Betaprodine is some five times more potent than alphaprodine, but is metabolized more rapidly, and only alphaprodine was ... Both exhibit optical isomerism and alphaprodine and betaprodine are racemates. Alphaprodine is closely related to desomorphine ... and it was found that 5 to 10 mg of betaprodine is equivalent to 25 to 40 mg of alphaprodine. Tests in rats showed alphaprodine ... Alphaprodine has a duration of action of 1 to 2 hours and 40 to 60 mg is equal to 10 mg of morphine via the subcutaneous route ...
Roberts, H; Kuck, MA (19 November 1960). "Use of alphaprodine and levallorphan during labour". Canadian Medical Association ...
This research produced the analgesic alphaprodine (Nisentil, Prisilidine), a very closely related compound. In 1976, a 23-year- ...
... and somewhat more distantly alphaprodine. Not being in clinical use in the United States, it is a Schedule I Narcotic ...
... does exhibit optical isomerism as do other chemicals of its general type ranging from pethidine and alphaprodine ...
... and alphaprodine (Nisentil). Phenadoxone has a US DEA ACSCN of 9637 and recently has had a zero annual manufacturing quota ...
... allylprodine alphameprodine alphaprodine betameprodine betaprodine desmethylprodine (MPPP) PEPAP trimeperidine Synthetic 4- ...
... acetylmethadol alphacetylmethadol alphameprodine alphamethadol alphamethylfentanyl alphamethylthiofentanyl alphaprodine ...
Alphamul Alphanate AlphaNine SD alphaprodine (INN) Alphaquin HP Alpharedisol Alphatrex Alphazine alpidem (INN) alpiropride (INN ...
Alphaprodine (α-1,3-dimethyl-4-phenyl-4-piperidinol propionate) Anileridine (ethyl 1-[2-(p-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4- ...
... alphaprodine MeSH D03.383.621.050 - anabasine MeSH D03.383.621.080 - betalains MeSH D03.383.621.080.500 - betacyanins MeSH ...
... alphaprodine, MPPP, etc.), bemidones (ketobemidone, etc.) and others more distant, including diphenoxylate and analogues. ...
Alphameprodine Alphamethadol Alphaprodine Anileridine Benzethidine Benzylmorphine (3-benzylmorphine) Betacetylmethadol ...
40 to 60 mg of alphaprodine and 10 mg of morphine. Oral formulations were also available. Piminodine has similar effects to ...
Ji, Jianguo; Bunnelle, William H.; Anderson, David J.; Faltynek, Connie; Dyhring, Tino; Ahring, Philip K.; Rueter, Lynne E.; Curzon, Peter; Buckley, Michael J.; Marsh, Kennan C.; Kempf-Grote, Anita; Meyer, Michael D. (2007). "A-366833: A novel nicotinonitrile-substituted 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.2.0]-heptane α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor selective agonist: Synthesis, analgesic efficacy and tolerability profile in animal models". Biochemical Pharmacology. 74 (8): 1253-1262. doi:10.1016/j.bcp.2007.08.010. PMID 17854775 ...
... (CHF-3381, V-3381) is a drug which was formerly being investigated as an anticonvulsant and neuroprotective and is now under development for the treatment of neuropathic pain and chronic cough in Europe by Vernalis and Chiesi.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8] It acts as a competitive, reversible, and non-selective monoamine oxidase inhibitor,[5][6][9] and as a low affinity, non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist.[1][2][10] A pilot study of indantadol for chronic cough was initiated in October 2009 and in April 2010 it failed to achieve significant efficacy in neuropathic pain in phase IIb clinical trials.[7][8][11][12] ...
In the US, ketorolac is the only widely available intravenous NSAID. An IV form of paracetamol, which is not an NSAID, became available in Europe in 2009 and then in the US.[13] The Syntex company, of Palo Alto, California developed the ophthalmic solution Acular[25] around 2006, which is currently licensed by Allergan, Inc.[26][27] In 2007, there were concerns about the high incidence of reported side effects. This led to restriction in its dosage and maximum duration of use. In the UK, treatment was initiated only in a hospital, although this was not designed to exclude its use in prehospital care and mountain rescue settings.[1] Dosing guidelines were published at that time.[28] Concerns over the high incidence of reported side effects with ketorolac trometamol led to its withdrawal (apart from the ophthalmic formulation) in several countries, while in others its permitted dosage and maximum duration of treatment have been reduced. From 1990 to 1993, 97 reactions with a fatal outcome were ...
Drugs that have been introduced for uses other than analgesics are also used in pain management. Both first-generation (such as amitriptyline) and newer anti-depressants (such as duloxetine) are used alongside NSAIDs and opioids for pain involving nerve damage and similar problems. Other agents directly potentiate the effects of analgesics, such as using hydroxyzine, promethazine, carisoprodol, or tripelennamine to increase the pain-killing ability of a given dose of opioid analgesic. Adjuvant analgesics, also called atypical analgesics, include nefopam, orphenadrine, pregabalin, gabapentin, cyclobenzaprine, hyoscine (scopolamine), and other drugs possessing anticonvulsant, anticholinergic, and/or antispasmodic properties, as well as many other drugs with CNS actions. These drugs are used along with analgesics to modulate and/or modify the action of opioids when used against pain, especially of neuropathic origin. Dextromethorphan has been noted to slow the development of tolerance to opioids ...
... (INN), or benorylate, is an ester-linked codrug of aspirin with paracetamol. It is used as an anti-inflammatory and antipyretic medication. In the treatment of childhood fever, it has been shown to be inferior to paracetamol and aspirin taken separately. In addition, because it is converted to aspirin, benorylate is not recommended in children due to concerns about Reye syndrome.[1] ...
Tamura T, Ogawa J, Taniguchi T, Waki I (January 1990). "[Preferential action of eptazocine, a novel analgesic, with opioid receptors in isolated guinea pig ileum and mouse vas deferens preparations]". Nihon Yakurigaku Zasshi. Folia Pharmacologica Japonica (in Japanese). 95 (1): 41-6. doi:10.1254/fpj.95.1_41. PMID 2154395 ...
The VIGOR (Vioxx GI Outcomes Research) study, conducted by Bombardier, et al., which compared the efficacy and adverse effect profiles of rofecoxib and naproxen, had indicated a significant 4-fold increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) in rofecoxib patients when compared with naproxen patients (0.4% vs 0.1%, RR 0.25) over the 12-month span of the study. The elevated risk began during the second month on rofecoxib. There was no significant difference in the mortality from cardiovascular events between the two groups, nor was there any significant difference in the rate of myocardial infarction between the rofecoxib and naproxen treatment groups in patients without high cardiovascular risk. The difference in overall risk was by the patients at higher risk of heart attack, i.e. those meeting the criteria for low-dose aspirin prophylaxis of secondary cardiovascular events (previous myocardial infarction, angina, cerebrovascular accident, transient ischemic attack, or coronary ...
Acetylsalicylic acid is a weak acid, and very little of it is ionized in the stomach after oral administration. Acetylsalicylic acid is quickly absorbed through the cell membrane in the acidic conditions of the stomach. The increased pH and larger surface area of the small intestine causes aspirin to be absorbed more slowly there, as more of it is ionised. Owing to the formation of concretions, aspirin is absorbed much more slowly during overdose, and plasma concentrations can continue to rise for up to 24 hours after ingestion.[152][153][154] About 50-80% of salicylate in the blood is bound to albumin protein, while the rest remains in the active, ionized state; protein binding is concentration-dependent. Saturation of binding sites leads to more free salicylate and increased toxicity. The volume of distribution is 0.1-0.2 L/kg. Acidosis increases the volume of distribution because of enhancement of tissue penetration of salicylates.[154] As much as 80% of therapeutic doses of salicylic acid is ...
... [1][2] is an opioid analgesic.[3] with a potency ½ that of morphine. It was initially discovered by Russian scientists in 1954 and subsequently rediscovered in the US in 1969.[4] Its LD50 in mice is 83 mg/kg.[5] It has never been marketed commercially, likely due to its low potency and lack of benefits compared to existing agents. ...
... binds to the opioid receptor. During the studies of in vitro inhibition of specific [3H] fentanyl binding to the opioid receptor, the order of analogues was: (±)-cis-3-methylfentanyl , fentanyl = alpha-methylfentanyl , butyrylfentanyl , benzylfentanyl.[2] The studies in inhibition studies on binding affinity achieved the same order of analogues. It means that butyrfentantyl is a less potent opioid-agonist than fentanyl. On the other side, during in vitro studies of cross-reactivity with the fentanyl antibody between fentanyl and the fentanyl analogs examined, revealed order: fentanyl = butyrylfentanyl , (±)-cis-3-methylfentanyl , benzylfentanyl , alpha-methylfentanyl.[2] High cross-reactivity may be the effect of the shape of the molecule - the shape of butyrfentanyl is closest to the original fentanyl molecule, which makes it easy to bind by fentanyl antibodies. The opioid receptor affinity of fentanyl and its analogs was determined from their inhibitory potency in a binding ...
... (INN and BAN; also known as phenazon, antipyrine (USAN), or analgesine) is an analgesic, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and an antipyretic. It was first synthesized by Ludwig Knorr in 1887.[1][2]:26-27 Phenazone is synthesized[3] by condensation of phenylhydrazine and ethyl acetoacetate under basic conditions and methylation of the resulting intermediate compound 1-phenyl-3-methylpyrazolone[4] with dimethyl sulfate or methyl iodide. It crystallizes in needles which melt at 156 °C. Potassium permanganate oxidizes it to pyridazine tetracarboxylic acid. Phenazone has an elimination half life of about 12 hours.[5] Indication: Used to relieve pain and fever. Antipyrine is often used in testing the effects of other drugs or diseases on drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver.[6]. ...
... is widely used in preparations as an enhancing agent for some analgesics and antitussives (acetaminophen, dihydrocodeine, codeine, hydrocodone). It is widely used in certain parts of the world as cough suppressant usually with codeine, and sometimes by itself or in addition to dextromethorphan as it, like diphenhydramine, possesses antitussive action of its own and is particularly useful in semi-productive coughs because of its moderate drying action. Phenyltoloxamine has analgesic and anti-spasmodic properties of its own[citation needed] and is used in combination with paracetamol, aspirin and other salicylates and other drugs in proprietary preparations available over the counter for backache, muscle strains and similar conditions. In this respect, it is similar to a closely related antihistamine, orphenadrine, and both drugs are very closely related to diphenhydramine and to doxylamine, the latter of which is the active ingredient in NyQuil and many other cough ...
Class Ib antiarrhythmic agents are sodium channel blockers. They have fast onset and offset kinetics, meaning that they have little or no effect at slower heart rates, and more effects at faster heart rates. Class Ib agents shorten the action potential duration and reduce refractoriness. These agents will decrease Vmax in partially depolarized cells with fast response action potentials. They either do not change the action potential duration, or they may decrease the action potential duration. Class Ib drugs tend to be more specific for voltage gated Na channels than Ia. Lidocaine in particular is highly frequency dependent, in that it has more activity with increasing heart rates. This is because lidocaine selectively blocks Na channels in their open and inactive states and has little binding capability in the resting state. Class Ib agents are indicated for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia and symptomatic premature ventricular beats, and prevention of ventricular fibrillation. Class Ib ...
... (INN) is a synthetic opioid analgesic related to methadone that was never marketed.[1] In a clinical trial of postpartum patients it was reported to produce analgesia comparable to that of morphine but with less nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness.[2][3] Other side effects included salivation, ataxia, and respiratory depression that was reversible by naloxone.[2][3] Similarly to many of its analogues, noracymethadol is a Schedule I controlled substance in the United States with an ACSCN of 9633 and 2013 annual manufacturing quota of 12 grammes. [4] and is also controlled internationally under the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961.[5] The salts known are the gluconate (free base conversion ratio 0.633) and hydrochloride (0.903).. Noracymethadol is an acetyl ester of methadol and it can be said with some precision that it is either the heroin or 6-monoacetylmorphine analogue of methadol, and being a methadol it exhibits optical isomerism. The other methadols ...
On June 30, 2009, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel voted by a narrow margin to advise the FDA to remove Vicodin and another opioid, Percocet, from the market because of "a high likelihood of overdose from prescription narcotics and acetaminophen products".[23] The panel also cited concerns of liver damage from their acetaminophen component, which is also the main ingredient in commonly used nonprescription drugs such as Tylenol.[23] Each year, acetaminophen overdose is linked to about 400 deaths and 42,000 hospitalizations.[24] In January 2011, the FDA asked manufacturers of prescription combination products that contain acetaminophen to limit the amount of acetaminophen to no more than 325 mg in each tablet or capsule within 3 years.[25][26][27][28] The FDA also required manufacturers on all acetaminophen containing products to issue a black box warning indicating the potential risk for severe liver injury and a warning highlighting potential for allergic ...
In June 2010, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency of the United Kingdom licensed nabiximols as a prescription-only medicine for the treatment of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis. This regulatory authorization represents the world's first full regulatory approval for the medicine. The spray is being marketed in the UK by Bayer Schering Pharma. Many people with MS cannot receive nabiximols due to local National Health Service (NHS) resistance to its funding;[5][6] but, in August 2014, the NHS in Wales agreed to fund Sativex for people with multiple sclerosis.[7] Nabiximols was also approved in Spain for MS spasticity in the second half of 2010 and was launched in that country in March 2011. It was approved in the Czech Republic in April 2011, in Germany in May 2011, in Denmark in June 2011 and in Sweden in January 2012 to people with MS who have not responded adequately to other medication for spasticity.[8] It has also been recommended for approval in Italy and Austria ...