doi:10.1007/978-3-319-26158-4_3. ISBN 978-3-319-26156-0. "Chorioamnionitis". www.stanfordchildrens.org. Stanford Children's ... Ernst, Holly (2018-07-31). "Chorioamnionitis: Infection in Pregnancy". healthline. Retrieved 21 April 2020. "Cerebral Palsy ... Infections like chorioamnionitis cause an infection in the maternal blood, commonly leading to premature birth and the newborn ...
... chorioamnionitis during pregnancy; neonatal or adult blindness from conjunctivitis; and infertility. Men who have had a ...
Chorioamnionitis Decidua Edmondson, N.; Bocking, A.; Machin, G.; Rizek, R.; Watson, C.; Keating, S. (2009). "The prevalence of ... chronic deciduitis in cases of preterm labor without clinical chorioamnionitis". Pediatr Dev Pathol. 12 (1): 16-21. doi:10.2350 ...
Overall perinatal mortality rate is high: 41% to 77%. Recurrence rate is also high: 67% to 100%. Chorioamnionitis Schubert, ... and chorioamnionitis (inflammation of the fetal membranes). Chronic lymphocytic placental inflammation occurs in 5% to 15% of ...
Chorioamnionitis Placentitis (2019, June 25). Care of the umbilicus and management of umbilical disorders. Retrieved from https ... Funisitis is inflammation of the connective tissue of the umbilical cord that occurs with chorioamnionitis. It involves only ...
Lahra MM, Gordon A, Jeffery HE (2007). "Chorioamnionitis and fetal response in stillbirth". Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 196 (3): ...
Many different bacteria and viruses can cause conjunctivitis in the neonate. The two most common causes are N. gonorrheae and Chlamydia acquired from the birth canal during delivery. Ophthalmia neonatorum due to gonococci (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) typically manifests in the first five days post birth and is associated with marked bilateral purulent discharge and local inflammation. In contrast, conjunctivitis secondary to infection with chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) produces conjunctivitis after day three post birth, but may occur up to two weeks after delivery. The discharge is usually more watery in nature (mucopurulent) and less inflamed. Babies infected with chlamydia may develop pneumonitis (chest infection) at a later stage (range 2 weeks - 19 weeks after delivery). Infants with chlamydia pneumonitis should be treated with oral erythromycin for 10-14 days.[6] Other agents causing ophthalmia neonatorum include Herpes simplex virus (HSV 2), Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus ...
Prevention includes the use of breast milk and probiotics.[2] A 2012 policy by the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended feeding preterm infants human milk, finding "significant short- and long-term beneficial effects," including reducing the rate of NEC by a factor of two or more.[10] Small amounts of oral feeds of human milk starting as soon as possible, while the infant is being primarily fed intravenously, primes the immature gut to mature and become ready to receive greater intake by mouth.[11] Human milk from a milk bank or donor can be used if mother's milk is unavailable. The gut mucosal cells do not get enough nourishment from arterial blood supply to stay healthy, especially in very premature infants, where the blood supply is limited due to immature development of the capillaries, so nutrients from the lumen of the gut are needed. A Cochrane review in 2014 found that supplementation of probiotics enterally "prevents severe NEC as well as all-cause mortality in preterm ...
The paralysis can be partial or complete; the damage to each nerve can range from bruising to tearing. The most commonly involved root is C5 (aka Erb's point: the union of C5 & C6 roots)[6] as this is mechanically the furthest point from the force of traction, therefore, the first/most affected.[7] Erb-Duchenne palsy presents as a lower motor neuron syndrome associated with sensibility disturbance and vegetative phenomena.[8] The most commonly involved nerves are the suprascapular nerve, musculocutaneous nerve, and the axillary nerve.[9][10] The signs of Erb's palsy include loss of sensation in the arm and paralysis and atrophy of the deltoid, biceps, and brachialis muscles.[6] "The position of the limb, under such conditions, is characteristic: the arm hangs by the side and is rotated medially; the forearm is extended and pronated. The arm cannot be raised from the side; all power of flexion of the elbow is lost, as is also supination of the forearm".[7] The resulting biceps damage is the main ...
Antibodies are produced when the body is exposed to an antigen foreign to the make-up of the body. If a mother is exposed to a foreign antigen and produces IgG (as opposed to IgM which does not cross the placenta), the IgG will target the antigen, if present in the fetus, and may affect it in utero and persist after delivery. The three most common models in which a woman becomes sensitized toward (i.e., produces IgG antibodies against) a particular antigen are hemorrhage, blood transfusion, and ABO incompatibility.. Fetal-maternal hemorrhage, which is the movement of fetal blood cells across the placenta, can occur during abortion, ectopic pregnancy, childbirth, ruptures in the placenta during pregnancy (often caused by trauma), or medical procedures carried out during pregnancy that breach the uterine wall. In subsequent pregnancies, if there is a similar incompatibility in the fetus, these antibodies are then able to cross the placenta into the fetal bloodstream to attach to the red blood ...
Chorioamnionitis. *Chorionic hematoma. *Constriction ring syndrome. *Monoamniotic twins. *Prelabor rupture of membranes ...
Pneumothorax: a collection of air within the pleural cavity, arising either from the outside or from the lung. Pneumothoraces may be traumatic, iatrogenic, or spontaneous. A tension pneumothorax is a particular type of pneumothorax where the air may enter (though a defect of the chest wall, lung, or airways) on inspiration, but cannot exit on expiration. Each breath increases the amount of trapped air in the chest cavity, leading to further lung compression. This is often an urgent situation and may progress to a medical emergency if there is compromise of the venous return to the heart causing hypotension and rarely shock ...
Chorioamnionitis. *Chorionic hematoma. *Monoamniotic twins. *Premature rupture of membranes. *Obstetrical hemorrhage * ...
Specific chromosomes: The influence of CPM on fetal growth is chromosome specific. Certain chromosomes carry imprinted genes involved in growth or placental function, which may contribute to impaired pregnancy progress when CPM is detected.[7] Different chromosomes are observed at different frequencies depending on the type of CPM observed.[2] The pregnancy outcome is strongly chromosome specific. The most frequently seen trisomic cells in confined placental mosaicism involve chromosomes 2, 3, 7, 8 and 16. The next frequently involved are 9, 13, 15, 18, 20 and 22.[8] It has been observed that CPM involving the sex chromosomes usually has no adverse effects on fetal development.[9] The common autosomal trisomies (21, 18, 13) made up a smaller number of cases of mosaicism detected on CVS, but were more often confirmed in fetal tissue (19%).[3] On the other hand, the uncommon autosomal trisomies accounted for a greater number of placental mosaicism cases, but were less often confirmed in fetal ...
It can be induced to assist thoracoscopic surgery.[7] It can be caused by a pulmonary barotrauma resulting when a person moves to or from a higher pressure environment, such as when a SCUBA diver,[8][9] a free-diver[10] or an airplane passenger[11] ascends or descends. In rare cases, pneumomediastinum may also arise as a result of blunt chest trauma (e.g. car accidents, fights, over pressure of breathing apparatus), while still evolving in the same fashion as the spontaneous form.[12] Pneumomediastinum is most commonly seen in otherwise healthy young male patients and may not be prefaced by a relevant medical history of similar ailments.[13] ...
... is a yellowish discoloration of the white part of the eyes and skin in a newborn baby due to high bilirubin levels.[1] Other symptoms may include excess sleepiness or poor feeding.[1] Complications may include seizures, cerebral palsy, or kernicterus.[1] In many cases there is no specific underlying disorder (physiologic).[2] In other cases it results from red blood cell breakdown, liver disease, infection, hypothyroidism, or metabolic disorders (pathologic).[2][1] A bilirubin level more than 34 μmol/l (2 mg/dL) may be visible.[1] Concerns, in otherwise healthy babies, occur when levels are greater than 308 μmol/L (18 mg/dL), jaundice is noticed in the first day of life, there is a rapid rise in levels, jaundice lasts more than two weeks, or the baby appears unwell.[1] In those with concerning findings further investigations to determine the underlying cause are recommended.[1] The need for treatment depends on bilirubin levels, the age of the child, and the underlying ...
Grades I and II are most common, and often there are no further complications. Grades III and IV are the most serious and may result in long-term brain injury to the infant. After a grade III or IV IVH, blood clots may form which can block the flow of cerebrospinal fluid, leading to increased fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus). There have been various therapies employed into preventing the high rates of morbidity and mortality, including diuretic therapy,[14] repeated lumbar puncture,[15] streptokinase therapy [16] and most recently combination a novel intervention called DRIFT (drainage, irrigation and fibrinolytic therapy). In 2002, a Dutch retrospective study[17] analysed cases where neonatologists had intervened and drained CSF by lumbar or ventricular punctures if ventricular width (as shown on ultrasound) exceeded the 97th centile as opposed to the 97th centile plus 4 mm.[18] Professors Whitelaw's original Cochrane review[14] published in 2001 as well as evidence from previous randomised ...
Primary polycythemias are due to factors intrinsic to red cell precursors. Polycythemia vera (PCV), polycythemia rubra vera (PRV), or erythremia, occurs when excess red blood cells are produced as a result of an abnormality of the bone marrow.[3] Often, excess white blood cells and platelets are also produced. PCV is classified as a myeloproliferative disease. Symptoms include headaches and vertigo, and signs on physical examination include an abnormally enlarged spleen and/or liver. In some cases, affected individuals may have associated conditions including high blood pressure or formation of blood clots. Transformation to acute leukemia is rare. Phlebotomy is the mainstay of treatment. A hallmark of polycythemia is an elevated hematocrit, with Hct , 55% seen in 83% of cases.[4] A somatic (non-hereditary) mutation (V617F) in the JAK2 gene is found in 95% of cases, though also present in other myeloproliferative disorders.[5] Primary familial polycythemia, also known as primary familial and ...
Inflammation of the fetal membranes is called chorioamnionitis. Balanced inflammation is an important factor in maintaining ...
Bersani, I; Thomas, W; Speer, CP (April 2012). "Chorioamnionitis-the good or the evil for neonatal outcome?". The Journal of ... Infections of the fetal membranes known as chorioamnionitis increases the risk. Intrauterine and neonatal insults (many of ...
Infection, however, is not shown to be an etiological factor, but a correlation to chorioamnionitis is identified as a risk. ... Mothers who have developed chorioamnionitis during pregnancy put their infant at higher risk for development of Wilson-Mikity ... "Awareness of Wilson-Mikity Syndrome: A Rare Complication of Chorioamnionitis". Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. ... Retrolental Fibroplasia Chorioamnionitis Cooperman, EM (May 17, 1969). "Wilson-Mikity syndrome (pulmonary dysmaturity syndrome ...
suggestive history of chorioamnionitis, PROM (premature rupture of membranes), etc... Culturing for microorganisms from a ...
This sometimes leads to chorioamnionitis and other negative pregnancy outcomes. Chorioamnionitis is due to the presence of ...
A chorioamnionitis also may lead to sepsis of the mother. Fetal infection is linked to preterm birth and to significant long- ... While the rupture of the membranes may not be followed by labor, usually delivery is indicated as infection (chorioamnionitis) ... It has been suggested that chronic chorioamnionitis is not sufficiently treated by antibiotics alone (and therefore they cannot ...
"The Prevalence of Chronic Deciduitis in Cases of Preterm Labor without Clinical Chorioamnionitis". Pediatric and Developmental ...
BALT can be induced even in fetal lungs after chorioamnionitis or intrauterine pneumonia. Also there is an evidence that ...
"The prevalence of chronic deciduitis in cases of preterm labor without clinical chorioamnionitis". Pediatr Dev Pathol. 12 (1): ...
"Early dynamic changes in pulse oximetry signals in preterm newborns with histologic chorioamnionitis". Pediatric Critical Care ...
Chorioamnionitis is inflammation of the amniotic sac (chorio- + amnion + -itis), usually because of infection. It is a risk ...