A paracusia, or auditory hallucination, is a form of hallucination that involves perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus. A common form of auditory hallucination involves hearing one or more talking voices. This may be associated with psychotic disorders, and holds special significance in diagnosing these conditions. However, individuals without any psychiatric disease whatsoever may hear voices. There are three main categories into which the hearing of talking voices often fall: a person hearing a voice speak one's thoughts, a person hearing one or more voices arguing, or a person hearing a voice narrating his/her own actions. These three categories do not account for all types of auditory hallucinations. Other types of auditory hallucination include exploding head syndrome and musical ear syndrome. In the latter, people will hear music playing in their mind, usually songs they are familiar with. This can be caused by: lesions on the brain stem (often resulting from a stroke); also, ...
... (MES) describes a condition seen in people who have hearing loss and subsequently develop auditory hallucinations. "MES" has also been associated with musical hallucinations, which is a complex form of auditory hallucinations where an individual may experience music or sounds that are heard without an external source. It is comparable to Charles Bonnet syndrome (visual hallucinations in visually impaired people) and some have suggested this phenomenon could be included under this diagnosis. Musical hallucinations and MES have only become widely recognizable in the last few decades of research, but there are indications throughout history that have described symptoms of musical hallucinations. The Romantic composer Robert Schumann was said to have heard entire symphonies in his head from which he drew as inspiration for his music, but later in his life this phenomenon had diminished to just a note that ...
... fall under the category of auditory hallucinations and describe a disorder in which a sound is perceived as instrumental music, sounds, or songs. It is a very rare disorder, reporting only 0.16% in a cohort study of 3,678 individuals. In 73 individual cases reviewed by Evers and Ellger, 57 patients heard tunes that were familiar, while 5 heard unfamiliar tunes. These tunes ranged from religious pieces to childhood favorites, and also included popular songs from the radio. Vocal and instrumental forms of classical music were also identified in some patients. Keshavan found that the consistent feature of musical hallucinations was that it represented a personal memory trace. Memory traces refer to anything that may seem familiar to the patient, which indicate why certain childhood or familiar songs were heard. Investigators have successfully narrowed down the major factors that are associated with musical hallucinations. Evers and Ellgers compiled a ...
The phantom eye syndrome (PES) is a phantom pain in the eye and visual hallucinations after the removal of an eye (enucleation, evisceration). Many patients experience one or more phantom phenomena after the removal of the eye: Phantom pain in the (removed) eye (prevalence: 26%) Non-painful phantom sensations Visual hallucinations. About 30% of patients report visual hallucinations of the removed eye. Most of these hallucinations consist of basic perceptions (shapes, colors). In contrast, visual hallucinations caused by severe visual loss without removal of the eye itself (Charles Bonnet syndrome) are less frequent (prevalence 10%) and often consist of detailed images. Phantom pain and non-painful phantom sensations result from changes in the central nervous system due to denervation of a body part. Phantom eye pain is considerably less common than phantom limb pain. The prevalence of phantom pain after limb amputation ...
The Hearing Voices Movement is the name used by organizations and individuals advocating the "hearing voices approach", an alternative way of understanding the experience of those people who "hear voices". In the medical professional literature, 'voices' are most often referred to as auditory hallucinations or 'verbal' hallucinations. The movement uses the term 'voices', which it feels is a more accurate and 'user-friendly' term. The movement was instigated by Marius Romme, Sandra Escher and Patsy Hage in 1987. It challenges the notion that to hear voices is necessarily a characteristic of mental illness. Instead it regards hearing voices as a meaningful and understandable, although unusual, human variation. It therefore rejects the stigma and pathologisation of hearing voices and advocates human rights, social justice and support for people who hear voices that is empowering and recovery focused. The movement thus challenges the medical model of mental illness, specifically ...
The main symptoms of delirium tremens are nightmares, agitation, global confusion, disorientation, visual and[9] auditory hallucinations, tactile hallucinations, fever, high blood pressure, heavy sweating, and other signs of autonomic hyperactivity (fast heart rate and high blood pressure). These symptoms may appear suddenly, but typically develop two to three days after the stopping of heavy drinking, being worst on the fourth or fifth day.[10] Also, these "symptoms are characteristically worse at night".[11] In general, DT is considered the most severe manifestation of alcohol withdrawal and occurs 3-10 days following the last drink.[9] Other common symptoms include intense perceptual disturbance such as visions of insects, snakes, or rats. These may be hallucinations, or illusions related to the environment, e.g., patterns on the wallpaper or in the peripheral vision that the patient falsely perceives as a resemblance to the morphology of an insect, and ...
Mania is a type of mood. Mania is usually a symptom of a medical problem or a mental illness. A person with mania is described as manic. When people are manic, they usually have much more energy than usual. They often have very strong emotions, and their moods may change very quickly.[1] The word "mania" comes from the Greek language (μwordsανία means mania).[2] That word comes from μαίνομαι (mainomai), which means "to rage" or "to be furious" (very angry). Mania is a symptom, not an illness by itself. Many different things can cause mania. These things include illegal drugs and brain tumors. However, most of the time, mania happens in people with bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder causes periods of mania that switch off with periods of depression.[3] Like with other symptoms, mania can be mild (not very bad), severe (very bad), or anywhere in between. Mild mania is usually called "hypomania." Very bad mania can cause psychosis, with hallucinations and delusions.[4] In some cases, ...
... describes a medical condition where a part of the brain becomes inflamed and causes symptoms that present as fever. The terminology is dated, and is encountered most often in Victorian literature, where it typically describes a potentially life-threatening illness brought about by a severe emotional upset. Conditions that may be described as brain fever include: Encephalitis, an acute inflammation of the brain, commonly caused by a viral infection. Meningitis, the inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Cerebritis, inflammation of the cerebrum. Scarlet fever, infectious disease whose symptoms can include paranoia and hallucinations. In The Wound Dresser / a series of letters written from the hospitals in Washington ..., by Walt Whitman the part called Letters of 1864 (about 3/4 of the way through the book), VI, a letter dated March 15, 1861(!) describes a patient Whitman lost to brain fever. In Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes story "The Crooked Man", ...
Through late 1967 and early 1968, Barrett became increasingly erratic, partly as a consequence of his reported heavy use of psychedelic drugs such as LSD.[8] There is also speculation that he suffered from schizophrenia. Once described as joyful, friendly, and extroverted, he became increasingly depressed and socially withdrawn, and experienced hallucinations, disorganized speech, memory lapses, intense mood swings, and periods of catatonia.[4] Although the changes began gradually, he went missing for a long weekend and, according to several friends, including Wright, came back "a completely different person."[4] One of the striking features of his change was the development of a blank, dead-eyed stare. He did not recognise old friends, and often did not know where he was; while on a tour of Los Angeles, Barrett is said to have exclaimed, "Gee, it sure is nice to be in Las Vegas!"[4] Many reports described him on stage, strumming one chord through the entire concert, or not playing at ...
Double has been interpreted in a number of ways. Looking backwards, it is viewed as Dostoevsky's innovation on Gogol. Looking forwards, it is often read as a psychosocial version of his later ethical-psychological works.[6] These two readings, together, position The Double at a critical juncture in Dostoevsky's writing at which he was still synthesizing what preceded him but also adding in elements of his own. One such element was that Dostoevsky switched the focus from Gogol's social perspective in which the main characters are viewed and interpreted socially to a psychological context that gives the characters more emotional depth and internal motivation.[7] As to the interpretation of the work itself, there are three major trends in scholarship. First, many have said that Golyadkin simply goes insane, probably with schizophrenia.[8] This view is supported by much of the text, particularly Golyadkin's innumerable hallucinations. Second, many have focused on Golyadkin's search for identity. ...
In addition, her mutation allows her to produce a "pixie dust" that causes hallucinations, often with comedic effects, such as demons seeing bright bubbles and teddy bears, or in one instance, causing Wolverine to see and try to fight a herd of unicorns. In another instance, Megan uses her dust seemingly harmlessly to enhance the audience's perceptions of Dazzler's light show during a concert. She states that she has no idea what individuals affected by her dust are seeing.[6]. After Magik takes part of Megan's soul in an attempt to create a Soulsword, her appearance changes, reflecting the portion of her soul lost to black magic. Artists' depictions of this change in her personality are inconsistent, but typically depict her pink hair with black streaks.[7] She also has the ability to detect the supernatural, as evidenced when she fought the N'Garai who were under a cloaking spell. When asked how she knows where they are she replies, "there's a sliver of darkness that Magik put inside my ...
... " is the fifteenth episode of the fourth season of House and the eighty-fifth episode overall. It was the first part of the two-part season four finale, the second part being "Wilson's Heart". Co-written by several House producers and directed by Greg Yaitanes, "House's Head" premiered on May 12, 2008 on Fox. The episode revolves around Dr. Gregory House (Hugh Laurie), who, after being involved in a bus accident, vaguely remembers seeing someone who is "going to die". House tries to trace back his steps throughout the episode to find out the identity of this person. A woman (Ivana Miličević), who claims to be "the answer", guides House through hallucinations about the crash. The episode eventually ends in a cliffhanger. 14.84 million American viewers watched the broadcasting of "House's Head", making House the ninth most-watched program of the week. The episode, and in particular a strip tease scene involving Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein), gained positive responses. The episode was ...
Buffy and her friends must quickly get to grips with the new rules of magic created at the end of Season Nine when they encounter a new breed of vampires which can shapeshift, walk in sunlight, and which is generally harder to kill. Another consequence is that Buffy's sister Dawn, though alive again thanks to the recreation of magic, has had a traumatic time adjusting to life; she feels her mother's death as if the event was recent, and her feelings for her boyfriend Xander have reset as well. Meanwhile, Xander is secretly haunted by apparitions of his dead ex-fiance Anya; he does not know if she is real or a hallucination. However, all is not bleak, as Buffy's old mentor Giles is delivered to her by Faith alive and mentally intact, but in the body of a child, following the events of Angel & Faith in the previous season. The group soon learn that the now-blank Vampyr book given to Buffy back in 1997 can be used to write new rules for magic, and quickly realizing what a danger this book is, the ...