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*  53d Weather Reconnaissance Squadron
"National Hurricane Operations Plan 2015" (PDF). Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology. Archived from the original ( ...
*  Air Pollution in Canada
Pugliese, S. C.; Murphy, J. G.; Geddes, J. A.; Wang, J. M. (2014-08-15). "The impacts of precursor reduction and meteorology on ...
*  Solenoid (meteorology)
In the context of meteorology, a solenoid is a tube-shaped region in the atmosphere where isobaric (constant pressure) and ... Frederick Sanders; Howard B. Bluestein (2008). "Solenoid (meteorology)". McGraw-Hill Companies. Mike Pritchard (2011-02-04). " ...
*  Inflow (meteorology)
Outflow (meteorology) "inflow". Glossary of Meteorology. American Meteorological Society. June 2000. Retrieved 5 February 2016 ... Within meteorology, inflow normally refers to the influx of warmth and moisture from air within the Earth's atmosphere into ...
*  Meteorology (Aristotle)
Meteorology (Greek: Μετεωρολογικά; Latin: Meteorologica or Meteora) is a treatise by Aristotle. The text discusses what ... An Arabic compendium of Meteorology, called al-'Athar al-`Ulwiyyah (Arabic: الآثار العلوية‎) and produced c. 800 CE by the ... Greek Wikisource has original text related to this article: Μετεωρολογικά Meteorology, translated by E. W. Webster (Alternate ... Aristotle's Meteorology in the Arabico-Latin Tradition, (Leiden: Brill) 2000. A copy of Meteorologicorum libri quatuor, edited ...
*  Outflow (meteorology)
Outflow, in meteorology, is air that flows outwards from a storm system. It is associated with ridging, or anticyclonic flow. ... Glossary of Meteorology (June 2000). Line echo wave pattern. Archived 2008-09-24 at the Wayback Machine. American ... Glossary of Meteorology (June 2000). "Haboob". American Meteorological Society. Retrieved 2010-03-27. ...
*  Trough (meteorology)
http://www.bom.gov.au/australia/charts/synoptic_col.shtml "Lee trough". Glossary of Meteorology (2nd ed.). American ...
*  Block (meteorology)
Ridiculously Resilient Ridge Geopotential height Ridge (meteorology) Trough (meteorology) Glossary of Meteorology, Second ... Blocks in meteorology are large-scale patterns in the atmospheric pressure field that are nearly stationary, effectively " ... Mountain Meteorology : Fundamentals and Applications. Oxford University Press. p. 166. ISBN 9780198030447. Retrieved 2013-05-17 ...
*  Polar meteorology
... at The Ohio State University Polar Meteorology at The University of Wyoming Polar Meteorology at The Naval ... Polar meteorology is the study of the atmosphere of Earth's polar regions. Surface temperature inversion is typical of polar ... Global warming has increased interest in polar meteorology. This is because most of Earth's snow and ice are in polar regions, ... Carbon dioxide (C02) is of particular interest in polar meteorology because it affects the melting of sea ice. Human activity ...
*  Forensic meteorology
... is meteorology, the scientific study of weather, applied to the process of reconstructing weather events ... Forensic meteorology is most often used in court cases, including insurance disputes, personal injury cases, and murder ... Levine, Alaina G. (14 Sep 2011). "Forensic Meteorology: Harsh Weather Spurs a Growth Industry". PBS NewsHour. "Certified ... Austin, Elizabeth; Hildebrand, Peter (2014). "The art and science of forensic meteorology". Physics Today. 67 (6): 32-37. ...
*  Ridge (meteorology)
Geopotential height Block (meteorology) Trough (meteorology) "Ridge". National Weather Service Glossary. National Weather ...
*  Mesoscale meteorology
Microscale meteorology Misoscale meteorology POLYGON experiment Storm scale Surface weather analysis Synoptic scale meteorology ... Mesoscale meteorology is the study of weather systems smaller than synoptic scale systems but larger than microscale and storm- ... Mesoscale Meteorology is divided into these subclasses: Meso-alpha 200-2000 km scale of phenomena like fronts, squall lines, ... Mesoscale Meteorology and Forecasting. Boston: American Meteorological Society. pp. 18-35. http://meted.ucar.edu/mesoprim/ ...
*  GPS meteorology
... refers to the use of the effect of the atmosphere on the propagation of the Global Positioning System's (GPS) ... There are currently two main operational techniques in use in GPS meteorology: GPS limb sounding from orbit, and GPS water ... Error analysis for the Global Positioning System GPS meteorology. ...
*  Inversion (meteorology)
In meteorology, an inversion is a deviation from the normal change of an atmospheric property with altitude. It almost always ... Weather portal Index of meteorology articles Service, NOAA's National Weather. "Glossary - NOAA's National Weather Service". w1 ...
*  Souther (meteorology)
In meteorology, Souther is a strong wind coming from the south. It's also a term widely used in maritime jargon to indicate, in ...
*  Microscale meteorology
These two branches of meteorology are sometimes grouped together as "mesoscale and microscale meteorology" (MMM) and together ... Storm scale Surface weather analysis Synoptic scale meteorology Wind engineering "AMS Glossary of Meteorology". ... Microscale meteorology is the study of short-lived atmospheric phenomena smaller than mesoscale, about 1 km or less. ... Microscale meteorology controls the most important mixing and dilution processes in the atmosphere. Important topics in ...
*  Military meteorology
Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center Enlisted meteorology and ... Military meteorology is meteorology applied to military purposes, by armed forces or other agencies. It is one of the most ... University meteorology departments grew rapidly as the military services sent cadets to be trained as weather officers. Wartime ... Naval meteorology and oceanography officers are restricted line officers in the Information Dominance Corps. CAPT Homer A. ...
*  Giovanni (meteorology)
... - Web interface that allows users to analyze NASA's gridded data from various satellite and surface ...
*  Training (meteorology)
In meteorology, training denotes repeated areas of rain, typically associated with thunderstorms, that move over the same ...
*  Invest (meteorology)
An invest in meteorology (short for investigative area, alternatively written INVEST) is a designated area of disturbed weather ...
*  Accretion (meteorology)
In meteorology or atmospheric science it is the process of accumulation of frozen water as precipitation over time as it ...
*  Misoscale meteorology
Misoscale is an unofficial scale of meteorological phenomena that ranges in size from 40 meters to about 4 kilometers. This scale was proposed by Ted Fujita, the father of the Fujita scale, to classify phenomenon of the order of the rotation within a thunderstorm, the scale of the funnel cloud of a tornado, and the size of the swath of destruction of a microburst. It is a subdivision of the microscale. "Letter M of meteorological Glossary". National Weather Service Glossary. Retrieved 28 December 2014. Ted Fujita (August 1981). "Tornadoes and Downbursts in the Context of Generalized Planetary Scales". Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. Boston: American Meteorological Society. 38 (8): 1511-1534. Bibcode:1981JAtS...38.1511F. doi:10.1175/1520-0469(1981) ...
*  Snowboard (meteorology)
A snowboard (US) or Weaverboard (Canada) is a meteorological tool used to aid in the obtaining of accurate measurement of snow accumulation. Snowboards are typically flat pieces of plywood painted a light color (most commonly white), around 16 to 24 in (41 to 61 cm) in length and width and around 0.5 to 0.75 in (1.3 to 1.9 cm) thick. In addition the Weaverboard used in Canada has a white stick with a black tip placed in the centre. This allows for the board to be found if the newly fallen snow was to completely cover the board. When measuring snow in grass the blades will produce inflated snow totals, whereas with a snowboard this effect is absent. The light or white color of a snowboard serves to minimize heating by sunlight, which often occurs on paved surfaces. These qualities make snowfall measurement using a snowboard more accurate than measurements without one. Snowboards should be placed at ground level at a distance away from a building of at least two times the height of that building. ...
*  Decoupling (meteorology)
In weather forecasting, decoupling is boundary-layer decoupling of atmospheric layers over land at night. During the day when the sun shines and warms the land, air at the surface of the earth is heated and rises. This rising air mixes the atmosphere near the earth. At night this process stops and air near the surface cools as the land loses heat by radiating in the infrared. If winds are light, air near the surface of the earth can become much colder, compared to the air above it, than if more mixing of air layers occurred ...
*  DBZ (meteorology)
dBZ stands for decibel relative to Z. It is a logarithmic dimensionless technical unit used in radar, mostly in weather radar, to compare the equivalent reflectivity factor (Z) of a radar signal reflected off a remote object (in mm6 per m3) to the return of a droplet of rain with a diameter of 1 mm (1 mm6 per m3). It is proportional to the number of drops per unit volume and the sixth power of drops' diameter and is thus used to estimate the rain or snow intensity. With other variables analyzed from the radar returns it helps to determine the type of precipitation. Both the radar reflectivity factor and its logarithmic version are commonly referred to as reflectivity when the context is clear. The radar reflectivity factor (Z) of precipitation is dependent on the number (N) and size (D) of reflectors (hydrometeors), which includes rain, snow, graupel, and hail. Very sensitive radars can also measure the reflectivity of cloud drops and ice. For an exponential distribution of reflectors, Z is ...