... (Swedish: Studenter i Paris) is a 1932 American-Swedish operetta film directed by Louis Mercanton. It was made by Paramount Pictures at its Joinville Studios in Paris as the Swedish-language version of He Is Charming. Henri Garat Steinar Jøranndstad Meg Lemonnier Aino Taube Waldman p.227 Waldman, Harry. Missing Reels: Lost Films of American and European Cinema. McFarland, 2000. Students in Paris on ...
For many years, French telephone numbers consisted of eight digits, including an area code. However, that system began to run out of numbers in the 1980s. On 25 October 1985, France changed to a system of two areas: outside Paris the old area code was incorporated into the subscriber's eight-digit number; for Paris, the code "1" was retained, and a digit "4" was added to the front of seven-digit numbers - for example, (fictional) Paris number 16 1 234 56 78 became 16 1 42 34 56 78. For numbers in the Île-de-France surrounding Paris, the old codes "3" and "6" joined the old seven-digit numbers to become eight-digit numbers and were assigned to the Paris area code "1". To call the rest of France from Paris, however, the trunk prefix "16" had to be dialed before the eight-digit number, and to call Paris from the rest of France, the prefix "16" had to be dialed, followed by the area code for Paris "1" and the eight-digit number. In 1996, this ...
The story is the basis of an opera, The Judgement of Paris, with a libretto by William Congreve, that was set to music by four composers in London, 1700-1701. Thomas Arne composed a highly successful score to the same libretto in 1742. The opera Le Cinesi (The Chinese Women) by Christoph Willibald Gluck (1754) concludes with a ballet, The Judgement of Paris, sung as a vocal quartet. Francesco Cilea's 1902 opera Adriana Lecouvreur also includes a Judgement of Paris ballet sequence. The story is the basis of an earlier opera, Il pomo d'oro, in a prologue and five acts by the Italian composer Antonio Cesti with a libretto by Francesco Sbarra (1611-1668). It was first performed before the imperial court in a specially constructed open-air theatre Vienna in 1668. The work was so long it had to be staged over the course of two days: the Prologue, Acts One and Two were given on July 12; Acts Three, Four and Five on July 14. The staging was unprecedented for its magnificence (and ...
The RATP was created on 1 January 1949 by combining the assets of the Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris (CMP), which operated the Paris Métro, and the Société des transports en commun de la région parisienne (STCRP), which operated the city's bus system. Earlier, the CMP had absorbed the Société du Chemin de Fer Électrique Nord-Sud de Paris in 1930 and the Ligne de Sceaux in 1937, which extended commuter rail to the suburbs. The STCRP had been created on 1 January 1921 by the merger of about half a dozen independent bus and streetcar operators in the Paris area. By the time the STCRP was merged into the RATP, all of its streetcars had been replaced by bus routes. In the early years of the 21st century, a partnership with the Transdev group resulted in RATP acquiring a minority shareholding in that group, with its many worldwide transport operations. However, in 2009, the Caisse des dépôts et consignations, the majority owner of the Transdev group, started negotiations ...
Live in Europe (released as The Great Show of Nina Simone: Live in Paris in France [1975]) is a live album by American singer-songwriter and pianist Nina Simone containing recording of Nina's performance at the second Montreux Jazz Festival 1968 (not in Paris).. ...
... (21 February 1724 - 16 January 1816) was a French surgeon born near the town of Joigny. He studied medicine in Paris, where one of his instructors was Jacques-Bénigne Winslow (1669-1760). For several years he was associated with the Salpêtrière, and in 1757 attained the chair of pathology of the College of Surgery. In 1759 he became a member of the French Academy of Sciences. In 1788 Tenon published the Mémoire sur les hôpitaux de Paris (Memoirs on the Hospitals of Paris), a treatise that was a concise and detailed account of French hospitals. It was concerned with aspects such as hygiene, patient care and environmental conditions of hospitals. Among the researches conducted was a visit by Tenon and Charles-Augustin de Coulomb to inspect the revolutionary design of the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse. The publication was a catalyst in regards to efforts made for replacement of the Hôtel-Dieu of Paris, being decided by a committee from the Academy of Sciences, whose ...
Born a Catholic, Gabrielle knew that the best way to conclude the religious wars was for Henry himself to become a Catholic. Recognizing the wisdom in her argument, on 25 July 1593 Henry declared that "Paris is well worth a Mass" and permanently renounced Protestantism.[9] This enabled him to be crowned King of France on 27 February 1594. Henry also arranged for Gabrielle's marriage to Liancourt to be annulled the same year.[10] On 7 June 1594, their first child was born, a son, César de Bourbon, future Duke of Vendôme. On 4 January 1595, Henry IV officially recognized and legitimized his son in a text validated by the Parlement de Paris.[11] In that text, he also recognized Gabrielle d'Estrées as the mother of his son and as "the subject the most worthy of our friendship"; in other words, Henry IV had the Parlement de Paris officially ratify Gabrielle's position as his mistress. In 1596, he made her marquise de Monceaux and, the following year, duchesse de Beaufort, a peeress of ...
Philharmonie 1 (part of the Philharmonie de Paris), a new 2400-seat symphony hall, is a project whose construction had been postponed for about twenty years, to complete the Cité de la Musique. On 6 March 2006 the French minister of Culture and communication Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres, the mayor of Paris Bertrand Delanoë, and the director of the Cité de la Musique, Laurent Bayle, announced the beginning of the construction at a press conference concerning the reopening of the Salle Pleyel, now associated with the Museum.[3]. The cost of construction was expected to be 170 million euros, and will be shared by the national government (45 per cent), the Ville de Paris (45 per cent), and the Région Île-de-France (10 per cent). But the cost in the end is expected to be €381 million ($488 million) [4]. In April 2007 Jean Nouvel won the design competition for the auditorium. He brought in Brigitte Métra as his partner, along with Marshall Day Acoustics (room acoustics design) and Nagata ...
The first completed lines radiated out of Paris, connecting France's major cities to the capital. These lines still form the backbone of the French railway system. By the 1860s, workers had completed the basic structure of the network, but they continued to build many minor lines during the late 19th century to fill in the gaps. By 1855, the many original small firms had coalesced into six large companies, each having a regional monopoly in one area of France. The Nord, Est, Ouest, Paris-Orléans, Paris-Lyon-Méditerranée (PLM), and the Midi lines divided the nation into strict corridors of control. Difficulties arose in that the six large monopolies, with the exception of the Midi Company, all connected to Paris, but did not link together anywhere else in the country. The French railway map comprised a series of unconnected branches running out of Paris. While this meant that trains served Paris well, other parts of the country were not served as well. For instance, one ...
Within a month of publication, Humbert Possenti, "a restaurateur and hotelier of forty years," had written to The Times complaining that the book was unfairly disparaging to the restaurant trade.[22] The Times Literary Supplement had previously reviewed Down and Out in Paris and London, describing it as "a vivid picture of an apparently mad world."[23] Orwell responded to the restaurateur's criticism with a letter to the same newspaper: "I do know that in our hotel there were places which no customer could possibly have been allowed to see with any hope of retaining his custom."[24] In the Adelphi, C. Day Lewis wrote, "Orwell's book is a tour of the underworld, conducted without hysteria or prejudice [...] a model of clarity and good sense."[23] JB Priestley, in the Evening Standard, considered it "uncommonly good reading. An excellent book and a valuable social document. The best book of its kind I have read in a long time."[23] Compton Mackenzie wrote of Orwell's "immensely interesting book ...
The site of this edifice, centred at the end of rue Royale, a line-of-sight between Gabriel's twin hôtels in the Place de la Concorde, required a suitably monumental end from the time that square was established in 1755, as Place Louis XV. The settlement around the site was called Ville l'Évêque. The site in the suburban faubourg had been annexed to the city of Paris in 1722.[4][5] Two false starts were made in building a church on this site. The reconstruction of the older church consecrated to Mary Magdalene was considered. The first design, commissioned in 1757, with construction begun with the King's ceremonial placing of the cornerstone, April 3, 1763, was halted in 1764; that first design, by Pierre Contant d'Ivry, was based on Jules Hardouin Mansart's Late Baroque church of Les Invalides, with a dome surmounting a Latin cross. In 1777, Contant d'Ivry died and was replaced by his pupil Guillaume-Martin Couture, who decided to start anew, razing the incomplete construction, shortening ...
... (4 November 1906 in Paris - 27 October 1982 in Paris) was a French author. He studied medicine and was a physician between 1930 and 1947. He learned Sanskrit, Pali, Tibetan and Tamil. He wrote some important works on the history of Indian medicine. He taught at Collège de France from 1952 to 1978. Jean Filliozat became a medical doctor in 1930, and was awarded a diploma from the École pratique des hautes études in 1934. In 1935 he was awarded a diploma by the Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales. He was director of studies at the École pratique des hautes études from 1941 to 1978. He established the Institut Français d'Indologie at Pondicherry in 1955 and was at the same time director of the École Française d'Extrême Orient from 1956 until 1977. He became a member of the Academie in 1966 and vice president of the Societe Asiatique in 1974. He was a member of the Legion d'honneur. Magie et médecine, Paris, P.U.F., 1943, vil-147 p. (Collection mythes ...
One of the key areas of the life of Mademoiselle was her involvement in the period of French history known as the Fronde, a civil war in France marked by two distinct phases known as the Fronde Parlementaire (1648-1649) and the Fronde des nobles (1650-1653). The former was precipitated by a tax levied on judicial officers of the Parlement of Paris that was met with a refusal to pay and the emergence of Louis de Bourbon, Prince of Condé (future Grand Condé) as a rebel figure who took the city of Paris by siege.[16] The influence of Cardinal Mazarin was also opposed.. At the Peace of Rueil of 1 April 1649, the Fronde Parlementaire ended and the court returned to Paris in August amid great celebration. Mademoiselle caught smallpox, but survived the illness.[17] Having convalesced, Mademoiselle befriended Claire Clémence de Brézé, Madame la Princesse, the unwanted wife of the Grand Condé.[18] The pair sojourned in Bordeaux, where Mademoiselle was involved in the peace which ended the siege in ...