Previous studies testing the association between the built environment and walking behavior have been largely cross-sectional and have yielded mixed results. This study reports on a natural experiment in which changes to the built environment were implemented at a university campus in Hong Kong. Longitudinal data on walking behaviors were collected using surveys, one before and one after changes to the built environment, to test the influence of changes to the built environment on walking behavior. Built environment data are from a university campus in Hong Kong, and include land use, campus bus services, pedestrian network, and population density data collected from campus maps, the university developmental office, and field surveys. Walking behavior data were collected at baseline in March 2012 (n = 198) and after changes to the built environment from the same cohort of subjects in December 2012 (n = 169) using a walking diary. Geographic information systems (GIS) was used to map walking routes and
Previous studies testing the association between the built environment and walking behavior have been largely cross-sectional and have yielded mixed results. This study reports on a natural experiment in which changes to the built environment were implemented at a university campus in Hong Kong. Longitudinal data on walking behaviors were collected using surveys, one before and one after changes to the built environment, to test the influence of changes to the built environment on walking behavior. Built environment data are from a university campus in Hong Kong, and include land use, campus bus services, pedestrian network, and population density data collected from campus maps, the university developmental office, and field surveys. Walking behavior data were collected at baseline in March 2012 (n = 198) and after changes to the built environment from the same cohort of subjects in December 2012 (n = 169) using a walking diary. Geographic information systems (GIS) was used to map walking routes and
Background Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension who achieve a six-minute walk distance of 380-440 m may have improved prognosis. Using the randomized controlled trial of macitentan in pulmonary arterial hypertension (SERAPHIN), the association between six-minute walk distance and long-term outcomes was explored. Methods Patients with six-minute walk distance data at Month 6 were dichotomized as above or below the median six-minute walk distance (400 m) and assessed for future risk of pulmonary arterial hypertension-related death or hospitalization and all-cause death. Additionally, six-minute walk distance values at baseline, Month 6 and the change from baseline to Month 6 were categorized by quartiles. All associations were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method using a log-rank test and Cox regression models. Results Patients with a six-minute walk distance |400 m vs. ≤400 m at Month 6 have a reduced risk of pulmonary arterial hypertension-related death or hospitalization (hazard ratio 0
TY - JOUR. T1 - The effects of sensory loss and walking speed on the orbital dynamic stability of human walking. AU - Dingwell, Jonathan B.. AU - Kang, Hyun Gu. AU - Marin, Laura C.. PY - 2007/5/10. Y1 - 2007/5/10. N2 - Peripheral sensory feedback is believed to contribute significantly to maintaining walking stability. Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy have a greatly increased risk of falling. Previously, we demonstrated that slower walking speeds in neuropathic patients lead to improved local dynamic stability. However, all subjects exhibited significant local instability during walking, even though no subject fell or stumbled during testing. The present study was conducted to determine if and how significant changes in peripheral sensation and walking speed affect orbital stability during walking. Trunk and lower extremity kinematics were examined from two prior experiments that compared patients with significant neuropathy to healthy controls and walking at multiple different ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - The efficacy of accumulated short bouts versus single daily bouts of brisk walking in improving aerobic fitness and blood lipid profiles. AU - Woolf-May, K.. AU - Kearney, E.M.. AU - Owen, A.. AU - Jones, D.W.. AU - Davison, R.C.R.. AU - Bird, S.R.. PY - 1999/12. Y1 - 1999/12. N2 - Fifty-six subjects (19 men and 37 woman) aged between 40 and 66 completed the study. They were allocated into three walking groups and a control group (C). The three walking groups performed the same total amount of walking for 18 weeks, but completed it in bouts of differing durations and frequencies. These were Long Walkers (LW; 20-40 min/bout), Intermediate Walkers (IW; 10-15 min/bout) and Short Walkers (SW; 5-10 min/bout); with the IW and SW performing more than one bout of walking a day. Following the 18 week walking programme, compared to the C group all walking groups showed similar improvements in fitness as determined by a reduction in blood lactate during a graded treadmill walking test (LW ...
Background: Previous studies testing the association between the built environment and walking behavior have been largely cross-sectional and have yielded mixed results. This study reports on a natural experiment in which changes to the built environment were implemented at a university campus in Hong Kong. Longitudinal data on walking behaviors were collected using surveys, one before and one after changes to the built environment, to test the influence of changes to the built environment on walking behavior. Methods: Built environment data are from a university campus in Hong Kong, and include land use, campus bus services, pedestrian network, and population density data collected from campus maps, the university developmental office, and field surveys. Walking behavior data were collected at baseline in March 2012 (n = 198) and after changes to the built environment from the same cohort of subjects in December 2012 (n = 169) using a walking diary. Geographic information systems (GIS) was used ...
To examine long term changes on glycated hemoglobin in sedentary employees exposed to two different walking programs during a 10-week intervention. A total of 68 sedentary employees participated in a 10-week walking intervention and were randomly assigned to one of three groups: intermittent walking, continuous walking or control group. Hemoglobin A1cNOW+ device tested glycated hemoglobin and accelerometry assessed physical activity. Results showed glycated hemoglobin significantly decreased over the ten weeks (5.82±0.49, 5.66±0.44) F(1,64) =4.229, p=.044) in the continuous walking group. Post-Hoc test showed the continuous walking group was significantly affected, F=8.463, p=.009, with a large size effect n2=.297. There were no changes within the intermittent group (5.69±0.63, 5.63±0.6) or control group (5.59±0.6, 5.6±0.54) (p,0.05). Accelerometry showed a main effect of time by group interaction F(4,124) =4.688, p=0.001). Post-Hoc indicated that the continuous walking group took ...
Walking Dead and its derivations may refer to: The Walking Dead (1936 film), an American horror film starring Boris Karloff and Marguerite Churchill The Walking Dead (1995 film), an American war film starring Madison Michelle and Andrew Gregg Walking Dead, a 2009 novel in the Atticus Kodiak series by Greg Rucka The Walking Dead, a 2007 novel by Gerald Seymour The Walking Dead (EP), a 1995 EP by Saint Vitus The Walking Dead Theme Song, by Bear McCreary Walking Dead, a 2002 song by Puressence from the album Planet Helpless Walking Dead (song), a 2005 song by Z-Trip The Walking Dead, a 2005 song by Dropkick Murphys from The Warriors Code The Walking Dead, a 2006 song by Zebrahead from Broadcast to the World The Walking Dead, a 2008 song by Spinnerette from Spinnerette Walking Dead, a 2012 song by Papa Roach from The Connection The Walking Dead (franchise), a media franchise, including: The Walking Dead (comic book), a comic book series by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore, and Charlie ...
Walking on Air or Walkin on Air may refer to: Walking on Air (Anise K song), 2012 Walking on Air (Katy Perry song), 2013 Walking on Air (Kerli song), 2008 Walking on Air (1936 film), directed by Joseph Santley Walkin on Air, a 1987 album by Bobbysocks Walking on Air, a song by Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark from the album Sugar Tax Walking on Air, a 1995 song by King Crimson Walking on Air, a song by the Bee Gees from This Is Where I Came In Walking On Air (2016 song), a Radio Dept. song composed by frontman Martin Carlberg Sooner or Later (Walkin on Air), a song by the Moody Blues from Strange Times Walking on Air, American musical film starring Maudie Edwards Walking in the Air, a song from the 1982 animated film The ...
Walking interventions have been shown to have a positive impact on physical activity (PA) levels, health and wellbeing for adult and older adult populations. There has been very little work carried out to explore the effectiveness of walking interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities. This paper will provide details of the Walk Well intervention, designed for adults with intellectual disabilities, and a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test its effectiveness. This study will adopt a RCT design, with participants allocated to the walking intervention group or a waiting list control group. The intervention consists of three PA consultations (baseline, six weeks and 12 weeks) and an individualised 12 week walking programme. A range of measures will be completed by participants at baseline, post intervention (three months from baseline) and at follow up (three months post intervention and six months from baseline). All outcome measures will be collected by a researcher who will be blinded
Scotland has a policy aimed at increasing physical activity levels in the population, but evidence on how to achieve this is still developing. Studies that focus on encouraging real world participants to start physical activity in their settings are needed. The Walking for Well-being in the West study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a pedometer-based walking programme in combination with physical activity consultation. The study was multi-disciplinary and based in the community. Walking for Well-being in the West investigated whether Scottish men and women, who were not achieving the current physical activity recommendation, increased and maintained walking behaviour over a 12 month period. This paper outlines the rationale and design of this innovative and pragmatic study. Participants were randomised into two groups: Group 1: Intervention (pedometer-based walking programme combined with a series of physical activity consultations); Group 2: Waiting list control for 12 weeks (followed by
This section describes innovative interspecies epidemiological approaches to understanding the data. DogEpi concepts are not meant to hound researchers, nor meant to be a golden (standard) retriever of epidemiological wisdom, but they are descended from the litter of current epidemiological thought, some of which is scatological. Firstly, the notion of dog walking to total walking ratio (DWTWR) and dog walking to total physical activity ratio (DWTPAR). The DWTWR, which is the percentage of all walking that was dog walking, was 22.9%. For 12% of the population, dog walking was half of their total walking. As a percentage of all physical activity, the DWTPAR was 13%, with 9% of the population doing at least half their total activity as dog walking. More important is the DAF (dog attributable fraction), which is an epidemiological estimate of the proportion of disease which might be prevented if all of the dog owners walked their dogs for at least 150 minutes per week. If this occurred, the ...
One of the most powerful and underrated ways to lose weight, stay healthy and live longer is an activity we do every day - walking. Even walking for an average of only 30 minutes a day can have huge health benefits, such as lowering your risk of stroke by 35% and Type 2 diabetes by 40%. The best thing about walking is that its free and easy to fit into your daily routine.. Here are some benefits of walking from the home doctor experts at House Call Doctor.. It can help you manage your weight. Walking is a great way to burn calories. This will depend on a few factors, including your walking speed, distance covered, terrain and your weight. Interval walking is a great way to burn the most calories. For example, you can experiment with walking fast for a minute and then cool down for two minutes until you reach 30 minutes total.. It can improve your mood. Walking can greatly improve your mental health. Aim for 30 minutes of brisk walking to help reduce anxiety, depression and a negative mood. It ...
An estimated 42% of older adults describe limited participation in outdoor walking defined as walking outside fewer than 3 days a week.1 Infrequent performance of outdoor walking is a marker of frailty2 and can increase the risk of mobility and self-care decline, social isolation and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQL).3 4 Difficulty walking represents a key individual barrier to community mobility in older adults.5 Decreased fitness, balance and leg strength are physical factors that contribute to reductions in outdoor walking.2 6 Psychological factors, such as fear of moving outdoors and decreased self-efficacy in community mobility, may also limit engagement in outdoor walking among older adults.2 7 Moreover, environmental barriers, including poor social support, scheduling, cost (eg, parking), transportation, walking distance to the destination, time limits/attentional demands (eg, walk signals and crowds),8 physical barriers (eg, stairs and curbs),8 physical load,8 poor ...
This is a group randomized trial where 8 communities in Worcester and Lowell (4 per city) will be randomly assigned to the 6-month dog walking intervention or a standard, self-help, print-based physical activity control condition. Dog owners (N=120; 15 per community) will be recruited. The intervention includes a social networking website, monthly newsletters, twice monthly neighborhood dog walks and community events. The intervention will: 1) educate owners about the benefits of dog walking to themselves and their dog, 2) teach strategies for regular dog walking, 3) teach dog walking tips and provide dog training seminars, 4) promote self-monitoring and goal setting for dog walking, 5) provide social networking opportunities for dog owners and 6) promote a sense of community via participation in neighborhood dog walks and community events. Intervention feasibility will be assessed by measures of implementation success, including recruitment and retention rates, website use, intervention ...
The average participant in a pedometer-based walking program without dietary change can expect to lose a modest amount of weight, on the order of 1 kg. Results from the 9 cohorts we examined were remarkably consistent and did not vary by the population targeted or the goal-setting strategies used. These findings are consistent with previous research showing that increasing moderate-intensity physical activity tends to result in a modest amount of weight loss.27-30. The amount of weight loss attributable to pedometer-based walking programs is small but important from a clinical perspective. According to the meta-regression results, the average participant adhering to a pedometer-based walking program can expect to lose about 0.05 kg per week. That translates to a weight loss of about 1 lb every 10 weeks. Over a year, participants can expect to lose about 5 lb. Although a 5-lb weight loss for an overweight participant may represent only 2% to 3% of that persons body weight, if the participant ...
A new study has reaffirmed a link between stroke reduction and walking in older men-but the link has more to do with time spent walking than intensity of the activity.. In an article published in the November 14 issue of Stroke, British researchers report on data involving 3,357 ambulatory men who took part in a 10-year study related to heart health. The men ranged in age from 60 to 80 and were grouped according to time spent walking, among other factors.. Researchers found that over the 10-year period, the men who spent more time walking every week (8 to 14 hours) reduced risk of stroke by about 33% over those who spent minimal time walking (0 to 3 hours a week). That finding wasnt surprising in itself, but when researchers compared distance/speed data among time cohorts, they found no significant association between distance and risk reduction. In other words, time spent walking mattered more than pace.. Among community-dwelling older men we observed … a strong inverse dose-response ...
A new study has reaffirmed a link between stroke reduction and walking in older men-but the link has more to do with time spent walking than intensity of the activity.. In an article published in the November 14 issue of Stroke, British researchers report on data involving 3,357 ambulatory men who took part in a 10-year study related to heart health. The men ranged in age from 60 to 80 and were grouped according to time spent walking, among other factors.. Researchers found that over the 10-year period, the men who spent more time walking every week (8 to 14 hours) reduced risk of stroke by about 33% over those who spent minimal time walking (0 to 3 hours a week). That finding wasnt surprising in itself, but when researchers compared distance/speed data among time cohorts, they found no significant association between distance and risk reduction. In other words, time spent walking mattered more than pace.. Among community-dwelling older men we observed … a strong inverse dose-response ...
Introduction: The aim of the study was to determine the impact of systematic individual Nordic Walking training on physical performance in older men. Material and methods: The study included 18 men (aged 52 to 73), divided into two groups. Group I (the experimental group) underwent an 8-week Nordic Walking training, while group II (the control group) did not perform any physical activity during the analyzed period. The level of physical exercise tolerance was assessed twice: at the beginning and after eight weeks of the study period using the Finnish walking test and the 30-minute walking test. The results were analyzed with the use of Statistica 10. software. Results: The results of the initial Finnish walking test show that the average values of the Fitness Index, time of a 2-kilometer distance coverage and HR were similar in both study groups. After 8 weeks, a statistically significant improvement in exercise tolerance was observed in the experimental group. Aerobic endurance evaluated on the ...
Background: Physical activity has numerous health benefits, including improving weight management. The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend ≥150 minutes/week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity (e.g., brisk walking) for substantial health benefits. Walking is the most commonly reported physical activity by U.S. adults.. Methods: CDC used data from the 2005 and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys to assess changes in prevalence of walking (defined as walking for transportation or leisure in at least one bout of 10 minutes or more in the preceding 7 days) by sex, age group, race/ethnicity, education, body mass index category, walking assistance status, region, and physician-diagnosed chronic disease. CDC also assessed the association between walking and meeting the aerobic physical activity guideline. Results: Overall, walking prevalence increased significantly from 55.7% in 2005 to 62.0% in 2010. Significantly higher walking prevalence was observed in most ...
Heart Foundation Walking is a large, free, community walking program that is unique in its scale and population reach, engaging more than 22,000 registered participants at the time of this evaluation. The program reached and retained a large number of participants, including vulnerable groups. The program had particularly high reach in remote and sparsely populated regions where physical activity facilities and programs are likely to be limited. Retention rates compare favourably to others reported in the scientific literature [20, 21].. The recruitment success of walking groups is often measured by the numbers of participants joining, rather than the reach to those who stand to benefit most [22]. However, walking groups have the potential to widen health inequities if they are not sensitively targeted to reach and cater to the needs of these high-risk groups [7] including women, people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged, older adults, adults who are overweight or obese, and people with, or ...
Physical activities are important in management and control of type 2 diabetes.[3],/ref,.[6] In the studies.[3][8] structured aerobic exercises such as walking reduces the absolute haemoglobin A1c value by about 0.6% and improves insulin sensitivity. The study proves that aerobic training such as walking combined with resistance training improves glycaemic control.[9] suggests that daily walking combined with diet therapy is useful for obese patients and can likewise work with type 2 diabetes. Although it is evident that physical activities such as walking helps control type 2 diabetes, 60-80% of the adult population in the US do not meet the recommended levels of physical activity.[2] Much of this low engagement in physical activities such as walking is correlated to the fear of walking alone and the risk of danger while walking outside.[10] This is in congruence to the study.[7] which states that lifestyle has an important role in reducing risk for type 2 diabetes since lifestyle is a factor ...
Background Walking while performing another task (eg, talking) is challenging for many stroke survivors, yet its neural basis are not fully understood. Objective To investigate prefrontal cortex activation and its relationship to gait measures while walking under single-task (ST) and dual-task (DT) conditions (ie, walking while simultaneously performing a cognitive task) in stroke survivors. Methods We acquired near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) data from the prefrontal cortex during treadmill walking in ST and DT conditions in chronic stroke survivors and healthy controls. We also acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and NIRS during simulated walking under these conditions. Results NIRS revealed increased oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in DT-walking compared with ST-walking for both groups. For simulated walking, NIRS showed a significant effect of group and group × task, being greater on both occasions, in stroke survivors. A greater increase in brain activation observed from ST
WALKING WITH GRANDFATHER Walking with Grandfather 1 Walking with Grandfather 2 Walking with Grandfather 3 Walking with Grandfather 4 Walking with Grandfather 5 Walking with Grandfather 6 Walking with Grandfather 7 Walking with Grandfather 8
Moritoh is developing POPO, a walking aid that enables walking practice while reducing the load from the users body weight.. Until now, there hasnt been a load-reducing walking aid - a device that lets users walk while reducing the load from their body weight. During the last 2-3 years, suspension walking lifts have become commonly used for rehabilitation in Japan. A machine that suspends from overhead to reduce the load from body weight needs to be large. So were developing POPO as a new kind of walking aid - one thats as compact as possible.. In Japan, when people start having difficulty walking, they end up using wheelchairs at a comparatively early stage. Thats true in hospitals as well. People use all kinds of walking aids, but if theres concern that theyll have an accident and make their condition worse, they immediately switch to a wheelchair. When that happens, theres a strong tendency for whatever core functionality people have to deteriorate. Weve developed this machine to ...
Self-reported daily walking time in COPD: relationship with relevant clinical and functional characteristics Maria A Ramon,1–3 Cristina Esquinas,1 Miriam Barrecheguren,1 Eulogio Pleguezuelos,4,5 Jesús Molina,6 José A Quintano,7 Miguel Roman-Rodríguez,8 Karlos Naberan,9 Carl Llor,10 Carlos Roncero,11–14 Marc Miravitlles1,3 1Department of Pneumology, Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 3Biomedical Research Networking Center Consortium of Respiratory Diseases (CIBERES), 4Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Mataró Hospital, 5TecnoCampus, College of Health Sciences, University of Pompeu Fabra, Mataró-Maresme, Barcelona, 6Francia Health Center, Dirección Asistencial Oeste, Madrid, 7Lucena Health Center I, Lucena, Córdoba, 8Son Pisà Primary Health Care Center, Palma de Mallorca, 9Campo de Belchite Health Center, Zaragoza, 10Primary Care Centre Via Roma, 11Addiction
Key findings:. · Walking boosts positivity and unleashes creativity, say 97%. · 1 in 2 Millennials experience reduction in stress and hypertension, post walking. · Walking uplifts the mood, say 37% patients suffering from Depression. · Almost 9 out 10 feel that walking helps reduce lifestyle related illnesses. New Delhi, April 7, 2017: In line with the theme of World Health Day 2017 - Depression - Max Bupa has unveiled the findings of its intercity consumer survey, Max Bupa Walk for Health. The fourth edition of the Max Bupa Walk For Health Survey reveals a strong correlation between walking and depression. According to the Survey, 97% of Indians who walk regularly, experience improvement in their mental and emotional health. Max Bupa Walk for Health Survey is a first of its kind study on walking behaviour of Millennials and Elderly carried across 4 cities, namely, Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore and Jaipur.. Max Bupa Walk for Health Survey also reveals that walking helps control stress among ...
The pilot study results, published in the summer issue of Pediatric Physical Therapy, suggest most children werent wearing orthoses or footwear that helped them improve their daily walking activity in amount or intensity, Bjornson and colleagues wrote. They pointed out that the two children whose shank-to-vertical angle was optimized were also those who demonstrated the greatest positive effects of AFOs and footwear on daily walking activity and intensity.. When they walked, they walked at higher rates, Bjornson said. Kids with CP walk slower and cant keep up with their peers. So, hopefully, interventions would help them walk more, and, when they do walk, walk faster. Hopefully they can keep up with their peers walking to the bus, or they can run to first base when they want to when they play baseball.. Elaine Owen, MSc, MCSP, a pediatric physical therapist at the Child Development Center in Bangor, North Wales, UK, told LER: Pediatrics the benefits for children with CP of walking outside ...
|p||b|OBJECTIVE: |/b|Determining the maximum walking time (MWT) using the treadmill test is the gold standard method for evaluating walking capacity and treatment effect in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). However, self reported functional disability is important when assessing quality of life. Changes in the Walking Estimated Limitation Calculated by History (WELCH) questionnaire scores were compared with the MWT.|/p| |p||b|METHODS: |/b|A cross sectional study was performed in patients with intermittent claudication. The treadmill test (3.2 km/h; 10% gradient) and WELCH questionnaire were administered to all patients for objective evaluation of walking capacity. Given the log normal distribution of these parameters in patients with PAD, a log transformation was applied to the WELCH score (LnW) and maximum walking time (LnT). The responsiveness of the WELCH score was determined using mean changes and correlation coefficients of LnW and LnT changes. The effect of time on the
Walking is an excellent exercise for burning calories and for improving cardiovascular fitness. Recent research has revealed that fast walking is superior to slow walking, especially for reducing abdominal fat. Overweight women who walked at a fast pace lost significantly more abdominal fat than those who walked at a slow pace, even though both groups did the same amount of walking over the six-month study period.
Regular physical activity (PA) is a major factor in maintaining health in aging populations. This study examines the influences of sociodemographic, health, and environmental characteristics on older adults walking behaviors, and the role physicians can play in promoting physical activity. Online and paper surveys (n = 272) were distributed to community-dwelling older (age ≥ 60) adults from a large integrated healthcare system in two counties in Central Texas. Descriptive statistics were utilized to characterize participants walking behaviors and places. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to predict being: 1) a frequent walker (i.e., walking at least three times a week); and 2) meeting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) PA recommendation through walking (i.e., walking ≥150 min per week), while considering sociodemographic, health, and environmental factors. Individuals had a median age of 69 years, were of both genders (50.37 % female), and were primarily non-Hispanic
Scientists have proved what anyone walking down a crowded street in modern city knows: those who gaze at their phones while ambulating are a danger to themselves and others.. Detailed here at PLOS ONE in research titled Texting and Walking: Strategies for Postural Control and Implications for Safety, the authors explain that they subjected 26 test subjects to experiments in which they measured normal walking, walking while reading a phone and walking while sending a text message. Subjects were screened to ensure they were familiar with modern phones with QWERTY keyboards.. Eight cameras were used to record subjects movement on an ~8.5m course and they captured all sorts of data: the paper says Relative motion between the thorax and head (neck motion), and between pelvis and thorax (trunk motion) were obtained by subtracting the time series of the relevant angles of the lower segment from the higher segment.. Those measurements lead to a very detailed discussion of kinematics and other ...
Several studies have explored the connection between walking speed and lifespan. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that walking speed, along with age and sex, was a reliable predictor of life expectancy. Another study found that risk of mortality decreases with higher walking intensity and increases with low walking pace.. The researchers in this study added another variable: weight. A persons body mass index (BMI) has long been an indicator of longevity. BMI refers to the ratio of a persons weight with respect to his/her height. The common perception is that a person with higher BMI weight has an increased risk of all-cause mortality (especially cardiovascular disease) while a person with lower BMI is generally healthier. However, the researchers findings may prove otherwise.. The researchers analyzed data from 474,919 people whose information were collected through the UK Biobank. The people had a mean age of 52.. Their findings revealed that ...
Certain conditions may put limitations on your movement with aging. Walking, moving or simply standing up may seem an arduous task. A wide range of mobility aids is available now to put an end to this. A standard walking stick with a T-shaped handle or L-shaped Fritz handle is the perfect companion for you during regular morning or evening walks. The Vissco and Tynor walking canes are elegant in aesthetic appeal and sturdy in support with firm rubber base. For extra support, especially for those with weak footing due to Arthritis, Osteoporosis, Parkinsons, Ataxia etc., a quadripod or tripod walking stick is the best choice. If you easily run out of breath while walking, due to asthma or chronic fatigue, you may opt for walking stick with seat which allows the provision of a seat anywhere. During post stroke or post surgical recovery, walkers are a better choice over walking sticks as they provide additional four points of support and reduces the chances of falling. Hemiplegic walker and ...
By Michael Grady, Yoga International. For many people the most convenient and practical exercise is walking. Walking not only conditions the heart and lungs, but also burns calories, alleviates stress, stimulates digestion and elimination, and expels stale air and carbon dioxide from the lungs. Walking is safe, convenient, and economical, and with proper clothing it can be done in all kinds of weather. A walk can accommodate all ages and fitness levels it doesn t matter whether you are old or young, stiff or flexible, in vibrant health or recovering from a major trauma or illness. Whatever your condition, there is a pace and style of walking that will leave you feeling more refreshed and energized. Even an experienced runner with the ability to pound the pavement in a rousing roadside run can still find a cardiovascular challenge in combining yogic breathing techniques with walking. Why not substitute low-impact walking and save your joints from trauma?. Walking while employing special breathing ...
Objective - To assess the relationship of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) to walking difficulty.. Methods - A population cohort aged ≥55 years recruited from 1996-98 (n=28,451) completed a standardized questionnaire assessing demographics, health conditions, joint complaints and functional limitations, including difficulty walking in the past 3 months. Survey data were linked to health administrative databases; self-report and administrative data were used to identify health conditions. Hip/knee OA was defined as self-reported swelling, pain, or stiffness in a hip or knee lasting ≥6 weeks in the past 3 months without an inflammatory arthritis diagnosis. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the determinants of walking difficulty and constructed a clinical nomogram.. Results - 18,490 cohort participants were eligible (mean age 68 years, 60% female). 25% reported difficulty walking. Difficulty walking was significantly and independently associated with older age, female sex, ...
When scientists measured participants before and after they joined a walking group, there were significant differences. Heres the case for rallying up friends and co-workers to go for regular walks.
A lively and diverse walking group, open to all, started in January 2012, offering a range of walks, to suit everyone, in and around Lancashire, Greater Manchester and surrounding counties. Join us to
If just walking isnt working - maybe its time to ramp things up with some power walking!. Here are some tips for getting your walking routine going with power walking.. Power Walking Form. To get the most out of your power walk, youll need to follow the correct form. If you feel self-conscious, either get over it or move to a private area! When you power walk, sources say you need to keep your arms swinging and your chin up, and get your toes pointing up with each forward step (some refer to this as keeping your heels up. Either way, the point is to get your legs and feet moving in a heel-ball-toe formation).. Big Steps. One of the keys to power walking is to take lunging steps. When you power walk, you are moving fast but not necessarily taking long strides (in fact, sources say you should aim for quick, small steps as you power walk), but you can intersperse this with extra-long strides or lunges as you go. The lunges give your legs an extra workout and work the muscles a bit differently ...
Stroke patients frequently need walking aids such as 4-point canne. However, the 4-point canne has to be lifted by the patient which limited gait speed. The adjunction of small wheel below the 4 point of the canne (4-roll) gives the possibility to the patient to walk without having to lift the canne as it will roll over the ground.. OBJECTIVE To compare the gait parameters with a 4-point canne and with a 4-roll canne METHODS The investigators will recruited stroke patients who necessitate 4 point-canne as walking aids. A 10 meters walking test, a 6 minutes walking test, an estimated energy cost and a patients satisfaction will be monitored with a 4-point canne (day 1) and with a 4-roll canne (day 2) in a cross-over study. The first tested device will be randomized.. PERSPECTIVE The investigators hope to demonstrate that a 4-roll canne makes possible to walk faster in a safe way after stroke ...
In the present study, it is shown that walking speed significantly relates to changes in the lipid profile in healthy middle-aged men and women walking 12 days to Santiago de Compostela. A higher walking speed was related to a higher increase in HDL-c and attenuated decrease in LDL-c and total cholesterol, a relationship that was not explained by changes in body weight. Differences in walking speed were not related to changes in blood pressure, weight, waist circumference, triglycerides or glucose.. Several well-designed randomised controlled trials, controlling for exercise volume, report no effects of exercise intensity on plasma lipoproteins or on other cardiovascular risk factors.7-10 These trials describe long-term changes (after 3-8 months) in cardiovascular risk factors and the total weekly amount of exercise is limited (not more than 3 h or 1000-1200 calories/week).7-10 The present study describes changes in cardiovascular risk factors during exercise, and the daily amount of exercise in ...
Correlation of the six-minute walk distance (6MWD) with the distancewalked, the time spent walking, and the number of steps as measured by theaccelerometer.
News from Loftus ACCORD Walking Group. ​. Its been a busy few months for Loftus ACCORD Walking Group, with several guided walks taking place as well as work on footpaths around the Loftus area. The group has also been distributing copies of the four walks leaflets it produced with funding from Awards for All. Its planned and led six guided walks so far this year, with a total of some 150 walkers taking part; the group also delivered walks for Redcar & Cleveland Borough Councils Summer 2018 Walking Festival.. Footpath repair and enhancement work has been taking place in locations such as Swalwell Wood, Handale and along the path between Liverton and Waupley. This work has involved close collaboration with the borough council and the North York Moors National Park Authority. Marshall Best, Chair of the group says Loftus Parish was awarded Walkers are Welcome status in 2015 and since then volunteers have worked hard to provide walks, keep paths in good condition and promote the district as a ...
Walking on Stones Walking on Stones Walking on Stones. Reflexology for the Future by Connie S. Young. Walking on Stones. Walking on Stones Walking on Stones Walking on Stones. Methuselah Therapeutic value reflexology The
Among more than 13 000 postmenopausal women in the WHI, slower walking speeds at baseline were associated with higher risk of incident ischemic stroke. In multivariate analyses, compared to women in the fastest tertile of walking speed, those with walking speeds in the second tertile (1.06m/s to 1.24 m/s) had a 29% increase in incident ischemic stroke risk (95% CI: 0.92 to 1.82), and those in the slowest tertile (,1.06 m/s) had a 69% increased incident ischemic stroke risk (95% CI: 1.21 to 2.36). This relationship persisted after adjustment for other tests of physical performance and was not affected by exclusion of women with baseline disease that may have affected walking ability or speed, or those who had exceptionally slow walking speeds. Notably, the strength of the association of walking speed with incident ischemic stroke in this group of women is independent of and comparable, if not stronger, to established risk factors for stroke, including hypertension and diabetes.. Stroke is one of ...
View more ,Introduction: Walking tests, including the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT), have been used to assess functional capacity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Learning effects through repeated practice have been reported for some field walking tests. However, the repeatability of ESWT at various time points, i.e. within the same day, within the week and one week apart, has not been examined. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the repeatability of ESWT overtime to determine whether or not a learning effect existed. Methods: Twenty‐two participants diagnosed with COPD [age 71 ± 6 years; FEV1% predicted 54 ± 24%] were recruited. Participants performed two incremental shuttle walk tests to determine the walking speed for the ESWT and a practice ESWT (Ep) to determine whether the ESWT level was appropriate. ESWT 1(E1) and ESWT 2(E2) were performed on the same day, 30 min apart; ESWT 3(E3) was performed within a week from E2; ESWT 4(E4) was performed one ...
The aim of this study was to investigate the association between walking ability and muscle atrophy in the trunk and lower limbs. Subjects in this longitudinal study were 21 elderly women who resided in nursing homes. The thicknesses of the following trunk and lower-limb muscles were measured using B-mode ultrasound: rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, transversus abdominis, erector spinae, lumbar multifidus, psoas major, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior. Maximum walking speed was used to represent walking ability. Maximum walking speed and muscle thickness were assessed before and after a 12-month period. Of the 17 measured muscles of the trunk and lower limbs, age-related muscle atrophy in elderly women was greatest in the erector spinae, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, and tibialis anterior muscles. Correlation coefficient analyses
If you have decided to start a walking program, you might want to engage the support of a fitness or health coach. A certified coach can answer questions, allow individuals to identify current or potential barriers, devise a solution, and help employees implement a personal walking plan. In addition they may help individuals to modify unhealthy behaviors and set realistic goals about weight loss! In a recent Research and Marketing report http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reportinfo.asp?report_id=302705 the health coach was identified as a key player on the team of professionals encouraging employees to take charge of their health. Think about a health coach for your company walking program. It is worth the investment ...
1. This study examined the influence of brisk walking on skeletal status in post-menopausal women.. 2. Subjects were 84 healthy women aged 60-70 years who were previously sedentary and at least 5 years post-menopausal. Subjects were randomly assigned to walking (n = 43) and control (n = 41) groups. Walkers followed a 12-month, largely unsupervised programme of brisk walking. The bone mineral density of the lumbar spine, femoral neck and calcaneus and broadband ultrasonic attention of the calcaneus were measured at baseline and after 12 months.. 3. Forty control subjects and 38 walkers completed the study. Walkers built up to 20.4 ± 3.8 min/day (mean ± SD) of brisk walking. Body mass increased in control subjects relative to walkers [mean change (SE) ± 0.9 (0.3) and −0.1 (0.3) kg respectively; P = 0.04]. Predicted maximum oxygen uptake increased in walkers by 2.1 (0.9) ml min−1 kg−1 (P = 0.02). Bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and calcaneus fell in control subjects [-0.005 ...
Balance walking (also called Nordic walking, walking with poles, or walking with trekking poles) offers many health benefits. Recently, Krin Patrie, Director of Balance Walking, spoke with me about the benefits of walking with poles, including the benefits for people with neuromuscular disease. - Balance Walking and Neuromuscular Disease - Neuromuscular Diseases at BellaOnline
TY - JOUR. T1 - Association of six-minute walk distance with subsequent lower extremity events in peripheral artery disease. AU - Nayak, Pooja. AU - Guralnik, Jack M.. AU - Polonsky, Tamar S.. AU - Kibbe, Melina R.. AU - Tian, Lu. AU - Zhao, Lihui. AU - Criqui, Michael H.. AU - Ferrucci, Luigi. AU - Li, Lingyu. AU - Zhang, Dongxue. AU - McDermott, Mary M.. N1 - Funding Information: The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: this work was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R01-HL083064 and R01-109244) and by intramural support from the National Institute on Aging and the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center. Publisher Copyright: © The Author(s) 2020. Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.. PY - 2020/8/1. Y1 - 2020/8/1. N2 - The prognostic significance of the six-minute walk distance for lower extremity events in people with peripheral artery disease (PAD) is unknown. This ...
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Your physiotherapist has developed a physical activity program of morning exercises and daily walking for you to complete during your first few weeks following surgery. The program has been designed to help your recovery and prepare you for cardiac rehabilitation.. The day you travel home from hospital, we ask that you rest and enjoy your return home. The next day (day one at home) begin the stretch/strength exercise program that a therapist reviewed with you prior to your departure from hospital.. The following day (second full day at home) begin your walking program. The program is designed to build your endurance, and later build up your speed. It is designed for you based on your heart function, your recovery in hospital and your previous level of activity.. The goal is for you to exercise regularly for a positive lifestyle, as well as to help you return to the activities that you most enjoy (swimming, golf, gardening, etc.). In the longer term, your goal is to exercise five to seven times ...
Recent advances in non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies have shown the feasibility of neural decoding for both users gait intent and continuous kinematics. However, the dynamics of cortical involvement in human upright walking with a closed-loop BCI has not been investigated. This study aims to investigate the changes of cortical involvement in human treadmill walking with and without BCI control of a walking avatar. Source localization revealed significant differences in cortical network activity between walking with and without closed-loop BCI control. Our results showed sustained α/µ suppression in the Posterior Parietal Cortex and Inferior Parietal Lobe, indicating increases of cortical involvement during walking with BCI control. We also observed significant increased activity of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) in the low frequency band suggesting the presence of a cortical network involved in error monitoring and motor learning. Additionally, the presence of low γ
TY - JOUR. T1 - Relationship between dual-task gait speed and walking activity poststroke. AU - Feld, Jody A.. AU - Zukowski, Lisa A.. AU - Howard, Annie G.. AU - Giuliani, Carol A.. AU - Altmann, Lori J.P.. AU - Najafi, Bijan. AU - Plummer, Prudence. PY - 2018/1/1. Y1 - 2018/1/1. N2 - Background and Purpose-Gait speed does not adequately predict whether stroke survivors will be active in the community. This may be because traditional single-task gait speed does not sufficiently reproduce the demands of walking in the real world. This study assessed whether dual-task gait speed accounts for variance in daily ambulatory activity above what can be predicted with habitual (single task) gait speed in community-dwelling stroke survivors. Methods-Twenty-eight community-dwelling individuals, 58.2 years of age (SD=16.6), 8.9 months poststroke (interquartile range, 3.7-19.4), completed a gait and cognitive task in single- and dual-task conditions. Daily ambulatory activity was captured using a physical ...
Background Motor intervention plays an important role in reducing the disabilities of Down syndrome (DS). A lack of balance and postural control has created motor problems in DS patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of backward walking on postural stability of DS patients. Materials and Methods Sixteen DS children with 8-10 age range were selected by convenience sampling method and assigned to control and experimental groups. The experimental group performed backward walking training for 8 weeks (2 sessions per week, each session for 25 min). The dynamic postural stability of both groups was examined by Biodex stability system (general balance, medial collateral and anterior-posterior balance indexes) before, during and after the training (pretest, 4th week, 8th week and 18th week). To analyze the data and test the hypotheses, independent t test was used. Results The results of this study showed that the three balance indexes in the experimental group was drastically lower
This study tested the psychometric properties of the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) in overweight patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.
UNLABELLED: Jung T, Lee D, Charalambous C, Vrongistinos K. The influence of applying additional weight to the affected leg on gait patterns during aquatic treadmill walking in people poststroke.. OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the application of additional weights to the affected leg influences gait patterns of people poststroke during aquatic treadmill walking.. DESIGN: Comparative gait analysis.. SETTING: University-based aquatic therapy center.. PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling volunteers (n=22) with chronic hemiparesis caused by stroke.. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable.. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Spatiotemporal and kinematic gait parameters.. RESULTS: The use of an ankle weight showed an increase in the stance phase percentage of gait cycle (3%, P=.015) when compared with no weight. However, the difference was not significant after a Bonferroni adjustment was applied for a more stringent statistical analysis. No significant differences were found in cadence and stride length. The use of an ankle ...
Walking canes are not just humble means of providing support when walking. Canes have graduated to being a fashion accessory-an essential part of wardrobe ensembles too. There are no boundaries to the creative liberties in this niche. The propositions continue to grow in the current collection of walking canes. However, canes of an era gone by are still valued for their antique attributes. Also called collectibles or collectible walking canes, these are not used for hiking or walking.
Buy Walking Boots & Walking Casts for less. Get the lowest prices on post op walking shoes, walking boots, walking casts and more online at ScripHessco.
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Treadmill exercise is commonly used as an alternative to over-ground walking or running. Increasing evidence indicated the kinetics of treadmill exercise is different from that of over-ground. Biomechanics of treadmill or over-ground exercises have been investigated in terms of energy consumption, ground reaction force, and surface EMG signals. These indexes cannot accurately characterize the musculoskeletal loading, which directly contributes to tissue injuries. This study aimed to quantify the differences of lower limb joint angles and muscle forces in treadmills and over-ground exercises. 10 healthy volunteers were required to walk at 100 and 120 steps/min and run at 140 and 160 steps/min on treadmill and ground. The joint flexion angles were obtained from the motion capture experiments and were used to calculate the muscle forces with an inverse dynamic method. Hip, knee, and ankle joint motions of treadmill and over-ground conditions were similar in walking, yet different in running. Compared with
Background: Despite current rehabilitation programs, long-term engagement in physical activity remains a significant challenge for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure (HF). Novel strategies to promote physical activity in these populations are greatly needed. Emerging literature on the benefits of both mind-body interventions and web-based interventions provide the rationale for the development of the Mindful Steps intervention for increasing walking behavior. Objective: This study aims to develop a novel multimodal mind-body exercise intervention through adaptation of an existing web-based physical activity intervention and incorporation of mind-body exercise, and to pilot test the delivery of the new intervention, Mindful Steps, in a randomized controlled feasibility trial in older adults with COPD and/or HF. Methods: In phase 1, guided by a theoretical conceptual model and review of the literature on facilitators and barriers of physical activity in COPD and
Even though these are some of the walking benefits for weight loss, it is crucial to know what are the walking workouts that will help you reap these rewards. Start off out with a warm up and then stroll up and down a hill followed by brisk walking on flat terrain. Ask your medical professional or physical therapist for suggestions ahead of lacing up your walking shoes. If you wont be tempted by the stores(purchasing), purchasing malls are also very good places for walking around. Numerous men and women recognize the neighborhood mall as an excellent place to walk for exercising - secure, fun and climate-controlled.. A media streaming device makes it possible for him to connect a Television to the Net so he can watch Tv shows, motion pictures and a lot more from web sites such as Netflix, Hulu Plus and Amazon Immediate Video (based on the variety of media streaming player). But there are some good medical doctors out there who have the machine and use it to SUPPLEMENT their therapies. Aerobic: ...
We investigated the impact of Nordic walking (NW) on gait patterns in individuals with Parkinsons disease (PD) following a 6-week NW familiarization. Twelve participants with PD and 12 healthy older adults took part in a gait analysis walking with and without poles (NP). Results showed larger knee power (knee extensor: K2) on the most affected leg in NW compared to NP (P = .01). On the less affected side, larger power absorption (knee extensor: K3) was found during preswing (K3) compared to older adults in both NP and NW (P = 0.01). NW showed longer stride length and single support time (P , .01) compared to NP. Walking with poles improved gait spatial-temporal characteristics and power profiles at the knee joint both on the less and most affected sides in individuals with PD. NW could be beneficial to help regain a more functional gait pattern in PD. ...
Background: Many mHealth programs exist for increasing physical activity (PA) yet few have been tested for their effects on fitness, fatness, and health related quality of life (HRQOL).. Methods: We conducted a 3-month randomized trial that examined 2 message formats that promoted the 10,000 steps/day walking program. Women (n=70), aged 48±12 years, BMI 35.0 ±3.8, with self-report of no regular (PA), were given a FitBit and smartphone, which automatically sent daily step data to us daily. Daily messages with feedback about meeting step goals and motivation to add 500 more daily steps/week were sent to the subjects smartphone. We compared the Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) consisting of audio, video and graphs versus the Short Message Service (SMS), or plain text messages. Message content was the same for both groups. Outcomes included the 6-minute walk test, weight, waist and hip circumferences, BMI, SF-36, and Profile of Mood States (POMS). We hypothesized that MMS subjects would be more ...
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Many studies showed that robot-assisted gait training might improve walking of patients after stroke. The question remains whether patients with other neurological diagnoses can improve their ability to walk by training in a gait center. Aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the effects of a gait center training in inpatient neurological rehabilitation on walking ability. We implemented a gait center training in addition to individual inpatient rehabilitation. Our primary outcome was walking ability based on the Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC). Our secondary outcomes were vital capacity and blood pressure. We predefined subgroups of patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and critical illness myopathy (CIM) and polyneuropathy (CIP). We included 780 patients from our inpatient rehabilitation center in our cohort study. We analyzed 329 patients with ischemic, 131 patients with hemorrhagic stroke and 74 patients with CIP/ CIM. A large number of patients were able to improve
Intermittent claudication, according to the Fontaine classification, is a classical symptom of stage II peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) of the lower limbs. It results from the progression of atherosclerosis leading to the narrowing and complete occlusion of arteries. It manifests with pain in the muscles of the lower limbs which forces the patients to interrupt their current activity. Supervised treadmill training is believed to lead to the most favourable outcomes in the form of improved pain-free walking distance and maximum walking distance. The improvement in pain related to intermittent claudication and in functional performance are probably the combined effect of various mechanisms in response to the exercise training. The most important mechanisms include: improved skeletal muscle metabolism, favourable haemorheologic changes, delayed progression of atherosclerosis, peripheral blood flow adaptation, improved economics of walking, and changed perception of pain. The role of ...
BACKGROUND: Societies face the challenge of keeping people active as they age. Walkable neighborhoods have been associated with physical activity, but more rigorous analytical approaches are needed. OBJECTIVES: We used longitudinal data from adult residents of Brisbane, Australia (40 - 65 years of age at baseline) to estimate effects of changes in neighborhood characteristics over a 6-y period on the likelihood of walking for transport. METHODS: Analyses included 2,789 - 9,747 How Areas Influence Health and Activity (HABITAT) cohort participants from 200 neighborhoods at baseline (2007) who completed up to three follow-up questionnaires (through 2013). Principal components analysis was used to derive a proxy measure of walkability preference. Environmental predictors were changes in street connectivity, residential density, and land use mix within a onekilometer network buffer. Associations with any walking and minutes of walking were estimated using logistic and linear regression, including ...
2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: In people with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the minimal detectable difference (MDD) in endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) performance following exercise training is unclear. We sought to determine the MDD for ESWT performance following supervised ground-based walking training using anchor- and distribution-based approaches and report whether these values exceeded random variation in test performance. Methods: Participants with COPD trained for 30-45 min, 2-3 times weekly for 8-10 weeks. The ESWT was performed before and after the training period. Immediately after training, participants rated their change in walking ability using a Global Rating of Change scale. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to derive the value that best separated those who perceived their improvement in walking ability to be at least a little better from almost the same, hardly any change. These values were compared with those calculated ...
Exercise training improves walking tolerance in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD).1-8 Typically this includes walking as the principal mode of training.4,5 Patients with PAD who walk with pain have greater improvements in walking distances than those who walk only to the point at which pain begins.6,7 However, forcing patients with PAD to walk with increasing pain is challenging as because of their personality type they tend to experience negative emotions more readily than people without PAD.9 They may therefore not tolerate pain well, which could lead to poor attendance at training sessions. However, no studies have specifically examined the relationship between prescription of exercise likely to cause pain and compliance with exercise programmes. Walker et al. found that a 6-week pain-free upper limb cycle ergometry exercise training programme and lower limb cycling training produced equal improvements in maximal walking distance (MWD) and pain-free walking distance (PFWD).1 ...
Stroke is a representative chronic disease with symptoms of movement and sensory disorders that affect the consciousness, language, cognition, and also cause paralysis [1,2]. Among them, motor neurons and sensory nerve damage cause stroke patients to have difficulty in daily life due to problems in balance and walking [3]. The main causes of such gait disturbances are decreased muscle activity, lack of balance sense, and reduced weight-bearing capacity [4], which limits the overall gait due to the slow gait cycle and reduced gait velocity [5]. Due to difficulties in performing daily life activities and requiring assistance, persons affected by stroke often exhibit low self-esteem, depression, and decreased quality of life [6].. Several studies have suggested various intervention methods to improve balance and walking ability for persons with stroke. Many studies have implemented treadmill gait training in patients with hemiplegia in order to improve postural symmetry by extending the weight ...
Measurement of foot pressure distribution (FPD) is clinically useful for evaluation of foot and gait pathologies. The effects of healthy aging on FPD during walking are not well known. This study evaluated FPD during normal walking in healthy young and elderly subjects. We studied 9 young (30 ± 5.2 years), and 6 elderly subjects (68.7 ± 4.8 years). FPD was measured during normal walking speed using shoe insoles with 99 capacitive sensors. Measured parameters included gait phase characteristics, mean and maximum pressure and force, and relative load. Time-series measurements of each variable for all sensors were grouped into 9 anatomical masks. Elderly subjects had lower normalized maximum pressure for the medial and lateral calcaneal masks, and for all medial masks combined. In the medial calcaneus mask, the elderly group also had a lower absolute maximum and lower mean and normalized mean pressures and forces, compared to young subjects. Elderly subjects had lower maximum force and normalized maximum
The overall aims of the studies were to investigate the effects of different training modalities on exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with moderate or severe COPD and, further, to explore two of the physical tests used in pulmonary rehabilitation.. In study I, the 12-minute walking distance (12MWD) did not increase on retesting in patients with exercise-induced hypoxemia (EIH) whereas 12MWD increased significantly on retesting in the non-EIH patients. In study II, we found that the incremental shuttle walking test was as good a predictor of peak exercise capacity (W peak) as peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) is. In study III, we investigated the effects of two different combination training programmes when training twice a week for eight weeks. One programme was mainly based on endurance training (group A) and the other on resistance training and callisthenics (group B). W peak and 12MWD increased in group A but not in group B. HRQoL, anxiety and depression ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Gait Coordination After Stroke: Benefits of Acoustically Paced Treadmill Walking. AU - Roerdink, M.. AU - Lamoth, C.J.C.. AU - Kwakkel, G.. AU - van Wieringen, P.C.W.. AU - Beek, P.J.. PY - 2007. Y1 - 2007. N2 - Background and Purpose: Gait coordination often is compromised after stroke. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acoustically paced treadmill walking as a method for improving gait coordination in people after stroke. Participants: Ten people after stroke volunteered for the study and comprised the experimental group. Nine elderly people who were healthy served as a control group. Methods: Gait cycle parameters, interlimb coordination, and auditory-motor coordination were examined while participants walked on a treadmill with and without acoustic pacing. Results: Stride frequency was adjusted to different acoustic pacing frequencies in all participants. In people after strike, gait symmetry improved with acoustic pacing. They predominantly ...
Many patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) have impaired gait and balance capacity, which may impact daily functioning. Reduced walking speed and impaired gait stability are considered important underlying factors for reduced daily functioning. With conventional therapy, patients are limited in training gait stability, but this can be trained on a treadmill in a virtual environment, such as with the Gait Real-time Analysis Interactive Lab (GRAIL). Our objective was to evaluate the effect of 6-weeks GRAIL-training on gait and dynamic balance in ambulatory iSCI patients. In addition, the long-term effect was assessed. Fifteen patients with chronic iSCI participated. The GRAIL training consisted of 12 one-hour training sessions during a 6-week period. Patients performed 2 minute walking tests on the GRAIL in a self-paced mode at the 2nd, and 3rd (baseline measurements) and at the 12th training session. Ten patients performed an additional measurement after 6 months. The primary outcome was
I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understand the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks, who had a genius, so to speak, for sauntering.- Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Everything is within walking distance if you have the time.-Stephen Wright (1955-)For approximately six million years, humans have walked the earth. This is the story of how, why, and to what effect we put one foot in front of the other. Walking has been the primary mode of locomotion for humans until very recent times when we began to sit and ride-first on horses and in carriages, then trains and bicycles, and finally cars, trucks, buses, and airplanes-rather than go on foot. The particular way we saunter, clomp, meander, shuffle, plod along, jaunt, tramp, and wander on foot conveys a wealth of information about our identity, condition, and destination. In this fast-stepping social history, Joseph A. Amato takes us on a journey of walking-from the first human migrations to marching Roman legions
Women with other risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol levels and obesity, greatly benefited. According to the authors of this study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, these results should encourage women who have no leisure-time physical activity, as the benefits are great and the effort is minimal. It was the amount of time spent walking, not the pace, that counted, the study found; women who strolled benefited as much as those who walked more rigorously. A brisk walk is more effective, but any kind of walking appears to be beneficial. So keep that body in shape! Youll look better, youll feel better, and youll be protecting your heart against disease. Ask your doctor of chiropractic for more information. Reference:. Lee IM, Rexrode KM, Cook NR, et al. Physical activity and coronary heart disease in women. The Journal of the American Medical Association 2001:285(11), pp. 1447-1453.. For additional information on womens health, go to ...
Its not surprising that tactile interaction with a smartphone while walking can increase the risk of traumatic injury, but texting while walking also affects
If you walk a lot its recommended to buy walking shoes which are designed to enhance the mechanics of walking and improve walking efficiency. Walking