Definition of variola virus in the Definitions.net dictionary. Meaning of variola virus. What does variola virus mean? Information and translations of variola virus in the most comprehensive dictionary definitions resource on the web.
Citation. Massung, R. F., Liu, L. I., Qi, J., Knight, J. C., Yuran, T. E., Kerlavage, A. R., Parsons, J. M., Venter, J. C., Esposito, J. J.. Analysis of the Complete Genome of Smallpox Variola Major Virus Strain Bangladesh-1975. Virology. 1994 Jun 01; 201(2): 215-40.. PubMed Citation. Abstract. We analyzed the 186,102 base pairs (bp) that constitute the entire DNA genome of a highly virulent variola virus isolated from Bangladesh in 1975. The linear, double-stranded molecule has relatively small (725 bp) inverted terminal repeat (ITR) sequences containing three 69-bp direct repeat elements, a 54-bp partial repeat element, and a 105-base telomeric end-loop that can be maximally base-paired to contain 17 mismatches. Proximal to the right-end ITR sequences are another seven 69-bp elements and a 53- and a 27-bp partial element. Sequence analysis showed 187 closely spaced open reading frames specifying putative major proteins containing , or = 65 amino acids. Most of the virus proteins correspond to ...
Variola atau cacar adalah penyakit menular pada manusia yang disebabkan oleh virus Variola major atau Variola minor.[1] Penyakit ini dikenal dengan nama Latinnya, Variola atau Variola vera, yang berasal dari kata Latin varius, yang berarti "berbintik", atau varus yang artinya "jerawat". Variola muncul pada pembuluh darah kecil di kulit serta di mulut dan kerongkongan. Di kulit, penyakit ini menyebabkan ruam, dan kemudian luka berisi cairan. V. major menyebabkan penyakit yang lebih serius dengan tingkat kematian 30-35%. V. minor menyebabkan penyakit yang lebih ringan (dikenal juga dengan alastrim, cottonpox, milkpox, whitepox, dan Cuban itch) yang menyebabkan kematian pada 1% penderitanya.[2][3] Akibat jangka panjang infeksi V. major adalah bekas luka, umumnya di wajah, yang terjadi pada 65-85% penderita.[4] ...
A severe prodrome lasts 3 to 4 days, followed by prolonged high fever and severe symptoms of toxemia. The enanthem on the tongue and palate is extensive. Skin lesions mature relatively slowly; by days 7 to 8, vesicles are flat, and nearly flush with the skin surface. Unlike ordinary-type smallpox, vesicles contain little fluid, are soft, and may contain hemorrhage. Death is often associated with pneumonia. Historically, most patients with flat smallpox were children (approximately 70%) and unvaccinated persons lacking cellular immunity. Case-fatality rates are at least 95% in unvaccinated patients, and 66% in vaccinated patients. 4. Hemorrhagic smallpox (3% of cases) This form is difficult to diagnose clinically unless there is an ongoing smallpox epidemic or known exposure. Diagnosis is typically by biopsy. The prodrome is severe and prolonged, with toxemia and prostration. There is extensive bleeding into the skin, nasal and oral mucous membranes, and gastrointestinal tract. This form usually ...
Define variola. variola synonyms, variola pronunciation, variola translation, English dictionary definition of variola. n. See smallpox. n the technical name for smallpox vaˈriolar adj n. smallpox. va•ri′o•lous, va•ri′o•lar, adj. Noun 1. variola - a highly contagious viral...
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Smallpox, the only human infectious disease to have been eradicated, remains a threat as a potential agent of bioterrorism. Mortality rates during natural outbreaks of smallpox varied widely, a feature partially attributed to strain-specific virulence of the etiological agent, the orthopoxvirus variola virus (VARV) [1]. An understanding of the genetic determinants of virulence of VARV is critical for predicting the potential of different strains for causing severe epidemics.. We analyzed the genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of a collection of 35 temporally, geographically and epidemiologically diverse VARV isolates housed at the US Centers for Disease Control and Preventions secure repository (previously described in [2]) for associations with VARV virulence. We investigated the only known metric of innate virulence of these isolates, their case fatality rates (CFRs), which range from ,1-30% [2]. Previously, outbreaks of smallpox have been classified as major when they ...
The lesions from these two specimens are from an early stage of smallpox in 1776. The disease is likely to have been contracted in utero. From the Hunterian Collection, Royal College of Surgeons, London.. DEFINITION: Smallpox is an acute contagious disease caused by variola virus, a member of the orthopoxvirus family. Smallpox, which is believed to have originated over 3,000 years ago in India or Egypt, is one of the most devastating diseases known to humanity.. For centuries, repeated epidemics swept across continents, decimating populations and changing the course of history. In some ancient cultures, smallpox was such a major killer of infants that custom forbade the naming of a newborn until the infant had caught the disease and proved it would survive…. Smallpox had two main forms: variola major and variola minor. The two forms showed similar lesions. The disease followed a milder course in variola minor, which had a case-fatality rate of less than 1 per cent. The fatality rate of variola ...
Smallpox was a very dangerous disease with a high mortality rate. It is caused by a virus. There are two different species of viruses that can cause the disease. They are Variola major and Variola minor. Some people also call smallpox Variola, from the Latin work for "spotted" which is also the viruses scientific name. Only humans can get this disease. Variola major kills between 20% and 40% of those who get it. Variola minor kills only about 1%. Many people who survive become blind because of the damage the virus does to the eyes.[1] During the first half of the 20th century, between 300 million and 500 million people died of this disease. Even in 1967, about 15 million people caught the disease, and about two million people died of it, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The first vaccine for smallpox used the results of cowpox infections. It was invented by Edward Jenner. It was used to stop people from getting smallpox. The word "vaccine" came from "vaccina", the Latin word ...
The threats posed by the poxvirus have been effectively dealt with, leading to the eradication of the diseases caused by the virus. Smallpox had already been eradicated from most countries in Europe and the US by 1940s but it still posed a serious threat in the Indian subcontinent and much of Africa in the 1960s. The World Health Organization (WHO) decided to take strong actions for the eradication of the disease and listed smallpox on the top of the list for eradication in 1967. The WHO smallpox eradication unit was set up in the same year. After years of effort and investment into the eradication of smallpox, the last cases of variola major occured in the Indian subcontinent in 1975 while the last case of variola minor occured in Somalia in 1977. The last cases of smallpox occured in a Birmigam laboratory in 1979. Smallpox had been fought, and fought successfully. Smallpox has been eradicated globally but there are concerns about the potential use of variola virus as a weapon of terror. As a ...
The threats posed by the poxvirus have been effectively dealt with, leading to the eradication of the diseases caused by the virus. Smallpox had already been eradicated from most countries in Europe and the US by 1940s but it still posed a serious threat in the Indian subcontinent and much of Africa in the 1960s. The World Health Organization (WHO) decided to take strong actions for the eradication of the disease and listed smallpox on the top of the list for eradication in 1967. The WHO smallpox eradication unit was set up in the same year. After years of effort and investment into the eradication of smallpox, the last cases of variola major occured in the Indian subcontinent in 1975 while the last case of variola minor occured in Somalia in 1977. The last cases of smallpox occured in a Birmigam laboratory in 1979. Smallpox had been fought, and fought successfully. Smallpox has been eradicated globally but there are concerns about the potential use of variola virus as a weapon of terror. As a ...
FACTS: Smallpox is a deadly disease caused by the variola virus. From ancient Egypt and Greece, to China and the Americas, it has killed countless millions for centuries. Smallpox arrived in the New World with Columbus and Cortes, and it devastated Native American populations who had no immunities to the virus. The disease played a major role in the conquest of Mexico and Peru, as well as the European settlement of North America. In India there is even a goddess of smallpox, Sitala. Her name means "the cool one." If you are a virologist, perhaps you might think variola is pretty cool. But rest assured, smallpox is a lethal disease that has played no small part in human history.. Variola is one of the largest and most complicated viruses known. It invades a human cell and forces it to reproduce the virus until there are thousands of viruses inside the cell. The cell bursts and showers the virus onto other cells. The disease is horrible, causing high fever, red pus-filled blisters and oozing ...
Three distinct chimpanzee Fabs against the A33 envelope glycoprotein of vaccinia virus were isolated and converted into complete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with human g
The newly obtained Variola virus samples are the oldest human virus ever to be sequenced, Dr. Edward Holmes of the University of Sydney told BBC News. Radiocarbon dating showed that the boy lived sometime around 1650 AD (a period when smallpox was common across Europe) but the evolutionary history of the disease itself led to a surprising discovery.. "This fossil tells us that the virus evolutionary history is much more recent than we thought- its actually only hundreds of years rather than thousands of years," Dr. Holmes explained. But he added that it was not possible to determine exactly where the disease came from, when it may have first appeared in humans, and what its ancestor might have been.. Interestingly, the researchers told NPR that the mummified child showed no signs of the disease, including pockmarks. Study co-author Henrik Poinar told the media outlet that the disease seems to be "human specific," unlike other pox viruses, which tend to affect other animals. If smallpox did ...
Humanitys worst scourge, the smallpox virus, may finally wind up on death row in May if health officials decide to destroy the last known samples. The virus was eliminated in human populations more than 30 years ago, but several international groups want to kill any remaining virus samples stored in test tubes on two continents.. Destruction of the smallpox virus, which was eradicated in the 1970s, has been mulled since 1980, but World Health Organization officials renewed debate about the matter earlier this year and will decide the viruses fate at an upcoming meeting.. Two labs possess the last known live samples of the variola virus - the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and a Russian facility in Siberia. Officials in developing nations, where smallpox is more likely to spread should it resurface, have been pushing for their destruction since 1980. The World Health Assembly decided to kill the samples in 1996, but they have been granted stays of execution in the decade ...
Smallpox is now a disease of historical interest only, its eradication having been certified by the World Health Assembly on May 8, 1980. 1 An exanthematous viral disease, it was once prevalent throughout the world, existing as an endemic infection wherever concentrations of population were sufficient to sustain transmission. Outbreaks of variola major, the only known variety until the end of the 19th century, resulted in case-fatality rates of 20% or more. Most of those who survived had distinctive residual facial pockmarks, and some were blind. A second variety, variola minor, produced less severe illness and was associated with case-fatality rates of 1% or less. It was first described in South Africa by de Korte 2 and in the United States by Chapin 3 and subsequently became the prevalent variety throughout the United States, parts of South America, and Europe as well as some areas of eastern and southern Africa. 4
Diagnosis Code 050.0 information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, ICD-10 conversion and references to the diseases index.
There is no longer any good reason to preserve lab samples of smallpox virus, an organism responsible for mass death and destruction, says Gareth Williams
Our Department has a journal club every Friday, when research folk (staff and students) get together to hear a postgrad student present an interesting new paper. Last Friday Alta Hattingh from my lab gave a thought-provoking and insightful presentation on whether or not smallpox virus should be destroyed - so I asked her to turn…
Smallpox is caused by the variola virus, which can be spread from person to person via respiratory droplets produced in the nose, mouth, and throat of someone who is infected and has begun to show signs of illness. After a person has been exposed to the virus, there is an incubation period of between 7 and 17 days prior to the onset of symptoms, which include high fever, severe headache and backache, and often vomiting and tremors. Two to five days later, the characteristic smallpox rash develops. It begins as flat, round lesions, primarily on the face and forearms, and evolves into deep, pus-filled blisters that may cover the entire body, including the palms and soles of the feet. Some patients have a fever throughout the course of the rash (two to four weeks), and often the blisters cause significant pain. In the last stage of the rash scabs form and fall off, leaving pitted scars. Some smallpox survivors are blind as a result of deep scarring in the eye area. Smallpox during pregnancy often ...
Smallpox, to take one counterexample, is not a zoonosis. Its caused by variola virus, which under natural conditions infects only humans. (Laboratory conditions are another matter; the virus has sometimes been inflicted experimentally on nonhuman primates or other animals, usually for vaccine research.) That helps explain why a global campaign mounted by the World Health Organization (WHO) to eradicate smallpox was, as of 1980, successful. Smallpox could be eradicated because that virus, lacking ability to reside and reproduce anywhere but in a human body (or a carefully watched lab animal), couldnt hide. Likewise poliomyelitis, a viral disease that has afflicted humans for millennia but that (for counterintuitive reasons involving improved hygiene and delayed exposure of children to the virus) became a fearsome epidemic threat during the first half of the twentieth century, especially in Europe and North America. In the United States, the polio problem peaked in 1952 with an outbreak that ...
Fortunately, in April 1977, India was declared a small pox free country. Small pox was once a major killer throughout the world and its eradication has prevented two million deaths, a few hundred cases of blindness and 10-15 million cases of diseases. Causative Agent Small pox is an infectious disease caused by the variola virus…. [ Continue Reading → ]. ...
To register with WHO all recombinant plasmids containing variola virus DNA sequences produced in the laboratories of the Russian Federation & provide an annual inventory on the national & international distribution of these plasmids. To submit an annual report to WHO on the relevant work of the Centre, including the two annual inventories as defined above in TOR 2 and 3. ...
Greenpeace has announced a series of efforts to protect bacteria from antibiotics. In the environmentalist organizations official statement it reads: "Humans must respect the other species on earth, most of which have been here long before we have." According to Greenpeace, the worlds bacteria and viruses continue to suffer at the hands of human-made anti-septic solutions, antibiotics, and other medicines. "Billions of bacteria die each day because of human actions," reads the statement. "Please help us stop this massacre by eradicating antibiotics, disinfection, and general hygiene. It is paramount that we preserve our environment and the natural order of the universe. We must stop playing God and attempting to change Nature." Already human action has brought to the brink of extinction unique species like Variola major, the virus responsible for smallpox. Greenpeace hopes its efforts will help preserve species of disease-causing bacteria and viruses for future generations.. ...
Health officials from 193 countries are gathering in Geneva, Switzerland, this week for the World Health Organizations annual meeting to discuss myriad health threats of today.
B-cells are formed in the bone marrow, and provide humoral immunity mediated by antibodies. They can recognise parts of antigens free in solution, by fitting them to the antibodies they carry on their surface. When a particular B-cell come into contact with an antigen which it fits, the B-cell swells and divides (through mitosis, or clonal selection)and the new activated B-cells (Plasma cells) secrete antibodies proteins that attack the invader. Once activated, a B-cell can pump out more than 10 million antibody molecules per hour. The antibodies neutralize or precipitate the destruction of the antigens by complement enzymes or scavenger cells. The B-cell can also produce different isotypes of the antibodies, who fit the same antigen but who defend the body in different ways ...
Actually, "inoculate" really does mean "stick it in your eye." Thats the way the first smallpox immunizations were administered. Serum was made from victims of vaccinia (a related viral disease, cowpox. As one might suspect, since vaca" is cow. Smallpox is "variola.") and it was instilled into the eye of the protectee after the doctor pulled the lower lid down to make a sac to drip a drop or two into. So it was literally an "in-ocul-ation," and then the word got generalized to mean any immunization against you-name-it disease, no matter where it was given ...
CIDRAP News) When the World Health Assembly (WHA) considers the fate of the remaining stocks of smallpox virus this week, the debate is likely to be framed in part by a report from a group of independent experts that says the only strong reason for keeping the virus is to satisfy strict regulatory requirements for new vaccines and antivirals. ...
CIDRAP News) When the World Health Assembly (WHA) considers the fate of the remaining stocks of smallpox virus this week, the debate is likely to be framed in part by a report from a group of independent experts that says the only strong reason for keeping the virus is to satisfy strict regulatory requirements for new vaccines and antivirals. ...
ST-246 is a new drug in development for the treatment of patients exposed to the smallpox virus. ST-246 information includes news, clinical trial results and side effects.
In article ,aquilla.1141956093A at sadye.emba.uvm.edu,, aquilla at salus.med.uvm.edu (Tracy Aquilla) wrote: :This is a technical issue. Wheres the ethics here? Is it intrinsically :wrong to alter plant or pest populations by our cultural practices? If so, :how does genetic engineering differ from what we have been doing for :thousands of years? Is this any different from the eradication of the :smallpox virus? :This one is an economic issue, again, no ethics. The question here appears :to be, is it wrong to depress the economies of struggling countries, and :again, hasnt this been done for years without any genetic engineering? How :does this differ from making strides in yields through more conventional :means. : Tracy Dear Tracy, This is a very surprising argument: As soon as somebody defines a problem as technical or economic ethics has to move out. The fact that a knife is a technology does not mean that we do not have to differentiate between good and bad uses. We also have to ...
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A few weeks ago some colleagues and myself published a new manuscript looking at the diversity of the human skin virome. In our previous previous work, we evaluated the diversity of viruses on the skin. Other groups have looked at virus diversity at other body sites including the gut, lungs, and oral cavity. Our new paper focused on the diversity within viruses on the skin. It provided initial insight into the genomic variability associated with major viruses in the skin virome. In other words, it was a high resolution study of the virome ...
I just found out about a major virus today while I was taking with some friends. It is called the My Party virus and it totally crashes the computer. My friends computer got totally trashed when he got hit by this virus. It comes in E-Mail form and totally messes up everything. Plus it sends the virus to anyone on your address list. BE CAREFUL. :)
In the event of a smallpox outbreak in the United States, how long would it take for a vaccine to start protecting Americans by stimulating an immune response? A new national study led by Saint Louis University School of Medicine will attempt to answer this question.. General routine vaccinations for smallpox were stopped in the United States in 1971, and the world was declared free of smallpox in 1980. But because of the recent concern about biowarfare and bioterrorism throughout the world, the U.S. government is making efforts to improve its ability to protect its citizens in the event of a bioterrorist attack involving the smallpox virus (Variola major virus).. This study at Saint LouisUniversity will look at the ability of an investigational vaccine made by Bavarian Nordic to stimulate the immune system against smallpox.. Vaccines prevent disease by giving the body a jump-start at recognizing the infecting virus or bacteria, said Sharon Frey, MD, the principal investigator for the study at ...
Smallpox is a highly contagious disease caused by the smallpox virus (variola major or variola minor). Smallpox is often life threatening and causes death in around 30% affected individuals. It is transmitted from person to person by direct contact or by inhaling airborne infected particles called droplet nuclei. Contaminated bed linens or clothing can also spread infection.. Naturally occurring smallpox was eliminated worldwide in late 70s though a worldwide immunization campaign. However, the stockpiles of smallpox virus saved for research purposes may be used as a bioterrorism agent. There is no treatment for smallpox. A vaccine can prevent smallpox but is not usually recommended as it may lead to serious complications in some individuals.. ...
The concept of using variola virus in warfare is an old one. British colonial commanders considered distributing blankets from smallpox victims among Native Americans as a biological weapon.(1-3) During the American Civil War, allegations were made about the use of smallpox as a biological weapon, although there subsequently proved to be no definite evidence for such.(4,5) In the years leading up to and during World War II, the Japanese military explored weaponization of smallpox during the operations of Unit 731 in Mongolia and China.(6,7). Nevertheless, the actual potential of variola virus as a biological weapon remains controversial. Given the ease of administration and the availability of the vaccinia virus as a vaccine against smallpox,(8) some have argued that smallpox would have limited biological warfare potential.(9) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia, presently maintains over 12 million doses of vaccinia vaccine in storage, and WHO has in storage ...
Smallpox is a disease caused by the variola major virus. Some experts say that over the centuries it has killed more people than all other infectious diseases combined. Worldwide immunization stopped the spread of smallpox three decades ago. The last case was reported in 1977. Two research labs still house small amounts of the virus. Experts fear bioterrorists could use the virus to spread disease.smallpox spreads very easily from person to person. Symptoms are flu-like and include high fever, fatigue and headache and backache, followed by a rash with flat red sores. The United States Stopped routine smallpox vaccinations in 1972. Military and other high-risk groups continue to get the vaccine. The United States Has increased its supply of the vaccine in recent years. The vaccine makes some people sick, so doctors save it for those at highest risk of disease ...
Gail Carlson, MPH, PhD, Health Education Specialist, University of Missouri Columbia. The simple answer is no. The United States Department of Health and Human Services is not recommending that the general public be vaccinated for smallpox at this time. There is no reason to believe that smallpox presents an immediate threat.. Smallpox is a serious, contagious, and sometimes fatal infectious disease. However, it was basically eliminated from the world in the late 1970s. The last know case of smallpox in this country occurred in 1949. Routine vaccinations ended in 1972 because it was no longer necessary for prevention.. Why all the concern about smallpox? Some laboratory stockpiles of the virus do exist, some outside of this country. Events occurring in the fall of 2001 led to increased concern that the variola virus, the virus that causes smallpox, could be used as a biological agent by terrorists.. As a precautionary measure, the U.S. government is taking steps to deal with a possible smallpox ...
Many experts suspected North Korea had samples of the smallpox virus. A Russian intelligence report made public in 1993 accused Pyongyang of having a smallpox weapon, though that has not been publicly corroborated. A declassified U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency report from May 1994 also quotes an unnamed source saying Russian scientists gave North Korea smallpox samples ...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued guidelines for diagnosing and treating adverse reactions to smallpox vaccination in the preoutbreak setting. Smallpox vaccine is made from live vaccinia virus but does not contain variola virus, which causes smallpox.
December 2010 What Is Smallpox? Smallpox is a disease caused by Variola virus. Smallpox was once a very common and deadly disease. After the World Health Organization (WHO) led a global effort to eradicate smallpox through vaccinations, the last natural case of smallpox was reported in 1977. In 1978 there was a case of laboratory-acquired […]
The disease has been declared extinct by world health authorities for almost 30 years now, but since Sept. 11 concerns arose over using smallpox and other infections as weapons. With that in mind, the Centers for Disease Control has already stockpiled 192.5 million doses of the vaccine.. Smallpox is caused by the variola virus, which spreads through close contact with infected individuals or contaminated objects. ACAM2000 is made using a pox virus called vaccinia, which is related to but different from the virus that causes smallpox.. ...
View Stock Photo of Smallpox Virus Single Virion As Seen By Negative Stain Electron Microscopy. Find premium, high-resolution photos at Getty Images.
If we mapped out the family tree of poxviruses, then vaccinia virus (the causative agent of cowpox) and variola virus (the causative agent of smallpox) would probably be sisters. Or at the very least, cousins. This close heritage allows the relatively benign vaccinia virus to confer variola virus-protective immune responses in vaccinated individuals. A safely…
The small round scar on the upper arm of most Americans over 40 is the evidence of the defeat of the only human disease to be eradicated through immunization, the deadly smallpox. The last known case occurred in 1977 in Somalia. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the disease eradicated in 1980 following a global immunization campaign. Routine vaccination against "Variola virus" ended in American in 1972.. After the declaration that the disease was eliminated worldwide, an agreement was reached that any remaining stocks of the virus would be destroyed or sent to secure laboratories at Russias State Research Center of Virology or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the U.S. Last week, however, a forgotten carton of smallpox vials was found at the Bethesda Maryland campus of the National Institutes of Health as employees cleaned the lab in preparation for a move to the main campus of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in White Oak, Maryland.. The only human ...
Currently, smallpox vaccine is stocked in a lyophilized (freeze-dried) state by the CDC.14 Approximately 15 million doses are available in the United States for immunizing military personnel and for controlling a possible outbreak, but this amount is not sufficient for the entire US population. Studies conducted in 2001 suggest that the vaccine may be diluted at least 1:5 to 1:10 and still provide a satisfactory response.7,8 Additionally, a previously unaccounted-for stock of approximately 85 million doses of concentrated smallpox vaccine put aside by Aventis Pasteur (Swiftwater, PA) is still biologically active.15 In addition, the US government has contracted for delivery of approximately 200 million doses of tissue culture-derived vaccinia vaccine, which is currently in production but has not gone through the evaluation steps for approval by the US Food and Drug Administration.. In the event of a known bioterrorist release of smallpox virus, vaccine would be administered to exposed ...
A two-year-old boy who died around 1569 turns out not to have died from smallpox, as previously thought, but what we now know to have been Hepatitis B - thanks to scientists who sequenced the genome of his mummified body.. This finding marks a confirmation that the mysterious illness has existed in humans for centuries, said researchers from McMaster University in Canada.. The child in question was buried in the Basilica of Saint Domenico Maggiore in Naples, Italy, around 440 years old, give or take 60 years. Its body was exhumed between 1983 and 1985, and the pock-marks all over led researchers to believe smallpox - the Variola virus - was the cause of death.. Immunostaining and electron microscopy seemed to confirm the presence of smallpox particles in these pustules, and the case has been an important one in establishing the human history of smallpox, having been considered the oldest evidence for the virus in Medieval remains.. But the new evidence tips that theory right out the ...
Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced the discovery of forgotten vials containing the smallpox virus in an unused cold storage room at the National Institutes of Health, located in Bethesda, Maryland. Smallpox is known as one of the most deadly diseases in human history. As such, much like anthrax, it is generally feared that it could be used to commit bioterrorism were it to fall into the wrong hands.. The 16 samples of the deadly disease, packaged in freeze-dried vials of which six indicated that they contained variola, the virus that causes smallpox, were discovered in a Food and Drug Administration lab by scientists, who were preparing for a move to the main campus of the FDA, located in Silver Spring, Md. The samples were located in a cardboard container with index cards and cotton balls packed inside to keep them from moving within the box.. The CDC statement assures that no health risk exists to the public or to NIH staff from the smallpox vials discovered, ...
With hospitals and health care workers around the country refusing to join the Bush administrations smallpox vaccination program, a Senate committee approved a measure on Wednesday to compensate workers disabled or killed by the shots. The measure is intended to encourage vaccination among health care and emergency workers who might respond to an attack using the deadly smallpox virus. Last year, after months of internal debate, President Bush announced a voluntary program to inoculate as many as 439,000 doctors, nurses and emergency workers who would be the first to respond if terrorists obtain the smallpox virus and introduce it into the United States. Last week, federal health officials announced that seven health care workers had developed cardiac problems after being vaccinated, and that two of them had died of heart attacks.