Press Release issued Dec 19, 2016: The growth of the global market is largely driven by rapid urbanization and increasing level of air pollution across the globe and increasing prevalence of respiratory diseases. Some of the other factors driving the growth of the global market include growing geriatric population, changing lifestyle, increasing healthcare expenditure, and high prevalence of tobacco smoking. Increasing demand of point-of-care diagnosis, growing demand for home care therapeutic devices and high growth in developing countries in respiratory care device are expected to create ample opportunities for the manufacturers of respiratory care device. However, lack of awareness, reimbursement concerns and harmful effect of respiratory care device on neonatal are hampering the growth of the global respiratory care device market.
VOA]The United Nations is warning the world is not prepared to meet the needs of rapid urbanization. Authors of the World Economic and Social Survey 2013 are calling for bold new strategies to address the overwhelming needs of the more than 6.5-billion people who will be living in cities by 2050.. ...
By 2050, there will be 2.5 billion more people living in cities than today. How is rapid urbanization set to impact investors and the global economy?
The pdf for this report is 704KB. The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating the effects of urbanization on stream ecosystems in 15 metropolitan areas. Assessments began in 1999 in the metropolitan areas of Anchorage, Alaska; Birmingham, Alabama; Boston, Massachusetts; Chicago, Illinois; Cincinnati-Dayton, Ohio; Los Angeles, California; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Trenton, New Jersey; and Salt Lake City, Utah. Additional studies began in 2001 in Atlanta, Georgia; Reno-Sparks, Nevada; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Denver, Colorado; Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Portland-Salem-Eugene, Oregon. In all of these studies, urbanization is defined as the conversion from rural land uses to residential and commercial uses that are typical of recent, generally sprawling, urban-growth patterns. ...
The Concordia African Studies Working Group, in partnership with the African Studies Program at McGill Universitys Institute for the Study of International Development, presents the 2nd Concordia-McGill Universities African Studies Conference. The conference will take place on 3-4 October 2019.. Theme: Rethinking Africas Urban Future(s). Africa is experiencing rapid urbanization. More than 22 million people are added to Africas urban population every year. By 2035 more than half of the continents population will be living in urban areas and Africa will host six of the 41 megacities of the world. For some, urbanization is the single most important transformation taking place on the African continent. Thus viewed, rapid urbanization bears critical implications on the future of Africa. Focussing on the social-cultural, economic and political dimensions, rapid urbanization can lead to efficient social service delivery, economic growth, and changes in state-society relations and regime politics ...
In 2003 and 2004, 30 streams near Milwaukee and Green Bay, Wisconsin, were part of a national study by the U.S. Geological Survey to assess urbanization effects on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics along an agriculture-to-urban land-use gradient. A geographic information system was used to characterize natural landscape features that define the environmental setting and the degree of urbanization within each stream watershed. A combination of land cover, socioeconomic, and infrastructure variables were integrated into a multi-metric urban intensity index, scaled from 0 to 100, and assigned to each stream site to identify a gradient of urbanization within relatively homogeneous environmental settings. The 35 variables used to develop the final urban intensity index characterized the degree of urbanization and included road infrastructure (road area and road traffic index), 100-meter riparian land cover (percentage of impervious surface, shrubland, and agriculture), watershed land cover
The considerable gap between urban and rural areas in China has been one of those social problems during the urbanization process. Since the early 2000s, an increasing number of theoretical and empirical studies have discussed the association between urbanization and urban-rural income gap (URIG) in China. However, a very limited consensus has been reached so far, which makes it challenging to support formulating well-informed policies. To identify factors contributing to different conclusions of the effects of urbanization on URIG in China, we conducted a systematic literature review of 29 empirical studies and stepwise meta-regression analysis from 94 direct effect-size estimates. Our findings reveal that while urbanization is associated with larger URIG when URIG is measured via urban-rural income/consumption, urbanization is associated with smaller URIG when URIG is measured with inequality index (e.g., Theil index and/or Gini coefficient). Additionally, financial development is correlated with
Many attempts have been made to quantify Africas malaria burden but none has addressed how urbanization will affect disease transmission and outcome, and therefore mortality and morbidity estimates. In 2003, 39% of Africas 850 million people lived in urban settings; by 2030, 54% of Africans are expected to do so. We present the results of a series of entomological, parasitological and behavioural meta-analyses of studies that have investigated the effect of urbanization on malaria in Africa. We describe the effect of urbanization on both the impact of malaria transmission and the concomitant improvements in access to preventative and curative measures. Using these data, we have recalculated estimates of populations at risk of malaria and the resulting mortality. We find there were 1,068,505 malaria deaths in Africa in 2000 - a modest 6.7% reduction over previous iterations. The public-health implications of these findings and revised estimates are discussed.
Urban areas account for more than 70% of CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels. Urban expansion in tropics is responsible for 5% of the annual emissions from land use change. Here, I show that the effect of urbanization on the global carbon cycle extends beyond these emissions. I quantify the contribution of urbanization to the major carbon fluxes and pools globally and identify gaps crucial for predicting the evolution of the carbon cycle in the future. Urban residents currently control ~22 (12-40)% of the land carbon uptake (112 PgC/yr) and ~24 (15-39)% of the carbon emissions (117 PgC/year) from land globally. Urbanization resulted in the creation of new carbon pools on land such as buildings (~6.7 PgC) and landfills (~30 PgC). Together these pools store 1.6 (±0.3)% of the total vegetation and soil carbon pools globally. The creation and maintenance of these new pools has been associated with high emissions of CO2, which are currently better understood than the processes associated with the
The conference on Urbanization and Poverty, jointly organized between the World Bank and George Washington University-Institute for International Economic Policy (GWU-IIEP), will bring together academics and development practitioners over two days to discuss the challenges of urbanization in view of rural-urban structural transformation.. The world is urbanizing rapidly, with cities today concentrating more than half the worlds population. While it is widely accepted that development and urbanization go hand in hand, the expansion of cities gives rise to both opportunities and challenges, with countries urbanizing in quite different ways. Urbanization has been occurring at different times and different paces, and some countries have concentrated the urban populations in few mega cities, while others have spread the urban populations across many smaller towns. Particularly little is known about the relation between the pace and nature of the urbanization process and the evolution of inequality ...
The Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Policy Model-China, a national scale cardiovascular disease computer simulation model, was used to project future impact of urbanization. Populations and cardiovascula
Stewardship as a concept is increasingly brought forward as a goal to reach sustainability goals of ensuring human wellbeing within the limits of Earths life support systems. Scholarship on the required capacities for planetary stewardship is growing rapidly, as are the insights. This thesis focuses on contributing with knowledge about what stewardship implies in terms of civic engagement in environmental issues, particularly in contexts where these can be particularly challenging: rapidly changing cities. Paper I describes the internal functioning of a citizen network engaged in various environmental issues in Bangalore, India. Analyzing social network structure and desired outcomes, it shows that while the loose structure inhibits efficiency, it encourages inclusiveness and builds legitimacy among members. Despite a reduced capacity to actively mobilize members, the network facilitates ecosystem monitoring and serves as an information platform to connect diverse groups across the city. Paper ...
Valve Market (Material - Copper, Stainless Steel, Plastic, Carbon Steel, and Brass; Application - Civil and Industrial) - Global Industry Analysis, Trend,...
Urbanization is a major anthropogenic factor affecting todays environment, making urban ecosystems the most dynamically evolving parts of modern biota. Although the influence of urbanization on biological species has been studied, a significant gap of knowledge exists regarding the effect of urbanization on the evolution of animal species. To address this question, my laboratory conducts a longitudinal study on amphibian communities in the Ural Mountains region in Russia. The Urals is natural barrier between Europe and Asia characterized by a considerable heterogeneity of landscapes, well-developed urban ecosystems, and diverse areas of environmental pollution. These factors strongly affect amphibian populations because the development of these animals is very sensitive to environmental cues. Starting 1977, we study five amphibian species at 20 geographical locations, including urban territories. We use standardized methods of data collection, which allows for comparisons between different ...
Development can have negative effects on streams in urban and suburban areas. As a watershed becomes covered with pavement, sidewalks, and other types of urban land cover, stream organisms are confronted with an increased volume of storm water runoff, increased exposure to fertilizers and pesticides, and dramatic changes in physical living spaces within the stream itself. In this episode, USGS scientist Jerry McMahon describes two take home messages for managers. ...
The formation of slums is closely linked to urbanization.[54] In 2008, more than 50% of the worlds population lived in urban areas. In China, for example, it is estimated that the population living in urban areas will increase by 10% within a decade according to its current rates of urbanization.[55] The UN-Habitat reports that 43% of urban population in developing countries and 78% of those in the least developed countries are slum dwellers.[6]. Some scholars suggest that urbanization creates slums because local governments are unable to manage urbanization, and migrant workers without an affordable place to live in, dwell in slums.[56] Rapid urbanization drives economic growth and causes people to seek working and investment opportunities in urban areas.[57][58] However, as evidenced by poor urban infrastructure and insufficient housing, the local governments sometimes are unable to manage this transition.[59][60] This incapacity can be attributed to insufficient funds and inexperience to ...
21 cities (2.5%) from low-income countries (e.g. Kathmandu in Nepal, Dar es Salaam in Tanzania). The findings revealed unevenness between built-up areas expansion (BUAE), which reflects the pace of infrastructure development, and urban population growth among the cities; and a widening gap between rapid urban population growth and slow urban greening, represented by features including new parks, green spaces and green roofs.. Cities in the upper-middle-income countries demonstrated the highest BUA expansion, which was more than three times that of high-income countries. Urban expansion and urban population growth in high-income countries remained the lowest. Cities in the low-income and lower-middle-income countries had the highest urban population growth on average, but were substantially lagging behind in BUA expansion and infrastructure development, resulting in serious urban problems such as slums and crowding.. The findings also revealed rapid urbanization of large cities in China in the ...
These six maps trace the development of the Norwood Park area through initial land sale, farming, suburban enclave, and urban neighborhood. The 1851 map identifies the first owners of land parcels shaped by the rectangular national land survey system and reveals the permanent imprint of the Native American era with the reserve created for Billy Caldwell, the Indian Boundary Line, and the diagonal roads based on Indian trails. In 1861 new farmsteads revealed landholdings turning into productive farms served by a new railroad line from Chicago, and a county poor farm appeared. By 1870 a curvilinear suburban subdivision had been laid out around the train station, the beginnings of a residential commuter suburb still surrounded by farms. The 1901 map shows denser subdivision and an enlarged cemetery but still much continuity in rural land ownership, though non-farm residences were beginning to accumulate along well-traveled roads. By 1928 the area was being inundated with gridded urban subdivisions ...
USGS studies examine the effects of urbanization on algae, aquatic insects, fish, habitat and chemistry in urban streams in nine metropolitan areas across the country: Boston, Mass.; Raleigh, N.C.; Atlanta, Ga.; Birmingham, Ala.; Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wis.; Denver, Colo.; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Salt Lake City, Utah; and Portland, Ore.. These USGS studies also show that land cover prior to urbanization can affect how aquatic insects and fish respond to urbanization. For example, aquatic communities in urban streams in Denver, Dallas-Fort Worth and Milwaukee did not decline in response to urbanization because the aquatic communities were already degraded by previous agricultural land-use activities. In contrast, aquatic communities declined in response to urbanization in metropolitan areas where forested land was converted to urban land, areas such as Boston and Atlanta.. Comparisons among the nine areas show that not all urban streams respond exactly the same. This is mostly because stream ...
The influence of urbanization on mutation and adaptive evolution are less clear. A small number of studies suggest that industrial pollution can elevate mutation rates, but the pervasiveness of this effect is unknown. A better studied phenomenon are the effects of urbanization on evolution by natural selection. A growing number of studies show that plant and animal populations experience divergent selection between urban and nonurban environments. This divergent selection has led to adaptive evolution in life history, morphology, physiology, behavior, and reproductive traits. These adaptations typically evolve in response to pesticide use, pollution, local climate, or the physical structure of cities. Despite these important results, the genetic basis of adaptive evolution is known from only a few cases. Most studies also examine only a few populations in one city, and experimental validation is rare ...
Urban areas especially cities are now home to slightly more than half of the worlds seven billion people. Current urbanization trends indicate that an additional three billion people will be living in urban areas by 2050, increasing the urban share of the worlds population to two-thirds. However, the current era of rapid urbanization has been marred with inadequacy of capacity and sometimes resources to match urban development needs. In many regions, urbanization is characterized by lack of adequate infrastructure, poor housing, inadequate plans, lack of effective legislations and financing mechanisms, etc., attributes that hinder shared urban prosperity. As such, the Global Urban Observatory (GUO) was established to fill the gaps in global monitoring of the urbanization process and all its dimensions.. The Global Urban Observatory (GUO) unit is a specialized statistical unit in charge of global monitoring of the Habitat agenda and other agenda with an urban linkage. This includes building ...
Water logging is a crucial problem in Guwahati and certain areas of the city get inundated within a very short duration of rainfall. Rapid urbanization rate with increased number of residential apartments, commercial buildings, streets and various other establishments have tremendously increased the percentage of sealed areas compared to the open spaces. This has resulted in lesser infiltration of water into the soils. Moreover, in order to accommodate the increasing population of the city, unplanned urban expansion takes place which ultimately lead to severe encroachments in the hills, low lying areas, wetlands and reduction in the forest cover. As a consequence due to the cleared hills and loss of wetlands, artificial or flash floods and water logging are frequent in the area. Several areas of Guwahati get waterlogged by flash floods due to heavy rains which disrupt the normal life. The drains in the area get silted up with silts carried with storm water along the hills and flooding the ...
By Xiaoqing Lin, Chunyan Lu, Kaishan Song, Ying Su, Yifan Lei, Lianxiu Zhong and Yibin Gao; Abstract: Rapid urbanization has affected the eco-environment in China. A clear understanding of the coupling relationship
TY - JOUR. T1 - The relationship between urbanization, the built environment, and physical activity among older adults in Taiwan. AU - Huang, Nuan Ching. AU - Kung, Shiann Far. AU - Hu, Susan C.. PY - 2018/5. Y1 - 2018/5. N2 - Urbanization and ageing are global phenomena and offer unique challenges in different countries. A supportive environment plays a critical role in addressing the issue of behavioral change and health promotion among older adults. Many studies in the U.S., EU, and Australia have considered promoting physical activity in the community based on ecological models, whereas very few Asian studies have examined the relationships among urbanization, the built environment and physical activity in elderly at the ecological level, especially from a multi-level perspective. Due to the prevalence of post-war baby boomers and a very low birth-rate, the older population (aged 65 years old and older) in Taiwan has increased rapidly since 2011 and has exceeded the younger generation (0-14 ...
The world is undergoing the largest wave of urban growth in history. More than half of the worlds population now lives in towns and cities, and by 2030 this number will swell to about 5 billion. Much of this urbanization will unfold in Africa and Asia, bringing huge social, economic and environmental transformations. Urbanization has the potential to usher in a new era of well-being, resource efficiency and economic growth. But cities are also home to high concentrations of poverty. Nowhere is the rise of inequality clearer than in urban areas, where wealthy communities coexist alongside, and separate from, slums and informal settlements. UNFPA works with partners in government, the UN system and civil society to advocate for the welfare and sustainability of rapidly urbanizing communities. UNFPAs works includes ensuring peoples access to essential services, particularly sexual and reproductive health care, as they move to and live in urban areas.
The world is undergoing the largest wave of urban growth in history. More than half of the worlds population now lives in towns and cities, and by 2030 this number will swell to about 5 billion. Much of this urbanization will unfold in Africa and Asia, bringing huge social, economic and environmental transformations. Urbanization has the potential to usher in a new era of well-being, resource efficiency and economic growth. But cities are also home to high concentrations of poverty. Nowhere is the rise of inequality clearer than in urban areas, where wealthy communities coexist alongside, and separate from, slums and informal settlements. UNFPA works with partners in government, the UN system and civil society to advocate for the welfare and sustainability of rapidly urbanizing communities. UNFPAs works includes ensuring peoples access to essential services, particularly sexual and reproductive health care, as they move to and live in urban areas.
The gradient approach allows for an innovative representation of landscape composition and configuration not presupposing spatial discontinuities typical of the conventional methods of analysis. Also the urban-rural dichotomy can be better understood through a continuous landscape gradient whose characterization changes accordingly to natural and anthropic variables taken into account and to the spatio-temporal scale adopted for the study. The research was aimed at the analysis of an urban-rural gradient within a study area located in central Italy, using spatial indicators associated with urbanization, agriculture and natural elements. A multivariate spatial analysis (MSA) of such indicators enabled the identification of urban, agricultural and natural dominated areas, as well as specific landscape transitions where the most relevant relationships between agriculture and other landscape components were detected. Landscapes derived from MSA were studied by a set of key landscape pattern metrics ...
Four decades after its economic reform in the late 1970s, China is still undergoing rapid urbanization and socio-economic changes. Planning, as an important government function in China, has played a critical role in facilitating its urbanization process. At this critical junction of Chinas repositioning its development strategies and seeking solutions to respond to a wide range of socio-economic, equity and environmental problems, governance and its relationship with planning has become more important than ever before. Governance is the exercise of political, economic and administrative authority in managing urban and rural development and its peoples wellbeing. Effective governance will provide mechanisms, processes, and institutions through which planning performs as public policies, and government, citizens, and other stakeholders articulate their interests, mediate their differences, and exercise their legal rights and obligations.. ...
Urbanization is process of global scale changing the social and environmental landscape on every continent. Urbanization is a result of population migration from rural areas in addition to natural urban demographic growth. In 2007, the worlds population living in towns and cities surpassed 50% for the first time in history and this proportion is growing. Rapid, unplanned and unsustainable patterns of urban development are making developing cities focal points for many emerging environment and health hazards. As urban populations grow, the quality of global and local ecosystems, and the urban environment, will play an increasingly important role in public health with respect to issues ranging from solid waste disposal, provision of safe water and sanitation, and injury prevention, to the interface between urban poverty, environment and health.. ...
The NYU Stern Urbanization Project is pleased to be part of the World Urban Forum in Medellín, April 5 - 11. Feel free to stop by our booth and learn more about the work of our Urban Expansion initiative from Alejandra Rangel-Smith, Patrick Lamson-Hall, and Nicolás Galarza. They will be joined by Jaime Vasconez, the lead of the Urban Expansion initiative in Latin America, as well as several of our partners from Ethiopia, Colombia, and India. The booth will feature short films about our work in Ethiopia and Colombia, as well as visualizations of urban expansion in 30 cities.. The flyer below (pdf here) describes our events, please feel free to join us. Well be presenting on the progress of our work with municipalities in Ethiopia and Colombia, launching the Spanish-language edition of Solly Angels book, Planet of Cities, and describing a new joint initiative with UN-Habitat and the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. ...
Expanding urbanization is a major factor behind rapidly declining biodiversity. It has been proposed that in urbanized societies, the rarity of contact with diverse environmental microbiota negatively impacts immune function and ultimately increases the risk for allergies and other immune-mediated disorders. Surprisingly, the basic assumption that urbanization reduces exposure to environmental microbiota and its transfer indoors has rarely been examined. We investigated if the land use type around Finnish homes affects the diversity, richness, and abundance of bacterial communities indoors. Debris deposited on standardized doormats was collected in 30 rural and 26 urban households in and near the city of Lahti, Finland, in August 2015. Debris was weighed, bacterial community composition determined by high throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene on the Illumina MiSeq platform, and the percentage of four different land use types (i.e. built area, forest, transitional, and open
People have been moving from the countryside to the city for at least 9,000 years, but this key population trend has now become one of the most visible and profound forces on Earth: 2008 is the first year in which more than half of us have become city dwellers. The process of becoming a mainly urban species has accelerated during the past century and has now concentrated nearly three-and-a-half billion people on less than 3 percent of the planets land surface. These monumental agglomerations of people, buildings, factories, roads, and vehicles-along with their associated social systems-have manifold and powerful environmental impacts, as well as effects on fertility and population growth rates, that we are only beginning to understand. The urbanization trend is global, but rates of urbanization have varied significantly by country and region. The worlds more developed countries (as classified by the United Nations) were predominantly urban by the 1950s, but the group of less developed ...
In addition, Haitong Securities released a report showing that from 2012 to 2021, another 592 million square meters of living space will be added to housing demand because of urbanization, which is equivalent to 61% of sales volume for commodity houses in 2011.. Third-tier cities will become the market with the most potential. As a report released by First Capital showed, second- and third-tier cities in central and western China and third-tier cities surrounding the first-tier cities will benefit from urbanization.. According to the recent situation of housing sales, some buyers with rigid demand for improved housing have already actively purchased houses in several third-tier cities, and many developers have also begun to arrange their development plans in second- and third-tier cities, showing that the real estate market is recovering. Zhang Minhua, Director of the Department of Investment Strategy & Research of the Global Personal Banking Service Division of Citibank, forecasts that the real ...
This course aims to provide the general theoretical backcloth for the programme, to offer a map of the relevant academic literature for prospective urban managers and an understanding of the key drivers of urbanization and urban change in and beyond Asia. It will explore the key contributors to our theoretical and conceptual understanding of the contemporary city, the notable paradigm shifts in urban theory and different disciplinary perspectives on urbanism and urbanization. In doing so, the course will engage with the following topics: what is a city?; urbanization and demography; cities, the global and the local; cities and economic competitiveness; social justice, inequality and the differentiated city; shifting geographies of urbanization and cities in particular regions; urban change and conflict; city futures and sustainability. Particular attention will be given to Asian urbanization and the extent to which our current theoretical understanding of urban processes and urbanization remains ...
This book is an attempt to understand a city through its roads. It explores the origins and development of three important roads of Calcutta (now renamed as Kolkata) from the pre-British colonial era to the postcolonial period. Spanning a period of four centuries, these three roads-Bagbazar Street in the north, Theatre Road in the centre, and Rashbehari Avenue in the south-register the contours of urbanization and the changes in the socio-cultural profile of the residents. The author locates this history within a broader theoretical framework with the help of which one can analyse the role of roads in urbanization, which are determined and influenced by the various political, economic, and socio-cultural impulses. The narrative traces the rise of Calcutta from a fledgling town to a giant metropolis through the history of these roads, and approaches the present era, when these roads have reached a cul-de-sac where their further expansion is restricted by territorial limits and environmental constraints.
The paper provides a comprehensive review of issues related to the subject matter. However, the rationale, the logical flow and the fluidity of the text require some improvements. This would help to strengthen the focus of the main points emerging from the literature, some of which may not necessarily related to urbanization and rural transformation unless explanation is provided of how they are linked. For instance, the third bullet point of the chapter Points Emerging from the literature reads Malnutrition has become more of an issue than undernutrition. What is exactly the nexus with urbanization and/or rural transformation? The same applies to the fifth bullet point, etc ...
Driven by rapid urbanization, economic growth, and changes in consumption patterns, food chains in emerging and developing economies are experiencing a fundamental transformation process. This transformation is usually characterized by increased vertical coordination, growth of modern distribution channels (e.g. supermarkets), consolidation of retail markets, and an increase in export orientation. The rapid growth in demand of modern food with higher quality and safety attracts multinational enterprises to invest in agriculture and food processing in emerging economies. The appearance of multinationals in the food systems of developing countries has been claimed to have a positive impact on economic development and reduction of poverty. The multinationals have adopted modern supply chain management practices for securing a large volume and consistent supply of high quality products. They introduce new technologies that boost productivity and post-harvest management for product upgrading.. While ...
Downloadable! This paper examines the evolution of wealth distribution in France during the urbanization process of the nineteenth century, based on a comprehensive dataset of individual inheritances. It presents a spatial decomposition between rural and urban areas, distinguishing Paris from other cities. We use a non-parametric approach based on wealth density functions. Changes in the level of wealth explained most of the spatial evolution of wealth during 1820-1939; at the turn of the century however, the effect of urbanization on wealth distribution increased gradually.
Article Analysis of effects of climate change on runoff in an urban drainage system: a case study from Seoul, Korea. Both water quantity and quality are impacted by climate change. In addition, rapid urbanization has also brought an immeasurable loss...
In developing countries, youth plays an important role in facing the challenges on availability, accessibility and use of food around the globe with increasing population, rapid urbanization and climate change. Youth serve in the field of food systems through many ways: some are directly working on farms producing food for the world, some are carrying out research in order to
BASEL, Switzerland, May 17, 2017 /3BL Media/ - On World Hypertension Day 2017, the Novartis Foundation and its partners, including Intel Corporation, the NCD Alliance, city governments and local partners, announce the launch of Better Hearts Better Cities, an innovative initiative to address the high rates of high blood pressure (hypertension) in low-income urban communities.. Rapid urbanization in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) has deepened health inequities and increased pressure on already under-resourced urban infrastructures and services. This is critical in LMICs which face a growing health crisis of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, with almost 75% of the global NCD deaths occurring in LMICs.1. The Novartis Foundation is taking ambitious steps to tackle hypertension, the prime risk factor for cardiovascular disease, in low-income urban communities. Better Hearts Better Cities convenes multisector partners - from food suppliers to health ...
Pasta and Noodles market in India is one of the fastest growing globally driven by steady economic growth and rise in disposable income of consumers. Rapid urbanization and a large young population are also helping the Pasta and Noodles market to grow further. Dried and Instant Noodles is the leading category in the Pasta and Noodles market with Convenience Stores being the leading distribution channel ...
With rapid urbanization and suburbanization in China, there is clear evidence of the decoupling of home-work locations in cities which is in contrast to the socialist danwei system where workers were housed in workplace compounds. This paper examines the diverse commuting patterns of suburban neighbourhoods in the Beijing metropolitan region. The research first examines the relationship between the characteristics of commutes in terms of time, distance, and mode, and the socio-economic attributes of residents. The analysis allows us to examine how different socio-economic groups, via latent class analysis, are often spatially concentrated in marginalized neighbourhoods, and further disadvantaged in their commuting experience. The socio-spatial variations in commuting patterns are analysed via GIS mapping analysis, statistical testing, and multiple regression analysis. Major variations were found in the commuting patterns in terms of time, distance and mode across different socioeconomic groups ...
Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is commonly applied for the removal of phosphorus (P) from wastewater. Realizing the rapid urbanization and population growth around the world, nutrient pollution problems has gained global concerns. The increasing array of Malaysias regulatory requirements on sewage treatment plants (STPs) is part of the abatement strategies on nutrient pollution issue. Reliably meeting low effluent limits can be difficult when EBPR process operated at temperature higher than 25oC. Thus, there is an urgent need to evaluate the applicability and compliance accountability of EBPR process for STPs in tropical climates with relatively high temperatures around 25oC - 32oC. In this study, the EBPR performance at the temperature range of 24oC - 32oC and its microbiological aspects, the population abundance and dynamic of PAOs and GAOs as well as the fine scale population of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (hereafter named Accumulibacter) were investigated. ...
Introduction. Key mortality indicators, such as age-specific death rates, life expectancy at birth and the leading causes of death in a population, are essential for population health assessment. Data on these standard international mortality indicators are needed in developing countries for comparative analysis, health policy, monitoring and evaluation, and epidemiological research. However, in such countries vital registration systems, which are the optimal source of these data, are seldom fully functional. 1 This is the case in Viet Nam, a densely populated developing country of 88 million people located in south-eastern Asia whose population structure is rapidly changing because of declining fertility and mortality and a transition in causes of death. 2 The countrys population distribution is also changing as a result of socioeconomic development and rapid urbanization. Thus, accurate measures of mortality by age, sex and cause of death from death registration systems are urgently needed to ...
The first major trend is an increase in individual empowerment, stemming from declines in poverty, the growth of a global middle class and more widely available communications and other technologies. Second, power will become more diffuse across countries, as emerging markets grow rapidly and many rich countries age and grow sluggishly. Third, demographic changes will take place slowly but inexorably. The world population will continue to rise rapidly and reach 8.3 billion in 2030 mainly on account of increased life expectancy in developing countries despite declining fertility. While some countries will shrink (such as Germany) others, like Kenya, will experience significant youth bulges, and rapid urbanization. Finally, as populations grow and increased consumption levels strain existing resources, access to food, energy, and water will become ever more crucial. So how will the global megatrends play out in the Kenyan context? The 2030 horizon also has a special meaning for Kenyas economic ...
Visit WRI Indias website India is quickly becoming an economic, technological, and diplomatic leader. Yet this growth has come at a cost. Rapid urbanization is placing a burden on infrastructure, energy consumption and public services. Already the fourth-largest economy, India is the worlds third-largest greenhouse gas emitter and fourth-largest electricity consumer. The economic and development decisions that the country makes over the next few decades will pose profound implications for the global environment. WRI India-established in 2011-works with local and national governments, businesses, and civil society to address Indias development challenges. We identify solutions that are both economically and environmentally sound. We develop blueprints for sustainable urban transport and smart city growth. We provide research and policy recommendations to expand renewable energy and access to affordable, reliable power. Our tools and guidance help businesses cost-effectively reduce greenhouse gas
States that while an extensive literature on heat-related mortality exists, greater understanding of influences of heat-related morbidity is required due to climate change and rapid urbanization influencesUndertakes an analysis of 6 years (2001-2006) of heat-related dispatches through the Phoenix Fire Department regional dispatch center to examine temporal, climatic and other
Demand for ceiling tiles was highest from the commercial segment in 2012. The commercial ceiling tiles industry has remained a vital part of the economy despite being negatively impacted by the global economic downturn in 2008-09. Furthermore, the commercial segment is expected to witness the fastest growth due to rapid urbanization, particularly in emerging economies of Asia Pacific and Latin America. The segment is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of 10.0%, from 2013 to 2019. Industrial was the second largest application segment of the ceiling tiles market in the same year. Rising construction activities in offices, conference rooms, testing and R&D labs coupled with growing industrialization are some of the major factors which are expected to drive the industrial infrastructure in emerging economies of China and India ...
Global genetically modified (GMO) food market is anticipated to showcase a tremendous CAGR of 3.2% during the forecast period i.e. 2016-2023. Additionally, growing number of population with hectic lifestyle and introduction of high nutrition food are believed to intensify the growth of genetically modified (GMO) food. Moreover, the global genetically modified (GMO) food market is projected to account for 130 Million tons by the end of 2021. In terms of geography, North America region captured the largest market of global genetically modified (GMO) food in 2014 aided by U.S. Moreover, rapid urbanization along with growing awareness regarding genetically modified (GMO) food products in this region is predicted to trigger the market of genetically modified (GMO) food. Moreover, in the U.S, 86% of corn, 93% of soybean and 90% of cotton are genetically engineered. Apart from this, Europe imports approximately 60 GM products from other countries, especially maize, soy bean, cotton and sugar beet. In ...