Platnick, N.I. (1985): On the Chilean spiders of the family Palpimanidae (Arachnida, Araneae). J. Arachnol. 13: 399-400. PDF ...
Like black widows, the female S. grossa is 6-10.5 mm in length and dark colored with a round, bulbous abdomen. Typical coloration ranges from purplish brown to black, with light-colored markings. Unlike black widows, redbacks, and other Latrodectus species, S. grossa does not have a bright red hourglass pattern or any other bright markings. Like many spiders, the male is sometimes smaller but can many times be nearly as long as the females. It measures 4.1-10.0 mm in length and is thinner than the female. The two sexes are colored similarly; however, the sexually mature male almost always has lighter, more reddish-coloured legs than the female. S. grossa spiders may shed up to six times (instars) before reaching maturity. According to Charles Hogue (Insects of the Los Angeles Basin, 1993), it reportedly preys on black widows.They can go several months without feeding, provided they have access to water. A well-fed female can lay three or more egg sacs each year. Each egg sac typically contains ...
Arachnida: Araneae, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones) mit Angaben zur Häufigkeit und Ökologie. Naturschutz und Landschaftspflege in ...
... species are small spiders, with a total body length mostly around 4-5 mm (0.2 in), sometimes smaller, with a high degree of sexual dimorphism. They are known as Peacock Spiders, based on the peacock-like display of the dorsal (upper) surface of the abdomen (opisthosoma) of the males, on which there is a "plate" or "fan" of usually brightly colored and highly iridescent scales and hairs, often forming patterns in which the foreground colors contrast with the iridescent background. There may in addition be "flaps" or dense fringes of hairs at the sides of the abdomen, sometimes brightly colored. In both sexes, the abdomen is joined to the cephalothorax by a long and very flexible pedicel. This allows males to raise their abdomens, which may also be capable of being flattened and waved from side to side,[3] thus emphasizing the appearance of the dorsal pattern. Not all species have colors that appear bright to human vision; Maratus vespertilio is relatively cryptically colored, with most ...
Arachnida: Araneae: Sicariidae)". American Entomologist. 55 (3): 158-169. doi:10.1093/ae/55.3.158.. ...
Tso, I.; Haupt, J. & Zhu, M. (2003): The trapdoor spider family Ctenizidae (Arachnida: Araneae) from Taiwan. The Raffles ...
... is a large spider with distinct sexual dimorphism. The females are relatively larger than the males, measuring up to 3.5 cm in body length, with a 10 cm legspan. The dorsal side of the body is chocolate-brown with small, lighter spots on the abdomen and many darker longitudinal stripes, particularly on the carapace. The ventral side is red-orange with thick black central region under the abdomen. Males measure up to 2.5 cm long and have very long and thin legs. The males are much lighter in colour than the females. They are distinct, with conspicuous palpal bulbs.[6] Cupiennius salei have one pair of principal eyes and three pairs of secondary eyes located on the prosoma (the anterior end of the head) and they are colour blind.[7] Being adapted to nocturnality, their visual capability is reduced and they rely on their tactile sensation to detect movements or vibrations in their environment.[6] Under laboratory conditions, females make cocoons every three to four weeks, each ...
"Ticks (Class Arachnida: Order Acarina)". In Samuel, William M.; Pybus, Margo J.; Kocan, A. Allan (eds.). Parasitic Diseases of ... "The complete mitochondrial genome of the scab mite Psoroptes cuniculi (Arthropoda: Arachnida) provides insights into Acari ...
I. persulcatus ticks transmit Lyme disease, babesiosis, and Siberian (TBEV-Sib) and Far Eastern (TBEV-FE) tick-borne encephalitis,[1][4] and probably human granulocytic anaplasmosis as well.[5] A recent study of the northernmost tick-borne encephalitis focus in Simo, Finnish Lapland, found I. persulcatus ticks in scattered foci along the western coast, including the Kokkola archipelago and Närpes municipality, demonstrating a northward movement of foci and an unusual combination of the TBEV-Eur strain and I. persulcatus ticks in an area with no evidence of cocirculation of tick species or TBEV subtypes.[1] ...
Members of Heterometrus are generally large-sized scorpions (100-200 mm total length). Coloration is dark in most species, often uniformly brown or black, sometimes with a greenish shine, with brighter-colored telson, walking legs, and/or pedipalp pincers in some species. The scorpions are heavily built with especially powerful and globose pedipalp pionkes, broad mesosomal tergites and a proportionally slender and thin metasoma. The telson is proportionally small and the stinger is often shorter than the vesicle. The cephalothorax and mesosoma are largely devoid of carinae and granulation and the median eyes are situated in a small, lenticular depression on the cephalothorax. Some species are parthenogenic.[3][7] ...
Arachnida". Lectures on Comparative Anatomy. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans. p. 252.. .mw-parser-output cite. ...
Arachnida Order:. Araneae Infraorder:. Araneomorphae Family:. Theridiidae Genus:. Latrodectus. Walckenaer, 1805[1] ...
The many genera of wolf spiders range in body size (legs not included) from less than 10 to 35 mm (0.4 to 1.38 in).[1][2] They have eight eyes arranged in three rows. The bottom row consists of four small eyes, the middle row has two very large eyes (which distinguishes them from the Pisauridae), and the top row has two medium-sized eyes. Unlike most other arachnids, which are generally blind or have poor vision, wolf spiders have excellent eyesight with their large eyes. The sensory hairs on their legs and bodies give them an acute sense of touch. Flashing a beam of light over the spider produces eyeshine. The light from the flashlight has been reflected from the spider's eyes directly back toward its source, producing a "glow" that is easily noticed. This is also especially helpful because when the nocturnal wolf spiders are out hunting for food it makes it easier to find them.[citation needed] Wolf spiders possess the third-best eyesight of all spider groups, bested by jumping spiders of the ...
Arachnida:Sarcoptes scabiei skin microscopy of surface scrapings worldwide skin-to-skin contact such as sexual activity and via ... Arachnida: Trombiculidae skin visual identification under magnification, microscopy worldwide (mesic habitats) high grass, ... Arachnida: Ixodidae and Argasidae skin visual worldwide high grass, leaf litter, weeds ...
All genera are able to produce sphingomyelinase D or a related tissue-destroying substance. It is unique to the family among spiders, and otherwise only found in a few pathogenic bacteria. Bites from most of the Neotropical species of Sicarius are not known to display dermonecrotic or systemic activity, except the highly venomous Sicarius ornatus which has active proteins of the sphingomyelinase D family found in the venom.[4][5] It has also recently been proven that Sicarius thomisoides contains active sphingomyelinase D, very similar to that of loxosceles laeta and Sicarius ornatus, and that its bite can cause serious damage in humans, Sicarius tropicus have been also reported for having dermonecrotic and hemolytic venom[6] The venom of many Sicariidae species is highly hemolytic and dermonecrotic,[2] capable of destroying red blood cells and causing lesions as large as 1 inch (25 mm) in diameter that take a long time to heal. Some require skin grafts and if the open wound gets infected, there ...
Arachnida 73440 7.9 Pycnogonida 600 2.67 Pauropoda 360 Chilopoda 3000 100 3.33 ...
Araneidae Clerck, 1758, Araneus Clerck, 1758 and Tegenaria Latreille, 1804 (Arachnida, Araneae): proposed conservation" (PDF). ...
Generally, orb-weaving spiders are three-clawed builders of flat webs with sticky spiral capture silk. The building of a web is an engineering feat, begun when the spider floats a line on the wind to another surface. The spider secures the line and then drops another line from the center, making a "Y". The rest of the scaffolding follows with many radii of nonsticky silk being constructed before a final spiral of sticky capture silk. The third claw is used to walk on the nonsticky part of the web. Characteristically, the prey insect that blunders into the sticky lines is stunned by a quick bite, and then wrapped in silk. If the prey is a venomous insect, such as a wasp, wrapping may precede biting and/or stinging. Much of the orb-spinning spiders' success in capturing insects depends on the web not being visible to the prey, with the stickiness of the web increasing the visibility and so decreasing the chances of capturing prey. This leads to a trade-off between the visibility of the web and the ...
The southern house spider is a species of large spider in the family Filistatidae. Currently given the scientific name Kukulcania hibernalis, it was formerly known as Filistata hibernalis. Found in the Americas, it exhibits strong sexual dimorphism. It occurs in southern North American states of USA, throughout Central America and some Caribbean to southern Brazil and Uruguay. The males may be mistaken for brown recluses because the two have similar coloration and body structure. However, compared to the brown recluse, male southern house spiders are typically larger in size, lack the distinctive violin shape on their cephalothorax, and have unusually long slender pedipalps. The females are dark brown or black and more compact. Both sexes may grow to be roughly 2 inches (5.1 cm) across (legs extended), with the males typically having longer legs, and the females often having larger, bulbous bodies. The abdomen of the southern house spider is covered with fine velvety light gray hair.. Female ...
Dorsally, carapace has greenish yellow or purplish tinge. Femur is greenish tinge with a purplish tinge. Tibia has two parallel lines of oblong yellow spots. All legs possess reddish brown setae and setae are more prominent on pedipalps and chelicerae.[4] Ventrally, first and second leg pairs are identical, with ground color yellow. Femur is also yellow. Tibia is bright yellow colored. Third and fourth leg pairs are identical. Ground color of them are yellow. Femur is black with centrally located large blue-grey spot. ...
Cushing P.E. (2008) Spiders (Arachnida: Araneae). In: Capinera J.L. (eds) Encyclopedia of Entomology. Springer, p. 3496. doi: ... Arachnida, Araneae)". Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. 178: 1-106. hdl:2246/991.. Full text at "A review of ... Structure and function of the female reproductive system in three species of goblin spiders (Arachnida: Araneae: Oonopidae) ... Complex Genital System of a Haplogyne Spider (Arachnida, Araneae, Tetrablemmidae) Indicates Internal Fertilization and Full ...
The life cycle of Dermacentor albipictus lasts for about a year, and it is a single-host tick. This means that the entire life cycle of the tick (larvae, nymphs, and adults) progress on a single host animal.[2] First, in late summer larvae hatch from eggs. After lying dormant for some time, they start to ascend vegetation and to group in clusters on plants up to 1.25 m in height. This allows them to latch onto animals that pass by and begin to feed on their host. While on this host, the larvae go through the stages of nymph and then finally transform into an adult.[6] Addison and McLaughlin, in a 1988 study of ticks on young moose in captivity, reported that larvae became nymphs about 10 days after being applied to the moose. Nymphs then underwent a long diapause before becoming adults in roughly mid-February. One moose, which had been infected with larvae 37 days after the others, still showed a similar timing of adult ticks appearing. The authors suggest the diapause may serve to delay ...
Fauna Romaniei, Arachnida, Acad. Roman., Bucuresti: 107,. *Hansen H. (1986) Die Salticidae der coll. Canestrini (Arachnida: ... Pesarini C. (1997) I ragni (Arachnida Araneae) del Monte Barro (Italia, Lombardia, Lecco), Mem. Soc. ital. Sci. nat. Museo civ ... Trotta A. (2005) Introduzione ai Ragni italiani (Arachnida Araneae), Memorie della Societa entomologica italiana, Genova ...
Ticks generally are obligate blood feeders. All active stages (larvae, nymphs and adults) require blood as a source of nutrition (except for a few Argasid genera in which the adult mouthparts are non-functional, i.e. Antricola, Otobius and Nothoaspis). Adults also require the blood for sperm or egg production. The feeding process of Ixodid ticks has first a slow phase for several days followed by a fast phase in the last 12-24 hours before detachment. There may be a tenfold increase in fed: unfed weights by the end of the slow phase, but there is an additional tenfold increase by the end of the final fast phase. Leaving the full engorgement as late as possible reduces the chances of detection and removal by the host. The process of feeding is called engorging. The hypostome has a groove along its dorsal surface forming a food canal (also known as the preoral canal) through which blood is drawn from the host and passed on to the mouth and pharynx. During blood feeding by Ixodid ticks, the liquid ...
Treatment is based on the severity of poisoning from the bite; the majority of cases do not require medical care, and patients with localised pain, swelling and redness usually only require local application of ice and simple oral analgesia such as paracetamol. Pressure immobilisation of the wound site is not recommended. Keeping the victim still and calm is beneficial.[57][126] Hospital assessment is recommended if simple pain relief does not resolve local pain, or systemic symptoms occur.[127][128] Opioid analgesics may be necessary to relieve pain.[102] Antivenom has been historically given for adults suffering severe local pain or systemic symptoms consistent with latrodectism, which include pain and swelling spreading proximally from site, distressing local or systemic pain, chest pain, abdominal pain, or excessive sweating (diaphoresis).[129] A significant proportion of bites will not result in envenomation or any symptoms developing; around 2-20% of bite victims have been treated with ...
Pocock, R.I. (1900). Arachnida. The Fauna of India, including Ceylon and Burma. London: W.T. Blandford. pp. xii+279. Bawaskar, ...
Arachnida. London: Taylor and Francis. p. 232. Molur, Sanjay; Daniel, B.A.; Siliwal, Manju (November 2004). "First record of ...
Arachnida. London: Taylor and Francis. pp. 259-265. Jäger, Peter (2002). "Heteropodinae: Transfers and Synonymies (Arachnida: ...
Pickard-Cambridge, O. (1895). Arachnida. Araneida. Bradley, Richard A. (2012). Common Spiders of North America. University of ...
CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Pickard-Cambridge, O. (1898). Arachnida. Araneida. "Elaver" at the Encyclopedia of Life ...