Isoxsuprine and pentoxifylline are two commonly used vasodilators in equine medicine. Isoxsuprine has been shown to have ... Isoxsuprine hydrochloride in the horse: a review. J Vet Pharmacol Ther. 2002 Apr;25(2):81-7. Liska, Dana A., et al. " ... The lack of efficacy of isoxsuprine may be partially due to its poor oral bioavailability (2.2%) and high first pass effect. ... The effect of oral isoxsuprine and pentoxifylline on digital and laminar blood flow in healthy horses. Vet. Surg. 1999; 28(3): ...
... is a class of prescription drugs in India appearing as an appendix to the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules, 1945 introduced in 1945. These are drugs which cannot be purchased over the counter without the prescription of a qualified doctor.The manufacture and sale of all drugs are covered under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act and Rules. It is revised at times based on the advice of the Drugs Technical Advisory Board, part of the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization[1] in the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. The most recent schedule H (2006) lists 536 drugs from abacavir to zuclopenthixol.[2] However, enforcement of Schedule H laws in India is lax, compared to the more restrictive Schedule X, for which a mandatory documentation trail must be maintained.[3] ...
Examples include isoxsuprine (currently unavailable in the UK) and pentoxifylline. Anticoagulants can also improve blood flow. ...
Isoxsuprine Mittag TW, Tormay A, Messenger M, Podos SM (February 1985). "Ocular hypotension in the rabbit. Receptor mechanisms ...
1997). "Effects of acepromazine maleate, isoxsuprine hydrochloride and prazosin hydrochloride on laminar blood flow in healthy ...
Befunolol Bromoacetylalprenololmenthane Broxaterol Cimaterol Cirazoline Etilefrine Hexoprenaline Higenamine Isoxsuprine ...
C04AA01 Isoxsuprine C04AA02 Buphenine C04AA31 Bamethan C04AB01 Phentolamine C04AB02 Tolazoline C04AC01 Nicotinic acid C04AC02 ...
... with fluticasone furoate and umeclidinium bromide-Trelegy Ellipta isoxsuprine mabuterol zilpaterol-Zilmax β2 agonists are ...
N-Isopropyloctopamine Isoxsuprine Labetalol Levonordefrin Levosalbutamol Mabuterol Methoxyphenamine Methyldopa Norepinephrine ( ...
... isoxsuprine (INN) ispinesib mesylate (USAN) ispronicline (USAN, (INN)) isradipine (INN) israpafant (INN) Istalol istaroxime ( ...
... fenoterol hexoprenaline isoxsuprine ritodrine salbutamol (INN) or albuterol (USAN) terbutaline zilpaterol (Beta blockers) ...
... antiparasitic product isoxsuprine - vasodilator used for laminitis and navicular disease in horses ivermectin - a broad- ...
... a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic Dihydroisocodeine Dobutamine Isoxsuprine Methyldihydromorphine Phenescaline Ractopamine ...
... is given orally, and many horses find the pills quite palatable. Isoxsuprine is a prohibited class B drug in FEI- ... Isoxsuprine (used as isoxsuprine hydrochloride) is a drug used as a vasodilator in humans (under the trade name Duvadilan) and ... Isoxsuprine is used in humans for treatment of premature labor, i.e. a tocolytic, and as a vasodilator for the treatment of ... Isoxsuprine may increase the heart rate, cause changes in blood pressure, and irritate the GI tract. It should therefore be ...
Isoxsuprine. *Radiprodil (RGH-896). *Rislenemdaz (CERC-301, MK-0657). *Ro 8-4304 ...
... (INN) (brand name Nopron) is a sedative-hypnotic drug of the phenylpiperazine group.[1][2] It has been used in the treatment of sleep disturbances since the early 1970s in several European countries including France, Italy, and Luxembourg.[3][4] It is commonly used with children and adolescents on account of its favorable safety and tolerability profile and lack of abuse potential.[5][6][7][8][9][10] Originally believed to act as an antihistamine and anticholinergic,[11] niaprazine was later discovered to have low or no binding affinity for the H1 and mACh receptors (Ki = , 1 μM), and was instead found to act as a potent and selective 5-HT2A and α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist (Ki = 75 nM and 86 nM, respectively).[12] It possesses low or no affinity for the 5-HT1A, 5-HT2B, D2, and β-adrenergic, as well as at SERT and VMAT (Ki = all , 1 μM), but it does have some affinity for the α2-adrenergic receptor (Ki = 730 nM),[12] likely acting as an antagonist there as well. Niaprazine ...
... is a selective β2 adrenergic receptor (adrenoreceptor) antagonist or beta blocker[1][2] . ICI binds to the β2 subtype with at least 100 times greater affinity than β1 or β3, the two other known subtypes of the beta adrenoceptor.[3][4] The compound was developed by Imperial Chemical Industries, which was acquired by AkzoNobel in 2008. ICI-118,551 has no known therapeutic use in humans although it has been used widely in research to understand the action of the β2 adrenergic receptor, as few other specific antagonists for this receptor are known.[5] ICI-118,551 has been used in pre-clinical studies using murine models.[6][7][8] When dissolved in saline, the compound crosses the blood-brain barrier. Common systemic doses used in rodent research are 0.5 or 1 mg/kg although efficacy has been demonstrated at doses as low as 0.0001 mg/kg in rhesus monkeys.[9] Doses up to 20 mg/kg have been used without toxicity. At room temperature in saline, the ICI 118,551 hydrochloride is soluble to ...
There are a variety of clinically useful ergoline derivatives for the purpose of vasoconstriction, the treatment of migraines, and treatment of Parkinson's disease. Ergoline alkaloids found their place in pharmacology long before modern medicine as preparations of ergot were often used by midwives in the 12th century to stimulate childbirth.[10] Following Arthur Stoll's isolation of ergometrine, the therapeutic use of ergoline derivatives became well explored. The induction of uterine contractions via the preparation of ergot was attributed to ergonovine, an ergoline derivative found in ergot, which is a powerful oxytocic. From this, methergine, a synthetic derivative, was elucidated.[7] While used to facilitate child birth, ergoline derivatives can pass into breast milk and should not be used during breastfeeding.[11] They are uterine contractors that can increase the risk of miscarriage during pregnancy.[3] Another example of medically relevant ergoline alkaloids is ergotamine, an alkaloid ...
Isoxsuprine. *Radiprodil (RGH-896). *Rislenemdaz (CERC-301, MK-0657). *Ro 8-4304 ...
Isoxsuprine. *Radiprodil (RGH-896). *Rislenemdaz (CERC-301, MK-0657). *Ro 8-4304 ...
Isoxsuprine. *Radiprodil (RGH-896). *Rislenemdaz (CERC-301, MK-0657). *Ro 8-4304 ...
The most common side effect is eye irritation felt as stinging or burning, which occurs in up to a third of patients. Blepharoconjunctivitis occurs in up to 5% of patients. Rarer adverse effects include keratitis, edema and increased lacrimation.[2][3] Allergies are rare, but seem to be more common than under the related drug timolol.[1] If the substance reaches the nasal mucosa via the tear duct, it can be absorbed into the bloodstream and cause systemic side effects. These include orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure) and other effects on the heart and circulatory system, breathing problems in people with asthma, and skin symptoms such as itching and aggravation of psoriasis.[1] ...
InChI=1S/C23H40N2O4/c1-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-23(27)25-15-19-12-13-21(22(14-19)28-4)29-17-20(26)16-24-18(2)3/h12-14,18,20,24,26H,5-11,15-17H2,1-4H3,(H,25,27 ...
... was discovered by scientists at Angelini, who also discovered trazodone.[15] Its development names have included ST-1191 and McN-A-2673-11.[16][1] The INN etoperidone was proposed in 1976 and recommended in 1977.[17][18] The drug was given brand names in Spain (Centren (Esteve) and Depraser (Lepori)) and Italy (Staff (Sigma Tau))[1] and was also given the brand names Axiomin and Etonin,[16] but it is not entirely clear if it was actually marketed; the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Encyclopedia provides no dates for commercial introduction.[19] According to Micromedex's Index Nominum: International Drug Directory, etoperidone was indeed previously marketed in Spain and Italy.[1] ...
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Isoxsuprine. *Radiprodil (RGH-896). *Rislenemdaz (CERC-301, MK-0657). *Ro 8-4304 ...
... (INN) is a drug which is used in scientific research. It acts as both a selective α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, and an antagonist for the imidazoline receptor.[1][2] Idazoxan has been under investigation as an antidepressant, but it did not reach the market as such. More recently, it is under investigation as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. Due to its alpha-2 receptor antagonism it is capable of enhancing therapeutic effects of antipsychotics, possibly by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex of the brain, a brain area thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. ...
... , also known as eformoterol, is a long-acting β2 agonist (LABA) used as a bronchodilator in the management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Formoterol has an extended duration of action (up to 12 h) compared to short-acting β2 agonists such as salbutamol (albuterol), which are effective for 4 h to 6 h. LABAs such as formoterol are used as "symptom controllers" to supplement prophylactic corticosteroid therapy. A "reliever" short-acting β2 agonist (e.g., salbutamol) is still required, since LABAs are not recommended for the treatment of acute asthma. It was patented in 1972 and came into medical use in 1998.[2] It is also marketed in the combination formulations budesonide/formoterol and mometasone/formoterol. ...
Since silodosin has high affinity for the α1A adrenergic receptor, it causes practically no orthostatic hypotension (in contrast to other α1 blockers). On the other side, the high selectivity seems to be the cause of silodosin's typical side effect of loss of seminal emission.[3] As α1A adrenoceptor antagonists are being investigated as a means to male birth control due to their ability to inhibit ejaculation but not orgasm, a trial with 15 male volunteers was conducted. While silodosin was completely efficacious in preventing the release of semen in all subjects, 12 out of the 15 patients reported mild discomfort upon orgasm. The men also reported the psychosexual side effect of being strongly dissatisfied by their lack of ejaculation.[4] ...
Most frequent side effects are nausea, orthostatic hypotension, headaches, and vomiting through stimulation of the brainstem vomiting centre.[9] Vasospasms with serious consequences such as myocardial infarction and stroke that have been reported in connection with the puerperium, appear to be extremely rare events.[10] Peripheral vasospasm (of the fingers or toes) can cause Raynaud's Phenomenon. Bromocriptine use has been anecdotally associated with causing or worsening psychotic symptoms (its mechanism is in opposition of most antipsychotics, whose mechanisms generally block dopamine).[11] Pulmonary fibrosis has been reported when bromocriptine was used in high doses for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.[12] Use to suppress milk production after childbirth was reviewed in 2014 and it was concluded that in this context a causal association with serious cardiovascular, neurological or psychiatric events could not be excluded with an overall incidence rate estimated to range between 0.005% ...