Purpose While exercise has been shown to be beneficial in improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among cancer survivors, evidence is limited on the independent role of sedentary behavior. We examined how objectively measured sedentary time was associated with HRQOL among long-term cancer survivors. Methods This cross-sectional study included 54 cancer survivors, on average 3.4 years postdiagnosis, who were enrolled into an exercise trial designed to improve cognitive function. At baseline, we measured sedentary time and moderate-vigorous intensity physical activity with the ActivPal, cardiorespiratory fitness with treadmill testing, and self-reported HRQOL with an established scale (SF-36). In multivariate models, we regressed HRQOL on sedentary time (percent of waking time spent sitting and lying). Results Survivors with higher sedentary time had significantly poorer physical functioning (β = −0.50, p = 0.028), general health (β = −0.75, ptrend = 0.004), and physical summary scores
Sedentary behavior is associated with an increased risk of mortality and many health conditions including type 2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome, independent of the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Furthermore, independent of total sedentary time and MVPA, Healy et al. observed that individuals who had more breaks in sedentary time had lower 2-h plasma glucose. Recent experimental findings also suggests that breaking up prolonged bouts of sedentary behavior (≥ 20 minutes) with either light or moderate intensity activity for 2 minutes reduces postprandial glucose and insulin responses.10 Replacing sedentary time with light-intensity activity or nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) may help to reduce the health consequences of sedentary behavior. The purpose of this study is to develop a smartphone application (NEAT!) to encourage sedentary adults with diabetes to increase breaks in prolonged bouts of sedentary behavior ...
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a 10-week family focused Active Play intervention on childrens weekday and weekend day sedentary time and total physical activity. Secondary objectives were to investigate the influence of specific confounding variables on childrens weekday and weekend day sedentary time and total physical activity.. Compared with an age-matched comparison group, a family focused intervention delivered in childrens centres located in areas of high deprivation resulted in a positive significant intervention effect on childrens sedentary time and total physical activity assessed using accelerometry for weekday and weekend day. The presence of a significant intervention effect on childrens sedentary time and physical activity are similar to the findings from other empirical family focused studies, which have demonstrated significant increases in physical activity levels [65-67]. Furthermore these results suggest that children in the intervention group ...
Physical inactivity and positive energy balance pose a risk to health. They increase the risk of obesity and associated non-communicable diseases. Recently, also sedentary behaviour has been associated with obesity and non-communicable diseases. Nevertheless, it has been unclear which type of sedentary behaviour is the most harmful. It is also unknown whether the relationship of sedentary behaviour with obesity is truly independent of other factors, for example physical activity and diet. Longitudinal data are limited, and the direction of causality and the mechanism of action are still unknown.. Aim: The aim of this study was 1) to identify the type of sedentary behaviour having the strongest association with obesity, 2) to explore the causal relationship of sedentary behaviour and weight increase, and 3) to additionally, investigate the relationship of sedentary behaviour with fatty liver. These were studied in cross-sectional and/or longitudinal settings using data from the Cardiovascular ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior and quality of life indicators in survivors of breast cancer. AU - Phillips, Siobhan M.. AU - Awick, Elizabeth A.. AU - Conroy, David E.. AU - Pellegrini, Christine A.. AU - Mailey, Emily L.. AU - McAuley, Edward. PY - 2015/11/15. Y1 - 2015/11/15. N2 - BACKGROUND The primary purpose of the current study was to determine prospective associations of accelerometer-assessed physical activity intensity and sedentary time with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) indicators among survivors of breast cancer. METHODS A total of 358 survivors of breast cancer wore an accelerometer for 7 days at baseline to assess different activity intensities (light, lifestyle, and moderate to vigorous) and sedentary behavior. Six months later, survivors completed online questionnaires that assessed HRQOL indicators (disease-specific HRQOL, fatigue, depression, and anxiety) and relevant covariates. Relationships between activity and ...
Previous questionnaires targeting older adults sedentary time have underestimated total sedentary time, possibly by not including all relevant specific sedentary behaviors. The current study aimed to investigate the criterion validity and test-retest reliability of a new questionnaire assessing a comprehensive set of sedentary behaviors. Additionally, we examined whether the criterion validity of the questionnaire differed according to age, gender and educational level. A sample of home-dwelling Belgian older adults (|64 years, n = 508) completed a newly-developed questionnaire assessing twelve specific sedentary behaviors and wore an accelerometer for seven consecutive days as criterion measure. A subsample (n = 28) completed the questionnaire a second time to examine test-retest reliability. Data collection occurred between September 2010 and October 2012. Correlational analyses examining self-reported total sitting time and accelerometer-derived sedentary time yielded a Spearmans ρ of 0.30. Using
The present study examined the influence of family circumstance on the physical activity and sedentary behaviour of adolescents living in England. Associations were not consistent across behaviours or between genders, and relationships for variables with more than two categories were not necessarily linear. Overall, higher levels of sedentary behaviour were associated with living in a single parent household in boys and lower SES in girls. Living in a low SES neighbourhood was associated with reduced participation in sports/exercise in boys and girls, and low individual level SES was associated with lower levels of active travel in boys only. Family structure was not associated with physical activity in girls, and relationships were inconsistent in boys.. Total sedentary behaviour was greater in boys from single versus dual parent households on weekdays and at weekends. Associations with individual sedentary behaviours (e.g. TV viewing, computer use) or groups of sedentary behaviour (e.g. ...
Sedentary behavior defined as time spent non-exercising seated or reclining posture has been identified has a health risk and associated with frailty and disablement for older adults. Older adults are the most sedentary segment of society. To date no study has investigated the determinants of sedentary behavior in older adults. This study reports a qualitative investigation of the determinants of sedentary behavior, strategies and motivator to reduce sitting time by structured interviews in a group of community dwelling older women (N = 11, age 65 and over). Older women expressed the view that their sedentary behavior is mostly determined by pain which acts both as an incentive to sit and a motivator to stand up, lack of energy in the afternoon, pressure from direct social circle to sit and rest, societal and environmental typecasting that older adult are meant to sit, lack of environmental facilities to allow activity pacing. This qualitative investigation highlighted some factors that older adults
TY - JOUR. T1 - International study of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time with body mass index and obesity: IPEN adult study. AU - Van Dyck, Delfien. AU - Cerin, Ester. AU - De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse. AU - Hinckson, Erica A.. AU - Reis, Rodrigo S.. AU - DAVEY, Rachel. AU - Sarmiento, Olga L.. AU - Mitáš, Josef. AU - Troelsen, Jens. AU - MacFarlane, Duncan J.. AU - Salvo, Deborah. AU - Aguinaga-Ontoso, Ines. AU - Owen, Neville. AU - Cain, Kelli L.. AU - Sallis, James F.. PY - 2015. Y1 - 2015. N2 - BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) has been consistently implicated in the etiology of obesity, whereas recent evidence on the importance of sedentary time remains inconsistent. Understanding of dose-response associations of PA and sedentary time with overweight and obesity in adults can be improved with large-scale studies using objective measures of PA and sedentary time. The purpose of this study was to examine the strength, direction and shape of dose-response associations of ...
Publishing in Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers looked at sedentary behaviour and reported that increased sedentary behaviour, both in total volume and prolonged uninterrupted bouts, was associated with increased risk of death.. Dr Amitava Banerjee, Senior Clinical Lecturer in Clinical Data Science and Honorary Consultant Cardiologist, UCL, said: "This large-scale US study in nearly 8000 individuals over the age of 45 years measured physical activity using accelerometers which is much more objective than self-report. There were three main findings. First, inactivity or "sedentary behaviour" made up most of the waking day: 12.3 out of 16 hours. Second, the total time spent inactive as well as the average duration of each period of inactivity were both associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. Third, the increased risk of mortality associated with sedentary behaviour was lower in those individuals who kept sedentary periods to less than 30 minutes.. "This is an observational ...
This cross-sectional study is one of the first to examine and compare the independent associations of objectively measured sedentary time, moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and fitness with cardio-metabolic risk factors. We studied 543 men and women (aged 18-49 years) from the NHANES 2003-2004 survey. Sedentary time and MVPA were measured by accelerometry. Fitness was assessed with a submaximal treadmill test. Cardio-metabolic risk factors included: waist circumference (WC), BMI, blood pressure, fasting glucose, HDL- and non HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and C-reactive protein (CRP). Sedentary time, MVPA and fitness were used as predictors for the cardio-metabolic outcomes in a multiple regression analysis. Standardized regression coefficients were computed. Results show that sedentary time was associated with HDL-cholesterol (β = −0.080, p = 0.05) and TG (β = 0.080, p = 0.03). These results became non-significant after adjustment for MVPA and fitness. MVPA was associated with WC
A recent ACSM Pronouncement published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise summarized the evidence for an association between excessive levels of sedentary behavior and negative health outcomes such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality. While the evidence is still accumulating, it appears as though the effects of sedentary behavior on health may not be completely independent of physical activity (and vice versa). Therefore, in formulating the questions to be examined by the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, there was considerable interest in understanding whether the amount of time spent sitting modifies the association between physical activity and health. One potential impact of such an interaction could be the refinement of physical activity recommendations based on the amount of sedentary time that a person experiences, for example based on their occupational requirements. In order to address this question, the Committee turned to ...
This systematic review examined the prevalence of childrens and adolescents sedentary time and sedentary behaviors during the after-school period. The findings highlight that children spent between 41-51 % of the after-school period sedentary and that adolescents are more sedentary than children (57 %). TV viewing and other screen-based behaviors make up just 26 % or less of this period. Other non-screen based sedentary behaviors (e.g., social sedentary behaviors, motorized transport, homework, and reading) comprise 54 % of the after-school period; however, it is possible several of these behaviors occur concurrently [47, 48]. The percentage of time spent sedentary after school is greater than other periods of the day, such as recess and lunchtime, where children also have discretion over their behavior choices. For example, children aged 5-6 years and 10-12 years spend approximately 15 % and 14 % of recess sedentary respectively, and 22 % and 21 % of lunchtime sedentary respectively [49]. ...
Children’s motor competence (MC) has declined in the past decades, while sedentary behavior (SB) has increased. This study examined the association between MC and physical activity (PA) levels among primary schoolchildren. Demographics, body height and weight, MC (Athletic Skills Track) and PA levels (ActiGraph, GT3X+) were assessed among 595 children (291 boys, mean age = 9.2 years, SD = 1.1). MC was standardized into five categories: from very low to very high. PA levels were classified into sedentary behavior (SB), light physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Mixed model analyses were conducted with PA levels as dependent variables and MC as the independent variable, while adjusting for age, gender, and BMI z-score on the individual level. Additional moderation analyses between covariates and MC and PA levels were also conducted. A negative association between MC and SB (β = -3.17) and a positive association between MC and MVPA (β =1.41) were found
View the Daily cumulative patterns of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour by cardiometabolic health status in middle-aged adults; a cross-sectional analysis. publication.
Purpose of Review: Prolonged sitting (sedentary behavior) has deleterious cardiovascular and metabolic correlates; however, little is known about the associations of too much sitting with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risk. In addition to the adverse effects of total sitting time, the manner in which it is accumulated has also been postulated to be important for cardiovascular health. Recent Findings: We describe recent evidence from several research papers published in the last 12-18 months, showing deleterious relationships of sedentary behavior with mortality outcomes. We also explore emerging findings on breaking up sedentary time and its potential beneficial impact on cardiovascular health. Summary: Consistent independent associations have been observed between sitting time/sedentary behaviors and elevated all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality risk. Generally, these associations have persisted following adjustment for physical activity. Furthermore, total sedentary time ...
Another dangerous lifestyle is the sedentary lifestyle. Routine day in day out. Do this and do that every day. Eat, sleep, work a bit, eat, sleep. No exercise at all. Seems like that is my lifestyle now. After a while the signs of sedentary lifestyle manifest themselves. The stomach growing bigger, the body getting weaker, the muscles disappearing, flabby muscles around the hand and legs. In the worst case scenario, the body will deteriorate and you may even have to wear cervical collars to support your weakened neck muscles. No, I do hope that I would not end up like that. I want to be active and fit physically. Must do something about it now ...
A recently released article that points out the dangers of inactivity among older adults is receiving wide media attention for its conclusion that regardless of time spent in moderate-vigorous activity, each hour spent in sedentary behavior significantly increases the odds of disability in 1 or more activities of daily living (ADL). For physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) the findings include big news about how the damage of sedentary behavior is independent of activity level-but the study also confirms what theyve always known about inactivity and reinforces the importance of PTs and PTAs as agents of change.. Since its February 19 advance e-publication in the Journal of Physical Activity & Health, "Sedentary Time in U.S. Older Adults Associated With Disability in Activities of Daily Living Independent of Physical Activity" (.pdf) has received attention from Reuters, National Public Radio, CBC, and NBC, among other media outlets. The reason for all the notice is ...
Studies of automatic associations of sedentary behavior, physical activity, and exercise are proliferating, but the lack of information on the psychometric properties of relevant measures is a potential impediment to progress. The purpose of this review was to critically summarize measurement practices in studies examining automatic associations related to sedentary behavior, physical activity, and exercise. Of 37 studies, 27 (73%) did not include a justification for the measure chosen to assess automatic associations. Additional problems have been noted, including the nonreporting of psychometric information (validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability) and the lack of standardization of procedures (e.g., number, type of stimuli). The authors emphasize the need to select measures based on conceptual arguments and psychometric evidence and to standardize measurement procedures. To facilitate progress, the review concludes with a proposal for conceptually appropriate validation ...
OBJECTIVE There is little epidemiologic research on longitudinal and secular trends in weight-related health behaviors throughout the stages of adolescence. In particular, few data are available to assess secular trends in various sedentary behaviors. The objective of this research was to investigate longitudinal and secular trends in physical activity and sedentary behavior in a large, diverse cohort of adolescents. METHODS Project EAT-II is a 5-year longitudinal study (N = 2516) that includes 2 cohorts that allow for the observation of longitudinal changes from early to midadolescence (junior high to high school; n = 806; mean baseline age: 12.8 +/- 0.8 years) and mid- to late adolescence (high school to post-high school; n = 1710; mean baseline age: 15.8 +/- 0.8 years). EAT-II also examined secular trends in health behavior from 1999 to 2004 in midadolescence. The main outcome measures of the mixed-model regression analyses used in this research were self-reported weekly hours of moderate to
TY - JOUR. T1 - An explorative study of current strategies to reduce sedentary behaviour in hospital wards. AU - Mavroeidi, Alexandra. AU - McInally, Lianne. AU - Tomasella, Flavio. AU - Dall, Philippa M.. AU - Skelton, Dawn A.. N1 - Acceptance in SAN AAM: no embargo. OA journal (CC-BY). PY - 2019/11/12. Y1 - 2019/11/12. N2 - Background: Prolonged sitting (or sedentary behaviour (SB)) has profound detrimental effects on health and is associated with increased risk of chronic disease, hospitalisation and premature death. In clinical practice, one of the principle aims in the rehabilitation of older adults is to maintain or increase physical activity. However while in hospital, a person will spend the vast majority of the day sitting or lying down, often in a single uninterrupted bout. A number of strategies (including the popular twitter-based campaign #endpjparalysis) have started to be implemented in hospital wards to get patients up and moving. Objective: This is the first explorative study ...
Moms of young children who engage in more screen-based sedentary behaviors, such as spending time on smartphones, tablets, or computers, tend to have greater
This study examined the classification accuracy of the activPAL™, including total time spent sedentary and total number of breaks in sedentary behavior (SB) in 4-6 year old children. Forty children aged 4-6 years (5.3±1.0 years) completed a ~150-min laboratory protocol involving sedentary, light and moderate-to vigorous-intensity activities. Posture was coded as sit/lie, stand, walk or other using direct observation. Posture was classified using the activPAL™ software. Classification accuracy was evaluated using sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC). Time spent in each posture and total number of breaks in SB were compared using paired sample t-tests. The activPAL™ showed good classification accuracy for sitting (ROC-AUC=0.84) and fair classification accuracy for standing and walking (0.76 and 0.73, respectively). Time spent in sit/lie, and stand was overestimated by 5.9% (95% CI=0.6%-11.1%) and 14.8% (11.6%-17.9%), respectively; walking
Only 53% of adults in Calderdale are achieving the Chief Medical Officers recommended levels of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week: [[nid:2184]].
Sedentary behavior is associated with poor cardiovascular health and diabetes in adults with severe obesity, independent of how much exercise they perform.
To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that insulin resistance predicts the decline in physical activity and increase in sedentary behavior experienced by peripubertal minority females over a year. Each unit lower in baseline SI was associated with an extra 3.6-min mean decrease in physical activity per day as measured by accelerometry over a year, while each one unit lower in baseline SI was associated with an extra mean 8.5-min increase in sedentary behavior per day over a year, regardless of adiposity, age, pubertal stage, or ethnicity. Each unit lower in SI at baseline predicted an extra 17.8-min increase in sedentary behavior as measured by self-report. While interventions to increase physical activity in youth have shown some promise, none have been able to increase activity to recommended levels. This may be because the association between pubertal declines in SI and activity levels has been ignored in intervention approaches.. Changes in insulin resistance might affect ...
The principle hypothesis, generally accepted, is that obesity is caused by eating more calories than are expended, the excess being stored as fat. Reduce intake, increase output, or both, and fat comes off. Its a tidy equation. Overeating causes obesity. Suppose you come up with a competing hypothesis that says that over or under eating, and/or low or high energy output are caused by the accumulation of fat, i.e., a hypothesis that at first glance seems more complicated, but is actually -- Occams Razor style -- simpler. What if, for whatever reason, a body simply accumulates fat, and overeating and sedentary behavior are in response to it? Can you see how thats simpler? So then the question becomes: what causes fat accumulation, which then sets off what in some ways is a positive feedback mechanism, including behaviors that are widely seen as causal rather than effects? Well Im no expert at this, but Gary Taubes has spent the last several years pouring over studies going back as far as the 1800s.
Researchers at Queensland University of Technology suggest that recommending moderate to high intensity physical activity to older age women was better than medicine.
Duration: Two year course plus one term Year one: weekend days. Year two: Tuesdays plus a few additional weekend days. When: Starts late September 2020Costs: Please view all of our training courses and feesEligible to apply for Registered Membership ...
sedentary time to ensure good present and future health for youth with disabilities. To design PA interventions for youth with disabilities, it is first necessary to know levels of PA and how PA is influenced by different factors, such as sex, age, and type of disability. This information is important for. ...
Sedentary lifestyles have been linked to many diseases including obesity and colon cancer. Heres a list of things to do around Richmond to get you moving!
Being a couch potato may have fewer long-term health consequences if you trade some of your couch time for gym time, suggests a new study.
Its believed that a sedentary lifestyle promotes obesity. But in the 19th century, a sedentary lifestyle tended to diminish appetite. Why?
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Moving your body at least every half an hour could help to limit the harmful effects of desk jobs and other sedentary lifestyles, research has revealed. The study found that both greater overall time spent inactive in a day, and longer periods o...
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If vegging out in front of the TV isnt your thing, use the warm weather as an excuse to spend an entire day outside, exploring parks or trails or whatevers a safe distance away (both from your home and from other people). Silcox also suggests framing your PTO request not as a holiday per se but as more of a mental health day. If your boss is the kind of person who will understand that what you want more than anything is a day with no plans or obligations in it, the kind of day where you (and everyone else in your household) can rest both your minds and your bodies, you might be able to swing a Friday or Monday off. Remember, even a tiny break from routine-and from work-can help prevent burnout.. If you cant take time off right now, whether for holiday or mental health purposes, see if you can block off an upcoming weekend day as a "No Plans Day." Treat it like the holiday/recuperation day you need: A time to rest, read, binge-watch TV shows, go outside and enjoy the sun, play games with your ...
Studies have shown a heightened risk of heart disease among those people who spend most of their days sitting. According to NPR, a 2010 study found that men who reported more than 23 hours a week of sedentary activity had a 64 percent greater risk of dying from heart disease than those who reported less than 11 hours a week of sedentary activity. For IT professionals who spend most of their time sitting in front of a computer, this should sound an alarm. Prevention: Get in the habit of taking regular short breaks to get your legs moving for a few minutes. Some studies have shown that frequent breaks every 15 minutes or so will help. You can also get in the habit of doing simple exercises whenever you're reading something and not interacting with a computer.. ...
It should come as no surprise that sitting around and not moving all day isnt really good for your body, but many may not be aware of just how many problems can be caused by such a sedentary lifestyle. Whether you choose to sit all day or are required to by the logistics of your job, you may want to take a new approach to your workday after learning just what health effects sitting can have on the body. It could impact not only your health, but the lives of your loved ones and expenditures towards healthcare.. ...
Greater sedentary time was associated with increased risk of adverse health outcomes, including early death, even in those who otherwise exercised regularly, a meta-analysis indicated. With data pooled from 41 primary research studies, researchers found that long periods of sitting time were positively correlated with all-cause mortality and other outcomes, …. Read More » ...
A stark report published in The Lancet today suggests that physical inactivity is a greater risk to public health than smoking. Exercise can no longer be viewed as personal choice, state the papers a...
Every week, we prominence 3 people who have overcome obstacles such as diseased eating habits, sedentary lifestyle, addictions, unsupportive family members, injuries and some-more in sequence to make probable what during one time seemed positively impossible.. These healthy-minded people have opposite ways of reaching their ultimate weight-loss goals, though a finish formula are mostly a same: a (well-deserved!) clarity of fulfilment and a new, some-more certain opinion on life.. Their solve is excellent and their suggestion is throwing - only try to review these stories though wanting to get adult and get moving! Week after week, we accept congratulatory comments from readers, who mostly demonstrate their possess weight detriment goals and a symbol these stories have had on them.. In that vein, we wanted to gleam an extra-bright spotlight on a few of a many inspirational weight detriment stories weve featured this summer, in box we missed them while we were travelling or exercising outside. ...
... Difficulty defecating is a common condition for many people. Leading a sedentary lifestyle, drinking little water, general bad bathroom habits and lo...
Improper diet, sedentary lifestyle, stress - they all invisibly destroy your heart. Circulatory system diseases develop for years without any symptoms. And then some day you suddenly feel breathlessness, palpitation and pain.
Health Reports, volume 22, number 1. Physical activity of Canadian adults: Accelerometer results from the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey
Sedentary behaviour has emerged as a unique determinant of health in adults. Studies in children and adolescents have been less consistent. We reviewed the evidence to determine if the total volume and patterns (i.e. breaks and bouts) of objectively measured sedentary behaviour were associated with adverse health outcomes in young people, independent of moderate-intensity to vigorous-intensity physical activity. Four electronic databases (EMBASE MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, PubMed and Scopus) were searched (up to 12 November 2015) to retrieve studies among 2- to 18-year-olds, which used cross-sectional, longitudinal or experimental designs, and examined associations with health outcomes (adiposity, cardio-metabolic, fitness, respiratory, bone/musculoskeletal, psychosocial, cognition/academic achievement, gross motor development and other outcomes). Based on 88 eligible observational studies, level of evidence grading and quantitative meta-analyses indicated that there is limited available evidence that the
High levels of sedentary behavior are linked to increased mortality. In the United States, individuals spend 55-70% of their waking day being sedentary. Since most individuals spend large portions of their daily lives at work, quantifying the time engaged in sedentary behavior at work is emerging as an important health determinant. Studies profiling academic institutions, where a variety of personnel with diverse job descriptions are employed, are limited. Available studies focus mostly on subjective methods, with few using objective approaches. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to assess sedentary behavior among all occupational groups of a college in the Northeastern United States utilizing both a subjective and an objective method. College employees (n = 367) completed the Occupational Sitting and Physical Activity Questionnaire (OSPAQ). A sub-sample of these employees (n = 127) subsequently wore an activPAL3 accelerometer 24 h per day for seven consecutive days. Outcome variables were
The current study examined objectively measured physical activity data collected on a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults and thus provided a unique opportunity to investigate total physical activity and various levels of physical activity intensity across racial/ethnic and sex groups. The most striking findings were the relatively higher amounts of physical activity among Hispanic men and women compared to their male and female counterparts.. This current effort indentified a pattern of higher physical activity levels in Hispanic men compared to white and black men. The results also indicate that Hispanic women engage in more light physical activity compared to their white and black counterparts. This is in contrast to previous results from national surveys, which have indicated that Hispanic men and women are less active compared to their white and black counterparts. Results from the 1994-2004 BRFSS showed that Hispanic men and women reported greater amounts of inactivity than ...
The purpose of this study was to examine the physical activity patterns of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) in comparison with younger adults with ID and older adults without ID. A sample of 109 participants was included in the study. Sophisticated data reduction, time stamped technology, and multiple objective measures (i.e., pedometers and accelerometers) were used to determine physical activity intensities and walking patterns of participants. Results indicate that older adults with ID are performing less physical activity than comparison groups. A small proportion of older adults with ID (6%) met national physical activity recommendations of 150 min of moderate or 75 min of vigorous physical activity in bouts greater than ten minutes across the week (USDHHS, 2008). Sedentary behavior was also an observable factor in this study. These findings demonstrate the need for health promotion efforts for adults with ID across the lifespan ...
MONDAY, Oct. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Interactions between genes and physical activity and genes and sedentary behavior may play a role in the development of obesity, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes.. Jee-Young Moon, Ph.D., from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York, and colleagues analyzed interactions of accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time with genetic variants on obesity among 9,645 U.S. Hispanics/Latinos. Ninety-seven genetic variants associated with body mass index (BMI) were used to calculate an overall genetic risk score (GRS), central nervous system (CNS)-related GRS, and non-CNS GRS.. The researchers found that genetic association with BMI was stronger in individuals with lower MVPA (first tertile) versus higher MVPA (third tertile; Pinteraction = 0.005) and in those with greater sedentary time (third tertile) versus less sedentary time (first tertile; Pinteraction = 0.006). Obesity ...
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