists of a caesarean section followed by the removal of the uterus. This may be done in cases of ... It is performed at very early gestations where the lower segment of the uterus is unformed as it is safer in this situation for ... Antibiotic prophylaxis is used before an incision.[55] The uterus is incised, and this incision is extended with blunt pressure ... The peritoneum is opened by repeat stretching, no abdominal swabs are used, the uterus is closed in one layer with a big needle ...
The uterus has four main parts. The fundus is the upper part of the uterus. It has a rounded shape. Another part of the uterus ... Cattle have two uteri.[20]. *The uterus of the horse is made of two short uterine horns. The uterus of the horse is affected by ... "RCPA - Uterus benign". www.rcpa.edu.au. Retrieved 2018-08-20.. *↑ "RCPA - Uterus endometrial and myometrial malignancies". www. ... The uterus or womb is part of the reproductive system of the female body. The uterus is the place a baby grows for nine months ...
u. Uterus. The uterine tube of the right side is marked m. v. Vulva. va. Vagina. W. Scattered remains of Wolffian tubes near it ... About the fifth month a ring-like constriction marks the position of the cervix of the uterus, and after the sixth month the ... A ring-like outgrowth of this epithelium occurs at the lower end of the uterus and marks the future vaginal fornix. At about ... The portions which lie in the genital cord[citation needed] fuse to form the uterus and vagina. This fusion of the ...