... /ˈdiːtrɪk/ is a United States Army Medical Command installation located in Frederick, Maryland. Historically, Fort Detrick was the center of the US biological weapons program from 1943 to 1969. Since the discontinuation of that program, it has hosted most elements of the United States biological defense program. As of the early 2010s, Fort Detrick's 1,200-acre (490 ha) campus supports a multi-governmental community that conducts biomedical research and development, medical materiel management, global medical communications and the study of foreign plant pathogens. It is home to the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), with its bio-defense agency, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). It also hosts the National Cancer Institute-Frederick (NCI-Frederick) and is home to the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR) and National Interagency Biodefense ...
For the first half of the American Civil War, the Baylor president was George Washington Baines, maternal great-grandfather of the future U.S. President, Lyndon Baines Johnson. He worked vigorously to sustain the university during the Civil War, when male students left their studies to enlist in the Confederate Army. Following the war, the city of Independence slowly declined, primarily caused by the rise of neighboring cities being serviced by the Santa Fe Railroad. Because Independence lacked a railroad line, university fathers began searching for a location to build a new campus.. Beginning in 1885, Baylor University moved to Waco, Texas, a growing town on the railroad line. It merged with a local college called Waco University. At the time, Rufus Burleson, Baylor's second president, was serving as the local college's president. That same year, the Baylor Female College also was moved to a new location, Belton, Texas. It later became known as the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor. A Baylor ...
得到博士學位後,亨特返回紐約歐文·倫敦的實驗小組,跟其他成員一同發現小量氧化了的穀胱甘肽(即GSSG)便足以抑制網狀紅血球合成蛋白質的能力,以及雙鏈核糖核酸(雙鏈RNA)完全制止了蛋白質合成。回到劍橋大學後,他與安東尼·亨特和理查德·傑克遜(英語:Richard Jackson (biochemist))一起工作。二人較早前發現了啟動血紅素合成的核糖核酸(RNA),即如今科學界認識的甲硫胺酸-轉運核糖核酸複合體。3至4年後,三人再發現最少兩個能夠抑制血紅素合成的化學物[13]。. 此外,亨特也定期在夏天於麻薩諸塞州海洋生物學實驗室(英語:Marine Biological Laboratory)工作。1982年夏,他在海洋生物學實驗室以其中一種海膽Arbacia punctulata(英語:Arbacia ...
Jakob Segal (1911-1995), a professor at Humboldt University in then-East Germany, proposed that HIV was engineered at a U.S. military laboratory at Fort Detrick, by splicing together two other viruses, Visna and HTLV-1. According to his theory, the new virus, created between 1977 and 1978, was tested on prison inmates who had volunteered for the experiment in exchange for early release. He further suggested that it was through these prisoners that the virus was spread to the population at large. At the end of the Cold War, former KGB agents Vasili Mitrokhin and Oleg Gordievsky independently revealed that the Fort Detrick hypothesis was a propaganda operation devised by the KGB's First Chief Directorate codenamed "Operation INFEKTION". This revelation was later supported by officer Günther Bohnensack of section X of East Germany's Hauptverwaltung Aufklärung. It is known that Segal was in close contact with Russian KGB officers and Mitrokhin mentioned him as a central asset of the ...
... is a recent field of research that investigates research practices with the ultimate goal of finding evidence-based improvements. It is also known as "research on research" or "the science of science" as it uses research methods to study how research is done and where improvements can be made. It covers all fields of scientific research (including health and medical research) and has been described as "taking a bird's eye view of science". It aims to improve scientific practice as summed up by John Ioannidis, "Science is the best thing that has happened to human beings [...] but we can do it better". Meta-research has grown as a reaction to the replication crisis and concerns about waste in research. The earliest meta-research paper was published in 1966 and examined the statistical methods of 295 papers in ten ...
... (BICR; also called the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute) is a biological research facility that conducts research into the basic biology of cancer. It is based in Glasgow, Scotland. The Institute is named in recognition of the early works of Sir George Beatson, a surgeon, who in 1912 established a research department at a cancer hospital in Glasgow. This department became independent from the hospital in 1967 when the Institute was founded by the then Director, Dr John Paul. Dr Paul also raised sufficient funds to move the Beatson in 1976 to its present location on the Garscube Estate, where it has since interacted closely with researchers at the University of Glasgow. Professor John Wyke became Director in 1987 and Professor Karen Vousden was appointed as Director in 2002. In 2016, Karen went on to become CRUK's chief scientist[1] and Prof Owen Sansom took over as Director, having served as Deputy Director since ...
Original research, also called primary research, is research that is not exclusively based on a summary, review, or synthesis of earlier publications on the subject of research. This material is of a primary-source character. The purpose of the original research is to produce new knowledge, rather than to present the existing knowledge in a new form (e.g., summarized or classified).[7][8] Original research can take a number of forms, depending on the discipline it pertains to. In experimental work, it typically involves direct or indirect observation of the researched subject(s), e.g., in the laboratory or in the field, documents the methodology, results, and conclusions of an experiment or set of experiments, or offers a novel interpretation of previous results. In analytical work, there are typically some new (for example) mathematical results produced, or a new way of approaching an ...
O Prêmio Harold Pender (em inglês: Harold Pender Award), iniciado em 1872 e denominado em homenagem ao seu fundador o decano Harold Pender, é concedido pela faculdade da Escola de Engenharia e Ciência Aplicada da Universidade da Pensilvânia a um membro de destaque da profissão de engenharia que obteve distinção por significantes contribuições à sociedade.[1] É a mais alta distinção da Escola de Engenharia.. ...
The MRC was founded as the Medical Research Committee and Advisory Council in 1913,[1] with its prime role being the distribution of medical research funds under the terms of the National Insurance Act 1911. This was a consequence of the recommendation of the Royal Commission on Tuberculosis, which recommended the creation of a permanent medical research body. The mandate was not limited to tuberculosis, however. In 1920, it became the Medical Research Council under Royal Charter. A supplementary Charter was formally approved by the Queen on 17 July 2003. In March 1933, MRC established the first scientific published medical patrol named British Journal of Clinical Research and Educational Advanced Medicine, as a periodical publication intended to further the progress of science, usually by reporting new research. It contain articles that have been peer reviewed, in an attempt to ensure that articles meet the ...
... (11 May 1905 - 17 February 1958) was an American organist. He was well known as a performer and educator, teaching at Juilliard and Union Seminary, a composer of a large number of choral anthems and solo organ pieces, and as a prominent leader in the American Guild of Organists. Harold Friedell was born in Jamaica, Queens, New York. At age sixteen, he became the organist of First United Methodist Episcopal Church in Jamaica, Queens, while studying organ with Clement Gale and David McK. Williams. Seven years later, in 1927, he was appointed Organist at Calvary Church, New York, and he also worked at St. James the Less, Scarsdale training a boys and girls choir on weekdays and playing for Sunday afternoon services. In 1929, he earned the FAGO diploma from the American Guild of Organists, its highest designation, while he continued to study at Juilliard School under Bernard Wagenaar and Roger Sessions. In 1931, Friedell was appointed Organist and Choirmaster at St. John's Church, ...
In January 1978, Bruce Campbell was a college dropout who had just quit his job as a taxicab driver. Sam Raimi was studying literature at Michigan State University with Robert Tapert, who was finishing his economics degree. While putting the finishing touches on It's Murder!, Tapert suggested doing a feature-length film to Raimi. Raimi felt it impossible, stating that they could never acquire the funding. Campbell declared: "I could always move back home." Tapert feared a career in fisheries/wildlife while Raimi was afraid that he would have to go back to work at his dad's home furnishing store. These were the practical reasons that convinced the three to put forth a feature-length film.[7] The three were big fans of the comedy genre, but they decided not to produce a comedy as they felt "a feature-length yuck fest just didn't compute". A well-noted scene from It's Murder moved Raimi to write the short film Clockwork. The three felt the end result was very effective and represented a new ...
Research Center for Human and Environmental Sciences aims to not only facilitate the cooperation among the fields of gene research, animal experiments, instrumental analysis, and radioisotope application to support the research which need higher techniques with safety and efficiency but also cultivate individuals with the skills necessary to conduct research in all these fields. Cooperative Research Center aims to not only contribute to technological development and technical training in local society but also stimulate research and education within Shinshu University through cooperative research between members of various university departments and those in the industry. Satellite Venture Business Laboratory (SVBL) aims to promote creative research and development that can form the basis of a venture business and foster talented individuals who have advanced technical ...
... (GCGH) is a research initiative launched by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that, if embraced by creative thinkers around the world, might bring about real progress in the health of the developing world. The word thinkers is an important distinction because the program encourages leaders of every discipline to contribute, whether it be engineers, biologists, pharmacists, scientists, etc. The program is founded on the assumption that with increased support and funding, contemporary science and technology can contribute to the fight against diseases affecting the developing world. With the generous offering of grants for projects, proposals are welcomed as they fit one of a set of 14 challenges, categorized in groups among seven stated goals. With the targeting of specific challenges, the initiative focuses on a variety of health problems inherent in today's developing world. While the 14 challenges are direct, the scope of the project is comprehensive as ...