TY - JOUR. T1 - Consensus paper on the surveillance of surgical wound infections. AU - Society for Hospital Epidemiology of America, for Hospital Epidemiology of America. AU - Sherertz, Robert J.. AU - Garibaldi, Richard A.. AU - Marosok, Randy D.. AU - Glen Mayhall, C.. AU - Scheckler, William E.. AU - Berg, Rosemary. AU - Centers for Disease Control, for Disease Control. AU - Gaynes, Robert P.. AU - Jarvis, William R.. AU - Martone, William J.. AU - Surgical Infection Society, Infection Society. AU - Lee, James T.. PY - 1992/10. Y1 - 1992/10. N2 - A Surgical Wound Infection Task Force was convened by the Society of Hospital Epidemiology of America to evaluate how surgical wound infection surveillance should be done and to identify where more information is needed. The task force reached consensus in the following areas. The Centers for Disease Control definitions of surgical wound infection should be used for routine surveillance because of their current widespread acceptance and ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Identifying patients at high risk of surgical wound infection. T2 - A simple multivariate index of patient susceptibility and wound contamination. AU - Haley, Robert W.. AU - Culver, David H.. AU - Morgan, W. Meade. AU - White, John W.. AU - Emori, T. Grace. AU - Hooton, Thomas M.. PY - 1985/2. Y1 - 1985/2. N2 - To predict the likelihood that a patient will develop a surgical wound infection from several risk factors, the authors used information collected on 58,498 patients undergoing operations in 1970 to develop a simple multivariate risk index. Analyzing 10 risk factors with stepwise multiple logistic regression tech niques, they developed a model combining information on four of the risk factors to predict a patients probability of getting a surgical wound infection. Then, with information collected on another sample of 59,352 surgical patients admitted in 1975-1976, the validity of this index as a predictor of surgical wound infection risk was verified. With the simplified ...
One hundred fifty-seven elderly patients with surgical wound infection were matched on wound classification and date of surgery to non-infected control patients. Factors examined for their association with wound infection included medical history, functional status, behaviour e.g. smoking, factors predisposing to infection e. g. results of CBC...
Background: Surveillance of healthcare-associated infection has been associated with a reduction in surgical site infection (SSI). Aim: To evaluate the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (KONIS) in order to assess its effects on SSI since it was introduced. Methods: SSI data after gastrectomy, total hip arthroplasty (THA), and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between 2008 and 2012 were analysed. The pooled incidence of SSI was calculated for each year; the same analyses were also conducted from hospitals that had participated in KONIS for at least three consecutive years. Standardized SSI rates for each year were calculated by adjusting for SSI risk factors. SSI trends were analysed using the Cochran-Armitage test. Findings: The SSI rate following gastrectomy was 3.12% (522/16,918). There was a significant trend of decreased crude SSI rates over five years. This trend was also evident in analysis of hospitals that had participated for more than three years. The SSI rate for THA was ...
books.google.comhttps://books.google.com/books/about/Guideline_for_prevention_of_surgical_wou.html?id=q71KGBF3HM8C&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareGuideline for prevention of surgical wound infections, 1985 ...
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three different glycemic control conditions (tight, conventional, and standard) in the intraoperative period on: 1) postoperative surgical site infections, and 2) postoperative procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein levels in patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Secondary aims of the study were to investigate the effects of the three glycemic treatment conditions on: 1) intraoperative blood glucose; 2) intraoperative glycemic stability; and 3) intensive care unit length of stay, in patients undergoing open-heart surgery. An experimental design with a multilevel, single factor, within-subjects design was utilized. Patients were nested within anesthesia provider teams. The design was counterbalanced by means of a Latin square, where each of three anesthesia provider teams dispensed each of three glycemic control conditions once. Thirty-seven participants were randomized to either tight glycemic control (n =15), which maintained blood glucose
The system used by the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) program to measure risk of surgical site infection uses a score of >3 on the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)-physical status scale as a measure of underlying illness. The chronic disease score measures health status as a function of age, sex, and 29 chronic diseases, inferred from dispensing of prescription drugs. We studied the relationship between the chronic disease score and surgical site infection and whether the score can supplement the NNIS risk index. In a retrospective comparison of 191 patients with surgical site infection and 378 uninfected controls, the chronic disease score and ASA score were highly correlated. The chronic disease score improved prediction of infection by the NNIS risk index and augmented the ASA score for risk adjustment.
Additional laboratory adverse experiences that were reported during therapy in ,0.1% of patients treated with INVANZ in clinical trials include: increases in serum creatinine, serum glucose, BUN, total, direct and indirect serum bilirubin, serum sodium and potassium, PT and PTT; decreases in serum potassium, serum albumin, WBC, platelet count, and segmented neutrophils. In a clinical trial for the treatment of diabetic foot infections in which 289 adult diabetic patients were treated with INVANZ, the laboratory adverse experience profile was generally similar to that seen in previous clinical trials. Prophylaxis of Surgical Site Infection following Elective Colorectal Surgery In a clinical trial in adults for the prophylaxis of surgical site infection following elective colorectal surgery in which 476 patients received a 1 g dose of INVANZ 1 hour prior to surgery and were then followed for safety 14 days post surgery, the overall laboratory adverse experience profile was generally comparable to ...
In an analysis that included nearly 300,000 patients from eight states who underwent ambulatory surgery (surgery performed on a person who is admitted to and discharged from a hospital on the same day), researchers found ...
Surgical site infections are common and costly operative complications. Wound care professionals need to know how to identify a surgical site infection, as well as techniques for assessment, prevention, monitoring, and patient education, to optimize clinical outcomes in their post-surgical patients.
Our ability to conduct a detailed cost estimate was limited, in that costs associated with information technology implementation are largely system-specific and are dependent on available resources and the expertise of inhouse personnel. As a result, we present a general categorization of the expected costs and resources required for adaptation and implementation of an electronic SSI detection tool, and provide an estimate of cost savings due to successful implementation for an example case.. As previously mentioned, we observed variations in SSI surveillance practices across the four partner health delivery systems. The practice of conducting manual review for surveillance with no automated support was used as the standard base case. Cost and resource use for implementation of the electronic surveillance algorithm were categorized in two primary cost buckets: (1) cost to set up; and (2) costs to run. In addition, we also note the expectation that there will be future costs and a resource burden ...
In a thorough review of the literature on surgical site infections, this author shares insights on key risk factors, discusses current concepts and controversies with preventative measures, and offers a salient overview on common pathogens.
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TY - JOUR. T1 - The surgical wound in infrared. T2 - thermographic profiles and early stage test-accuracy to predict surgical site infection in obese women during the first 30 days after caesarean section. AU - Childs, Charmaine. AU - Wright, Nicola. AU - Wilmott, Jon. AU - Davies, Matthew. AU - Kilner, Karen. AU - Ousey, Karen. AU - Soltani, Hora. AU - Madhuvrata, Priya. AU - Stephenson, John. PY - 2019/1/7. Y1 - 2019/1/7. N2 - Background: Prophylactic antibiotics are commonly prescribed intra-operatively after caesarean section birth, often at high doses. Even so, wound infections are not uncommon and obesity increases the risk. Currently, no independent wound assessment technology is available to stratify women to low or high risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Study Aim: to investigate the potential of non-invasive infrared thermography (IRT), performed at short times after surgery, to predict later SSI. Methods: IRT was undertaken in hospital on day 2 with community follow up (days 7, ...
Ethicon has joined leading wound closure specialists to discuss recommendations to ease the burden of surgical site infections (SSIs) on patients and costs to healthcare systems across Europe, Middle East and Africa.. SSIs can be a serious complication of surgery, and are becoming the most common healthcare-associated infections, increasing morbidity and mortality rates among affected patients.1,2 The meeting was held at the fourth International Consortium for Prevention & Infection Control (ICPIC) conference in Geneva, Switzerland.. Speaking at the event, Professor Leaper, Professor of Clinical Sciences at the University of Huddersfield commented: "There are many reasons why we must act urgently to limit the incidence of surgical site infections. Not only do they have a significant impact on patients in terms of delayed wound healing, increased need for further surgery and longer hospital stays, but prescribing antibiotics to combat surgical site infections contributes to the growing problem of ...
This toolkit is part of the World Health Organization Safe Surgery 2015 Initiative, which is using the Surgical Safety Checklist Program to help hospitals reduce surgical infections, major complications, and related deaths. The goal is to ...
Exploratory descriptive study, developed in a governmental hospital of tertiary care in Minas Gerais (Brazil), from January 2008 to December 2009. Medical records and reports of control infection practitioner of 98 patients readmitted with SSI were reviewed and the data were analyzed in relation to gender, age, co morbidities, length of staying, surgery, specialty, type of procedures, wound class, duration of surgery, SSI and micro-organisms. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Practices to Reduce Surgical Site Infections among Women Undergoing Cesarean Section. T2 - A Review. AU - McKibben, Rebeccah A.. AU - Pitts, Samantha I.. AU - Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina. AU - Perl, Trish M.. AU - Bass, Eric B.. PY - 2015/1/1. Y1 - 2015/1/1. N2 - OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among women undergoing cesarean section (C-section), a common procedure in North America. While risk factors for SSI are often modifiable, wide variation in clinical practice exists. With this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the results and quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses on interventions to reduce surgical site infections among women undergoing C-section. METHODS We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for systematic reviews and meta-analyses published between January 2000 and May 2014 on interventions to reduce the occurrence of SSIs (incisional infections and endometritis), ...
Surgical site infection (SSI) is the third most common healthcare-associated infection, yet is the most costly in terms of resources. Objective: To improve patient care experience, develop better links between acute and community care and reduce readmissions for SSI. Methods: To reduce cardiac SSI, a photo of the surgical wound was taken on the day of hospital discharge (Photo at Discharge = PaD), accompanied by individualised information for patients and carers. Patient feedback was sought via a postal questionnaire (85% return rate) and telephone follow-up. A prospective surveillance service monitored SSI rates on readmission. Results: Observational audit and SSI surveillance data collected over a 21-month period suggest PaD is associated with four times lower readmission rates for incisional SSI (p=0.0344). The potential savings are estimated at £15,000 per deep incisional SSI prevented. Discussion: PaD is associated with improved patient experience, a reduction in incisional SSI readmission rates
Based on those findings, we initiated a prospective observational study implementing a continuous insulin intravenous infusion protocol as recommended internationally in our patients, both diabetic and nondiabetic, to achieve a blood glucose level (BGL) between 4 and 8 mmol/l. Our sample study population included 116 patients, mean age 54 (± 17.9) years, 65 (56%) were males, 62 (53%) received coronary artery bypass grafting and 46 (40%) were diabetic. Initially there was resistance to implement this protocol and compliance was poor. We therefore embarked on a nursing and physician education program for more than 1 year. We initiated a new prospective study in 2006-2007. The study included 270 patients, mean age 52 years (± 15.8), 155 (57%) were males, 136 (50%) received coronary artery bypass grafting and 97 (36%) were diabetic. ...
Backes Manouk, Dingemans Siem A., Dijkgraaf Marcel G. W., van den Berg H. Rogier, van Dijkman Bart, Hoogendoorn Jochem M., Joosse Pieter, Ritchie Ewan D., Roerdink W. Herbert, Schots Judith P. M., Sosef Nico L., Spijkerman Ingrid J. B., Twigt Bas A., van der Veen Alexander H., van Veen Ruben N., Vermeulen Jefrey, Vos Dagmar I., Winkelhagen Jasper, Goslings J. Carel, Schepers Tim Effect of Antibiotic Prophylaxis on Surgical Site Infections Following Removal of Orthopedic Implants Used for Treatment of Foot, Ankle, and Lower Leg Fractures: A Randomized Clinical Trial JAMA 2017;318 (24):2438-2445 [PubMed] ...
Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a common cause of healthcare-associated infection. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed criteria that define surgical site infection as infection related to an operative
Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available. ...
Just received my April issue of Infection Control Today and, after scanning the table of contents, turned immediately to the article on page 64, Covergown Policy and Postoperative Infection Rate. Covergown and scrub use has been a hot topic for some time now. The article stated [that] a review of the literature revealed no studies that directly correlated postoperative wound infection with the practice of wearing covergowns over scrubs when leaving the OR. The authors list as the major purpose of their study "to determine the rates of postoperative infection when covergowns are and are not used." In the methodology section, the authors state "for the postoperative infection rate portion of the study, charts from surgical cases were randomly selected...." As an Infection Control Professional (ICP), I would question determination of infection rates based on a sampling (random selection of cases). In infection control practice, denominator data for determining infection rates would include all ...
The majority of elderly patients with a displaced fracture of the proximal femur are now treated with a hemiarthroplasty. Prosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication, and the infection rate is high in this group of elderly patients. Local application of gentamicin produces high antibiotic concentrations in the wound. The aim of this study is to determine whether locally administered collagen-gentamicin in the joint perioperatively in addition to routine IV prophylaxis with beta-lactam antibiotics can reduce the early postoperative infection rate (, 4 weeks postoperative)after hemiarthroplasty in proximal femoral fractures ...
The majority of elderly patients with a displaced fracture of the proximal femur are now treated with a hemiarthroplasty. Prosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication, and the infection rate is high in this group of elderly patients. Local application of gentamicin produces high antibiotic concentrations in the wound. The aim of this study is to determine whether locally administered collagen-gentamicin in the joint perioperatively in addition to routine IV prophylaxis with beta-lactam antibiotics can reduce the early postoperative infection rate (, 4 weeks postoperative)after hemiarthroplasty in proximal femoral fractures ...
Few investigators have used robust analytic methods to assess risk factors and outcomes for surgical site infections (SSIs) after craniotomy and craniectomy (CRANI) procedures. We performed a retrospective study among patients undergoing CRANI procedures between 2006 and 2010 at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC) to assess the effect of an intervention (e.g., limiting Gliadel wafer use among patients with malignant brain tumors) on the trend of SSI rates, to identify independent risk factors for SSIs, and to evaluate one-year postoperative patient outcomes associated with these SSIs. We abstracted demographic data and clinical data from medical records or from the UIHCs Health information Management System. We identified 104 patients with SSIs and selected 312 controls. Of SSIs, 88% were deep incisional or organ space infections, 70% were identified after patients were discharged from their initial hospitalizations, 32% were caused by Staphylococcus aureus alone or in combination with
Abdominal surgical site infections are among the most common complications of inpatient admissions and have serious consequences for outcomes and costs. Different risk factors may be involved, including age, sex, nutrition and immunity, prophylactic antibiotics, operation type and duration, type of shaving, and secondary infections. This study aimed to determine the risk factors affecting abdominal surgical site infections and their incidence at Imam Khomeini, a major referral teaching hospital in Iran. Patients (n = 802) who had undergone abdominal surgery were studied and the relationships among variables were analyzed by Students t and Chi-square tests. The subjects were followed for 30 days and by a 20-item questionnaire. Data were collected through pre- and post-operative examinations and telephone follow-ups. Of the 802 patients, 139 suffered from SSI (17.4%). In 40.8% of the cases, the wound was dirty infected. The average age for the patients was 46.7 years. The operations were elective in 75.7
OBJECTIVE Characterizing readmissions from orthopedic surgical site infections. METHOD An integrative review of literature in the LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane, SciELO and PUBMED databases, using the descriptors Patient readmission, Wound infection, Cross infection, Orthopedic procedures, Orthopedics. RESULTS 78 studies were identified and 10 publications were selected. Surgical site infections are the most common cause of unplanned orthopedic readmissions, representing long periods of hospitalization, new surgical procedures and high costs, and greater possibility of subsequent hospitalizations. Most significant predictors have indicated average length of hospitalization, need for intensive care, emergency status at admission, risk of death, age ,; 65 years, males and higher body mass index. CONCLUSION Readmission rates have increasingly become measures of quality and concerns about costs. New studies could involve issues related to indirect costs, specifically social and psychological costs ...
Leading specialists discuss SSI prevention and recent guidelines regarding the use of triclosan-coated sutures in all types of surgery [1]. SINGAPORE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Ethicon,* part of the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies,** brought together a consortium of international experts to discuss surgical site infection (SSI) prevention across Asia Pacific at the first-ever Care+ Masters Symposium. SSIs can be a serious complication of surgery and are becoming the most common healthcare-associated infection (HAI), contributing to rising morbidity and mortality rates among affected patients. [2-3] The meeting, held at the companys offices in Singapore, provided delegates with an invaluable opportunity to learn how they can implement SSI prevention guidelines and surveillance methods across Asia Pacific.. Speaking at the event, Dr Liau Kiu Hin, Medical Director & Senior Consultant Surgeon, Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital & Specialist Centre, commented: "Surgical site infections are preventable ...
Risk factors for surgical site infection in a teaching hospital: a prospective study of 1,138 patients Keping Cheng, Jiawei Li, Qingfang Kong, Changxian Wang, Nanyuan Ye, Guohua Xia Department of Infection Control, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, Peopleâ s Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) in a teaching hospital.Methods: A prospective study was initiated to investigate risk factors for SSI at a university-affiliated tertiary care center from July 2013 to December 2014. The chi-square test for categorical variables was used to determine the significance of association, whereas the multivariate logistic regression model was used to examine independent risk factors for SSI.Results: A total of 1,138 patients met the inclusion criteria, in whom 36 cases of infection occurred during the hospitalization period and two cases occurred after discharge. Univariate analysis
BACKGROUND: In low-income countries, surgical site infections (SSIs) are a very frequent form of hospital-acquired infection. Surveillance is an important method for controlling SSI but it is unclear how this can best be performed in low-income settings. AIM: To examine the epidemiological characteristics of various components of an SSI surveillance programme in a single Kenyan hospital. METHODS: The study assessed the inter-observer consistency of the surgical wound class (SWC) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores using the kappa statistic. Post-discharge telephone calls were evaluated against an outpatient clinician review gold standard. The predictive value of components of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHNS) risk index was examined in patients having major obstetric or gynaecological surgery (O&G) between August 2010 and February 2011. FINDINGS: After appropriate training, surgeons and anaesthetists were found to ...
The incidence of postoperative wound infection in a general surgical unit is reported both before and after transfer from a "Nightingale" type multibed ward to a new "race-track" type of surgical ward with controlled ventilation and with 40% of its beds in single rooms. Following transfer postoperative wound infection was reduced by about 55%.. With the use of certain types of staphylococcal infection as an index of cross-infection it was shown that transfer was followed by a 72% reduction in cross-infection of wounds.. A case is made for control of hospital cross-infection in surgical wards. The principal change in ward architecture resulting from the transfer was the extensive division of ward space into separate compartments (40% of single-bed rooms), which make controlled ventilation easier.. ...
Merck & Co., Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved INVANZÃ ® (ertapenem), a once-daily injectable antibiotic, for the prophylaxis of surgical site infection (SSI) following elective colorectal surgery in adults. This approval was based upon the results of the landmark PREVENT trial, the largest prospective, randomized double-blind, comparative clinical trial ever conducted in antibiotic prophylaxis for elective colorectal surgery (N=1002). Results from the study were presented today in the New England Journal of Medicine. "Given the high incidence of SSI, Merck is very pleased to be able to offer a new alternative with clinically demonstrated efficacy," said Murray A. Abramson, M.D., M.P.H., senior medical director, Merck Research Labs, Infectious Diseases, Merck & Co. Inc. In the PREVENT study, a statistically significant difference favoring INVANZ over cefotetan with respect to the primary endpoint has been observed. A second adequate and ...
by Physicians Weekly , Jan 9, 2013. Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common complication facing colorectal surgery patients, occurring in 15% to 30% of cases. SSIs prolong hospitalization, increase readmissions, require subsequent treatment, affect quality of life, and increase healthcare costs to the tune of $1 billion annually. Research has not shown an association between adherence to well-known infection control process measures and substantial SSI reduction. While the occurrence of SSIs can never be fully eliminated in any feasible scheme, many can be prevented. Addressing SSIs as a Team In a study published in the August 2012 Journal of the American College of Surgeons, my colleagues and I found that physicians and nurses often feel as though they know what needs to be done to improve safety for colorectal surgery patients, but they feel disempowered. Using these perceptions as the basis for our study, we tested the implementation of a surgery-based comprehensive unit-based ...
Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive, slow-growing, anaerobic bacillus, predominantly found as a commensal on the skin and mucous membranes of adults. It is, however, also considered an opportunistic pathogen; mostly associated with acne vulgaris, but rarely also with severe infections such as infective endocarditis, prosthetic joint infections, and deep sternal wound infections following cardiothoracic surgery. In addition, P. acnes has recently been found in high frequency in prostate tissue from patients with prostatitis and prostate cancer. The NOD-like receptors (NLR) act as intracellular sensors of microbial components, and a number of various bacteria have been found to induce assembling and activation of NLR-inflammasomes; leading to a pro-inflammatory response. The inflammasome-mediated formation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 involves the auto-proteolytic maturation of caspase-1. This study investigated if P. acnes activates inflammasomes. ...
Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining topical or local antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis ...
Surgical site infection prevention resources and guidelines to prevent post surgical infections such as Staphylococcus aureus in healthcare settings.
The descriptions for this measure come from source: www.leapfroggroup.org.. "To prevent infections after major colon surgery, hospital staff should use appropriate antibiotics before surgery, clean the surgical site with special antiseptics, and closely monitor patients during and after the surgery. Surgical site infections can be very serious, and may spread throughout the body. A patient with this type of infection often faces a long recovery in the ICU. Some people even die from the infection.". ...
2016 Annual Meeting: Single Institutional Experience with 12,165 Median Sternotomies: A Simple Risk Assessment Tool for Deep Wound Infection
Background: The New Zealand (NZ) SSI Improvement Programme began in 2013 and has prospectively collected data on hip and knee arthroplasties performed in the 20 District Health Board hospitals. The data base was analysed to determine risk factors for surgical site infections (SSI) in hip and knee arthroplasties. Methods: Data captured included information on the patient (sex, age, height, weight and BMI), procedure (antimicrobial prophylaxis and skin antisepsis) and SSI. The CDC NHSN definitions for SSI were used. All patients were followed for 90 days. Only SSI occurring during the initial admission or resulting in readmission were included. Results: ...
INTRODUCTION Nosocomial infections represent one of the most common complications of hospitalized patients especially those with more severe conditions. Infection of the urogenital tract (associated with urinary catheterization), surgical wound infection (SWI), infection of the blood stream (associated with intravascular devices), and pneumonia (associated with the ventilator) are responsible for approximately 80% of all nosocomial infections. Infection of the urogenital tract is more common (35%), but it is associated with the lowest morbidity. Infection of the surgical wound is the second in frequency (20%), but the third in costs; infection of the blood stream and pneumonia are less common (15% each), but they are associated with high mortality rates and costs1,2. Besides the increase in the duration of hospitalization and the need of intensive care that cause an increase in hospital costs, the condition of surgical patients with infection can deteriorate, they might not recover their prior ...
First prize went to Thomas Steeves of Dalhousie University, for research that compared the effects of 1 versus 3 days of antibiotic treatment on surgical site infections after orthognathic surgery. Based on the results of a double-blind randomized controlled trial, Steeves study suggests that 3 days of post-operative antibiotics reduced the risk of surgical site infections compared to 1 day, but this benefit may be outweighe d by the risks of over-administering antibiotics. "One of our goals in doing this research was to prevent overuse of antibiotics," says Steeves. "We did a number needed to treat analysis that showed only 1 in 10 patients benefitted from the extended 3-day regimen; so this suggests its still an over-administration of antibiotics. Based on our survey of oral surgeons in Canada, we found that over 40% prescribe oral antibiotics for a week following surgery, so over-prescription of antibiotics may be common." Steeves won an expense-paid trip to the 2016 American Dental ...
Studies show that less than half of the surfaces in a room are disinfected properly in between patients. Xenex robots help hospitals reduce the risk of infection by destroying the microscopic germs that may be missed during the manual cleaning process. Xenexs germ fighting robots take room decontamination to the next level with LightStrike pulsed xenon technology, which uses xenon gas, an environmentally-friendly element, to create Full Spectrum, high intensity UV light that quickly destroys infectious germs. The robot destroys C.diff spores, MRSA and other microorganisms in less than five minutes. Hospitals using Xenex devices have published outcome studies in peer-reviewed journals showing 50-100 percent decreases in C.diff, MRSA and Surgical Site Infection rates when those hospitals used the Xenex robots to disinfect rooms ...
A surgical Site Infection occurs at the site of a surgical incision. Germs can get into the incision area, and cause an infection. It can develop within 30 days of an operation, or sometimes even up to one year if an implant (such as a knee or hip joint implant) is used. Infections can be minor, or occasionally they can increase complications that result in a longer length of stay in the hospital, or an increased readmission rate for patients. Post-operative SSIs are the most common health care-associated infections in surgical patients ...
A new smartphone app, WoundCare, is enabling patients to remotely send images of their surgical wounds for monitoring by nurses, allowing earlier detection of surgical site infections (SSIs) and prevention of hospital re-admissions. SSIs are the most common hospital-acquired infection and the leading cause of hospital re-admission following an operation. Given the prevalence off SSIs, researchers at the Wisconsin Institute of Surgical Outcomes Research, Department of Surgery at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, set out to assess if postoperative wounds could be effectively monitored by having patients upload photos through the WoundCare app and answering a few brief questions to gather information not easily captured through images.. Patients cannot identify infections and frequently ignore or fail to recognise the early signs of wound complications, according to a report of the research published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. This leads to the "common and frustrating ...
Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria are commonly found on the skin (armpit, groin, and genital areas) and in the nose of many people. These bacteria normally do not cause illness. However, when these bacteria enter the body through a break in the skin, they can cause small infections such as pimples and boils. Staph can also cause serious infections such as bloodstream infections, pneumonia, or surgical wound infections. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to the antibiotic methicillin and other antibiotics related to penicillin.. How is MRSA spread?. MRSA is spread by close contact with an infected person, either by direct skin contact or indirect contact with shared objects or surfaces, such as shared towels, razors, soap, wound bandages, bedding, clothes, hot tub or sauna benches, and athletic equipment. Wound drainage or pus is very infectious.. Who is at risk for MRSA?. Your risk is higher if you:. * Have recurrent skin ...
Surgical site infection (SSI) after spine surgery is a devastating complication. It is classified as a "never event" by payers, because it is presumed to be the result of a lapse in quality.. A mainstay of SSI prevention is antibiotic treatment, but antibiotic concentrations are lower in bone tissue than blood levels. Because of this, there has been increasing interest in the use of in-wound antibiotics (IWA) placed directly on the spine at the completion of surgery to help avoid spine SSI. However, because spine SSI happens relatively infrequently and there is considerable variation in IWA techniques among hospitals and surgeons, it remains to be determined if the broad use of IWA would actually decrease rates of spine SSI.. CERTAIN is interested in better understanding surgeon practices and beliefs around in-wound antibiotics. The Spine Infection study will partner with spine surgery clinics and hospitals to:. ...
EMR = electronic medical record.. Text Description. This Exhibit shows the modified flow diagram for identifying surgical site infection (SSI) cases. To the left of the manual flow process is a small diagram showing flow of microbiology and hospital admissions data into electronic reports. Electronic medical record review (without floor visits) sends notice of a potential case for verification and, separately, information needed to document the potential SSI case. This documentation is aggregated monthly for reporting.. Return to Document. ...
It is established that the frequency SSI in patients with CRC is 26- 27%. Correlation between postoperative complications and long-term results of radical surgical treatment of CRC: any postoperative complications decrease long-term survival after surgical treatment of CRC; infectious complications are a major cause of reduced survival in this group of patients, although patients with high preoperative risk often develop non-infectious complications; patients with severe form of surgical site infections have a bad prognosis long-term survival. Strategies to prevent infectious complications and implement more intensive surveillance protocols for those with severe infections may improve quality of care and long-term outcomes in patients undergoing curative-intent surgery for CRC.