Genetic predisposition to testicular germ-cell tumours Testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) are the most common neoplasm in young men. Various studies have suggested the existence of an inherited predisposition to development of these tumours. Genome-wide screens subsequently provided evidence of a TGCT susceptibility gene on chromosome Xq27 (TGCT1) that might also predispose to cryptorchism. However, this putative gene has yet to be identified, and other TGCT susceptibility genes probably exist. Completion of the human gene map and advances in genetic research will facilitate further investigation of genetic predisposition to TGCT. Insight into inheritance of TGCT might lead to the identification of individuals at increased risk of developing the disorder, increase our understanding of the mutation pathways that lead to sporadic cases, and contribute to improvement in diagnosis and treatment. Clinicians should record the family history of cancer and urogenital differentiation defects in patients ...
Treatment of The testicles are located inside the scrotum, a loose bag of skin underneath the penis. They produce male sex hormones and sperm cells for reproduction, Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in American males between the ages of 15 and 34. But denial and embarrassment about the testicles contribute to testicular cancer being one of the least mentioned cancers. The cause of testicular cancer is unknown, Testicular cancer is highly treatable when diagnosed early. Depending on the type and stage of testicular cancer, you may receive one of several treatments, or a combination. Regular testicular self-examinations can help identify dangerous growths early, when the chance for successful treatment of testicular cancer is highest, Testicular Cancer, Testicular Cancer Symptoms, Diagnosis Of Testicular Cancer, Testicular Cancer Diagnosis, Testicular Cancer Risk Factors, Testicular Cancer Treatment, Testicular Cancer Test, Testicular Cancer Surgery, Testicular Cancer Prevention, Testicular
BACKGROUND: Resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy is associated with poor prognosis in testicular germ cell cancer, emphasising the need for new therapeutic approaches. In this respect, the therapeutic concept of anti-angiogenesis is of particular interest. In a previous study, we presented two novel anti-angiogenic compounds, HP-2 and HP-14, blocking the tyrosine kinase activity of angiogenic growth factor receptors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), and related signalling pathways in testicular cancer. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of these new compounds in platinum-resistant testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs), in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS: Drug-induced changes in cell proliferation of the cisplatin-sensitive TGCT cell line 2102EP and its cisplatin-resistant counterpart 2102EP-R, both expressing the VEGFR-2, were evaluated by crystal violet staining. Both compounds inhibited the growth of cisplatin-resistant TGCT cells in a ...
1. Manku G, Hueso A, Brimo F, Chan P, Gonzalez-Peramato P, Jabado N. et al. Changes in the expression profiles of claudins during gonocyte differentiation and in seminomas. Andrology. 2016;4:95-110 2. Das MK, Furu K, Evensen HF, Haugen OP, Haugen TB. Knockdown of SPRY4 and SPRY4-IT1 inhibits cell growth and phosphorylation of Akt in human testicular germ cell tumours. Sci Rep. 2018;8:2462 3. International Prognostic Factors Study G, Lorch A, Beyer J, Bascoul-Mollevi C, Kramar A, Einhorn LH. et al. Prognostic factors in patients with metastatic germ cell tumors who experienced treatment failure with cisplatin-based first-line chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol. 2010;28:4906-11 4. Turnbull C, Rahman N. Genome-wide association studies provide new insights into the genetic basis of testicular germ-cell tumour. Int J Androl. 2011;34:e86-96 discussion e-7 5. Hanna NH, Einhorn LH. Testicular cancer-discoveries and updates. N Engl J Med. 2014;371:2005-16 6. Kanetsky PA, Mitra N, Vardhanabhuti S, Li M, Vaughn ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cumulative burden of morbidity among testicular cancer survivors after standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy. T2 - A multi-institutional study. AU - the Platinum Study Group. AU - Kerns, Sarah L.. AU - Fung, Chunkit. AU - Monahan, Patrick O.. AU - Ardeshir-Rouhani-Fard, Shirin. AU - Abu Zaid, Mohammad I.. AU - Williams, Anna Lynn M.. AU - Stump, Timothy E.. AU - Sesso, Howard D.. AU - Feldman, Darren R.. AU - Hamilton, Robert J.. AU - Vaughn, David J.. AU - Beard, Clair. AU - Huddart, Robert A.. AU - Kim, Jeri. AU - Kollmannsberger, Christian. AU - Sahasrabudhe, Deepak M.. AU - Cook, Ryan. AU - Fossa, Sophie D.. AU - Einhorn, Lawrence H.. AU - Travis, Lois B.. PY - 2018/5/20. Y1 - 2018/5/20. N2 - Purpose In this multicenter study, we evaluated the cumulative burden of morbidity (CBM) among . 1,200 testicular cancer survivors and applied factor analysis to determine the co-occurrence of adverse health outcomes (AHOs). Patients and Methods Participants were # 55 years of age at ...
Long-term studies have shown that testicular cancer survivors who received radiation and chemotherapy have an increased risk of cardiovascular problems and death compared to the general population, and that chemotherapy for the disease may also pose a higher risk of developing metabolic syndromes. Patients may reduce their chances of developing of these problems by adopting healthy diet and exercise habits, refraining from smoking, and limiting alcohol consumption, but the new study shows that many testicular cancer survivors are, instead, placing themselves at even greater risk.. The team studied 189 patients who were diagnosed with testicular cancer between 1990 and 2007 and recruited through the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Patients, who were, on average, 44 years old and 6.8 years post-diagnosis, completed surveys about various health habits. Almost 25 percent of patients surveyed reported current tobacco use, and 35 percent reported "risky" alcohol use, which the researchers defined as 14 ...
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According to a new study, boys whose testes have not descended into the scrotum at birth, may be nearly three times more likely to develop testicular cancer later in life.. Previous studies of the condition called cryptorchidism (undescended testes) have shown that in 5 to 10 percent of testicular cancer patients undescended testes were present.. However, it has remained unclear exactly how much a boys risk of testicular cancer is increased if he was born with undescended testes.. The new study was designed to answer that question and concluded that boys with undescended testes were 2.9 times more likely to develop testicular cancer. About 6 percent of newborn boys are born with undescended testes.. Researchers must now consider whether this degree of increased cancer risk means that boys born with the condition should undergo heightened surveillance for testicular cancer in addition to current close followup.. The study was published in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood.. ...
Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm of young men 15-45 years of age, and incidence of these tumors has been increasing in recent decades for reasons currently unknown. Histologic type of TGCT can be divided into the broad categories of seminomas and non-seminomas. It currently remains to be elucidated if these histologic types share a common etiology. In this study we analyzed the largest set of bilateral cases of TGCT ever assembled, 550, to determine if the histologic type of the first tumor predicts that of the second. Presuming an individual with a history of two primary tumors has the same risk factors for both tumors, a concordance of histologic types in the same individual would suggest that the risk factors for seminomas and non-seminomas differ. The data show no association between the histologic type of the first and second tumors when the analysis is adjusted for the age at first diagnosis (odds ratio (OR)=0.95) This finding suggests that the ...
Multi-institutional assessment of adverse health outcomes among north American testicular cancer survivors after modern cisplatin-based chemotherapy Academic Article ...
Chromosomal imbalances associated with carcinoma in situ and associated testicular germ cell tumours of adolescents and adults. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) or intratubular germ cell neoplasia is generally considered the precursor lesion of adult testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT). The chromosomal imbalances associated with CIS and the corresponding seminoma (SE) or nonseminoma (NS) have been determined by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis of microdissected material from seven cases. Significantly, the CIS showed no gain of 12p material whereas in the invasive components of all cases gain of 12p was found, in 2 cases associated with amplification of the 12p11.2-12.1 region. Interphase fluorescence in situ analysis was consistent with this and provided evidence for the i(12p) or 12p11.2-12.1 amplification in the SE and NS but not in the corresponding CIS. This suggests a role for these changes in progression of CIS to invasive testicular cancer or progression of the invasive disease. ...
A testicular neoplasm is a type of abnormal growth in the testicle. The main signs of a testicular neoplasm are a painless lump...
Clinical stage I testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) are highly curable neoplasms. The treatment of stage I testicular cancer is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Standard options after radical orchiectomy for seminoma include active surveillance, radiation therapy or 1-2 cycles of carboplatin, and options for nonseminoma include active surveillance, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) or 1-2 cycles of bleomycin plus etoposide plus cisplatin (BEP). All the options should be discussed with each patient and treatment choices should be made by shared decision making as virtually all patients with clinical stage I TGCT can be cured of their disease ...
Incidence and survival for testicular germ cell tumor in young males: A report from the Northern Region Young Persons Malignant Disease Registry, United ...
Charles C Chung, Peter A Kanetsky, Zhaoming Wang, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Roelof Koster, Rolf I Skotheim, Christian P Kratz, Clare Turnbull, Victoria K Cortessis, Anne C Bakken, D Timothy Bishop, Michael B Cook, R Loren Erickson, Sophie D Fosså, Kevin B Jacobs, Larissa A Korde, Sigrid M Kraggerud, Ragnhild A Lothe, Jennifer T Loud, Nazneen Rahman, Eila C Skinner, Duncan C Thomas, Xifeng Wu, Meredith Yeager, Fredrick R Schumacher, Mark H Greene, Stephen M Schwartz, Katherine A McGlynn, Stephen J Chanock, Katherine L Nathanson, Meta-analysis identifies four new loci associated with testicular germ cell tumor, Nature Genetics, 2013, 45, 6, ...
Testicular cancer (TC) is the most frequent solid malignancy in young men aged between 15 and 40 years. The worldwide incidence is about 7.5 per 100,000 subjects, but the rates vary considerably between countries and ethnic groups. About 95% of all TCs are represented by testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), which include seminoma and non-seminoma histological types. It has been reported that about 18,000 European subjects over reproductive age develop a TGCT every year and its incidence is increasing in several countries over the past 50 years. Early diagnosis and modern treatment have resulted in over 95% survival rate and improved quality of life in testicular cancer survivors. However, the benefits of cancer treatments may hide some risks. In fact, possible side effects can be developed during the treatment itself or later from months to years after the completion of therapy, persisting during the whole life. Therefore, TGCT survivors frequently complain a number of healthy problems such as
The incidence of testis cancer has increased by 40% in the last four decades particularly in men younger than 35 years, a patient population that is at the peak of their reproductive age which prompts many doctors to consider organ-sparing options.. "Patient assessment for organ-sparing in testis cancer is crucial, and patient and history taking is very important not only in the diagnosis of testis cancer, but also in patient selection for an organ-sparing option (OSS)," said Z. Kopa (HU) in an update lecture on testis cancer during the 15th Central European Meeting held in Budapest.. "There are strong arguments for organ-sparing such as the high accuracy in frozen section examination (FSE) which is around 100%, and the increasing attention paid to the cosmetic, functional, and psychological outcomes of patients with testicular tumours," added Kopa, although he noted that the literature lacks studies with a high level of evidence in comparing OSS with radical surgery.. He also cited the EAU ...
There are approximately 8,800 new diagnosis of testis cancer each year, which account for 0.5% of all new cancer diagnoses. Most testis tumors present with a painless mass or swelling in the testis. The patients exam typically reveals a firm, nontender testis mass. Men between 20 and 34 years of age are at highest risk of testis cancer, with decreasing risk over time.. An abnormal testicular exam will trigger a full workup including tumor markers (HCG, AFP, B-HCG), testicular ultrasound and cross-sectional imaging (CT or MRI) to evaluate for metastatic disease. Unless bulky metastatic disease is seen, the patient will need to undergo radical orchiectomy. During this procedure, the affected testis will be removed through an incision in the groin as to not violate or disturb the lymphatic channels in the scrotum. The pathologist will evaluate for the type of tumor cells present which, in conjunction with postoperative tumor marker levels, will determine further therapy.. Testis cancers are ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Bilateral testicular tumors in an infant. AU - Luo, C. C.. AU - Lin, J. N.. AU - Huang, C. S.. PY - 1998/1. Y1 - 1998/1. N2 - A 7-month-old infant showed bilateral enlarged, non-tender scrotal masses. The level of α-fetoprotein was greater than 10,000 ng/ml preoperatively; a high left inguinal orchiectomy was performed for a suspected yolk-sac tumor. The right testis was diagnosed as a mature teratoma because it was not possible to establish a line of cleavage between the tumor and the normal tissue, and a high right inguinal orchiectomy was performed. Only one case of bilateral testicular teratomas has been reported in the literature to date. We report a rare second case of bilateral testicular tumors, one a yolk-sac turner and the other a teratoma.. AB - A 7-month-old infant showed bilateral enlarged, non-tender scrotal masses. The level of α-fetoprotein was greater than 10,000 ng/ml preoperatively; a high left inguinal orchiectomy was performed for a suspected yolk-sac ...
Abstract:. Metastatic germ cell tumors represent a model of a curable malignant disease due to a unique chemosensitivity to cisplatin-based combination therapy resulting in long term survival rates of about 80%. Therefore, germ cell tumors became a model for the evaluation of long-term treatment toxicity as well as for the role of chemotherapy dose intensification in patients with very advanced disease. Patients with first relapse seem to profit most from high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support and a multinational study is underway to prove its role. In addition chemotherapy-resistance has become an important area of experimental and clinical research in the few multiply relapsed / refractory patients. Several new agents have been tested in this situation with gemcitabine, paclitaxel and oxaliplatin being the most active. Carefully conducted clinical studies and the development of clinical risk models for all stages of this disease have significantly contributed to the progress ...
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The most common solid tumor in males ages 20-39 is testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is highly curable with 5-year survival rates above 96%. Long-term effects of both the testicular cancer and its treatment are important in understanding survivorship in this population. Chemotherapy poses its own specific risks such as vascular toxicity, lung disease and renal dysfunction. Also important is the understanding of fertility after testicular cancer and even prior to a cancer diagnosis patients may face issues with sperm count and testosterone level abnormalities. It is also critical to be aware of the possibility of developing a second malignancy after testicular cancer with the contralateral testis being a high-risk occurrence.. Source: Hayes-Lattin B, Nichols C. Testicular Cancer: A Prototypic Tumor of Young Adults. Semin Oncol. 2009; 36:432-438. ...
Testicular cancer is the most common solid tumor among males 15 to 34 years of age, with an estimated 8,850 new cases and 410 deaths during 2017 in the United States. With effective treatment, the overall five-year survival rate is 97%. Risk factors for testicular cancer include undescended testis (cryptorchidism), personal or family history of testicular cancer, age, ethnicity, and infertility. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine screening in asymptomatic men. Men with symptoms should receive a complete history and physical examination. Scrotal ultrasonography is the preferred initial imaging study. If a solid intratesticular mass is discovered, orchiectomy is both diagnostic and therapeutic. Staging through chest radiography, chemistry panel, liver function tests, and tumor markers guides treatment. Active surveillance, chemotherapy, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, and radiation therapy are treatment options following orchiectomy. For patients desiring future
ABOUT 1000 of testicular germ-cell tumours occur in men treated for maldescended testes (Whitaker, 1970). The risk of testicular tumour in men with maldescended testes has been estimated at 35 times that of normal men (Whitaker, 1970). Recently 2 case-control studies confirmed the increased risk of testicular tumour in maldescended testes (Morrison, 1976; Henderson et al., 1979). Testicular germ-cell (TGC) tumours may be preceded by carcinoma in situ in a biopsy several years before (Skakkebaek, 1972, 1978). Raised concentrations of serum o-foetoprotein (AFP) and serum human chorionic gonadotropin : subunit (hCG) often preceded other signs of relapse in nonseminomatous TGC tumours (Waldmann & McIntire, 1974). Serum AFP and serum hCG were measured as a screen for TGC tumours in men with maldescended testes, in addition to physical examination and testicular biopsy. The histological findings of the first 50 men biopsied have recently been reported elsewhere (Krabbe et al., 1979). In this paper we report
We ran out of time. These are important(!), so read on…. *Change in survival rates which I could not quite recall in relation to the chemo I used:. 1) Testicular cancer used to be a brutal killer. If you were diagnosed with nonseminoma, you had to have a complete Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection ( Yes, I still had one of these) because it was the only thing that could possibly cure the cancer. If you had Stage III testicular cancer, little could be done. Back in 1970, about 90% of testicular cancer patients died of their disease.. The 70′s brought us the success of Cisplatin which, when used in combination with other chemotherapy drugs and the appropriate use of surgery, brought the cure rate to an astounding 80%! This chemotherapy is not pleasant, but its profound success has allowed the doctors to decrease the toxicity of all of the various testicular cancer treatments. (1). 2) I wanted to mention more about screening and prevention:. There is no standard or routine screening test ...
Testicular germ cell cancer (GCC) represents 1 % of all human cancers and its incidence has increased by 1 % over the last 50 years [1, 2]. In young men, it represents one of the most malignant forms and is the second commonest cause of cancer-related death [1, 2]. Testicular tumor cell growth constitutes the majority of testicular malignancies [2]. GCC patients have a high cure rate, and are sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy, but 5 % of patients develop resistance to treatment.. Impaired muscle function and cancer-related fatigue (CRF) are two of the most common complications among patients in additiounder chemotherapy [3]. Moreover, early, localized muscular fatigue and severe deconditioning are common observations in clinical practice involving GCC patients undergoing chemotherapy [4]. The cause of this muscle deconditioning is unknown and although the effects of antineoplastic drugs have been described in some detail [4, 5], the way these effects may affect the phenomenon of CRF is ...
In 2015, it is estimated that 8400 U.S. men were diagnosed with testis cancer and 380 men died from testis cancer. Testis cancer is most commonly...
Risk factors for testicular cancer include undescended testicle, family and personal history of testicular cancer. Learn about testicular cancer risk.
A 7-month-old infant showed bilateral enlarged, nontender scrotal masses. The level of α-fetoprotein was greater than 10,000 ng/ml preoperatively; a high left inguinal orchiectomy was performed for a suspected yolk-sac tumor. The right testis was diagnosed as a mature teratoma because it was not possible to establish a line of cleavage between the tumor and the normal tissue, and a high right inguinal orchiectomy was performed. Only one case of bilateral testicular teratomas has been reported in the literature to date. We report a rare second case of bilateral testicular tumors, one a yolk-sac tumor and the other a teratoma.
Testicular cancer represents the more frequent solid tumour affecting males aged 15-35 years.In the last decades, its incidence showed a progressive increased probably due to genetic and environmental factors. Despite exposure to some viruses such as HIV, HCV, EBV and HPV is frequently related to cancer development, there are no studies aimed to evaluate the possible implication of viral infections in the pathogenesis of testicular cancer. In this study we analyzed sperm parameters and prevalence of HPV on sperm in 155 testicular cancer patients at diagnosis (T-1), after orchiectomy (T0) and after 12 months from surgery or from the end of adjuvant treatments (T12). All patients showed a significantly higher prevalence of semen infection than controls (9.5% and 2.4% respectively) and altered sperm parameters both at T-1 and T0. Considering sperm parameters, at T-1 we observed a reduction of progressive motility, and after orchiectomy patients showed a reduction of sperm concentration and count and a
We are recruiting two groups of men: men with TGCT and men without TGCT. These two groups of men will be very much the same in other respects. Studying two groups of men who are similar except for their cancer diagnosis will help us to identify differences between men who do and do not have TGCT.. We are recruiting men with testicular cancer (our cases) from hospitals in Philadelphia and the surrounding counties. We are recruiting men without TGCT (our controls) from the same area using random address based sampling. Given the possible genetic and environmental components of TGCT, we are also interested in gathering data from the parents of our cases. ...
Testicular cancer is a disease in which cancerous cells form in the tissues of one or both testicles. Germ cells within the testicles produce young sperm that travel through a network of tubes into the epididymis, a long coil, where the sperm are stored in order to mature. Almost all testicular cancers start in the germ cells. The two main types of tumors that form from testicular germ cell are seminomas and nonseminomas. Nonseminoma tumors tend to grow slower and more contained. Seminoma tumors typically grow more quickly and farther spread. The testicular form of cancer is most commonly found in men ages 20 to 35 years old. Continue reading to learn more about common risk factors, symptoms and treatment.. ...
Given the high cure-rate for testicular cancer (TC) and the patients young age, comprehensive evaluation of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important consideration in this patient population.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Handling and reporting of orchidectomy specimens with testicular cancer. T2 - Areas of consensus and variation among 25 experts and 225 European pathologists. AU - Berney, Daniel M.. AU - Algaba, Ferran. AU - Amin, Mahul. AU - Delahunt, Brett. AU - Compérat, Eva. AU - Epstein, Jonathan I.. AU - Humphrey, Peter. AU - Idrees, Mohammed. AU - Lopez-Beltran, Antonio. AU - Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina. AU - Mikuz, Gregor. AU - Montironi, Rodolfo. AU - Oliva, Esther. AU - Srigley, John. AU - Reuter, Victor E.. AU - Trpkov, Kiril. AU - Ulbright, Thomas M.. AU - Varma, Murali. AU - Verrill, Clare. AU - Young, Robert H.. AU - Zhou, Ming. AU - Egevad, Lars. PY - 2015/9/1. Y1 - 2015/9/1. N2 - Aims: The handling and reporting of testicular tumours is difficult due to their rarity. Methods and results: A survey developed by the European Network of Uro-Pathology (ENUP) and sent to its members and experts to assess the evaluation of testicular germ cell tumours. Twenty-five experts and 225 ENUP ...
Brad was diagnosed with testicular germ cell cancer on Jan. 1, 2009. Thousands of people are diagnosed with a form of testicular cancer each year.
The testicles are two egg-shaped structures with a firm, slightly spongy feel located below the penis in the sac of loose skin called the scrotum. The size of the testicles should be roughly the same. Two main functions of the testicles include sperm and testosterone production. Tumors of the testicle are relatively rare malignancies, accounting for 1-2% of cancers among US men, with an incidence of approximately 5.4 out of 100,000 men per year. The incidence is highest in Caucasians and lowest in African-Americans. Risk factors for developing testicular cancer include a history of cryptorchidism (i.e. one or both testicles failed to move into the scrotum before birth), family history of testicular cancer, and a personal history of testicular cancer. Most testicular tumors are initially diagnosed due to discovery of a painless firm mass in the testis. After consultation with a physician, this may be confirmed with an ultrasound of the testicle, which is a simple non-invasive radiologic ...
Sixty four patients with a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and primary testicular involvement were identified. Median age was 67. All patients had initial surgery including bilateral orchiectomy in 5 patients. Majority of patients (n = 48, 75%) were in clinical stage IE ad IIE at presentation. Risk category according to the modified NCCN-IPI was low or low-intermediate in 48 (75%) patients. Chemotherapy was given to 57 (89%) inluding rituximab in 29 (45%) of patients. CNS prophylaxis with intrathecal methotrexate was applied in 35 (55%) patients. Radiotherapy to contralateral testis was applied to 3 patients. Out of 48 (70%) patients in complete remission after initial treatment, 19 (38%) subsequently relapsed at median (range) of 36 (3.5 -144) months with many relapses occuring far beyond of 3 years. 62% of relapsed patients died of disease. In patients who relapse late, extranodal sites were frequently involved. Eight patients had CNS relapse including 6 patients not given CNS ...
Testicular cancer information including its causes and various combination treatments available. Testicular Cancer has one of the highest cure rates of all cancers. Testicular Cancer symptoms in detail are described.
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Vol. 43 (4): 652-654, July - August, 2017 doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2016.0323.1 EDITORIAL COMMENT Sandro C. Esteves 1 1 ANDROFERT, Centro
Testicular Cancer stage 1 treatment: Outlining the treatment of stage 1 testicular cancer patients using surgery, radiation and chemotherapy
The advances seen in the treatment of testicular cancer are among the great achievements in modern medicine. These advances were made possible by the collaborative efforts of cancer researchers around the world. Investigators have been able to address many questions regarding the treatment of patients with disease limited to the testis, those with metastasis to the retroperitoneum only, and those with advanced metastatic disease. Questions answered include the chemotherapeutic agents to be used and in what combinations, the proper intensity of treatment and appropriate dosing, the optimal number of cycles of chemotherapy according to validated risk stratification, appropriate surgical approaches that preserve sexual function, the treatment of relapsed disease, what supportive care measures to take, and survivorship issues following treatment of testicular cancer ...
Testicular cancer radiation therapy makes use of high intensity x-rays or various other kinds of radiation for destroying the cancer cells present in the testicles of men. Normally, testicular cancer radiation therapy is given to the patients who have already undergone surgery. This is done to prevent the recurrence of testicular cancer in them. Sometimes testicular cancer radiation therapy might also be given to patients who are suffering from recurrence testicular cancer. The kind of radiation used for treating testicular cancer is known as external beam radiation which is produced form machines containing beams of high energy. This high energy beam is normally aimed toward the lymph nodes present in the pelvic or abdominal region. Testicular cancer radiation therapy dosage and the number of sittings would greatly depend on the stage of the disease and kind of testicular cancer. Most often testicular cancer radiation therapy is given to patients in their advanced stages of cancer.. Patients ...
Testicular cancer radiation therapy makes use of high intensity x-rays or various other kinds of radiation for destroying the cancer cells present in the testicles of men. Normally, testicular cancer radiation therapy is given to the patients who have already undergone surgery. This is done to prevent the recurrence of testicular cancer in them. Sometimes testicular cancer radiation therapy might also be given to patients who are suffering from recurrence testicular cancer. The kind of radiation used for treating testicular cancer is known as external beam radiation which is produced form machines containing beams of high energy. This high energy beam is normally aimed toward the lymph nodes present in the pelvic or abdominal region. Testicular cancer radiation therapy dosage and the number of sittings would greatly depend on the stage of the disease and kind of testicular cancer. Most often testicular cancer radiation therapy is given to patients in their advanced stages of cancer.. Patients ...
A New Study Links XRCC2 Mutations to Cisplatin Resistance in Testicular Cancer. Whole-exome sequencing of testicular germ cell tumours.
The Testicular Cancer Resource Center - A source of information and support on all aspects of testicular cancer and extragonadal germ cell tumors.
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: If you are a man, you have a pair of egg-shaped glands called testicles, enclosed in your scrotum, which is a pouch that hangs behind your penis. Your testicles produce sperm cells and make the hormone testosterone. Inside each testicle are coiled tubes called seminiferous tubules, where your body creates immature sperm cells, also known as germ cells or spermatogonia. Through a series of stages, called spermatogenesis, spermatogonia develop into mature sperm. Testicular cancer is a disease of abnormal cell growth in one or both of your testicles. It usually begins in your germ cells, where genetic damage or changes, called mutations, cause the cells to grow uncontrollably. The cancerous germ cells clump together to form a tumor, which continues to grow. In most cases, these mutations occur in your germ cells and are called germ cell tumors. Doctors classify germ cell tumors as nonseminoma or seminoma, or based on the appearance of the cells under a microscope.
The research shows that late-onset side effects can occur in clusters, such as erectile dysfunction paired with thyroid disease, or as different types of cardiovascular problems like coronary artery disease, vessel damage, and obesity, added Sarah Kerns, Ph.D., the studys first author, and an assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Rochester Medical Center and a Wilmot investigator.. The study involved more than 1,200 testicular cancer survivors who were treated with chemotherapy. Scientists evaluated the cumulative burden of diseases following treatment and found the most common negative health outcomes were obesity, sensory neuropathy, ringing in the ears and hearing damage. Only about five percent of patients had no negative health effects, and 76 percent had a low-to-medium burden of side effects. Nineteen percent had a high-to-severe disease burden.. The research further suggests that vigorous exercise might be protective for the one in five ...
This research will determine if depression in testicular cancer survivors is correlated with demographic characteristics and cancer-related facots.