The Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal published by the BMJ Group. It covers research and reviews in the fields of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry. Its editor-in-chief is Matthew Kiernan. Every two months, it includes a supplement of reviews and educational material titled Practical Neurology. The journal was established in 1920 by Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson as the Journal of Neurology and Psychopathology. "About the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry". Archived from the original on 2008-03-08. Retrieved 2008-04-09. Official ...
The Multiple Sclerosis Journal (formerly Multiple Sclerosis) is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering the clinical neurology of multiple sclerosis. The editor-in-chief is Alan J. Thompson (University College London). It was established in 1995 and is published by Sage Publications. The journal is abstracted and indexed in: Biological Abstracts BIOSIS Current Contents EMBASE Excerpta Medica Elsevier BIOBASE Current Awareness in Biological Sciences EMBASE Excerpta Medica Index Medicus/MEDLINE Science Citation Index Expanded Scopus According to the Journal Citation Reports, its 2014 impact factor is 4.822, ranking it 22 out of 192 journals in the category "Clinical Neurology". The journal was first established in 1995 with Ingrid Allen (Queen's University Belfast) as founding editor. Three issues appeared in 1995, five in 1996, and from 1997 six issues appeared each year until 2006. In 2007 there were nine issues and in 2009, the current monthly publication was ...
He was born in Cedarville, New Jersey. A year after Wilson's birth, his father died and his family moved to Edinburgh. In 1902 he graduated with an M.B. from the University of Edinburgh Medical School, and during the following year he received his B.Sc. in physiology. Afterwards he traveled to Paris, where he studied with neurologists Pierre Marie (1853-1940) and Joseph Babinski (1857-1932). In 1905 he relocated to London, where he worked as registrar and pathologist at the National Hospital, Queens Square. Later, he was appointed professor of neurology at King's College Hospital. Wilson specialized in clinical neurology, and made important contributions in his studies of epilepsy, narcolepsy, apraxia and speech disorders. He described hepatolenticular degeneration in his Gold Medal winning M.D. dissertation of 1912 titled "Progressive lenticular degeneration" from the University of Edinburgh Medical School.[1] He was honored for his research of the disease, and afterwards ...
... is a peer-reviewed scientific journal of neuroscience. It was established in 1976 with Matthew J. Wayner (then at Syracuse University) as founding editor in chief. Later it was edited by Stephen Dunnett (Cardiff University). He was succeeded in 2010 by Andres Buonanno (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development). It is published 18 times per year by Elsevier. It was an official journal of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society. The journal is abstracted and indexed in BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents/Life Sciences, EMBASE, BIOBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PsycLIT, Science Citation Index, and Scopus. According to the Journal Citation Reports, it has a 2010 impact factor of 2.498, ranking it 137th among 237 journals in the category "Neuroscience". Pryse-Phillips, William (2009). Companion to Clinical Neurology. Oxford University Press. "Web of Science". 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-30. Official ...
deedeedee I'm looking into history right now. I'll see what it says. Newtonspeed 03:58, 29 April 2007 (UTC) I'm changing that part about some US medical schools admitting students after 2 years of undergraduate. I've never heard of any such schools, no such schools are cited, and even if it's true it is of vanishing significance to anyone who wants to know about the education required to become a neurologist. For all intents and purposes, it takes 12 years of post-secondary education to become a neurologist, and the article should reflect that. 71.72.97.136 (talk) 15:14, 21 June 2008 (UTC) I am of the opinion that the emphasis on educational length should lie in how long it takes to be a neurologist after completing medical school. Everyone know the criteria for getting admitted to med.school and how long this education is in it self, so the more interesting part here is how long it takes to specialize in neurology and thus become a neurologist. In contrast to cite ones total school path... ...
Moye's work with rural education and his writings provoked criticism from certain elements of the city. He was accused with recklessness for his sending young women to live in the isolated hamlets of the countryside. He was further accused of rigorism in his dealing with penitents, as well as making unfair criticisms of both the clergy and of midwives in his writings on Baptism. They prevailed on Bishop de Montmorency-Laval to take action against the two authors. As a result, in May 1762, the bishop ordered Moye to suspend the sending out of volunteers-though those already in the countryside were left in their situations. He further transferred him from Metz to serve as vicar of Dieuze. As this was his native region, Moye did not consider it a punishment, but worried about the future of his volunteers, who were coming to be called the "poor Sisters". His coworkers in the project assured him that the setback was only temporary. Moye was again accused of an extreme rigidity in his dealing with the ...
The Brain Research Trust (also known as BRT) is a British medical research charity dedicated to the research of neurological diseases and conditions. Registered charity no. 1137560 Since its founding in 1971, the Trust has funded research totalling more than £30 million at University College London's Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London. The Trust aims to provide a steady income to sustain and expand the vital research carried out at the Institute of Neurology, which together with the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, is the UK's foremost centre for research into diseases of the brain and nervous system. From the more than 250 identifiable neurological conditions, the Institute's current research programme includes: Alzheimer's Disease, Brain Tumours, Multiple Sclerosis, Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Epilepsy, Motor Neurone Disease, Migraine, Brain Trauma and Spinal Cord Regeneration. Official site Charity Commission. Brain Research ...
... (born 1978) is a Québécois farmer, author, educator and advocate for economically-viable sustainable agriculture. He is the founder, with his wife, Maude-Hélène Desroches, of Les Jardins de la Grelinette, a certified organic market garden in Saint-Armand, Quebec. The farm has become internationally known for achieving profitability and productivity using biologically intensive cropping systems. The low-tech, high-yield methods of production employed on the micro-farm form the basis of Fortier's bestselling book, The Market Gardener: A Successful Grower's Handbook for Small-Scale Organic Farming. An educational film called The Market Gardener's Toolkit, in which Fortier describes the tools and techniques used on his farm was released in 2016. Fortier met his wife and farming partner while both were studying at McGill University's School of Environment. After graduating in 2001, Fortier and Desroches spent time working on organic farms in the United States and Mexico. They ...
As early as the 16th century, agents to induce seizures were used to treat psychiatric conditions. In 1785, the therapeutic use of seizure induction was documented in the London Medical Journal.[1][88][89] As to its earliest antecedents one doctor claims 1744 as the dawn of electricity's therapeutic use, as documented in the first issue of Electricity and Medicine. Treatment and cure of hysterical blindness was documented eleven years later. Benjamin Franklin wrote that an electrostatic machine cured "a woman of hysterical fits." In 1801, Giovanni Aldini used galvanism to treat patients suffering from various mental disorders.[90] G.B.C. Duchenne, the mid-19th century "Father of Electrotherapy", said its use was integral to a neurological practice.[91]. In the second half of the 19th century, such efforts were frequent enough in British asylums as to make it notable.[92]. Convulsive therapy was introduced in 1934 by Hungarian neuropsychiatrist Ladislas J. Meduna who, believing mistakenly that ...
There are hundreds of psychotherapy approaches or schools of thought. By 1980 there were more than 250;[53] by 1996 more than 450;[54] and at the start of the 21st century there were over a thousand different named psychotherapies-some being minor variations while others are based on very different conceptions of psychology, ethics (how to live) or technique.[55][56] In practice therapy is often not of one pure type but draws from a number of perspectives and schools-known as an integrative or eclectic approach.[57][58] The importance of the therapeutic relationship, also known as therapeutic alliance, between client and therapist is often regarded as crucial to psychotherapy. Common factors theory addresses this and other core aspects thought to be responsible for effective psychotherapy. Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), a Viennese neurologist who studied with Jean-Martin Charcot in 1885, is often considered the father of modern psychotherapy. His methods included analyzing dreams for important ...
... (CMT) er ei mengd arvelege perifere nevropatiar og mellom dei mest vanlege arvelege nervesjukdomane. Sjukdomane har ulikt genetisk opphav. Kring 70% av pasientane med CMT har ei eller anna form av DNA-endring som involverer genet for perifert myelinprotein 22. Kring halvparten av pasientane har ei duplisering av dette genet, og andre har ulike mutasjonar i det. Andre pasientar att har mutasjonar i gena som kodar for protein som neksusbeta-1-protein (GJB1 ), mitofusin-2 (MFN2), myelinprotein null (MPZ), tidleg vekstrespons 2 (EGR2) og periaksin (PRX). Totalt er over 80 gen knytte til danninga av sjukdomen.[1][2] Charcot-Marie-Tooth-sjukdomen kan gje pasientar frå milde symptom til sterk invalidisering. Symptom inkluderer muskelveikskap, muskelsvinn og kjensletap. Dei fleste pasientane opplever demyelinisering.[1][2] Charcot-Marie-Tooth-sjukdomen vart fyrst skildra i 1886 av nevrologane Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), eleven hans Pierre Marie (1853-1940)[3] og ...
Born in New Zealand, he studied at the University of Otago at Dunedin, South Island, where he qualified in medicine in 1924. He then took up a fellowship to perform research at the department of Dr Sir Charles Scott Sherrington, where he studied motor neuron physiology. He obtained a DPhil and published sixteen scientific papers on his research.[1]. In 1928 he took up a clinical post at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London, and over the subsequent years underwent neurological specialist training, as well as serving as a lecturer, at the National Hospital and Guy's Hospital. The National Hospital was at the forefront of the developing specialty of neurology, and he was influenced by some of the senior staff such as Gordon Holmes, Charles Symonds and Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson.[1] In 1933 he joined the Territorial Army (TA) section of the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC), being commissioned as a lieutenant on 9 December 1933,[2] and promoted ...
Maguire is a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow[7] and Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London,[11] UK, where she is also the Deputy Director. Maguire heads the Memory and Space research laboratory at the Centre. In addition, she is an honorary member of the Department of Neuropsychology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London.. Maguire and others have noted that a distributed set of brain regions supports human episodic (autobiographical) memory, defined as the memory for personal everyday events,[12] and that this brain network overlaps considerably with that supporting navigation in large-scale space and other diverse cognitive functions such as imagination and thinking about the future.[13] In her research Maguire seeks to place episodic memory in the context of wider cognition so as to understand how common brain areas, and possibly common processes, support such disparate ...