We analyzed a large data set of laboratory experiments to examine the effects of cyanobacteria containing or lacking intracellular toxic metabolites and of different morphology on zooplankton population growth rates across multiple genera and species of cladocerans, rotifers and cyanobacteria. Twenty-one of the 29 zooplankton species maintained positive growth rates when fed a diet containing cyanobacteria even though cyanobacteria were a poor food source for half of the zooplankton species tested relative to a diet containing only green algae and/or flagellates. Differences among zooplankton species could not be explained by grazer species body lengths, even when experiments were restricted to those that used only filamentous cyanobacteria. Single-celled cyanobacteria were more detrimental to a larger number of zooplankton species compared to filamentous or chroococcoid colonial cyanobacteria. We also found no clear effect of putative cyanobacterial toxins on the growth of seven zooplankton ...
Desert springs, which harbor diverse and endemic invertebrate assemblages, are often used as refuge habitats for protected fish species. Additionally, many of these springs have been colonized by invasive fish species. However, the potential impacts of recently established fish populations on invertebrate communities in desert springs have been relatively unexplored. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to assess the impact of both protected and invasive fish on community structure of spring-dwelling invertebrates focusing on zooplankton. Experimental populations of spring zooplankton communities were established and randomly assigned to one of three treatments, (1) invasive western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis); (2) endangered Mohave tui chub (Siphateles bicolor mohavensis); and (3) fishless control. Final populations of zooplankton and fish were sampled, sorted, identified and counted. The treatment differences of zooplankton communities were analyzed by comparing the densities of six major
A literature synthesis of phytoplankton growth (μ) and grazing (m) rate estimates from dilution experiments reveals that microzooplankton account for most phytoplankton mortality in the oceans, averaging 60-75% of daily phytoplankton production (PP) across a spectrum of open-ocean and coastal systems. For reasonable estimates of gross growth efficiency (GGE=30-40%), such impacts imply that secondary production rates of microzooplankton (MP2°) are typically in the range 21-34% of PP. However, multiple trophic transfers within the microbial community can further enhance total microzooplankton production by an additional third to a half (MPtot=28-55% of PP). These estimates are 2-5 times typical values for bacterial production (10-15% of PP). Thus, in aggregate and on average, microzooplankton consume substantially more (6-7 times) production from phytoplankton than from heterotrophic bacteria. High grazing impacts and relatively high GGEs are consistent with population growth rates for ...
Discussion Our study suggests that local and regional processes interact to produce patterns of species composition and diversity of zooplankton in Kasseb Reservoir. In this system of highly connected reservoirs, Kasseb Reservoir provides the water for the Ghdir El Goulla Reservoir (Sellami et al., 2009). Connections between reservoirs can have positive and negative impacts on zooplankton communities. The Kasseb Reservoir has low diversity (8 zooplankton species). The results of this study suggest that this system is structured according to the species-sorting paradigm (Leibold et al., 2004). Connectivity can promote high community diversity by providing new species from the regional pool, but can also limit local diversity by washing out species, setting up local communities for competitive exclusion, and otherwise providing a disturbance that can offset equilibrium conditions (Cottenie and DeMeester, 2005).. The highest zooplankton densities were found in early September at a depth of 5 m ...
... different trophic states (Corrientes, Argentina) Abundância e diversidade específica do zooplâncton em dois lagos com estados tróficos diferentes (Corrientes, Argentina) Frutos, SM.1, 2, Poi de Neiff1, 2, ASG. and Neiff, JJ.1 Centro de Ecología Aplicada del Litoral - CONICET, CP 3400, C.C. 291, Corrientes, Argentina e-mail: [email protected]; [email protected] 2 Departamento de Biología, FACENA, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste e-mail: [email protected] Abstract: Aim: In this study, we compare the composition and abundance of zooplankton community between a lake affected by the domestic sewage and in an unaffected lake. We also identified the environmental variables associated with the variation in the most abundant populations and the rotifer species that are indicators of trophic state; Methods: Seventeen zooplankton samples (50 L per sample) were filtered through a plankton net (53 µm) in the limnetic zone of each site. Non ...
Quantitative seasonal studies on gelatinous zooplankton in Norwegian fjords are scarce. We recorded the quantitative composition of the gelatinous zooplankton community in Korsfjord and Fanafjord during 1 yr. Thirty-six species or genera of hydromedusae, 7 species of siphonophores, 4 species of ctenophores and 2 species of scyphomedusae were recorded. Aglantha digitale was numerically dominant in both fjords. A separate video-profiling study on the vertical distribution of fully grown specimens of this species was made in Korsfjord and the adjacent Bjørnafjord. Our data suggest 2 A. digitale generations yr-1, with relatively low importance of the latter generation. The overwintering strategy includes autumn growth to full size and distribution at intermediate depth, mainly between 200 and 300 m. Siphonophores were prominent in the more oceanic Korsfjord, while Fanafjord was characterized by meroplanktonic hydromedusae. More species were recorded from Korsfjord, which may be partly attributed to ...
Metabolic and stoichiometric theories of ecology have provided broad complementary principles to understand ecosystem processes across different levels of biological organization. We tested several of their cornerstone hypotheses by measuring the nucleic acid (NA) and phosphorus (P) content of crustacean zooplankton species in 22 high mountain lakes (Sierra Nevada and the Pyrenees mountains, Spain). The P-allocation hypothesis (PAH) proposes that the genome size is smaller in cladocerans than in copepods as a result of selection for fast growth towards P-allocation from DNA to RNA under P limitation. Consistent with the PAH, the RNA: DNA ratio was , 8-fold higher in cladocerans than in copepods, although fast-growth cladocerans did not always exhibit higher RNA and lower DNA contents in comparison to slow-growth copepods. We also showed strong associations among growth rate, RNA, and total P content supporting the growth rate hypothesis, which predicts that fast-growing organisms have high P ...
About my research:. A project in the Daly Zooplankton Ecology Lab focuses on identifying changes to zooplankton ecology relative to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. I will be comparing historic pre-spill samples collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to post-spill samples collected by researchers here at USF. My research will establish a baseline of the natural spatial, seasonal, and interannual variation in zooplankton community structure prior to the DWH oil spill and subsequently compare it with post DWH zooplankton data. To process samples, our lab will be using a revolutionary piece of equipment in the zooplankton research field: Hydroptic Zooscan digital imaging system. The Zooscan overcomes traditionally time-consuming and difficult taxonomic techniques that have previously limited large-scale zooplankton analyses. I hypothesize that the DWH oil spill resulted in a significant shift in zooplankton abundance, distribution, and composition in the northeast ...
Station ALOHA is located in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre 60 miles off of Oahu. Subtropical gyres are known to have a high diversity of zooplankton because of the low nutrients available in this region. High-nutrient sub-polar gyres, contrast with sub-tropical regions, as their zooplankton diversity is low due to increased biomass and intense competition. However, recovery of the MOCNESS and ring nets at Station ALOHA have provided a wide variety of zooplankton for our student scientists on board. We have been working hard all day to obtain information on the abundance and types of zooplankton found, requiring many hours of sorting through the "cod ends" of the nets (baskets that collect the seawater and zooplankton). Once collected, scientists must filter out the zooplankton by size and identify the species using microscopes. Some of the desired zooplankton species like nauplii (baby copepods) are so tiny that they have to be sorted with tweezers under a microscope. This is a tedious and ...
Al-Mutairi, H. and Landry, M. R.: Active export of carbon and nitrogen at station ALOHA by diel migrant zooplankton, Deep-Sea Res. Pt. II, 48, 2083-2103, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0967-0645(00)00174-0, 2001. Andersen, V., Devey, C., Gubanova, A., Picheral, M., Melnikov, V., Tsarin, S., and Prieur, L.: Vertical distributions of zooplankton across the Almeria-Oran frontal zone (Mediterranean Sea), J. Plankton Res., 26, 275-293, https://doi.org/10.1093/plankt/fbh036, 2004. Antezana, T.: Vertical distribution and diel migration of Euphausia mucronata in the oxygen minimum layer of the Humboldt Current, Oceanogr. East. Pacific II, 2, 13-28, 2002. Antezana, T.: Species-specific patterns of diel migration into the Oxygen Minimum Zone by euphausiids in the Humboldt Current Ecosystem, Prog. Oceanogr., 83, 228-236, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2009.07.039, 2009. Antezana, T.: Euphausia mucronata: A keystone herbivore and prey of the Humboldt Current System, Deep-Sea Res. Pt. II, 57, 652-662, ...
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior Program // Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. Topics: Community Ecology, Trophic interactions, Non-consumptive predator effects, Animal Behavior, Phenotypic Plasticity. We seek applicants who are interested in studying community and aquatic ecology starting in Fall 2012. We currently have funding for students to join a research effort examining non-consumptive effects (also called trait-mediated effects) of predators on zooplankton communities in Michigan ponds. Potential projects include examining predator-induced effects on zooplankton phenotype (including behavior) and how these induced effects influence zooplankton population and community dynamics. While particular PhD projects are flexible within the scope of the overall project, the positions could include integration of field, laboratory and ecological modeling. One of the positions will be given to a student interested in their research including ecological theory /modeling. Collaborators ...
Our research interests are in zooplankton ecology and physiology, coastal and deep-sea food webs, nutrient cycling, and marine detritus or "marine snow." Much of our current focus is on how zooplankton community structure affects flux of organic material and cycling of nutrients in the sea.. Our laboratory is involved in a number of projects with this theme, including the. ...
The report describes results of studies conducted to obtain data to assess the effects of waste disposal on the marine environment of the New York Bight. The report concerns zooplankton studies including distribution, seasonal occurrence and vertical migration of zooplankton populations in the dumping grounds. (Author)(*MARINE BIOLOGY
We developed new perspectives to identify important questions and to propose approaches for future research on marine food web lipids. They were related to (i) structure and function of lipids, (ii) lipid changes during critical life phases, (iii) trophic marker lipids, and (iv) potential impact of climate change. The first addresses the role of lipids in membranes, storage lipids, and buoyancy with the following key question: How are the properties of membranes and deposits affected by the various types of lipids? The second deals with the importance of various types of lipids during reproduction, development, and resting phases and addresses the role of the different storage lipids during growth and dormancy. The third relates to trophic marker lipids, which are an important tool to follow lipid and energy transfer through the food web. The central question is how can fatty acids be used to identify and quantify food web relationships? With the fourth, hypotheses are presented on effects of ...
To evaluate the effects of different anthropogenic activities on zooplankton and the pelagic ecosystem, we conducted seasonal cruises in 2010 to assess spatial heterogeneity among the mesozooplankton communities of Xiangshan Bay, a subtropical semi-enclosed bay in China. The evaluation included five different areas: a kelp farm, an oyster farm, a fish farm, the thermal discharge area of a power plant, and an artificial reef, and we aimed to identify whether anthropogenic activities dominated spatial variation in the mesozooplankton communities. The results demonstrated clear spatial heterogeneity among the mesozooplankton communities of the studied areas, dominantly driven by natural hydrographic properties, except in the area near the thermal discharge outlet of the power station. In the outlet area, thermal shock caused by the discharge influenced the mesozooplankton community by decreasing abundance and biomass throughout the four seasons, even causing a shift in the dominant species near the ...
Ecological consequences of global warming include shifts of species ranges toward higher altitudes and latitudes as well as temporal shifts in phenology and life-cycle events. Evidence is accumulating that increasing temperature is also linked to reduced body size of ectotherms. While temperature can act directly on body size, it may also act indirectly by affecting the timing of life-cycle events and the resulting population age and size structure, especially in seasonal environments. Population structure may, in turn, be influenced by temperature-driven changes in resource availability. In a field mesocosm experiment, we investigated how water temperature and mixed surface layer depth (a temperature-dependent determinant of light availability to phytoplankton) affected population dynamics, population age and size structure, and individual size at stage (size at first reproduction) of Daphnia hyalina during and after a phytoplankton spring bloom. Mixed layer depth was inversely related to the ...
ePIC (electronic Publication Information Center) is the official repository for publications and presentations of Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI)
A concentrated blend of marine zooplankton designed to provide the essential fatty acids, proteins, vitamins, amino acids, & natural carotenoids needed for coral growth. Provides a more bioavailable source of pigmentation.
Current fauna, biomass and distribution on zooplankton in the upper water of the Yinluan Project are investigated and studied. A biodiversity Index analysis is performed. Based on the present study and referring to the historic investigated data and the information from the studies on allied domestic water bodies, an ecological and environmental status of the investigated area is assessed and evaluated. The research result suggests that the water quality of the area can be delimited to poor to mesotrophic type. But more attention should be paid as the eutrophication tendency caused by box aquaculture in Panjiakou and Daheiting Reservoirs.
Using common garden experiments and a comparative field study, we have shown that the strong effects of life-history differences among alewife populations on zooplankton communities have propagated across the food web to influence the phenotype and fitness of a competing species. We found that bluegill from different lake types differed in (i) growth rates when exposed to small- or large-bodied prey, (ii) prey size selectivity and (iii) gill raker morphology. Our results revealed clear divergence in foraging traits between bluegill from landlocked and no-alewife lakes, but only weak divergence in bluegill between anadromous and no-alewife lakes. Consistent predation by landlocked alewife shapes the zooplankton community [7] such that it produces strong selection for traits that increase foraging performance on small-bodied zooplankton [16]. Consequently, we found bluegill from replicated landlocked lakes to be better adapted to feeding on small-bodied prey; they were less selective for large ...
At the Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, planktonology research has a long tradition, dating since the very beginnings of the Institute activities. Working in the lab combines research in ecology and phytoplankton and zooplankton taxology, and researching primary production processes. Taxonomy research is mostly focused on microzooplankton, mezozooplankton and microphytoplankton, while in the ecological research most of the attention is on the research of phytoplankton and zooplankton community changes created under the influence of anthropogenic activities and climate changes. In this research of great help is long-term data (phytoplankton, zooplankton, primary production, chlorophyll / a /), which represent a special value of this laboratory and the Institute itself.. ...
Lakes are important global ecosystems and many of them are nutrient-poor (unproductive). Especially in northern boreal latitudes, lakes may be heavily subsidized by terrestrial organic material (t-OM) from peat layers in the catchment. Thus, in addition to heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton, zooplankton may also use the particulate fraction of peat layer t-OM (t-POM) as a potential food source in those systems. Inputs of t-OM in northern latitudes are anticipated to increase in the future due to increasing precipitation and temperature. As t-OM is a good substrate for bacterial growth and as bacteria can often outcompete phytoplankton for inorganic nutrients, the proportions of heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton are expected to change in unproductive lakes. This may have pronounced impacts on zooplankton population dynamics.. The aim of my thesis was to investigate how changes in food quality and quantity will affect metazoan zooplankton performance in unproductive lakes. Three ...
The benthic macroinvertebrates and the zooplankton of the shallow (,1.5 m deep) sandy middle regions of the Peel-Harvey Estuary and of the nearby Swan Estuary were sampled seasonally between the winters of 1986 and 1987. Measurements were also taken of the environmental variables in the benthos and in the water column.. In comparison with the Swan Estuary, the Peel-Harvey Estuary is highly nutrient enriched and is not as well flushed. As a consequence, the water in the basins of the Peel-Harvey experience large seasonal blooms of the blue-green alga Nodularia spumigena and massive growths of benthic and drifting green algae. The first led to marked seasonal declines in redox values, secchi depths and nocturnal dissolved oxygen and, together with the decomposition of the macroalgae, resulted in a marked increase in particulate organic matter in the sediments.. The following comparisons between the benthic invertebrate fauna in the Peel- Harvey with that of the Swan Estuary are consistent with the ...
Abstract. In a changing ocean there is a critical need to understand global biogeochemical cycling, particularly regarding carbon. We have made strides in understanding upper ocean dynamics, but the deep ocean interior (, 1000 m) is still largely unknown, despite representing the overwhelming majority of Earths biosphere. Here we present a method for estimating deep-pelagic zooplankton biomass on an ocean-basin scale. We have made several new discoveries about the Atlantic, which likely apply to the world ocean. First, multivariate analysis showed that depth and Chl were the basic factors affecting the wet biomass of the main plankton groups. Wet biomass of all major groups was significantly correlated with Chl. Second, zooplankton biomass in the upper bathypelagic domain is higher than expected. Third, the majority of this biomass comprises macroplanktonic shrimps, which have been historically underestimated. These findings, coupled with recent findings of increased global deep-pelagic fish ...
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Friday, January 18, 2013, 05:20 (GMT + 9) A new study provides unprecedented evidence of viral infections in copepods, or tiny marine crustaceans. Viruses could account for part of the up to 35 per cent of the zooplanktons mortalities, whose causes are currently unknown but suspected to be harmful algae, environmental stressors, parasites and diseases. Researchers used genomic techniques to support the hypothesis that viral infections are a major cause of copepod deaths.. The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science.. This is the first evidence of viruses in marine zooplankton, said Ian Hewson, Cornell University assistant professor of microbiology and senior author of the paper. Copepods are critical in oceanic food webs and ocean carbon cycling, which helps regulate the Earths climate. They also consume most of the oceans phytoplankton, which seize about half of the carbon dioxide pulled from the atmosphere and fixed in plant cells. As copepods defecate ...
Positive associations between temperature and recruitment success of cod, haddock and herring in the area studied are well documented, but the causal basis has remained elusive (Ottersen et al. 2004). Disentangling the roles of temperature and zooplankton has been particularly difficult because the temperature index used in most studies (TKOLA) has been considered as an indicator of both temperature and zooplankton availability in the study system (Ottersen & Sundby 1995; Ottersen & Loeng 2000), and because multi-annual zooplankton data have largely been lacking (but see Ellertsen et al. 1989). Several non-exclusive mechanisms have been suggested to explain the temperature-recruitment associations, including physiological effects of temperature on growth (Ottersen & Loeng 2000), increased on-shelf advection of copepods in warm years (Sundby 2000) and a better spatio-temporal match between the fish larvae and their zooplanktonic food during warm years (Ellertsen et al. 1989; Fossum 1996). Our ...
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87000 by 2015, among which over 4,800 samples have been analyzed at species level. Although no online access is available, those data are recorded following the international standard (Darwin Core) format. ​. Using those species level data, we have studied how ecosystem structures in the western North Pacific changed responding to climatic forcing, in particular, the North Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The scientific outcome includes phenological change and latitudinal shift of dominant copepods, Neocalanus species, which were driven by the decadal warm-cool cycle related to PDO. As mentioned above, one of the recent trends in the retrospective study is basin to global scale synthesis of long-term ecosystem changes. We have conducted collaborative studies with international counterparts, and participated in some international projects aiming for global comparison of long-term zooplankton variation. Those collaborative researches revealed, for example, the seesaw pattern in its decadal ...
University of British Columbia researchers have identified a small virus that attacks another virus more than 100 times its own size, rescuing the infected zooplankton from certain death. The discovery may provide clues to the evolutionary origin of some jumping genes found in other organisms. The study, by UBC marine microbiologist Dr. Curtis Suttle and Ph.D. student Matthias Fischer, was published online March 3, 2011, in Science Express. It describes the marine virus Mavirus and its interaction with marine zooplankton Cafeteria roenbergenesis and CroV, the worlds largest marine virus. "Its a microbial version of the David and Goliah story where, after infecting Cafeteria roenbergeneis, Mavirus protects it against infection by CroV, while ensuring its own survival," said Dr. Suttle. Viruses rely on host cells to replicate; in the case of Mavirus, its host is another virus, making it only the second known virophage. It needs CroV to replicate, and in the process suppresses the propagation of ...
Kelly Benoit-Bird is a marine biologist who uses sophisticated acoustic engineering techniques to explore the previously invisible behavior of ocean creatures at scales ranging from swarms distributed over many cubic kilometers to individual predators. The food web of ocean surface waters begins with microscopic creatures that serve as the source of food for tiny organisms (zooplankton) just large enough to generate an acoustic signature. Although zooplankton drift in response to ocean currents, Benoit-Bird has shown that they use their modest locomotive capacity to form swarms with distinct three-dimensional structures that change with feeding conditions. Using multi-frequency acoustic backscattering, she has been able to reconstruct the feeding patterns of swimming predators of zooplankton (known as nekton) as they first pass downward through a layer of zooplankton, then reverse course and pass through upward. Having precise data about the horizontal and vertical distribution of oceanic food ...
Biomass, proximate composition, organic carbon and calorie content of assorted zooplankton from the surface waters were studied. Day and night stations revealed significant difference in biomass (displacement volume, dry wt and organic carbon) whereas at coastal and oceanic stations irrespective of day and night the difference was significant only in dry wt values. Protein and organic carbon content peaked at 14-degrees-16-degrees-N. Average calorific content was 4.05 kcal.g-1 dry wt. High lipid content at 12-degrees-14-degrees-N correlated with maximum chl-a ...
The effects of increasing fishing pressure in combination with temperature increases in the Nordic and Barents Seas have been evaluated using an end-to-end model for the area forced by a downscaled RCP 4.5 climate scenario. The scenarios that have been applied have used four different fractions of fisheries mortality at maximum sustainable yield (Fmsy); 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.1 × Fmsy. As it is highly likely that more ecosystem components will be harvested in the future, the four scenarios have been repeated with fishing on a larger number of ecosystem components, including harvesting of lower trophic levels (mesozooplankton and mesopelagic fish). The zooplankton biomass had an increasing trend, regardless of the increase in fishing pressure on their predators. However, when introducing harvest on the lower trophic levels, this increase was no longer evident. When harvesting more components, the negative response in biomass of pelagic and demersal fish to increasing harvest became more prominent,
Zooplankton dormancy forms in two environments of the upper Paraná River floodplain (Brazil) Formas de dormência do zooplâncton em dois ambientes da planície de inundação do alto Rio Paraná (Brasil) Palazzo,
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The likelihood of an ecological system to undergo undesired regime shifts is expected to increase as climate change effects unfold. To understand how regional climate settings can affect resilience; i.e., the ability of an ecosystem to tolerate disturbances without changing its original structure and processes, we used a synchronized mesocosm experiment (representative of shallow lakes) along a latitudinal gradient. We manipulated nutrient concentrations and water levels in a synchronized mesocosm experiment in different climate zones across Europe involving Sweden, Estonia, Germany, the Czech Republic, Turkey and Greece. We assessed attributes of zooplankton communities that might contribute to resilience under different ecological configurations. We assessed four indicator of relative ecological resilience (cross-scale, within-scale structures, aggregation length and gap size) of zooplankton communities, inferred from discontinuity analysis. Similar resilience attributes were found across experimental
Some marine zooplankton are only temporary residents of the plankton, representing the larval stages of marine invertebrates such as corals, worms, snails, clams and crabs. After a period in the open water, these larvae must settle to the ocean floor where they will live out their adult lives. It is important that larvae are able to find the best place in which to settle, as this will affect their future success and survival.. Many marine larvae rely on a chemosensory organ in the head, known as the apical organ, to detect chemical cues from their environment that are indicative of favourable settlement sites. How environmental cues are interpreted by the apical organ to generate behavioural responses during settlement is not yet understood.. Studying Platynereis larvae, we have identified a neuropeptide, myoinhibitory peptide (MIP), as an apical organ signaling molecule that triggers larval settlement. In lab culture, 2 day Platynereis larvae actively swim in a water column. Exposure of the ...
SO 5/82 Period:- 1982-9-25 to 1982-10-27. Region: Australian North West Shelf. Ship :- Soela [details]. Description:- Soela cruise SO 5/82 was undertaken for a biological and hydrological sampling programme in the North West Shelf. Leg 1 cruise objectives were to collect biological information on demersal fish; to determine zooplankton abundances of alternate trawl sites and collect larval fish; to collect benthic samples with grab and epibenthic sled and to develop a method of otbaining healthy fish for tagging. Leg 2 cruise objectives were to collect hydrology and particulate samples; to collect larval fish and zooplankton samples and to collect biological information on squid, lethrinids, carangids and sharks ...
and search WWM with the term coral allelopathy, and read particularly re Euphylliids in this regard. Bob Fenner,. Colt Coral Feeding 11/7/07 Hi, ,Hi Jason, I recently acquired a Colt Coral from my LFS. Ive been looking all over the net for feeding info and am confused as to what and how often it should be fed. Im supplementing weekly with iodine. ,Strontium should be added also.,,,Mmmm. Not necessary IMO. RMF,, My LFS recommended that I feed medium sized zooplankton once a week. They recommended a bottled zooplankton product by Brightwell Aquatics that is not refrigerated. Is this the best way to go? Is phytoplankton a preferred food over zooplankton for this species? Any help would be appreciated. Love the site. ,Jason, since the Colt Coral (Cladiella sp.) is photosynthetic, no feeding is actually required as long as the light intensity is suitable. Some feel it is beneficial to do occasional feedings. My choice would be Marine Plankton With Cyclopeeze, made by Liquid Life. Is what I use on ...
1. Asuncion, I. Bioluminescence and the future of lighting. October 2012. Available from: ,http://business.inquirer.net/88268/bioluminescence-and-the-future-of-lighting, 2. Belkin, S., Genin, A., Lonescu, M., and Zarubin, M. Bacterial bioluminescence as a lure for marine zooplankton and fish. PNAS 2012 109 (3) 853-857. Available from : ,http://www.pnas.org/content/109/3/853.full.pdf+html, 3. Boyle, R. Bacterial Lamp Can Eat Your Sewage and Light Up Your House. November 2011. Available from: ,http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2011-11/fed-human-waste-luminous-bacteria-can-light-your-house, 4. Case. J., Haddock. S., Moline. M. January 2010. Bioluminescence in the Sea. Annual Review of Marine Science. Vol. 2: 443-493. Available from: , http://arjournals.annualreviews.org, 5. Charrier, T., Durand, M., Affi, M., Jouanneau, S., Gezekel, H., and Thouand, G.(2010). Bacterial Bioluminescent Biosensor Characterisation for On-line Monitoring of Heavy Metals Pollutions in Waste Water Treatment Plant ...
Eyespots cannot form images but enable the animal to sense the direction of light, because the pigment cell shades the photoreceptor from one side. In Platynereis, selective illumination of one eyespot changes the beating of adjacent cilia by direct cholinergic innervation, resulting in locally reduced water flow. Computer simulations of larval swimming show that these local effects are sufficient to direct the helical swimming trajectories of larvae towards the light. The computer model also shows that axial rotation of the larval body is essential for phototaxis and that helical swimming increases the precision of navigation. Our findings in Platynereis larvae provide a general mechanistic understanding of phototaxis in marine zooplankton larvae and its regulation by simple eyespots. It is possible that a similar direct coupling of light-sensing with ciliary locomotor control was a principal feature of the first animal eyes. ...
The module takes as an over-arching theme the concepts of ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services. It commences with 5 introductory lectures that illustrate the factors that underpin ecosystem functioning, as well as factors that can cause ecosystems to change. The key corner-stones that underpin ecosystem processes are detailed. A particular focus is made on exploring the role of biodiversity in maintaining ecosystem functions and services. Drivers of ecosystem change and resistance to change are considered, in the contexts of ecosystem resilience, system vulnerability and ecosystem regime-shifts. The role of biodiversity in maintaining resilience in marine systems is examined. Factors that determine secondary production of systems are considered, with particular focus on zooplankton, marine benthos and fish. The practical shapes of ecosystem functioning, services, resilience and vulnerability are then illustrated by a series of lectures that consider the biology, ecology and ...
The module takes as an over-arching theme the concepts of ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services. It commences with 5 introductory lectures that illustrate the factors that underpin ecosystem functioning, as well as factors that can cause ecosystems to change. The key corner-stones that underpin ecosystem processes are detailed. A particular focus is made on exploring the role of biodiversity in maintaining ecosystem functions and services. Drivers of ecosystem change and resistance to change are considered, in the contexts of ecosystem resilience, system vulnerability and ecosystem regime-shifts. The role of biodiversity in maintaining resilience in marine systems is examined. Factors that determine secondary production of systems are considered, with particular focus on zooplankton, marine benthos and fish. The practical shapes of ecosystem functioning, services, resilience and vulnerability are then illustrated by a series of lectures that consider the biology, ecology and ...
Adults are neritic usually in schools, entering lagoons and lower estuaries (Ref. 7399); rarely entering freshwater (Ref. 3573, 59043). Juveniles move to coastal lagoons and estuaries in winter and especially in spring (Ref. 59043). They feed on small benthic organisms, detritus, and occasionally on insects and plankton (Ref. 2804). Juveniles feed only on zooplankton (Ref. 59043). Reproduction takes place in the sea, from July to November. Oviparous, eggs are pelagic and non-adhesive (Ref. 205). Minimum size allowed for fishing is 20 cm. The quality of the flesh is variable (Ref. 30578). ...
The poor diversity of the zooplankton community and of copepods appears to be a characteristic feature of several small basins on the Egyptian Mediterranean coast, particularly those receiving land-based effluents (e.g. Abdel-Aziz & Dorgham 2002, Abdel-Aziz 2004). The number of. zooplankton species recorded Enzalutamide during the present study (42 taxa including larval stages) is slightly higher than that recorded (37 taxa) by Abou-Zeid (1990) and El-Serehy et al. (2001). This may be because their studies did not take into account the western lagoon connected with the lake, or the continuous dredging activities in the main lake and shipping lane, which renew the lakes water masses. In general, the low number of species recorded in the lake can be attributed to the continuous discharge of wastewater, which leads to increasing nutrient concentrations and hence the dominance of just a few. species. This was confirmed by Ludsin et al. (2001) and Prepas & Charette (2003), who concluded that the ...
Established in 2005, a real-time monitoring site was installed in Kentucky Lake on the Highland naviagation light. Data are returned every 15 minutes and are being used to compare Kentucky Lake processes, such as respiration, with lakes and reservoirs around the world. Several of these efforts are being carried out through the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON). The data also are helping us to understand how invasive species such as Daphnia lumholtzi or Asian carp, enter into and compete with natural communities. Present efforts are focusing on zooplankton patterns over the first 20 years of monitoring and how lanscoape and climate change may be affecting community structure. Data also are being used by local marinas and sportsmen ...
Occurs in lakes and flowing streams usually in deep holes with rock or gravel substrates (Ref. 5259). Inhabits cool, clear water of rivers, lakes and reservoirs. Prefers slow-flowing, deep rocky pools. Solitary, swimming near the bottom or in mid-water, but form small shoals during the spawning season (October to December) (Ref. 44894). Forms large shoals near shore. Fry feeds on zooplankton; adult on aquatic insects, crustaceans and mollusks. Male matures at 20 cm (2 y), female at 30 cm (3 y). Spawns upstream in spring or early summer; eggs hatch in 13-18 days; larvae of 7 cm TL (Ref. 5259). Moves into areas just upstream of shallow riffles over gravel or rocky bottoms to spawn. The female releases demersal eggs which sink into cracks in the substrate. Fish in reservoirs move into flowing feeder streams to spawn. Sexual maturity is reached after 2 years (20 centimeters) for males, 3 years (30 centimeters) for females (Ref. 44894). Tolerates temp. down to 9°C (Ref. 7276). Infected by nematodes ...
Adults usually in schools inhabit coastal waters (Ref. 3573); sometimes in lagoons and estuaries (Ref. 59043). Juveniles around 2.0 cm SL move to coastal lagoons and estuaries in summer and autumn (Ref. 59043). Adults are herbivorous feeding on algae and vegetal detritus while juveniles feed on zooplankton until about 3 cm SL, then on benthic organisms until 5 cm SL (Ref. 9987, 59043). Reproduce in summer (Ref. 2804). Oviparous, eggs are pelagic and non-adhesive (Ref. 205). Utilized for roe, but also fresh, smoked and frozen (Ref. 9987). ...
Usually lives in schools. Males reproduce for the first time at two years, females at three. Females larger than males. Spawns pelagic eggs in May-August, rarely until early October. Juveniles around 20 mm SL move to coastal lagoons and estuaries in summer and autumn. Juveniles feed on zooplankton until about 30 mm SL, then on benthic organisms until 50 mm SL; adults feed on algae, vegetal detritus and sediment ...