The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is a large (up to 17 m) whale, generally black in colour with occasional white belly patches and no dorsal fin. Right whales were once common in temperate waters of the Western Atlantic but were seriously depleted by whaling. An accurate population estimate for the species is yet to be calculated. The population of North Atlantic right whales in Atlantic Canadian waters was estimated in 2003 to number about 322 animals; however more recent estimates suggest the current population numbers about 350 animals. North Atlantic right whales are protected and listed under Schedule 1, Part 2 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA).
In a new study published this week in Endangered Species Research, North Atlantic right whale scientists found that whales who undergo prolonged entanglements in fishing gear endure sky-high hormone levels, indicating severe stress, which researchers discovered using a pioneering technique of examining scat from live, entangled, and dead whales over 15 years.
The tiny population of critically-endangered North Atlantic right whales may not have had any calves this year, scientists fear, in what would be an “unprecedented” calamity for the species.
A new study offers a glimpse into the state of mind of North Atlantic right whales while they are trapped and dying in fishing gear.
Whales are separated into the toothed whales, Odontocetes (which includes dolphins, porpoises, narwhals, beaked whales and sperm whales), and the whalebone, or baleen, whales, also called Mysticetes. The latter are mostly very large, which, instead of teeth, have baleen (whalebone) to filter small prey from the water; they are what people generally think of when the word whale is used. The whalebone whales include the rorquals - the blue whale, fin whale, sei whale, Brydes whale, minke whale, and humpback whale; the grey whale; and the various right whales. Although whales are famed for the massive size reached by some species, such as the blue whale (the largest animal to ever live), others are relatively small, like the pygmy right whale which grows to about 20 feet.[1] Though whales have many traits in common with fish (including fins and tails) they are classified as mammals under the Linnaean taxonomy classification system because they breathe air and lactate. Whales have a number of ...
Whales are separated into the toothed whales, Odontocetes (which includes dolphins, porpoises, narwhals, beaked whales and sperm whales), and the whalebone, or baleen, whales, also called Mysticetes. The latter are mostly very large, which, instead of teeth, have baleen (whalebone) to filter small prey from the water; they are what people generally think of when the word whale is used. The whalebone whales include the rorquals - the blue whale, fin whale, sei whale, Brydes whale, minke whale, and humpback whale; the Grey Whale; and the various right whales. Although whales are famed for the massive size reached by some species, such as the blue whale (the largest animal to ever live), others are relatively small, like the pygmy right whale which grows to about 20 feet[1]. Though whales have many traits in common with fish (including fins and tails) they are classified as mammals under the Linnaean taxonomy classification system because they breathe air and lactate. Whales have a number of ...
Florida takes a special interest in right whales because their only known calving ground is located off the coasts of Georgia and Florida.. In 1994, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) designated the coastal waters of Florida and Georgia as the right whale critical habitat in the Southeast U.S. This designation provides more protection for right whales while they are in the calving grounds. In an effort to protect this critical stage in the life of right whales, researchers, including the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI) of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR), and the New England Aquarium (NEA), fly Early Warning System (EWS) aerial surveys to locate animals during the calving season. The EWS surveys are organized to relay location information to mariners in an attempt to prevent vessel-whale collisions. Additionally, in July 1999, NMFS and the U.S. Coast Guard developed and implemented Mandatory Ship ...
Florida takes a special interest in right whales because their only known calving ground is located off the coasts of Georgia and Florida.. In 1994, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) designated the coastal waters of Florida and Georgia as the right whale critical habitat in the Southeast U.S. This designation provides more protection for right whales while they are in the calving grounds. In an effort to protect this critical stage in the life of right whales, researchers, including the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI) of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR), and the New England Aquarium (NEA), fly Early Warning System (EWS) aerial surveys to locate animals during the calving season. The EWS surveys are organized to relay location information to mariners in an attempt to prevent vessel-whale collisions. Additionally, in July 1999, NMFS and the U.S. Coast Guard developed and implemented Mandatory Ship ...
ABSTRACT: The location of mating grounds used by Endangered North Atlantic right whales Eubalaena glacialis has eluded discovery despite centuries of whaling and decades of marine mammal surveys. If this species gestation duration is similar to the closely related southern right whale E. australis, then conception for the North Atlantic right whale occurs in the boreal winter. Between 2002 and 2008, aerial surveys identified half the North Atlantic population in the central Gulf of Maine between November and January. Generalized linear models indicated that significantly higher proportions of both known fathers and conceptive females were present in this region compared to most other areas seasonally inhabited by right whales. Their presence in the central Gulf of Maine during the estimated conception period strongly suggests that this region is a mating ground for the species. Roseway Basin, on the southwestern Scotian Shelf, also had high proportions of reproductive whales and may be the site ...
This Cuviers beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) shows it head above the water displaying the characteristic two larger teeth as well as its truncated snout. .: Back :. ...
Not only did Foster give birth here, but so did her daughter. That made Foster one of a pair of new grandmothers among the 20 North Atlantic right whales that calved this winter.. More impressive than the Southeasts grandma whales may be the only right whale known to have given birth up north this year. Shes an old-timer named Wart, who had a grand-calf and also a great-grand-calf born this season. Right whales mature at about age 10 and give birth every three to five years.. And then theres a whale known only by her number, 1334. She gave birth to yet another approximately 12-foot, 2,000-pound bundle of joy this season. The new calf is her ninth recorded offspring, making her the most prolific right whale known.. The tally of births for the season, which is winding down in Georgia, is about average but comes as a relief after last years low count of only six babies born to the highly endangered species.. Right whale aerial surveys will continue through March 31 in south Georgia and through ...
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Gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) populations in the eastern North Pacific have increased at an annual rate of close to 3% since cessation of commercial exploitation and now number over 20,000 (Buckland et al. 1993, Reilly 1992), which is close to their historical population size.
ShareThis[31] Parks, S. E., D. R. Ketten, J. A. Trehey, J. T. O Malley, and J. J. Arruda, Anatomical predictions of hearing in the North Atlantic Right Whale, The Anatomical Record, vol. 290, issue 6: Wiley-Liss Inc., pp. 734-744, 05/2007. Get PDF: Full Text.pdf (format PDF / 553 KB) ...
There are two types of whale: baleen and toothed.. Baleen whales have long bristle-fringed plates, known as baleen, which are made of keratin (a protein also found in human hair and fingernails) and fixed to the roof of the mouth. These sieve the minute crustaceans, such as krill, that they feed on. Baleen whales have two blowholes. And unlike some other whales, they do not use echolocation (emitting sounds to locate solid objects).. Baleen whales include the largest animals ever known. Greatest of all is the blue whale; the heaviest ever recorded was a female of 190 tonnes. Baleen whales migrate through New Zealand waters on their way south to feed on krill, which are abundant in the Southern Ocean. Of the worlds 13 species of baleen whales, eight are known in New Zealand, but only two, the southern right whale and Brydes whale, breed in New Zealand waters.. ...
A 2.88 metres long female Pygmy Sperm Whale, Kogia breviceps, was washed up dead on Thurleston Beach in Devon. This is an extremely unusual stranding of a deep sea whale. Scientists from the Natural History Museum in London (Spokesman: Richard Sabin) have taken DNA samples in an attempt to discover from which population this whale came from. The cause of death was unknown. This species is much commoner in the southern hemisphere. The presence of a population west of the Bay of Biscay is possible. ...
Perrins beaked whale (Mesoplodon perrini) is the newest species of beaked whale to be described. The first two specimens were found in May 1975 stranded on the California coast, with two more specimens being found in 1978 and 1979, and the last in September 1997. They were initially identified as Hectors beaked whale (Mesoplodon hectori), except for the most recent one, which was assumed to be a neonate Cuviers beaked whale. Following inclusion of one of these specimens in a mtDNA sequence database of beaked whales, it turned out that they seemed well distinct from M. hectori (Dalebout et al. 1998). The other "Hectors" specimens from California were subsequently confirmed to belong to the same undescribed taxon (Dalebout 2002). The new species was formally described in 2002 by Dalebout et al.; its common and specific names are a tribute to cetologist William F. Perrin. Despite the superficial similarities to the (entirely allopatric) Hectors beaked whale, this species is closely related to ...
A collaborative Russia-U.S. research program on western gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) summering off northeastern Sakhalin Island, Russia, has been ongoing since 1995 and has produced important new information on the present day conservation status of this critically endangered population. This interim report reviews preliminary findings from 2007 research activities and combines such with data from previous years, in some cases ranging back to 1994. Photo-identification research conducted off Sakhalin Island in 2007 resulted in the identification of 83 whales, including nine calves and two previously unidentified non-calves. When combined with data from 1994-2006, a catalog of 169 photo-identified individuals has been compiled. Not all of these 169 whales can be assumed to be alive, however. The most current mark-recapture analyses conducted estimated the abundance for the population to be 98 (95% CI=89-110) in 2002 and 99 (95% CI = 90-109) in 2003. A recent population assessment using a Bayesian
American photographer Brian Skerry rates this meeting with a southern right whale in New Zealand waters as "the most incredible animal encounter" of his life. Skerry photographed the bus-sized whale - 14m long and 70 tonnes - investigating his dive assistant after the men had hitched a ride with a New Zealand research expedition to the Auckland Islands, aboard the Dunedin-based yacht Evohe. This photograph won the Underwater World category of this years Wildlife Photographer of the Year awards, the New Zealand Herald noted recently. The expedition leader, Dunedin marine biologist Dr Simon Childerhouse, said that expanding southern right whale numbers at the Auckland Islands were increasing the likelihood of Dunedin and Otago people having their own close encounters. Mating activity involving four of the whales off Taieri Mouth had been photographed by the Otago Daily Times in June last year, and the whales could be seen in the Otago Harbour. Southern right whales, New Zealand sea lions and fur ...
the classification of the pygmy sperm whale. The American Naturalist of 1871 had an article describing the current state of classification of kogia breviceps, including the controversy over the name kogia not being suitable for the classical Latin naming system developed by Linnaeus. It was called barbarous and undefined and others favored the more Latin sounding name euphysetes (meaning good or easy blower), yet the name kogia has remained. It was humorously suggested in this article that the name euphysetes may be applied to those so concerned about the name ...
There are also some other smaller and rarer species such as the Southern Bottlenose whale (up to 9.75m long), Arnouxs beaked whale (to 7.5m) and the southern hourglass dolphin, the smallest Cetacean in Antarctic waters at 1.5-2m long. Whale statistics - these are very variable. If you do any research on whales on the internet, or in books, you will find that there are wide differences in the recorded length and mass of the various species. Lengths are generally more reliable than weights as it easier to measure the length of a whale, from whalers records or from photographs against objects of known size. The weight on the other hand is very difficult to measure and is often based on some rough measurements and estimates from those measurements of whales caught by whalers.. Unlike other animals it is not possible to guide a whale onto a weigh bridge or to suspend it from a crane to measure the weight (or even take it to the whale-weigh station, arf!). The only time whales have been available in ...
Protecting right whale mothers and their young is critical to the recovery of the population," said Barb Zoodsma, NOAA Fisheries Service right whale biologist. "The loss of any right whale is of concern, and we ask for everyone to adhere to measures that protect this critically endangered species.". Each year, pregnant females migrate southward more than 1,000 miles from feeding areas off Canada and New England to the warm, calm, coastal waters off South Carolina, Georgia and northeastern Florida to give birth and nurse their young. These waters are the only known calving area for the species.. Collisions with ships and entanglement in fixed fishing gear are the two greatest threats to the recovery of North Atlantic right whales, which is why it is important that all mariners and fishers are aware of the regulations. ...
NEWS FLASH: Rare Right Whale Sighted in Monterey Bay. Although this report is usually about the North Atlantic population of northern right whales, there is another group of these animals out there -- a Pacific population. The Pacific population is believed to be even smaller than the Atlantic population and quite probably on the road to extinction.. These whales are seldom seen -- but what follows is a press release from the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (released on March 2nd) about an unusual sighting there.. Rare Right Whale Sighted in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary dateline March 2. An extremely rare northern right whale, a species nearly extinct, was spotted off the Big Sur Coast last week, fleeing a pair of apparently aggressive gray whales in an unusual interaction observed by Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary officials.. Monterey Bay Sanctuary Superintendent Bill Douros and NOAA Corps pilot Lt.. Commander Matt Pickett, were aboard the Sanctuary airplane SEA WOLF, ...
Alfred the fossil whale skull: Photo credit: Ben Healley.. Monash University scientists have played a key role in discovering the origin of filter feeding in baleen whales - the largest animal known to have ever existed.. The discovery is detailed in a paper co-written with international researchers and palaeontologists from Museum Victoria. Alfred the 25- million-year-old fossilised whale skull was unveiled at the Museum today.. "Alfred shows how ancient baleen whales made the evolutionary switch from biting prey with teeth to filtering using baleen," said Monash Science Senior Research Fellow, Dr Alistair Evans, one of the authors of the paper.. "They first became suction feeders. Feeding in this way resulted in reduced need for teeth, so over time their teeth were lost before baleen appeared.". There has been a lot of mystery around how and when baleen first formed.. "But we now have long-sought evidence of how whales evolved from having teeth to hair-like baleen - triggering the rise of ...
A new study of more than 100 North Atlantic right whales over 15 years shows the analysis of a hormone product in the animals waste can provide information on their stress levels and health.. (From Boston Globe/ By Ben Thompson) - "These levels show stress from extreme physical trauma," lead study author Rosalind Rolland, a senior scientist at the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life at the New England Aquarium, said in a statement.. "Its an animal welfare issue," she said. "For the first time, we can get hormone levels on not just dead but living whales.". The study, published this week in Endangered Species Research, covers the "pioneering technique" developed by Rolland used to examine feces taken from 125 right whales from 1999 to 2014. That group included a mix of 113 healthy whales, six that were "chronically entangled" in fishing gear, one that stranded for several days, and five that were quickly killed by vessel strikes, the aquarium said.. ...
Its always difficult to write the weekend whale watch report because theres just so much to say! Both Friday and Saturdays Breakfast with the Whales cruises were dominated by calves. On Friday, we watched as Baby tail lobbed, pec slapped and breached. Then we got to see Mom breach, followed by baby making another attempt. On Saturday, we spend most of our time with a very active and curious little calf. We saw 21 whales both days. On the 10:00 Whale Watch on Friday we saw 10 Whales of which 2 groups were competitive pods, and we even saw a few dolphins. On Saturday, guests aboard our 10:00 Whale Watch saw 15 whales in pods of twos and threes. The most exciting part of that trip was getting to witness MULTIPLE BREACHES! We saw 10 full-on breaches from the same pod of 3 whales. Our 3:00 Whales and Cocktails on both Friday and Saturday were a little quieter than the early trips. On Friday, we saw 6 whales and watched a competitive pod of 4 whales for most of the trip. On Saturday, we didnt see ...
Youll visit Stellwagen Bank, the East Coasts most famous whale watching destination. Stellwagens heavy concentration of humpback, finback, and minke whales guarantees an adventure filled with opportunities to view and learn about whales as they frolic in their natural habitat.. Each Boston Whale Watching Cruise is narrated and guided by a naturalist from the noted Whale Center of New England (WCNE). The WCNE has been studying the whales of New England for more than 20 years and its members are recognized worldwide as authorities on whales.. One of the whales youre likely to spot during a Boston Whale Watching Cruise is the humpback. These Northern hemisphere humpbacks reach an average length of 50 feet, and a weight of about 37 tons! Sadly, theyre also among the most endangered, and its estimated that only 8 percent of their original population remains. With the data collected on each cruise, WCNE is able to further the understanding of whales and their world. And, their presence on board ...
The southern right whale dolphin is a an underwater mammal that can be found in the cool waters of the southern hemisphere. This animal was first published in
With a body length of 10 m and an estimated mass of 9800 kg (Lockyer, 1981), the whale tagged with tag IV probably contained some 2001 of air after inhalation while at the surface (inferred from Clarke, 1978). If the lungs of a sperm whale collapse (Ridgway, 1971) as they do in smaller odontocetes (Ridgway et al., 1969), the whale would have had, at most, 3.51 of air available to it for sound production at a depth of 600 m. Thus, sperm whales recycle the air after each click or group of clicks (as demonstrated in Tursiops sp.; Dormer, 1979) and/or use very small volumes of air to generate each click. Considering the highly reduced air volume available for sound production when the whale is at a depth of 700 m and that sperm whales have been reported to phonate at depths of more than 2000 m (Whitney, 1968), it is conceivable that air simply is not involved in sperm whale sound production. That view, however, is not supported by experimental data on sound production in the homologous structures of ...
North Pacific right whale, showing closed blowholes, callosities and abnormal barnacles probably aquired from association with humpbacks - View amazing North Pacific right whale photos - Eubalaena japonica - on Arkive
Ecologists have at last got a view of sperm whales behaviour during t...Working in the Atlantic the Gulf of Mexico and the Ligurian Sea scie...The researchers used the tags to record the sounds that sperm whales p...Dr Stephanie Watwood and colleagues found that sperm whales produced b...The sperm whale is the worlds largest deep-diving toothed whale feed...,Ecologists,home,in,on,how,sperm,whales,find,their,prey,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
A major conservation concern for beaked whales (family Ziphiidae) is they appear to be vulnerable to modern sonar operations, which arises from recent strandings that temporally and physically coincide with naval sonar exercises.[20] Post mortem examinations of the stranded whales in concurrence with naval exercises have reported the presence of hemorrhaging near the ears or gas and fat emboli, which could have a deleterious impact on beaked whales that is analogous to decompression sickness in humans.[11] Gas and fat emboli have been shown to cause nervous and cardiovascular system dysfunction, respiratory distress, pain, and disorientation in both humans and animals.[20] In the inner ear, gas embolism can cause hemorrhages, leading to disorientation or vestibular dysfunction. Breath-holding divers, like beaked whales, can develop decompression-related problems (the "bends") when they return to the surface after deep dives.[1] This is a possible hypothesis for the mass strandings of pelagic ...
...AUCKLAND New Zealand The first paternity study of southern right wha...Results of the study by researchers at the University of Auckland Or...The study found that most of the right whales born near the remote sub... This finding gives us information on the breeding behavior of right w...,First,paternity,study,of,southern,right,whales,finds,local,fathers,most,successful,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
Identified as Mystacodon selenensis, the fossil whale is described as a small to medium-sized creature that had teeth, but in other ways resembled modern humpbacks and blue whales, they explained - hence its name, which Science News said translates to "toothed mysticete.". The remains were discovered in the deserts of Peru by a team led by Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences paleontologist Olivier Lambert. It was approximately four meters long, or about as big as a modern-day pilot whale, and like primitive whales, still had a protruding hip bone indicating that it still had hind legs left over from when its ancestors were terrestrial quadrupeds.. However, the creature also had a flat snout similar to those of modern-day baleen whales, and while ancient whales had elbow-like joints in its front flippers, M. selenensis does not - nor do modern-day baleen whales, according to the authors of the new Current Biology paper.. Lamberts team believes that M. selenensis might have used ...
Mono- and Stereopictres of 5.0 Angstrom coordination sphere of Iron atom in PDB 2zsq: Carbonmonoxy Sperm Whale Myoglobin At 140 K: Laser on [150 Min]
Mono- and Stereopictres of 5.0 Angstrom coordination sphere of Iron atom in PDB 2zt2: Carbonmonoxy Sperm Whale Myoglobin At 120 K: Laser on [600 Min]
Strange things continue to happen in our wildlife world. On Jan. 12, a North Atlantic right whale mother and calf were found living in Cape Cod Bay.
Durbin E, Teegarden G, Campbell R, Cembella A, Baumgartner MF, Mate B. North Atlantic right whales, Eubalaena glacialis, exposed to paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins via a zooplankton vector, Calanus finmarchicus. Harmful Algae. 2002 ;1:243-251. ...
NARRATOR:. It is late spring on Kodiak Island, Alaska. The air and the water are growing warmer and the locals have returned to feed. But even against this monumental landscape, all eyes are on the horizon for one of natures most graceful giants: the gray whale. It is here that they begin and end the longest migration of any mammal - 12,000 miles from the icy waters of the Arctic to the warm lagoons of Baja, Mexico, and back again.. Gray whales have a narrow, tapered head, and a streamlined body. They surface only for a quick spout and breath before disappearing back into the ocean. Instead of teeth, gray whales have baleen, which is like a thick comb made up of long, fine hairs. Diving to the muddy bottom, grey whales scoop up sediment from the ocean floor, filtering out water and mud and trapping plankton and krill.. In the 1700 and 1800s, whalers in search of oil, meat, and baleen hunted gray whales to near extinction. In 1946 an international treaty was signed to provide oversight and ...
Drones seem to be everywhere these days, from backyards to battlegrounds. Scientists are using them too: in this case, to assess the health of endangered North Atlantic right whales. Since drones are small and quiet, they can fly close to whales without disturbing them, bringing back incredibly detailed photographs and samples of microbe-rich blow.
J. Michael Williamson Principal Investigator-WhaleNet ,http://whale.wheelock.edu, Associate Professor-Science Wheelock College, 200 The Riverway, Boston, MA 02215 voice: 617.734.5200, ext. 256 fax: 617.734.8666, or 617.566.7369 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ---------- Forwarded message ---------- Date: Mon, 24 Feb 97 12:25:00 GMT From: [email protected] To: [email protected], [email protected] Subject: BRF--NZealand-Beached Whales BRF--NZealand-Beached Whales WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- Five sperm whales beached on the central New Zealand coast today, too far ashore to be refloated after high tide receded. Three whales died outright, and conservation workers shot the other two. The whales, ranging up to 50 feet in length and 70 tons, were found at Taupata Creek on the northern end of New Zealands South Island. The Department of Conservation in nearby Takaka, 110 miles west of Wellington, the capital, said it was "very unusual" for sperm whales ...
The southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) were intensely exploited in the Southern Hemisphere between the 18th and 20th centuries. Although the species has been protected internationally from commercial whaling since 1935, some populations were further depleted by illegal catches until the early 1970s. Current estimates suggest that there are approximately 7,000 southern right whales, which is thought to represent a small fraction (about 5%) of its population size prior to commerical whaling. Although some populations have shown signs of recovery, the species is still vulnerable and cited under "Appendix I" of the International Trade of Endangered Species Fauna and Flora (CITES) and on the IUCN red list of endangered species at risk of extinction (IUCN 2000). Current genetic analyses, involving the use of mithocondrial and nuclear markers (e.g. microsatellites), has focused on the existent levels of genetic variability and extent of gene flow with other wintering grounds (e.g. Peninsula ...
To understand the relationship between sonar and whales, dolphins, or porpoises, one has to know that these marine animals have quite a good vision (depending on the species youre looking at). However, beneath the surface of water, their vision does become slightly impaired due to light rays being refracted by the waves on the surface. This is where sonar comes into play…a whale in this case, emits its own sound waves -sonar- at a certain frequency. the sound waves are then reflected off an object and return to a receptive organ in the whale, thus, the whale is able to visualise prey, and its surrounding environment from a further distance.. How does the sonar affect the whales? Well, basically the sound waves emitted by the ships are at a higher frequency than the sound waves emitted by the whales. These sonar waves produced from the ships interfere with the sonar waves of the whales, and hence, the whales are unable to detect their surroundings before its too late. For example, in March ...
The initial sighting of the gray whale is exhilarating. The blow-a puff of steam standing up to 12 feet off the water-will appear; where there is one blow, others are sure to follow as whales tend to travel in groups of two to six. An amazing maneuver the whales perform is spyhopping. A whale may stick its head above water one or more times consecutively-it is believed that the whale is either getting bearings or using gravity to help swallow. The most dramatic and exciting behavior observed is breaching. The whale will leap out of the water and fall to its side or back making a spectacular splash. This behavior can be perceived as a form of communication to other whales in the area or means of back scratching to release the numerous parasites from the whales hides ...
MELBOURNE, FLA. - Scientists have found that a genetic mutation in the eyes of right whales that hampers their ability to see in bright light may make them more susceptible to fatal entanglements in fishing gear, one of the major causes of death for this critically endangered mammal.. The study of this whale species, which numbers less than 500 individuals remaining in the Western Atlantic Ocean, may also help scientists better understand how vision works in other mammals, including people.. Florida Institute of Technology doctoral student Lorian Schweikert and her adviser, Michael Grace, professor of neuroscience and senior associate dean of science, worked with Jeffry Fasick, an assistant professor of biology at the University of Tampa, to characterize this newly discovered mutation in Northern right whales and Bowhead whales. Their results suggest that this mutation may seriously harm the whales ability to visually avoid entanglement.. According to their new study, "Evolutionary Loss of Cone ...
After studying the dead whale in Monterey Bay for over a year and half, Vrijenhoek and Goffredi have come to the conclusion that the two new worm species are but the tip of the iceberg (or perhaps the tip of the whale s tail). Whale carcasses-or whale falls, as they are called-represent a massive input of food into the generally food-limited environment of the deep sea. One whale fall can provide as much organic material as thousands of years of marine snow, the organic debris that drifts down from surface waters to sustain life in the deep. Whale-fall specialist Craig Smith of the University of Hawaii has identified entire ecosystems with hundreds of different animals that have developed around a single whale fall. Some of these communities may be sustained for decades on the oil-saturated whale bones. The MBARI scientists will describe the unusual animal community at the Monterey Canyon whale fall in a paper to be published in the October 2004 issue of Deep Sea Research ...
I have been thinking of whales this week and remembering when I first saw a big one very close-up, so at the start of my podcast you can hear the sound, recorded underwater in the Atlantic Ocean of a humpback whale communicating with other whales.. The stranding of hundreds of whales on the New Zealand coastline was harrowing in the television pictures which showed the helplessness of these magnificent creatures when out of their environment, stranded ashore and the enormous efforts of human beings to refloat them. Some of those efforts were successful, but unfortunately, many whales died…... The moment when I first saw a whale close-up is one of the memories etched on my mind. I was on the bow of Irelands first entry in the Round the World Yacht race in the Atlantic in May of 1990 when it happened. Suddenly, a huge whale was alongside us, so close I felt I could touch it. NCB Ireland was 85 feet long and the whale seemed, to my eyes, to be just as big and very close to the boat. I was awed ...
Release Date: May 6, 2013. Robert Meredith, an assistant professor in Montclair State Universitys Department of Biology and Molecular Biology wants to know "what makes a whale a whale.". He is one of the authors of "Rod Monochromacy and the Coevolution of Cetacean Retinal Opsins," published in the April 18, 2013 issue of PLOS Genetics. (http://www.plosgenetics.org/doi/pgen.1003432) The articles findings, based on studies conducted when Meredith was a post-doctoral researcher in biology at University of California, Riverside (UCR), focus on the molecular evolution of whale visual pigments.. While whales and other cetaceans evolved from land-dwelling mammals, which had evolved from aquatic ancestors, they ultimately adopted a fully aquatic lifestyle between 40 and 49 million years ago. "This re-invasion of an aquatic habitat resulted in multiple morphological and molecular changes," says Meredith. The eyes of deep-diving whales such as the giant sperm whale and Sowerbys beaked whale show ...
The U.S. Coast Guard towed the carcass of the 15-foot male to shore. There were no external injuries on the animal, and no other whales were spotted in the area.. Wrinkles on the whales skin identified it as a newborn, said Barb Zoodsma, who coordinates the right whale recovery program in the Southeast for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.. "Fetal folds were still visible on the animal," she said.. Whales, like humans, grow in a fetal position in their mothers uterus before birth.. "They get wrinkled," Zoodsma said. "When they pop out, they still have the wrinkles. Were not sure how long they persist - maybe a few days.". Ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear are common causes of whale deaths. But natural causes might be at play in this case.. "We dont know if this is natural mortality," Zoodsma said. "We have to wait and see what the animal tells us.". The whale was transported to the University of Florida Veterinary School in Gainesville for a necropsy, the term ...
The torpedo-shaped underwater robots, called gliders, can read calls from four types of endangered whales and relay their locations in real time. And they can do it in weather too harsh for the plane and boat surveys now relied on to find the whales.. On a three-week trip between November and early December, the gliders developed by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution located nine right whales.. The robots also led the Endeavor into an area where researchers were able to observe the whales firsthand, once the waters calmed.. "The system worked, quite frankly, beyond my expectations," said WHOI scientist Mark Baumgartner, a project co-leader.. The gliders are primarily about protecting whales, since knowing where the often-hard-to-find whales are can help regulators devise rules that prevent often fatal human contract, such as ship strikes.. The robots are about 6 feet long with short wings. They arent new, but their ability to almost instantly recognize the whales is.. In 2005, they were ...
Endangered sperm whales living in the Gulf of Mexico have not been affected by powerful acoustic devices used by oil companies looking for new sources of hydrocarbons, according to a federally funded study released Thursday.. The $9.3 million study examined the impact of offshore seismic activity for six years. Seismic work involves firing air guns into the water, on the Gulfs sperm whale population, estimated to be around 1,600.. The project included researchers from eight universities, but it was managed overall by Texas A&Ms Department of Oceanography, with research scientist Ann Jochens and professor Doug Biggs serving as principal investigators.. "The bottom line is that air gun noise from seismic surveys that are thousands of yards distant does not drive away sperm whales living in the Gulf," Biggs explains.. Most of the whales live in the northern Gulf, often in areas heavy with exploration and production operations.. "The two are not mutually exclusive," said Randall Luthi, director of ...
A male sperm whale feeding near the surface. Sperm whales are a toothed whale , rather than a baleen whale , and are found throughout the worlds...
The cheek teeth [of Aetiocetus] are leaf shaped, similar to those of Patriocetus, but smaller and with the roots coalesced. The triangular rostrum, reduced dentition, and the conformation of the posterior ends of the maxillae, premaxillae, and nasals (Ernlong, 1966:s) are characters that would be expected in the ancestor of the mysticetes. Thenius (1969:489) stated: "Even if Aetiocetus, because of its geologic age (upper Oligocene) cannot be a direct stem form of the cetotheres, yet this genus documents that a specific family (Aetiocetidae) must be classified as ancestor, the link between ancient and baleen whales.. "Among the few Cetacea known from deposits of middle Oligocene age are two occurrences of unmistakable Mysticeti. One of these, Mauicetus Benham, 1939, from New Zealafid, has long nasals embraced by premaxillae and maxillae which extend posteriorly to the level of the supraorbital process of the frontal, together with an anteriorly thrusting triangular supraoccipital. The Oligocene ...
According to this article from The Royal Society (published November 2010) whales are very prone to the harmful rays of the sun. The scientists discovered whales that spend more time at the surface of the sea had more skin cells exposed and therefore were showing more damage from the ultraviolet radiation.. It was even pointed out that lighter species of blue whales are more sensitive to the sun than darker fin whales or sperm whales.. The authors noted, "We conclude that the thinning ozone layer may pose a risk to the health of whales and other vulnerable wildlife.". ...
Ships travelling in the western Gulf of St. Lawrence no longer have to follow a temporary mandatory slowdown.. Transport Canada put a speed restriction in place last summer after the deaths of 12 North Atlantic Right Whales in the Gulf - many of which died from ship strikes.. No sightings of Right Whales have been recorded in recent weeks according to Transport Minister Marc Garneau.. Garneau says his department didnt hesitate to issue fines during the speed restriction and continues to investigate all reported cases of non-compliance.. He adds the federal government is continuing to work with partners including scientific experts along with industry and environmental groups to ensure these marine mammals are protected.. (Map courtesy DFO). ...
As measures to reduce ship strikes on the North Atlantic Right Whale off the East coast of the U.S. move into their final developmental stages, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California has issued an Order to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) directing it to propose a rule to protect the Pacific Right Whale in the Pacific Ocean. In this latest development from...... More. ...
Bradford, A.L., Weller, D.W., Punt, A.E., Ivashchenko, Y.V., Burdin, A.M., VanBlaricom, G.R. and R. L. Brownell, Jr. 2012. Leaner leviathans: body condition variation in a critically endangered whale population. Journal of Mammalogy. 93(1):251-266. PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS AND BOOK CHAPTERS. Bradford, A.L., Weller, D.W., Wade, P.R., Burdin, A.M., Brownell, R.L., Jr. In Press. Population abundance and growth rate of western gray whales Eschrichtius robustus. Endangered Species Research.. Bradford, A.L., Weller, D.W., Ivashchenko, Y.V., Burdin, A.M. and Brownell, R.L., Jr. In Press. Anthropogenic scarring of western gray whales (Eschrictius robustus). Marine Mammal Science.. Lowther, J.L., Archer, F.I. and Weller, D.W. Submitted. Genetic variation of coastal and offshore bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Marine Mammal Science.. Weller, D.W. Submitted. Predation on Marine Mammals. In: W.F. Perrin, B. Würsig, and H. Thewissen (Eds.). Encyclopedia of ...
Kitamura, S., Matsuishi, T., Yamada, T. K., Tajima, Y., Ishikawa, H., Tanabe, S., Nakagawa, H., Uni, Y. and Abe, S. (2013), Two genetically distinct stocks in Bairds beaked whale (Cetacea: Ziphiidae). Marine Mammal Science, 29: 755-766. doi: 10.1111/j.1748-7692.2012.00607.x ...
Sofi anything is possible. I was just giving my theory on what I believe may have caused the deaths. I did however think they were all gray whales, dont know why I interpreted that way. But, anyway my theory has not changed. I still believe that their deaths were due to starvation due to higher gray whale numbers needing more food and consuming more of all of the other whale species food and the imbalance of their environment. And the gray whale population IS higher now than it was back before they were even hunted. They are still protected yes, but only so they dont get back on the edge of extinction because of hunters. Anyhow like I said, I was only giving my theory ...
Although the whales see their ocean world in black-and-white, it makes sense that they can differentiate orange from other colors since the clouds of zooplankton upon which they feed are orange in color, said Michael Moore, director of the marine mammal center at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. The research was long overdue, Moore said, because fishing gear entanglements are common. More than 80 percent of right whales show evidence of having been entangled in some type of fishing gear and the whales acquire a new entanglement scar once every three years on average, he said. "The problem of entanglement of large whales, right whales, in fixed fishing gear is huge. It doesnt seem that way to an individual fisherman. From the whales perspective its a daily occurrence," he said ...
In 1839, in the first scientific treatise on the sperm whale, Thomas Beale, a surgeon aboard a whaler, wrote that it was "one of the most noiseless of marine animals." While they do not sing elaborate songs, like humpbacks or belugas, in fact they are not silent. Whalers in the 1800s spoke of hearing loud knocking, almost like hammering on a ships hull, whenever sperm whales were present. They called the animals "the carpenter fish." Only in 1957 did two scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution confirm the sailors observations. Aboard a research vessel, the Atlantis, they approached five sperm whales, shut off the ships motors and listened with an underwater receiver. At first, they assumed the "muffled, smashing noise" they heard came from somewhere on the ship. Then they determined the sounds were coming from the whales. ...
We started our Wednesday off on a nice, calm ocean, but the whales were anything but calm! On our Breakfast with the Whales Cruise, we saw 2 different Mom/Baby/Escort pods. We stayed with each of them for quite awhile…and the calf from the second pod delighted us when she breached 3 times right next to the boat! We also saw pec slaps and tail lobs from different adults, and when we dropped the hydrophone, we heard some very clear songs. For a grand finale on this cruise, another pod of whales swam right under the boat. Captain Scotty turned off the motors, and was able to see the whales on our depth sounder…and to top it off, the whales then decided it would be a good idea to pop up 5 feet from the boat…we couldnt believe our luck (or their curiosity). As the wind came up through the day, we saw lots more surface activities. On our Whales and Cocktails Cruise, we saw multiple breaches, pec slaps and tail lobs. We also saw several peduncle throws and some other splashes (not sure which ...
Mesnick, S.L., Evans, K. Taylor, B.L., Hyde, J., Escorza-Trevino, S and Dizon, A.E. 2003. Sperm Whale Social Structure: Why it Takes a Village to Raise a Child. Pages 170-174, In, Animal Social Complexity: Intelligence, Culture and Individualized Societies (F.B.M. de Waal and P.L. Tyack, eds.). Harvard University Press.. Mesnick, S.L. 2001. Genetic Relatedness in Sperm Whales: Evidence and Cultural Implications. Behavior and Brain Science 24(2):346-347.. Mesnick, S. L., Taylor, B.L., Le Duc, R.G., Escorza Trevino, S., OCorry-Crowe, G.M. and Dizon, A.E. 1999. Culture and Genetic Evolution in Whales. Science, 284: 2055a. Mitchell, E. A., Mesnick, S.L. and Allen, A.C. 2002. Sperm Whale Depredation in the Demersal Longline Fishery for Sablefish, Anaplopoma fimbria, in the Gulf of Alaska: Research Needs and Approaches to Mitigation. Working Paper for the Workshop on Cetacean Interactions with Commercial Longline Fisheries in the South Pacific Region: Approaches to Mitigation, Apia, Samoa, November ...
Mesoplodon bidens species guide - found in much of the North Atlantic, can be quite active at the surface. First beaked whale to be identified and named in 1800 from stranded individual in the Moray Firth, Scotland.
FORT LAUDERDALE -- An aging adult female pygmy sperm whale found beached two weeks ago has died at Ocean World, a spokesman said. The whale, named Ariel after a character in the movie The Little Mermaid, died of heart disease and other illnesses at 2:30 p.m. on Monday. A necropsy and other tests will be conducted on the whale, which was 9 feet 9 inches long and weighed more than 900 pounds. Results will be shared with the Marine Mammal Stranding Network. The whale was discovered by beachgoers just south of the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier on March 29. Ocean World, which is part of the stranding network, was called in to help by the Florida Marine Patrol.
Researchers spotted Bayla for the first time on Jan. 2, 2009, swimming alongside her mother and a pod of bottlenose dolphins off the coast of Georgia.. Like all right whale encounters, the sighting of Picasso with her days-old calf was a matter of luck. In an era when wild animals are routinely monitored, their every movement documented for years running, whales are the exception. Whales cant be banded like birds, or collared like a wolf, and implanted tags can fail after a short time. The legions of scientists who study them often can only guess their location in the depths.. Researchers catalog sightings in a database painstakingly maintained by the New England Aquarium since 1980. The database distinguishes the whales often by cream-colored skin patches that grow in the same spots where human hair sprouts - on heads, above eyes, chins, and jawlines.. Picasso had been named for the modernistic cross-hatch of splotches on her head, the result not of the naturally occurring callosities but of ...
The largest populations of the species are currently distributed in the South Atlantic Ocean. Although a number of provisional stocks have been described for the species based on historically whaling records and geographic distribution of the wintering grounds, the rates of migratory interchange or degree of isolation among these populations are still poorly known ...
Alter, S. E.; Rynes, E; and Palumbi S. P. 2007. DNA evidence for historic population size and past ecosystem impacts of gray whales. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104(38) 15162-15167 View PDF. Palumbi S R, Roman J. 2004. Counting Whales in the North Atlantic - Response. Science 303: 4 View PDF. Roman, J. and Palumbi, S. R. 2003. Whales before whaling in the North Atlantic. Science 301:508-510. View PDF. Simmonds, M.P., Haraguchi, K., Endo, T., Cipriano, F., Palumbi, S.R., Troisi, G.M. 2002. Human health significance of organochlorine and mercury contaminants in Japanese whale meat. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health 65(17):1211-1235 View PDF. Baker, C.S., et al. 2000. Predicted decline of protected whales based on molecular genetic monitoring of Japanese and Korean markets. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B - Biological Sciences. 267(1449):1191-1199. View PDF. Cipriano, F. and S.R. Palumbi. 1999. Genetic tracking of a protected whale. Nature. ...
Fossils are present in high numbers and often show excellent quality of preservation. The most conspicuous fossils are the skeletons and bones of whales and sea cows, and over several hundred fossils of these have been documented. The fossils of whales vary from single bones to entire skeletons, and a number of partial skeletons are currently on display in the public part of the park. The two common whales are the large Basilosaurus, and the smaller (3 to 5 metre) Dorudon. At least two other species are known from rarer remains. The whales possess small hind limbs, that are not seen in modern whales, and a powerful skull with teeth similar to those of carnivorous land mammals. Other mammals are represented by the skeletons of three species of sirenia or sea cows. These were fully marine like the whales, and likewise show primitive features not seen in modern species and possess teeth that suggest that they grazed on seagrasses and other marine plants. Bones of the primitive elephant Moeritherium ...
The sperm whale is the largest toothed cetacean and has the highest degree of sexual dimorphism. There is a low dorsal hump, followed by a series of crenulations. It has a large head with a squarish profile, narrow underslung lower jaw, and functional teeth only in the upper haw (these fit into sockets in the upper jaw). The blowhole is located at the left front of the head. The head is highly modified, and is divided into sections called the junk and the spermaceti organ, or case. The spermaceti organ is a large oil-filled reservoir, the function of which is controversial. Sperm whales have a dish shape to the facial area of the skull, extreme cranial asymmetry, and a long rostrum. Sperm whales are known to be capable of very deep, long dives. ,123 ...
Baumgartner MF, Cole TVN, Clapham P, Mate B. North Atlantic right whale habitat in the lower Bay of Fundy and on the Southwestern Scotian Shelf during 1999-2001. Marine Ecological Progress Series (MEPS). 2003 ;264:137-154. ...
NMFS proposes to eliminate the expiration date (or ``sunset clause) contained in regulations requiring vessel speed restrictions to reduce the likelihood of lethal vessel collisions with North Atlantic right whales. The regulations restrict vessel speeds to no more than 10 knots for vessels 65...
One hundred and twenty stranding events of Stejnegers beaked whales were reported in Japan between 1999 and 2011. The purpose of this study is to introduce pathological data and to discuss probable causes of death for 44 Stejnegers beaked whales among them. The significant pathological findings were the pulmonary edema, parasitic granulomatous nephritis, emaciation, amyloidosis, suppurative bronchopneumonia and so on. The probable causes of death were categorized as noninfectious in 43 of the cases, which included drowning, starvation and secondary amyloidosis. One individual was diagnosed with septicemia, which was the only example of an infectious disease. Because we could not always perform advanced analyses, such as microbiology tests, biotoxin examinations or contaminant analyses, the finality of our findings may be impaired. However, the present study has broad implications on the causes of death
Two of mine are only about 4 or 5 miles from our house. One is in an area of wetlands where the marsh grass grows in clumps very straight and even. The grass snakes through the bog and when there is no breeze, it is reflected perfectly in the still water in front of it. Some days when I pass that area and the light is hitting it just right, it looks like endless clusters of gold wires reflected in a pool of black oil and I can feel my shutter finger twitching. The problem is that it is located on a very busy stretch of Route 20 and if my car and I survived even a short layover there, I would probably be arrested for stopping in such a dangerous area to indulge what others, who dont understand the concept of the White Whale, might consider to be just a photographic itch. Ah, sometimes I feel as misunderstood as Ahab. ...
A replica of the Bangudae petroglyphs at the Gyeongju National Museum, South Korea.. Today, the city of Ulsan on South Koreas southeast coast is the center of Koreas burgeoning whale-eating culture. Theres a waterfront esplanade with a dozen or so restaurants that serve whale meat, and an annual whale festival that attracts tens of thousands of visitors. Ironically enough, in 2005, the city hosted the International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting. That was when local plans to build a whale meat processing plant were killed, a move for which Greenpeace often takes credit.. To many of us, whale meat doesnt taste all that good - kind of like scooping out a handful of lard from a bucket and putting it into ones mouth. But try telling that to an Inuit, or a Korean for that matter. An article by Park Soo-mee in Seouls JoongAng Daily contended that whales are "one of the only mammals that has the texture of fish but the flavor of meat. Its a strangely well-matched combination.". At the ...
Witness WHALES MIGRATing FROM May to December. May signals the beginning of the annual whale migration, as humpback and southern right whales make their way from the food-rich southern ocean to breeding grounds in the warm northern waters ...
Scientists still dont know why hundreds of baby southern right whales are turning up dead around Patagonia, a decade after observers first saw signs of the worst die-off on record for the species, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).
Sperm whales are assessed as the most abundant deep water whale species in Irish waters. The researchers have found the species mainly in the Rockall Trough
Finden Sie alle Bücher von True, Frederick William - Description of Mesoplodon Mirum: A Beaked Whale Recently Discovered on the Coast of North Carolina (1913). Bei der Büchersuchmaschine eurobuch.com können Sie antiquarische und Neubücher VERGLEICHEN UND SOFORT zum Bestpreis bestellen. 1162063238
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Using numbers from studies of feeding and nutrition, Lavery and her colleagues calculate that each whale brings up about 10 grams of iron a day from the depths and then defecates it at the surface. The beauty of this sperm whale output is that it takes the form of drifting liquid plumes that can feed life in the upper ocean, Lavery says. She notes that experiments with iron have struggled with iron fertilizers that clump and sink before upper-water plankton can eat all of the goodies. Yet, she says, those experiments document measurable carbon trapping with even less iron fertilizer than sperm whales contribute ...
Next-generation sequencing has allowed us to characterize cetacean gut microbial communities and discover surprising similarities to the microbiomes of terrestrial herbivores and carnivores.. I am thrilled to announce the publication of our paper on the whale gut microbiome in Nature Communications.. By sequencing the bacterial genomes contained in whale fecal samples, we explore the gut community of baleen whales and its functional potential. We find a remarkable fusion microbiome that, while highly diverged overall from that of terrestrial mammals, contains functional elements characteristic of both terrestrial carnivore and terrestrial herbivore gut microbiomes. We find evidence to support the hypothesis that whales (which are descended from herbivorous terrestrial mammals, but are carnivores, eating small crustaceans and small fish) may use foregut fermentation to break down their food, much as ruminants do. In particular, the need to break down recalcitrant chitin in the exoskeletons of ...
PROVINCETOWN, Mass. -- They call it whale watching. Whale searching would be more appropriate. Most of our time aboard the Dolphin VI was spent carefully scanning the choppy waters off the coast of this trendy Cape Cod community, hoping for a glimpse of the graceful creatures who sometimes make their home there. ``There`s a sighting at 9 o`clock,`` naturalist Peggy Christian said over the loudspeaker. Quickly, all of us who had been looking on the starboard (that`s the right) side of the boat ran over to the port (that`s left), and looked out to see if the whale she had spotted would surface again. Sure enough, just the very top of the finback whale was visible slicing through the whitecapped waters. At least we could say we`d seen a whale.
As part of a public engagement of science project we have set up a web site www.whalequest.org.uk that explains the statistics behind whale surveys. There is a also a chance to win a trip on the IFAW whale survey vessel Song of the Whale WHALEQUEST - win a trip on a whale research vessel! This competition is part of a project funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to raise public awareness and interest in research done at the University of St Andrews to improve methods of assessing wildlife populations. To enter you must be aged 16-21 and a UK resident. We cant just count all the whales in the sea, we have to estimate numbers from partial counts. The estimates have uncertainty associated with them and this uncertainty can be large. Do some estimation for yourself by playing WhaleQuest. Enter the competition by submitting your estimate from the game. The better your estimate, the higher your chance of winning the prize and going out to survey whales yourself ...
Few animal traits are trotted out as illustrations of evolution as often as the whales supposed vestigial hip bones. Defenders of evolution ask why else would a whale, which has no hind limbs, have hip bones unless they are all that remains of an ancient, land-walking, whale ancestor? Recent research has uncovered new details about the critical function of whale hips-details that undermine this key evolutionary argument and confirm divine design.1. Vestigial organs originally referred to useless body parts left over from some ancient evolutionary ancestor. The human appendix has served as a textbook example of a vestigial organ thought to have no current function. Research has since shown that it serves multiple uses in the human digestive and immune systems. A perfectly useful appendix clearly nullifies this argument for evolution.. One by one, researchers have described impressive uses for all of the organs that 19th century naturalists thought were vestigial. Will whale hip bones also be ...
Mesoplodon ginkgodens species guide - has a smoothly sloping forehead and a long beak. They are widely distributed in warm temperate and tropical waters of the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean.
Whale droppings have emerged as a natural ocean fertilizer which could help combat global warming by allowing the Southern Ocean to absorb more carbon dioxide, Australian scientists have found.New research from the Australian Antarctic Division suggests whales naturally fertilize surface waters with iron-rich whale excrement, allowing the whole eco-system to send more carbon down into deep waters."The plants love it and it actually becomes a way of taking carbon out of the atmosphere," Antarctic scientist Steve Nicol told Reuters, adding the droppings appear as a plume of solids and liquids.A larger population of baleen whales and krill would boost the productivity of the whole Southern Ocean ecosystem and could improve the absorption of carbon dioxide, blamed for global warming.Iron is a limited micronutrient in the Southern Ocean, but recent experiments have found that adding soluble iron to surface waters helps promote much-needed phytoplankton algal blooms.Iron is contained in algae in the ...
By Bekah Logan, naturalist. Were halfway through the season, and the whales are starting to head back north!. The migration seemed to slow for a few weeks, and stormy weather kept us out of the water for a few days. However, the whales are back off our coast in full force.. Weve begun seeing juveniles, adult males, and newly pregnant females begin the long journey back to their home in the Arctics Bering and Chukchi seas. This pattern is expected. After the initial migration to Mexico, males and females mate and pregnant females give birth. New mothers linger longer in Bajas lagoons to make sure their calves build enough strength for the journey. We should begin seeing those pairs in mid-March.. Our whale watching cruises are venturing further west to find whales now that theyve started home. The trip takes them about 100 days, and their route back tends to be a few miles further away from the coastline.. ...
In October 2010, a team of scientists from Russia and the United States satellite tagged a western gray whale off Sakhalin Island, Russia. This is the fi...
Tom Hoban of Everett was kayaking near his beach house on Mission Beach with a neighbor recently. They got a treat when a pair of gray whales swam under them, and then began feeding nearby. He was lucky enough to get this great video of the whales.. Whales are active in our area right now. If youd like to read more about them, or find out how to take a chartered trip, read our story here. ...
Scientists in the past have used this waxy matrix as an aging tool, similar to counting tree rings. Then, the question arose: Could whale earwax chronologically archive chemicals, such as man-made pollutants?" said Usenko, assistant professor of environmental science in Baylors College of Arts and Sciences. Over the past two years, Trumble and Usenko developed analytical methods capable of answering that very question. "The type of information we can derive from these earplugs along with our methodology is exceptionally valuable. There is nothing like it. It really should be classified as a new field of research," Usenko said. Historically, scientists have used whale blubber to determine hormone and chemical exposure, but that method only provides information over short, finite periods of time and can be difficult to obtain and cost-prohibitive. "Whales are free-ranging animals and you cant get these types of profiles or information on free-ranging animals in any part of the world. This has ...
Sperm whales rely on sonar to navigate. They send out sound pulses, which bounce back off distant surfaces, helping them to form a clear picture of their underwater world. This doesnt work on a shallow sandy seabed, like Britains, and whales quickly become disorientated. "The pod probably followed a shoal of squid into the North Sea around the New Year and then got stuck," says Peter Evans, director of The SeaWatch Foundation. "As they head south the water becomes shallower. Once they end up on a sand bank its all over for the whale. It causes cardiovascular collapse and their organs start failing ...
Moby Dick is the most famous whale who ever lived. Herman Melville based his renowned novel on an actual sperm whale. The real Moby Dick was not really an albino; only his forehead and hump were white.
To some, the White Whale is a myth. To others, he is immortal. But one significant question is, What is the White Whale to Ahab? Ishmael grants that Ahab views the whale as an embodiment of evil. Ishmael himself is not so sure. The narrator often sees both sides of a question, never more so than in Chapter 42, "The Whiteness of the Whale." There he tells us that Moby Dicks whiteness might represent good or evil, glory or damnation, all colors or the "visible absence of color.". For Ahabs interpretation, it is helpful to consider the captains comments in the pivotal Chapter 36. There, the captain says he sees Moby Dick as a "mask," behind which lies a great power whose dominance Ahab refuses to accept. Ahab sees that inscrutable power as evil.. Some scholars argue that it is not the whale, or the force behind the whale, that is evil; the evil is in Ahab. Others see the captain as simply insane. Ahab is out of control as he rants about attacking the force behind the façade of Moby Dick. He ...
Do whales fascinate you? Do you think it is permissible to kill whales for their commercial value? Do you think the ban on whaling should be relaxed? bomb bay benny replied. Ahh point taken, but conservation and arms don t mix. What you say is true but an utopian dream. Its like saying that all countries go for 100% disarmament and spend the money on conservation and eco friendly drives. Won t happen in any political arena. Hasn t happened since man invented the spear I think... But yes we need more funds and focus for conservation drives, probably people shouldnt be so materialsitc... do away with things like lipsticks go au naturale RockyM replied. WE MUST STOP KILLING WHALES. ITS A CRIME. Vinod replied. informative article. i want to know if whales ar found in india? is it possible to see them ...
April 15, 2015 - On a recent expedition aboard the Nautilus vessel in the Gulf of Mexico off the Louisiana coast, researchers got a giant surprise. As they viewed footage streamed by the Hercules remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a sperm whale swam into the frame and proceeded to circle around the ROV multiple times. The ROV was operating at 1,962 feet (598 meters) below sea level.Click here to read more:Rare Video Captures Sperm Whale in Deep SeaVideo courtesy Ocean Exploration Trust/GISR
I have a sperm whale feature in the current issue of [X-Ray Magazine (#35)](http://www.xray-mag.com/newsletter/subscribers/2010-04/newsletter.html) ([PDF, free download](http://www.xray-mag.com/en/content/x-ray-mag-35)). Check it out if youre interested in the sperm whales I spoke about at [TEDxBerkeley](http://echeng.com/journal/2010/04/04/eric-cheng-ted-talk/) last Saturday! ...
Stock Photo of Sperm Whale Mother with newborn calf. High Quality Sperm Whale Stock Photos and Gloss Prints are available from Oceanwide Images Stock Photo Library.
... definition, a large, square-snouted whale, Physeter catodon, valued for its oil and spermaceti: now reduced in number and rare in some areas. See more.
original description Vela, A.I., Fernandez, A., Espinosa de los Monteros, A., Goyache, J., Herraez, P., Tames, B., Cruz, F., Dominguez, L., and Fernandez-Garayzabal, J.F. "Lactobacillus ceti sp. nov., isolated from beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris)." Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. (2008) 58:891-894. [details] ...
Minke whales feed on fish and various invertebrates; like all baleen whales they filter their food from the water using their baleen plates like sieves. Although largely a solitary species, when feeding minke whales can often be seen in pairs, and on particularly good feeding grounds up to a hundred individuals may congregate. A number of feeding techniques have been observed, including trapping shoals of fish against the surface of the water. After a ten month gestation period, births occur in mid-winter, at birth the calf measures up to 2.8 metres in length. It will be weaned at four months of age, and will stay with its mother for up to two years, becoming sexually mature at seven years of age. Minke whales have an average life span of around 50 years. Minke whales are rather inquisitive and often swim by the side of boats for up to half an hour ...
We enjoyed an amazing day of viewing Orcas, Humpback Whales++ and a Minke Whale with unbelievable sightings! What a day of contrast and colour, of quiet foraging of Orcas and then amazing lunge feeding and airborne acrobatics by Humpback Whales. Our tour this morning took us first into Weynton Passage where we enjoyed viewing Humpback Whales, it was reported that there were eight in the vicinity but with the sudden sighting of a large male Orca fin out in the Queen Charlotte Strait, we headed in that direction and met up with the A8s who were foraging initially off Bold Head but moving steadily west, they were taking long dives and were soon off Bold Head and still heading west and a small group of Dolphins were seen amongst them. Their A-Clan vocalizations were beautiful to listen to, all the while we trailed our hydrophone while sailing quietly along. While the A30s began making their way into Blackfish Sound from Blackney Passage where they had been foraging in a heavy flooding current with ...
Citation: Perrin, W. (2009). Balaenoptera physalus physalus Tomilin, 1946. In: Perrin, W.F. (2017). World Cetacea Database. Accessed at http://marinespecies.org/cetacea/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=383554 on 2017-10-18 ...
order Cetacea, suborder Mysticeti). A family that includes the fin, humpback, and blue whales. The body is streamlined, the snout pointed, the throat and chest grooved. The dorsal fin is hooked and set far back on the body. The tail is slightly notched at the mid-line, and scalloped along the posterior edge. The cervical vertebrae are not fused. The baleen plates are broad and short, the left and right rows being joined anteriorly. The animals are typically grey on the dorsal surface, with some white on the ventral surface; but Megaptera novaengliae (humpback) may be black above and below, with white flippers. Members of the family feed on krill and small fish, and occur in both hemispheres. They grow to 7-30 m depending on species. There are six species, in two genera: Balaenoptera (B. acutorostrata, minke or lesser rorqual; B. borealis, sei; B. physalus, fin; B. musculus, blue; B. edeni, Brydes); and Megaptera novaengliae (humpback). ...
False killer whales are highly unusual in this area. A March sighting of a baby being born next to a whale watching boat off Dana Point drew national attention and had experts amazed.. The calf was born when a pod of about 15 females pushed their way across the ocean near the Dana Point Headlands and huddled against the Manutea, a sailboat operated by Captain Tom Southern, with Capt. Daves Dolphin Safari and Whale Watch. Videos of the live birth went viral.. Forney is a false killer whale specialist. Mostly, she has studied the tropical species in Hawaii where they are more commonly found.. The unusually warm water off Southern California in the last four years has brought the tropical dolphins to the area along with a host of other warm-water species such as the loggerhead turtles, pelagic red crabs, sharks and by-the-wind-sailors - a sort of jellyfish.. Those oddities have also brought a host of sport fish such as yellow fin tuna, dorado and marlin. Those game fish are just what false killer ...
1-A. Civets (all species of Viverridae except Malabar civet)]. [1-B. Common fox (Vulpes bengalensis)]. 1[1-C. Flying squirrels (all species of the genera Bulopetes, Petaurista, Pelomys. and Eupetaurus)]. [l-D. Giant squirrels (Ratufa macroura Ratufa indica, and Ratufa bicolor)]. [2. Himalayan brown bear (Ursus arctos)]. 2[2A. Himalayan black bear (Selenarctos thibetanus)]. ][2B. Jackal (Canis aureus)]. ][2C. Jungle cat (Felis chaus)]. [2D. Marmots (Marmota bobak himalayana, Marmota caudata)]. [2E. Martens (Martes foria intermedia, Martes flovigule, Martes gwatkinsii)]. [3. ***]. 4. Otters (Luthra, L. perspicillata). 3[4-A. Pole cats (Vormela peregusna, Mustila poturius). 4-B. Red fox (Vulpes vulpes, vulpes montana, vulpes griffithi, vulpes pusilla). [5. Sloth bear (Melursus ursinus)]. ][5A. Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus)]. a[6. ***]. [7. Weasells (Mustela Sibirica, Mustela Kathian, Mustela Altaica)]. [8. Checkered keelback snake (Xenochrophis piscatar)]. 9. Dhaman or rat snake ...
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My research interests are diverse but include investigating exposure and effects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), especially polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in marine apex predator species in European waters such as killer whales (Orcinus orca) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). This involves longstanding collaborative work with Robin Law, Jon Barber and other colleagues at Cefas Lowestoft laboratory in Suffolk. Although PCB use/manufacture was banned in Europe in the 1980s, blubber PCB concentrations consistently exceed all known thresholds for mammalian toxicity and are likely to be the main driver of marked population declines in European marine apex predators like killer whales (orcas), bottlenose dolphins and striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the NE Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea regions (Jepson et al 2016). PCB concentrations did initially decline in biota following an EU-ban in the mid-1980s, but PCBs have now stabilised in most European biota. For many ...
Stenella longirostris orientalis : Eastern spinner dolphin. 23. Stenella coeruleoalba : Striped dolphin 24. Delphinus delphis : Short-beaked common dolphin 25. Delphinus capensis : Long-beaked common dolphin 26. Lagenodelphis hosei : Frasers dolphin 27. Lagenorhynchus obscurus posidonia : Peruvian Dusky dolphin 28. Lissodelphis peronii : Southern right whale-dolphin 29. Grampus griseus : Rissos dolphin 30. Peponocephala electra : Melon headed whale 31. Feresa attenuata : Pygmy killer whale 32. Pseudorca crassidens : False killer whale 33. Orcinus orca : Orca 34. Globicephala melas edwardii : Southern long-finned pilot whale 35. Globicephala macrorhynchus : Short-finned pilot whale Family: Phocoenidae. 36. Phocoena spinipinnis : Black or Burmeisters porpoise ORDER: CARNIVORA Sub-order: CANIFORMIA. Superfamily: Pinnipedia. Family: Otariidae. 37. Otaria byronia = flavescens : South American sea-lion (resident). 38. Arctocephalus australis gracilis : South American fur seal (resident). 39. ...