If you read the article with a critical eye (I know, thats a pain to do sometimes...) you will see two things that should make you question all the lazy pundits. First, the study was conducted on newts (Cynops pyrrhogaster), not humans (Homo sapiens). They clearly stated, "functional olfactory receptor genes is different between amphibians and mammals, so we cannot rule out the expression of receptors with very high TCA sensitivity in humans." Hmmm. That changes the conclusion a bit. Human olfactory receptors could interact with TCA differently than those of newts! Additionally, the authors stated that, "we cannot assume that we surveyed all possible olfactory receptors in the newt." Might there be other olfactory receptors that transduct musty odors? Humans have around 400 functional genes coding for olfactory receptors. The picture just got a bit more complicated... ...
The Chinese Fire Belly Newt (Cynops orientalis) is a small black newt measuring about 2.2 to 4 inches. It has bright orange aposematic coloration on the ventral sides. C. orientalis is commonly seen in pet stores where it is frequently confused with the Japanese Fire Belly Newt (C. pyrrhogaster) because of similarities in size and in coloration. It typically exhibits smoother skin and a rounder tail than the C. pyrrhogaster, and has less obvious parotoid glands.. They are mildly poisonous and excrete toxins though their skin. Consisting mainly of tetrodotoxins, newts of the genus Cynops pose a medically significant threat if enough toxins are consumed. Despite this, skin excretions along are not likely to be harmful to humans unless they entire animal is swallowed. Regardless, the washing of hands before and after making contact with these or any amphibians is important to reduce the risk of transferring toxins or disease to and from the animal.. Though these newts are relatively easy to care ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - alpha-chain sequence of newt haemoglobin (Taricha granulosa).. AU - Coates, M.. AU - Brimhall, B.. AU - Stenzel, Peter. AU - Hermodson, M.. AU - Gibson, D.. AU - Jones, R. T.. AU - Vedvick, T.. PY - 1977/4. Y1 - 1977/4. N2 - The amino acid sequence of the alpha-chain of the major haemoglobin of a newt, T. granulosa, has been determined. The chain is 142 residues long and has an extra methionine at its N-terminus when compared with human alpha-chain. Most of the tryptic peptides were sequenced by a combination of the subtractive Edman method and by deduction from the compositions of overlapping fragments produced by various enzymic treatments. The sequence of two core regions was obtained by automatic sequencing of large peptides produced by trypsin cleavage at arginine residues only after blockage of lysine residues by citraconylation; by cleavage between aspartic acid and proline residues with 70% formic acid, and by cyanogen bromide cleavage at methionine residues. The ...
The most aquatic of Pacific newts, the rough-skinned newt is identified by its warty skin and its small eyes, with dark lower lids. It searches for its invertebrate prey both on land and in the water, and its toxic skin secretions repel most of its enemies. In the breeding season, the males skin temporarily becomes smooth and his vent swells. Unlike other western newts, the female rough-skinned lays her eggs one at a time, rather than in masses, on submerged plants or debris. The eggs hatch into aquatic larvae. ...
The rough-skinned newts poison has an unlikely counter. Of all things, the common garter snakes in the newts habitat are the only things that can eat the toxic not-lizards. These are not impressive snakes to look at, but they have evolved such that the binding feature in tetrodotoxin cannot work its deadly magic. The two are in an arms race so fierce that the snake keeps evolving stronger and stronger counters to stronger and stronger pufferfish poison ...
This is primarily an old world family with six representatives in North America (Stebbins 1985), one of which can be found in Idaho, Taricha granulosa (Rough-skinned Newt). Characteristics of the family include vomerine teeth in two long rows (Goin and Goin 1971),the absence of a nasolabial groove, no parasphenoid_teeth ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Membrane Receptors for Corticosterone. T2 - A Mechanism for Rapid Behavioral Responses in an Amphibian. AU - Moore, Frank L.. AU - Orchinik, Miles. PY - 1994/12. Y1 - 1994/12. N2 - This paper reviews evidence that, in some cases, steroid hormones rapidly modulate behaviors by binding to specific cell-surface receptors on neurons. The evidence comes from research with an amphibian model, Taricha granulosa. In Taricha, stress and corticosterone inhibit reproductive behaviors with a rapidity that is inconsistent with traditional models for steroid action (models in which intracellular steroid receptors function as transcription factors). A series of radioligand binding assay studies identified a corticosteroid receptor in neuronal membranes that appears to mediate the rapid behavioral responses in Taricha. Studies with various steroids showed a strong correlation between their potencies to inhibit the behavior and their potencies to inhibit corticosterone binding. Neurophysiological ...
The rough-skinned newt, Taricha granulosa, is a common amphibian in the Pacific Northwest, but very little is known about its helminth parasites. This species typically overwinters on land and returns to breeding ponds in ...
A seminal review in Frank Moores lab confirmed that acute exposure to either endogenous or exogenous corticosterone exposure caused male rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa) to exhibit lowered clasping of girls, a courtship behavior that normally lasts hrs or times (Moore & Miller 1984). Importantly, the inhibition of the behavior occurs eight minutes soon after corticosterone publicity (Orchinik et al. 1991). Membrane-sure corticosterone receptors, which do not migrate towards the nucleus, ended up also uncovered from the newt Mind (Orchinik et al. 1991, 1992). These conclusions are essential given that they exhibit that reproductive actions can be quickly downregulated adhering to the discharge of corticosterone. A lot of mating and courtship behaviors are conspicuous, which enhances the risk of predation (Cooper 1999). This may clarify why anxiety-response devices which are activated by predators rapidly downregulate reproductive things to do inside the confront of threats. In woman ...
Although the herpetofauna of Quail Ridge is well documented, very little herpetological research has been conducted to date, leaving large areas open to ambitious investigators. Coreigh Greene (UCD Graduate Group of Ecology) investigated the influence of social interactions and density dependence on habitat preference in western fence lizards, using animals from Quail Ridge, among other sites. Mike Benard (UCD Population Biology Graduate Group) has been studying local adaptation of Pacific treefrogs (Hyla regilla) to different larval environments, as well as the ability of adults to use and move between temporary ponds at Quail Ridge, and the resulting population genetic structure in this species; similar work on other pond-breeding amphibians, such as the California newt (Taricha torosa), would be a useful addition to understanding the herpetofauna of the region. But much more remains. We have alluded to the potential role of Quail Ridge in tracking responses to climate change and exotic ...
Salamandridae is a family of salamanders consisting of true salamanders and newts. Currently, 74 species (with more expected) have been identified in the Northern Hemisphere - Europe, Asia, the northern tip of Africa, and North America. Salamandrids are distinguished from other salamanders by the lack of rib or costal grooves along the sides of their bodies and by their rough skin. Their skin is very granular because of the number of poison glands. They also lack nasolabial grooves. Most species of Salamandridae have moveable eyelids but lack lacrimal glands. Nearly all salamandrids produce a potent toxin in their skin, with some species being deadly to many other animal species. With a few exceptions, salamandrids have patterns of bright and contrasting colours, most of these are to warn potential predators of their toxicity. They have four well-developed limbs, with four toes on the fore limbs, and (in most cases) five toes on the hind limbs. They vary from 7 to 30 cm (3 to 12 in) in ...
Read "Effect of Introduced Crayfish and Mosquitofish on California Newts, Conservation Biology" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
The lens regeneration pattern in our work is similar to previous studies in rabbit and rodent models.31,32,34,49-51 The difference between most of the other studies and our study is that we performed the capsulorrhexis at 3 mm, not minimally or sealed. The previous study shows that an intact lens capsular bag will enhance the shape, structure, transparency, and growth of the regenerated lens.34 Preventing adhesions and wrinkles may improve the shape of the regenerated lens and in areas where the anterior capsule is missing, normal lens regeneration does not occur.52-54 However, in our study, though the anterior capsule was impaired, lens regeneration with a fairly regular shape and translucency still could occur in a considerable amount of animals (Fig. 7), and some wrinkles and adhesions were reversible. Lois et al.,26 who developed a PCO model by surgical technique with capsulorrhexis, also mentioned lens regeneration in all the animals in their study, but the observation period was not long ...
Based on the role of retinoblastoma (Rb) in lens development and in the cell cycle reentry of muscle cells during limb regeneration, we have analyzed expression or Rb patterns in intact and lens regeneration-undergoing newt eyes. We find that in intact newt eye Rb is expressed in the retina as a gradient with higher levels in the photoreceptor layer and virtually no expression in the ganglion layer. In addition, a second gradient was detected within the photoreceptor layer with expression diminishing at the dorsal and ventral regions. In the intact lens, Rb is expressed in the lens epithelium and in the differentiating lens fibers at the bow region. During lens regeneration, Rb is expressed very strongly in the differentiating lens fibers, but not in the lens epithelium. Using an antibody specific to the hyperphosphorylated form of Rb, we detected the inactive protein only in the pigment epithelial cells of the iris. These distinct patterns might be related to the regenerative potential of the ...
talk , contribs) uploaded File:MT and MF movements.mp4 (The precise coupling of f-actin and parallel MT movements occurrs in all four zones of f-actin dynamic behavior: the lamellipodium,lamellum, convergence zone, and cell body. Primary cultures of newt (Taricha granulosa) lung epithelial cells were microi...) ...
Fire Belly Newts are best kept in species tanks. They have very specific needs and will eat whatever they can fit in their mouths. They can also excrete a toxin from glands by their head which could harm other creatures. They are most definitely not compatible with other creatures that require a tropical environment ...
Fire Belly Newts are best kept in species tanks. They have very specific needs and will eat whatever they can fit in their mouths. They can also excrete a toxin from glands by their head which could harm other creatures. They are most definitely not compatible with other creatures that require a tropical environment ...
We have previously reported that C3, a central component of the complement system, is expressed in the regenerating blastema of the amputated limb in axolotls. This finding suggested that complement may exert a novel, noninmmunologic role in complex developmental processes such as limb regeneration in urodeles. We have previously demonstrated by in situ hybridization that a newt blastema cell line expresses C3 mRNA, suggesting that these cells are actually synthesizing C3 locally (19). In the same report, we showed that C3 mRNA and protein were also expressed in the regenerating limb of another salamander species, the axolotl, which does not regenerate eye tissues. Extending this intriguing observation to another urodele species that possesses the remarkable capacity to regenerate several of its body parts, we investigated the involvement of complement in urodele regeneration in a more rigorous and systematic manner. In that respect, we focused on dissecting the role of two key components of the ...
Zhiyong YUAN, Ke JIANG, Limin DING, Liang ZHANG and Jing CHE, 2013. A New Newt of the Genus Cynops (Caudata: Salamandridae) from Guangdong, China.
The rough-skinned newt might look innocuous. But the newts red underbelly means poison, and a frog is about to find out the hard way... by eating it.
Disclaimer: The Animal Diversity Web is an educational resource written largely by and for college students. ADW doesnt cover all species in the world, nor does it include all the latest scientific information about organisms we describe. Though we edit our accounts for accuracy, we cannot guarantee all information in those accounts. While ADW staff and contributors provide references to books and websites that we believe are reputable, we cannot necessarily endorse the contents of references beyond our control. ...
Yang, D.-d., J.-p. Jiang, Y.-h. Shen, and D.-b. Fei. 2014. A new species of the genus Tylototriton (Urodela: Salamandridae) from northeastern Hunan Province, China. Asian Herpetological Research 5: 1-11 ...
GenDR A curated database of genes associated with dietary restriction in model organisms either from genetic manipulation experiments or gene expression profiling.. ...
Disclaimer: The Animal Diversity Web is an educational resource written largely by and for college students. ADW doesnt cover all species in the world, nor does it include all the latest scientific information about organisms we describe. Though we edit our accounts for accuracy, we cannot guarantee all information in those accounts. While ADW staff and contributors provide references to books and websites that we believe are reputable, we cannot necessarily endorse the contents of references beyond our control. ...
It is generally associated with woodland habitats, including deciduous, coniferous, mixed forests and dry forests and woodlands. This is an adaptable species also present in meadows, bushlands, parks, fruit gardens, many damp habitats and rural and urban areas. The species breeds in still and slow moving shallow waters and irrigation ditches; females lay 200-300 eggs. It is often recorded from modified habitats. Several hybrids with L. helveticus have been reported while hybridization with L. montandoni is quite common in syntopic ...
The Lens - Regeneration (2010) EAC Rip | FLAC (Img) + Cue + Log ~ 400 Mb | MP3 CBR320 ~ 143 Mb Scans (JPG, 300 dpi) ~ 41 Mb | RAR 5% Recovery Neo Progressive Rock | Giant Electric Pea #GEPCD 1041 To find the roots of a modest band called THE LENS, we have to go back to 1976, when guitarist Mike Holmes, Peter Nicholls (vocals) and Niall Hayden (drums) met when according to the urban myth, searching for a GENESIS ticket, so they decide to form a band called THE GILN almost out of nothing. They soon recruit bass player Rob Thompson and keyboardist Peter Blackler and changed the name to THE LENS. They start to play in small venues. Really this was an amateur attempt, to the point that Niall Hayden often was replaced by Brian Marshall, or when the two were together, both played, something similar happened with Peter Nichols position…
Semantic Scholar extracted view of Influence of Embryonic Implants upon Lens Regeneration in Rabbits. by Herbert Binder et al.
I have the following animals for sale: CB 2015 A. lugubris juveniles - six available About an inch long and eating D. melanogaster fruit flies These
Herpetology A-95866 (MCZ:Herp:A-95866); Notophthalmus viridescens viridescens; North America: United States: Massachusetts: Berkshire; Mass: Berkshire: Savoy Mtn State Park, bog outlet at Bog Pond [VERBATIM ELEVATION:1858ft]; Animalia Chordata Amphibia Lissamphibia Caudata Salamandroidea Salamandridae Notophthalmus viridescens viridescens; Red-spotted Newt
1. Historical versus Current Distribution. Riemer (1958) conducted the first comprehensive investigation of the distribution and systematics of the genus Taricha and recognized 2 allopatric subspecies of T. torosa (California newts; Riemer, 1958): T. t. torosa (Coast Range newts) and T. t. sierrae (Sierra newts). Coast Range newts are distributed from central Mendocino County in northwestern California south through the Coast Ranges to Boulder Creek on the western slope of the peninsular ranges in San Diego County (Stebbins, 1985). Coast Range newts are found from sea level to at least 1,280 m on Mt. Hamilton, Santa Clara County, California (Stebbins, 1959). The southernmost localities in San Diego County compose a geographic isolate (Stebbins, 1985; Jennings and Hayes, 1994a), and were once recognized as a distinct subspecies (T. t. klauberi : Wolterstorff, 1935; Stejneger and Barbour, 1943) or species (T. klauberi: Bishop, 1943; Smith and Taylor, 1948). They are genetically distinct (Tan, ...
Induction of skin allograft tolerance in chimaeras of urodele amphibian, Pleurodeles waltlii Michah. Allogenic chimaeras were produced in Pleurodeles waltlii (Amphibian, Urodele) by associating the anterior and the posterior parts of two different embryos. A reciprocal exchange between two homologue embryos gave rise to reciprocal allogenic chimaeras.. Skin grafts performed in the adult stage between two reciprocal chimaeras are always tolerated. On the other hand, when two skin grafts coming from the anterior and the posterior part of one chimaera are grafted on a common host, one of them may be tolerated and the other rejected: each part of a chimaera keeps its own antigenicity.. In allogenic chimaeras, the average natural tolerance for skin allografts is 30 % higher than in sibling controls.. ...
Some amphibians respond to climate change by advances in phenology. Previous work at Llysdinam found significant advances in Lissotriton arrival dates in 1997-2005 compared with the 1980s. This study investigated newt migration phenology and whether early arrival reflected earlier breeding. A temporal difference was found in the size of Lissotriton newts arriving to the pond. Large newts made up a greater proportion of early arrivals. Photographic identification of ventral markings of great crested and male smooth newts was used to monitor individual movements. Breeding was not synchronous with arrival because there was a variable delay before breeding. Lissotriton eggs in Llysdinam Pond were detected ten weeks earlier in 2007 than 2006. In contrast great crested females advanced oviposition by four weeks in 2007 and prolonged oviposition by five weeks. The effect of arrival time on breeding for Lissotriton newts was studied in outdoor tanks. There was a greater delay between arrival and ...
1. Historical versus Current Distribution. According to Hurlbert (1969) eastern newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) are second only to tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum) among U.S. salamanders in the extent of their distribution. Specifically, eastern newts are found throughout the eastern United States in historically forested areas from northern and central Minnesota, eastern and southern Wisconsin, eastern Iowa, northern and southern Illinois, extreme east-central and southeastern Kansas, and eastern Oklahoma and Texas to the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. Four subspecies are recognized. Broken-striped newts (N. v. dorsalis) are distributed in southeastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina. Central newts (N. v. louisianensis) have a disjunct distribution. Southern populations are distributed along the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, except for most of peninsular Florida, and up the Mississippi River drainage into northern Missouri, southern Illinois, and southwestern ...
An ultrastructural study of the early stages of development of the hind limb-bud has been carried out in Pleurodeles waltlii Michah. The most interesting results concern the structure of the epidermis and the evolution of the dermo-epidermal boundary in the limb-bud.. At every level of the limb-bud, the mesoderm draws near to the epidermis due to filopodia that penetrate the basal fibrous layer which becomes progressively disorganized; this can be considered as the establishment of interactions between epidermis and mesoderm. Some subepithelial cells with dense bodies participate in the disorganization of the basal fibrous layer.. There is no special epidermal feature at the limb-bud apex. However, the ultrastructural uniformity of the epidermis (which can be related to its histoenzymological uniformity) does not exclude a morphogenetic role of that epidermis.. The absence of any apical differentiation of the Pleurodeles hind limb-bud as well as the absence of a strictly localized ...
This dataset contains the digitized treatments in Plazi based on the original journal article Wielstra, B., Litvinchuk, S. N., Naumov, B., Tzankov, N., Arntzen, J. W. (2013): A revised taxonomy of crested newts in the Triturus karelinii group (Amphibia: Caudata: Salamandridae), with the description of a new species. Zootaxa 3682 (3): 441-453, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3682.3.5 ...
Throughout much of the newts range, the common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) is resistant to the newts toxin. In several populations, these snakes successfully prey upon the newts. Toxin resistant garter snakes are the only known animals today that can eat a T. granulosa newt and survive. This is an example of co-evolution.[2] The snakes resistance to the toxin has resulted in a selective pressure that favours newts which produce more potent levels of toxin. Increases in newt toxicity then apply a selective pressure favouring snakes with mutations conferring even greater resistance. This cycle of a predator and prey co-evolving is sometimes called an evolutionary arms race. In this case it results in the newts producing levels of toxin far in excess of what is needed to kill any other conceivable predator.[3] ...
In the upper panel, transmission electron microscopy reveals a tangled mass of ~30nm diameter nuclear chromatin fibers when the contents of the nucleu...
The Pleurodeles waltl species page at Amphibians and Reptiles of Morocco. Information, distribution maps, pictures and videos of Pleurodeles waltl
TY - JOUR. T1 - Aquaporin-3 facilitates epidermal cell migration and proliferation during wound healing. AU - Hara-Chikuma, Mariko. AU - Verkman, A. S.. PY - 2008/2/1. Y1 - 2008/2/1. N2 - Healing of skin wounds is a multi-step process involving the migration and proliferation of basal keratinocytes in epidermis, which strongly express the water/glycerol-transporting protein aquaporin-3 (AQP3). In this study, we show impaired skin wound healing in AQP3-deficient mice, which results from distinct defects in epidermal cell migration and proliferation. In vivo wound healing was ∼80% complete in wild-type mice at 5 days vs ∼50% complete in AQP3 null mice, with remarkably fewer proliferating, BrdU-positive keratinocytes. After AQP3 knock-down in keratinocyte cell cultures, which reduced cell membrane water and glycerol permeabilities, cell migration was slowed by more than twofold, with reduced lamellipodia formation at the leading edge of migrating cells. Proliferation of AQP3 knock-down ...
The epidermal cells which migrate over the wound surface of the amputated limb of the adult newt were examined using the scanning electron microscope. Specimens were prepared routinely for scanning electron microscopy or were embedded in Epon 812 for light microscopic observations. A cuff of epiderm …
Read "Changes in the Relative Number of Bipolar-Like Cells in the Retina of Pleurodeles waltl as a Function of Age and as a Result of Light Exposure, Russian Journal of Developmental Biology" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin. Its name derives from Tetraodontiformes, an order that includes pufferfish, porcupinefish, ocean sunfish, and triggerfish; several of these species carry the toxin. Although tetrodotoxin was discovered in these fish and found in several other aquatic animals (e.g., in blue-ringed octopuses, rough-skinned newts, and moon snails), it is actually produced by certain infecting or symbiotic bacteria like Pseudoalteromonas, Pseudomonas, and Vibrio as well as other species found in animals[citation needed]. Tetrodotoxin is a sodium channel blocker. It inhibits the firing of action potentials in neurons by binding to the voltage-gated sodium channels in nerve cell membranes and blocking the passage of sodium ions (responsible for the rising phase of an action potential) into the neuron. This prevents the nervous system from carrying messages and thus muscles from flexing in response to nervous stimulation. Its mechanism of action, selective blocking of the ...
Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin. Its name derives from Tetraodontiformes, an order that includes pufferfish, porcupinefish, ocean sunfish, and triggerfish; several of these species carry the toxin. Although tetrodotoxin was discovered in these fish and found in several other aquatic animals (e.g., in blue-ringed octopuses, rough-skinned newts, and moon snails), it is actually produced by certain infecting or symbiotic bacteria like Pseudoalteromonas, Pseudomonas, and Vibrio as well as other species found in the animals ...
A couple of things are worth noting. The picture was taken with my iphone and while there is no scale, the eft was about as long as my pinky finger (which incidentally is also the width of my iphone). This is the terrestrial stage of the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens), which can live up to 15 years in the wild. As a parasitologist, I remember vividly a study by Gill and Mock in the mid 1980s showing that individuals of this species can have very high levels of parasitism by a trypanoma species (similar to the protozoan that causes African sleeping sickness in humans). If my understanding of the life cycle of this amphibian is correct, the terrestrial phase is a juvenile phase that looks like a typical adult salamander and the adult aquatic phase looks more larval with vanes on the tail (correct me if I am wrong, Glen Kit ~ lab coordinator at Carleton). At any rate, the adults had very high parasite counts of this flagellated protozoan in their blood and the authors could not find ...
Organisms need to adapt to the ecological constraints in their habitat. How specific processes reflect such adaptations are difficult to model experimentally. We tested whether environmental shifts in oxygen tension lead to events in the adult newt brain that share features with processes occurring during neuronal regeneration under normoxia. By experimental simulation of varying oxygen concentrations, we show that hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation lead to neuronal death and hallmarks of an injury response, including activation of neural stem cells ultimately leading to neurogenesis. Neural stem cells accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during re-oxygenation and inhibition of ROS biosynthesis counteracts their proliferation as well as neurogenesis. Importantly, regeneration of dopamine neurons under normoxia also depends on ROS-production. These data demonstrate a role for ROS-production in neurogenesis in newts and suggest that this role may have been recruited to the capacity to replace ...
We demonstrate a prevalent effect of genetic dissimilarity on paternity in sperm competition experiments with L. vulgaris. Moreover, although last-male sperm precedence was suggested based on morphological evidence (Sever et al. 1999), we show that the paternity share between two competing males is independent of their order of insemination.. Given our modest sample size and accounting for the fact that several factors are potentially confounding any genetic effects (for example, we had no information about the number of sperm transferred by each male), the influence of genetic dissimilarity seems surprisingly strong. Out of 20 cases, only one male with higher paternity share was strikingly more closely related to the female than the competitor; in three other cases, SMdiff of the more successful male was only marginally positive (figure 1). This suggests that paternity is more likely to be determined by a threshold effect rather than in a gradual way. Female sensitivity to differences in ...
The Northern Crested Newt (Triturus cristatus), known also as the Great Crested Newt or Warty Newt, is a newt belonging to the family Salamandridae found across Europe and parts of Asia.. Its range extends from Great Britain and Brittany in the west across much of Europe north of the Alps and the Black Sea. Its the biggest and least common of the three newts found in the British Isles and is one of only four amphibians protected by the UK Biodiversity Action Plan.. The newts have dark grey colored backs and flanks, and are covered with darker colored spots so they seem almost black. Their undersides are either yellow or orange and are covered in large black blotches which have a unique pattern in each individual.. The males can be distinguished from the females by the presence of a jagged crest in the breeding season. This crest runs along their backs, then a separate smoother-edged crest runs above and below their tails. They also have a silver grey colored stripe that runs along their ...
Many organisms undergo transitions between aquatic and terrestrial environments - either during their lifetime or as a result of an amphibious habit. Such transitions present a drastic change in physical conditions, as these environments differ in viscosity, density and gravitational effects (Vogel, 1994; Graham, 1997). Some such organisms employ different locomotor structures (or different combinations of structures) during aquatic and terrestrial locomotion. For example, mudskippers (e.g. Periophthalmus) and some salamanders (e.g. Taricha) primarily use their tail for aquatic locomotion, but rely more on their paired appendages during terrestrial locomotion (Frolich and Biewener, 1992; Ashley-Ross and Bechtel, 2004; Pace and Gibb, 2009). However, elongate limbless vertebrates (or vertebrates with non-weight-bearing appendages) must employ the same propulsive structure, the axial skeleton and musculature, across both habitats. This raises the question: how is the same anatomical structure ...
The RAPAd® method of Adenovirus construction, developed by ViraQuest Inc. scientists, has been used by other scientists around the world.. Request Quote ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Trophic effect of transferrin on amphibian limb regeneration blastemas. AU - Mescher, Anthony. AU - Munaim, S. I.. PY - 1984. Y1 - 1984. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021280796&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021280796&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. VL - 230. SP - 485. EP - 490. JO - Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Comparative Experimental Biology. JF - Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Comparative Experimental Biology. SN - 0022-104X. IS - 3. ER - ...