See also: Schistosomicide. Ethiopian children treated for Schistosoma mansoni. There are two drugs available, praziquantel and ...
... is a schistosomicide. It is used to treat schistosomiasis, the helmintic disease caused by certain flatworms ( ... However, it is one of the most effective schistosomicide drugs. It has recently also been investigated for use in the treatment ...
A schistosomicide is a drug used to combat schistosomiasis. Examples listed in MeSH include: amoscanate arteether artemether ... a new schistosomicide against Schistosoma haematobium". Br Med J. 2 (6202): 1396-8. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.6202.1396. PMC 1597073. ... chloroxylenol hycanthone lucanthone metrifonate niridazole oltipraz oxamniquine praziquantel stibophen Schistosomicides at the ...
An anti-schistosome drug is a schistosomicide. Parasitism of humans by Schistosoma appears to have evolved at least three ...
... is the schistosomicide approved by the FDA in 1975. It is a metabolite of lucanthone. Hycanthone interferes with ...
... schistosomicides MeSH D27.505.954.122.250.100 - antiprotozoal agents MeSH D27.505.954.122.250.100.055 - amebicides MeSH D27.505 ...
It acts as a schistosomicide and has been shown in rodent models to inhibit the formation of cancers in the bladder, blood, ...
The substance appears to have a slight toxicity in higher doses, with effects such as liver and intestinal disorders at high exposure in test animals (just below LD50 level).[citation needed] Some reproductive disorders and decreasing weaning weight have been observed, also at high exposure. Effects on humans from use as a drug include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, or headache; very rarely also ringing in the ears, vision changes, stomach pain, yellowing eyes and skin, dark urine, fever, fatigue, increased thirst and change in the amount of urine occur.[citation needed] Carcinogenic effects have been shown at higher doses.[11] ...
InChI=1S/C48H74O14.C47H72O14/c1-11-25(2)43-28(5)17-18-47(62-43)23-34-20-33(61-47)16-15-27(4)42(26(3)13-12-14-32-24-55-45-40(49)29(6)19-35(46(51)58-34)48(32,45)52)59-39-22-37(54-10)44(31(8)57-39)60-38-21-36(53-9)41(50)30(7)56-38;1-24(2)41-27(5)16-17-46(61-41)22-33-19-32(60-46)15-14-26(4)42(25(3)12-11-13-31-23-54-44-39(48)28(6)18-34(45(50)57-33)47(31,44)51)58-38-21-36(53-10)43(30(8)56-38)59-37-20-35(52-9)40(49)29(7)55-37/h12-15,19,25-26,28,30-31,33-45,49-50,52H,11,16-18,20-24H2,1-10H3;11-14,18,24-25,27,29-30,32-44,48-49,51H,15-17,19-23H2,1-10H3/b13-12+,27-15+,32-14+;12-11+,26-14+,31-13+/t25-,26-,28-,30-,31-,33+,34-,35-,36-,37-,38-,39-,40+,41-,42-,43+,44-,45+,47+,48+;25-,27-,29-,30-,32+,33-,34-,35-,36-,37-,38-,39+,40-,41+,42-,43-,44+,46+,47+/m00/s1 ...
... is a highly effective, broad-spectrum antihelmintic indicated for the treatment of nematode infestations, including roundworm, hookworm, whipworm, threadworm, pinworm, and the intestinal form of trichinosis prior to its spread into the tissues beyond the digestive tract. Other drugs are used to treat worm infections outside the digestive tract, as mebendazole is poorly absorbed into the bloodstream.[9] Mebendazole is used alone in those with mild to moderate infestations. It kills parasites relatively slowly, and in those with very heavy infestations, it can cause some parasites to migrate out of the digestive system, leading to appendicitis, bile duct problems, or intestinal perforation. To avoid this, heavily infested patients may be treated with piperazine, either before or instead of mebendazole. Piperazine paralyses the parasites, causing them to pass in the feces.[10] It is also used rarely in the treatment of hydatid disease. Evidence for effectiveness for this disease, ...
... is a medication used to treat a number of parasitic worm infections.[2] This includes ascariasis, hookworm infections, enterobiasis (pinworm infection), trichostrongyliasis, and trichinellosis.[2] It is taken by mouth.[2] Side effects include nausea, headache, dizziness, trouble sleeping, and rash.[2] A lower dose should be used in people with liver disease.[2] While it does not appear to be harmful during pregnancy, it has not been studied for this use.[3] It is unclear if it is safe for use during breastfeeding.[2] It is in the antihelmintic family of medications.[4] It works by paralyzing worms.[4] Pyrantel was initially described in 1965.[5] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[6] Pyrantel is available as a generic medication.[4] It costs less than 25 USD per course of treatment in the United States.[1] It may also be used to treat worms in a number of other animals.[5] ...
The ability of parasites to survive treatments that are generally effective at the recommended doses is a major threat to the future control of worm parasites in small ruminants and horses. This is especially true of nematodes, and has helped spur development of aminoacetonitrile derivatives for treatment against drug-resistant nematodes, as well as exploration of doxycycline to kill their endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria. The resistance is measured by the "fecal egg count reduction" value which varies for different types of helminths.[8] Treatment with an antihelminthic drug kills worms whose phenotype renders them susceptible to the drug, but resistant parasites survive and pass on their "resistance" genes. Resistant varieties accumulate, and treatment failure finally occurs. ...