Because of the toxins in its body that come from consuming algae, the California sea hare has very few predators. Among these, however, is the giant green anemone, which reportedly takes them in large numbers; however, the anemone will capture a sea hare and then proceed to digest only 67-85% of it before regurgitating the remains. This is because the anemone consumes only enough of the sea hare to expose the sea hare's digestive gland and its associated toxins. Once this gland has been exposed, it causes the anemone to reject all of the remaining undigested animal, including parts it would otherwise have taken in as food.[5] Other predators include starfish, lobsters,[6] and the ophistobranch Navanax inermis which will take juveniles.[7] When it is considerably disturbed, the sea hare is capable of releasing two different kinds of ink from different locations within its mantle cavity, much in the way an octopus does. One ink is reddish-purple and comes from what is called the purple ink ...
The U.S. state of Alabama is home to these known indigenous mammal species.[1] Historically, the state's indigenous species included one armadillo species, sixteen bat species, thirteen carnivore species, six insectivore species, one opossum species, four rabbit species, twenty-two rodent species, and three ungulate species.[2][3][4][5][6][7] Four of these native species have become extirpated within the state, including the American bison, cougar, elk, and the red wolf.[1][8] There are six known introduced mammal species in the state. These include the black rat, brown rat, fallow deer, feral swine, house mouse, and nutria.[8] Several other mammal species have had verifiable sightings within the state, but are believed by biologists to be without established breeding populations. These include the California sea lion (in Mobile Bay), ring-tailed cat, and jaguarundi.[4] Human predation and habitat destruction has placed several mammal species at risk of extirpation or extinction. The Alabama ...
... is a chocolate bar made by Nestlé, previously a Rowntree's product. It originated in Fawdon, England. The Lion Bar was originally designed by Alan Norman, Experimental Confectioner, at a factory in Fawdon, Tyneside, England.[citation needed] It consists of a filled wafer, caramel (32%) and crisp cereal (26%) covered in milk chocolate (42%). It was introduced by Eric Nicoli of Rowntree's in the 1970s, after a trial in the Dorset area in 1977.[citation needed] It was in some areas known as Big Cat until the late 1990s.[citation needed] When Nestlé acquired the brand in 1988, the recipe was changed, as was the packaging.[citation needed] In the United Kingdom, both White Lion and Peanut Butter Lion limited edition bars have also been available, as well as a "king size" variety. The bar is occasionally found in the U.S., Canada, Tajikistan, Brazil, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand in European import shops, although a similar bar, Mr. Big, is made by Cadbury in Canada. In recent ...
Lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata), also known as Hair Jelly and Sea Blubber, are a type of jellyfish which are mostly found in north Atlantic and north Pacific waters. The stings of these jellyfish are painful but not fatal. The species is found near the coast of the U.S. shore line.. The lion's mane jellyfish can grow up to 2 m width by its pileus ("bell") and its tentacles up to 30 m long. The largest Lions Mane Jelly recorded was 120 FT, but most jellyfish are far smaller, usually some 30 cm by pileus width and up to 50 cm by tentacle length. It eats mainly plankton and is itself eaten by sunfish, sea turtles and some seabirds. Like all jellyfish, it lives only for one year.. A group of jellyfish is called a smack.. ...
The Albani lion is a 1st-century Roman green basalt lion statue with a yellow marble sphere under one paw, in the Albani Collection in the Denon Wing of the Louvre (inventory number Ma 1355) in Paris, France.[1]. The Albani lion is possibly a reproduction of an earlier Greek bronze statue, as basalt was used in the 1st century AD for reproductions of Greek bronzes.[1]. ...
The Lindenwood Lions and Lady Lions are the intercollegiate athletic teams of Lindenwood University, located in St. Charles, Missouri. The school is primarily a member of the NCAA Division II, although women's ice hockey and gymnastics and men's volleyball compete in NCAA Division I. The Lions joined the NCAA and the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA) in the summer of 2013, after completing the transition process from the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and the Heart of America Athletic Conference (HAAC). In addition to the 27 NCAA sports teams administered by the Lindenwood University Department of Athletics, the Lindenwood University Student Life Sports Department administers 21 additional non-NCAA sports. Modern intercollegiate athletics at Lindenwood trace roots back to intracollegiate sports, gym classes, and recreational activities associated with the development of modern sports during in the late 1800s and early 1900s in the United States. ...
A large and dangerous lion was terrorizing the people and animals near the city of Nemea. Weapons of iron, bronze, or stone could not pierce the lion's thick hide (skin). Eurystheus ordered Herakles to kill and skin this lion.[1] Herakles went to the region of Nemea and stayed with a poor man named Molorchos at Kleonai. Molorchos' son had been killed by this lion. Molorchos wanted to sacrifice his only ram to Herakles, but Herakles asked him to wait thirty days. If he did not return within thirty days, the ram was to be sacrificed to him as a hero. If he returned within thirty days, the ram was to be sacrificed to Zeus the Deliverer.[2] Herakles found the lion outside its lair on Mount Tretos. His arrows and sword were useless against the beast. He hit the lion with his club and the animal went into his lair. Herakles blocked one of the two openings to the cavern with nets, then entered the cavern. He wrestled the lion and choked it to death. The lion bit off one of his fingers. He returned to ...
The nictitating membrane is normally translucent. In some diving animals, including sea lions, it is activated on land, to remove sand and other debris-its function in most animals. In crocodiles, it protects their eyes from water but also hinders their focus under water. In some diving animals, for example beavers and manatees, it is transparent and moves across the eye to protect it while under water.. Birds can actively control their nictitating membrane.[8] In birds of prey, the membrane also serves to protect the parents' eyes from their chicks while they are feeding them, and when peregrine falcons go into their 200-mile-per-hour (320 km/h) dives, they will blink repeatedly with their nictitating membranes to clear debris and spread moisture across the eyes. Woodpeckers tighten their nictitating membrane a millisecond prior to their beak impacting the trunk of a tree to prevent shaking-induced retinal injury.[9]. The membrane can be used to protect the eye while attacking prey, as in ...
Coordinates: 38°26′48″N 123°7′35″W / 38.44667°N 123.12639°W / 38.44667; -123.12639 Goat Rock Beach is a sand beach in northwestern Sonoma County, California, United States. This landform is a sub-unit of Sonoma Coast State Beach, owned and managed by the State of California. At the northern terminus of Goat Rock Beach is the mouth of the Russian River, and the southern end of this crescent shaped expanse is the massive Goat Rock, an iconic outcrop of the Sonoma Coast, which is barely attached to the mainland by a narrow isthmus. Goat Rock Beach is frequented by beachcombing visitors but usually not in high numbers except in mid-summer; there is some wading and surfing activity, although these uses are moderated by the rip current generated by a steep gradient into the water that leads to an underwater trench parallel to the waterline. The beach is also a regular resting ground for seagulls, river otters, elephant seals, harbor seals, and sea lions, the latter three ...
... (Sanskrit: सिंहासन; IAST: Siṁhāsana) or Lion Pose is an asana. The name comes from the Sanskrit words simha (सिंह) meaning "lion", and asana (आसन, āsana) meaning "posture" or "seat". The asana resembles a seated lion, hence the name Simha (lion in Sanskrit) asana. The practitioner's facial expressions are modified to resemble a lion. The Lion Face Gesture (Simha Mudra) is performed with other sitting asanas such as Padmāsana (Lotus Pose), or standing with the palms on the waist and the feet 6-12 inches apart. The stretching of the tongue in the asana has been claimed[by whom?] to help with voice-related difficulties (e.g., stammering) and throat-related problems (e.g., hoarseness and tonsillitis). The asana has been claimed[by whom?] to aid better functioning of the carotid sinus, the sinus nerves, the larynx, and the thyroid and parathyroid glands. The carotid bodies assist in maintaining normal blood pressure and heartbeats. The breathing exercise is ...
Larisch S، Yi Y، Lotan R، Kerner H، Eimerl S، Tony Parks W، Gottfried Y، Birkey Reffey S، de Caestecker MP، Danielpour D، Book-Melamed N، Timberg R، Duckett CS، Lechleider RJ، Steller H، Orly J، Kim SJ، Roberts AB (December 2000). "A novel mitochondrial septin-like protein, ARTS, mediates apoptosis dependent on its P-loop motif". Nature Cell Biology. 2 (12): 915-21. PMID 11146656. doi:10.1038/35046566. ...
സസ്തനികളിലെ ഫെലിഡേ കുടുംബത്തിലെ പാന്തറ ജനുസ്സിൽ ഉൾപ്പെട്ട ഒരു വന്യജീവിയാണ് സിംഹം. (ഇംഗ്ലീഷ്: Lion. ശാസ്ത്രീയനാമം പാന്തറ ലിയോ). വലിയ പൂച്ചകൾ (Big Cats) എന്നറിയപ്പെടുന്ന നാല് ജീവികളിൽ ഒന്നാണ് സിംഹം. 272 കിലോഗ്രാം വരെ ഭാരം വയ്ക്കുന്ന സിംഹങ്ങൾ, കടുവയ്ക്കു ശേഷം മാർജ്ജാര വർഗ്ഗത്തിലെ രണ്ടാമത്തെ വലിയ ജീവിയാണ്. ആഫ്രിക്കൻ ഭൂഖണ്ഡത്തിലും ഏഷ്യയിലും ആണ് ഇപ്പോൾ സിംഹങ്ങൾ അധിവസിക്കുന്നത്. ...
The coat of arms shows the three historic states which Sömmerda belonged to in the past. In the left is the Saxon symbol, to the right is the lion as symbol of Thuringia, and in the bottom is the wheel as the symbol of Mainz ...