How is Chronic Disease and Sociodemographic Risk Factors abbreviated? CDSRF stands for Chronic Disease and Sociodemographic Risk Factors. CDSRF is defined as Chronic Disease and Sociodemographic Risk Factors very rarely.
This study examined independent contributions of executive functioning (EF), state regulation (SR), and social risk factors to symptom dimensions of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in two cohorts, which included 221 Norwegian children and 294 Finnish adolescents. Independent contributions of EF and SR were shown in the Norwegian cohort and EF contributed independently in the Finnish cohort. When controlling for each symptom dimension, cognitive functioning and social risk factors were differentially associated with inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms. The results show the need to include both social risk factors and cognitive functioning to obtain a better understanding of ADHD symptoms.. ...
BACKGROUND: Although diabetes is a well-known risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, the cardiovascular disease risk of glycemia below the current diabetic threshold remains uncertain. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 652,901 Korean men aged 30 to 64 years from the Korean National Health Insurance System were categorized into 8 groups by fasting blood glucose (FBG) level at baseline and were followed up for cardiovascular diseases occurrence during 1992-2001. Over the follow-up period of 8.8 years, 10,954 stroke and 3766 myocardial infarction events occurred. In age-adjusted analyses, there was evidence of linear associations between FBG and myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke. However, with additional adjustment for socioeconomic position, behaviors, and other cardiovascular disease risk factors, the associations with myocardial infarction and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke were markedly attenuated with increased risk only at the ...
Led by Shivani Patel, PhD, researcher in the Hubert Department of Global Health at Rollins School of Public Health, the team studied data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) national surveys from 2009 to 2010. The goal was to determine the extent to which national cardiovascular mortality could be expected to decrease if all states were successful at reducing those risk factor levels to specified target levels.. Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death nationally. The top five leading preventable risk factors for heart disease are elevated cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and smoking. The fraction of cardiovascular deaths that could have been prevented in 2009 to 2010 were reported under two scenarios: complete elimination of risk factors, and a more realistic goal of reduction of risk factors to the best achieved levels in U.S. states in 2009-2010.. Findings suggest that about half of deaths could be prevented if the modifiable risk factors ...
In this large, representative cohort of very old subjects aged 80 years and older, traditional cardiovascular risk factors did not show an association with all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. This pattern was observed both in subjects with and without cardiovascular disease. The presence of frailty, on the other hand, was able to identify patients at high risk for mortality. However, within the strata of robust and frail subjects, traditional cardiovascular risk factors were not able to further identify patients at risk of mortality. Only a history of cardiovascular disease showed a strong association with mortality in robust subjects.. The current study showed that classic cardiovascular risk factors were not associated with mortality in the oldest old. In the Leiden 85 Plus study, de Ruijter et al. [17] showed that classic risk factors included in the Framingham risk score could not identify patients at risk for cardiovascular mortality. This study was performed on a subpopulation of ...
The relationship between two well-established biological risk factors for schizophrenia has been discovered by John Hopkins researchers.
The relationship between depression and demographic risk factors, individual lifestyle factors, and health complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, Yusuf Kayar, Nuk
This is the first study on children concerning the changes of the cardiovascular risk factor profile in obesity in relation to the degree of weight reduction. In agreement with previous reports,7,8 our study showed that up to two thirds of our obese children already had one or more unfavourable cardiovascular risk factors.. In our sample, a significant improvement of cardiovascular risk factor profile associated with obesity (hypertension, increase in LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, decrease in HDL cholesterol) was shown due to a reduction of SDS-BMI of at least 0.5 over the time period of one year, while a reduction of SDS-BMI below showed no significant improvement except a lowering of LDL cholesterol in the group of children with a reduction of SDS-BMI of at least 0.25. A reduction of LDL cholesterol despite an improvement of other cardiovascular risk factors is probably caused by diet and not due to effective weight loss. Since hypertriglyceridaemia and decreased HDL cholesterol are ...
This study investigated the associations between circulating plasma biomarkers, which were previously identified by proteomics or immunohistochemistry experiments in human carotid plaques and adverse cardiovascular outcome in patients undergoing coronary angiography. The prognostic value of the majority of these proteins, including OGN and NGAL/MMP9 complex, for MACE had not yet been investigated. Higher circulating OGN and NGAL/MMP9 complex levels were associated with incident MACE during the first year of follow-up, independently of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Adding OGN or NGAL/MMP9 to a model containing conventional cardiovascular risk factors improved risk classification and discriminatory ability, although the latter was not statistically significant. These associations with incident MACE and improvements in predictive ability were independent of CRP.. In previous proteomic experiments, we have identified a series of novel potential markers of vulnerable atherosclerotic ...
Breast cancer is a devastating disease. The specter of breast cancer frightens most women because it causes substantial morbidity and mortality despite our ever-increasing ability to provide earlier diagnosis and improved treatments. Breast cancer incidence rates are increasing worldwide, yet the relatively well-established risk factors account for no more than 50 to 55% of the breast cancer risk of westernized populations. 1-3 As a result, breast cancer epidemiologists have continued to search for additional risk factors, particularly lifestyle and environmental exposures, that are amenable to intervention.. Ovarian hormones, and particularly estrogens, play a major role in the development of breast cancer. 4 In fact, most accepted breast cancer risk factors can be interpreted as surrogate measures of a womans cumulative exposure to estrogen and possibly, progesterone. These risk factors include early age at menarche, late age at menopause, nulliparity or late age at first birth, lack of or ...
Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35,568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Logistic regression models were used in case-case analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and tumor subtypes, and case-control analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and the risk of developing specific tumor subtypes in 12 population-based studies. All statistical tests were two-sided.In case-case analyses, of the epidemiological risk factors examined, early age at menarche (≤12 years) was less frequent in case patients with PR(-) than PR(+) tumors (P = .001). Nulliparity (P = 3 × 10(-6)) and increasing age at first birth (P = 2 × 10(-9)) were less frequent in ER(-) than in ER(+) ...
Background: Obesity is a known risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and plays a role in other CHD risk factors including dyslipidemia, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. With nearly two-thirds of the adult US population being overweight and obese, it is important to know how these individuals perceive their CHD risk.. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between self-reported CHD risk factors and perceived CHD risk among overweight and obese adults.. Methods: Demographic data, CHD risk factors, and perceived lifetime CHD risk were collected via electronic surveys using REDCap, an Internet-based data capture tool, of overweight and obese adults enrolled in a Weight Loss Research Registry. CHD risk factors were assessed using an investigator-developed survey of self-reported diagnoses of hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes, family history of CHD, and current smoking status. A risk factor ranking was assigned to each participant ranging from 0 ...
Synonyms for epidemiological association in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for epidemiological association. 106 synonyms for association: group, company, club, order, union, class, society, league, band, set, troop, pack, camp, collection, gathering, organization.... What are synonyms for epidemiological association?
Background: Job strain is associated with an increased coronary heart disease risk, but few large-scale studies have examined the relationship of this psychosocial characteristic with the biological risk factors that potentially mediate the job strain - heart disease association. Methodology and Principal Findings: We pooled cross-sectional, individual-level data from eight studies comprising 47,045 participants to investigate the association between job strain and the following cardiovascular disease risk factors: diabetes, blood pressure, pulse pressure, lipid fractions, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, obesity, and overall cardiovascular disease risk as indexed by the Framingham Risk Score. In age-, sex-, and socioeconomic status-adjusted analyses, compared to those without job strain, people with job strain were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio 1.29; 95% CI: 1.11-1.51), to smoke (1.14; 1.08-1.20), to be physically inactive (1.34; 1.26-1.41), and to be obese (1.12; ...
Few studies have evaluated risk factors among stroke patients in our population. This study is aimed at exploring risk factors among black stroke patients. A total of 524 stroke patients seen at University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital between January 2005 and June 2011 were evaluated to ascertain risk factors. Prestroke risk factors were obtained from patient’s medical history and hospital records. Risk factors such as hypertension were gotten from case history, with hypertension defined as blood pressure (BP) of ≥ 140/90 mmHg or features of long standing hypertension. History of smoking, alcohol intake, transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were also noted. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor, found in 87% of patients, followed by hypercholesterolaemia 15.1%, past history of stroke 11.5%, diabetes 10.1%, alcohol 8.8%, smoking 6.8%, TIA 5.3%, heart failure 2.4% and preeclampsia-eclampsia 2.0%, while 19.7% had more than one risk factor. About 53% had no prior knowledge of being
Guwatudde D, Mutungi G, Wesonga R, Kajjura R, Kasule H, Muwonge J, Ssenono V, Bahendeka SK.. The Epidemiology of Hypertension in Uganda: Findings from the National Non-Communicable Diseases Risk Factor Survey. PLoS One. 2015; 10(9): e0138991 ...
A recent study suggests that stiffness of the aorta may be a key risk factor for dementia. The findings are important, as aortal stiffness is something that people may be able to manage via lifestyle changes and medication even later in life. Participants in the study included 356 people with an average age of 78 who t
Background: Previous studies have examined individual risk factors in relation to peripheral arterial disease (PAD) but the combined effects of these factors are largely unknown. We investigated the degree to which clinical risk factors may explain the risk of PAD among men.. Methods: We prospectively followed 45,596 men from the Health Professional Follow-up Study without a history of cardiovascular disease at baseline during a 22-year period (1986-2008). We defined four clinical risk factors - smoking, history of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia - that were updated biennially during follow-up. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare PAD risk across individual and joint risk factors.. Results: During 874,769 person-years of follow-up, 497 confirmed PAD cases occurred. All four clinical risk factors were significantly and independently associated with a higher risk of PAD after multivariate adjustment (Figure). Risk of PAD more than doubled (hazard ratio: 2.14; ...
Hepatitis C virus itself is a causal risk factor for chronic kidney disease beyond traditional risk factors: a 6-year nationwide cohort study across Taiwan. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Rationale: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is a critical determinant of morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have identified several cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, which may partly arise from a shared genetic basis with CAD, and thus be useful for discovery of CAD genes. Objective: We aimed to improve discovery of CAD genes, and inform the etiologic relationship between CAD and several CVD risk factors using a shared polygenic signal-informed statistical framework. Methods and Results: Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) summary statistics and shared polygenic pleiotropy-informed conditional and conjunctional false discovery rate (FDR) methodology, we systematically investigated genetic overlap between CAD and 8 traits related to CVD risk factors: low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), type 2 diabetes (T2D), C-reactive protein (CRP), body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and type 1 diabetes ...
Design, setting and participants: A CVD risk-factor survey was carried out in rural south-eastern Australia from 2004 to 2006. Using a stratified random sample, data for 1116 participants aged 35-74 years were analysed. Applying the Framingham risk equations to risk-factor data, 5-year probabilities of a coronary heart disease event, stroke and cardiovascular event were calculated. The effect of different changes in risk factors were modelled to assess the extent to which cardiovascular diseases can be prevented by changing the risk factors at a population level (population strategy), among the high-risk individuals (high-risk strategy) or both ...
Results Carotid plaque was present in 162 (49.1%) of the Spanish patients. The SCORE and Framingham score were each strongly associated with plaque (P ,0.0001). In predicting plaque presence, the area under the curve (AUC) (SE) of the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve for the Framingham score was larger than for the SCORE (0.799 (0.024) versus 0.747 (0.027), P =0.003). The optimal cut-off value and corresponding sensitivity and specificity for the Framingham score and SCORE were 11.0, 64% and 81% and 0.5, 86% and 58%, respectively. Based on optimal cut-off values, a high Framingham score but not SCORE was associated with carotid plaque independent of age, sex, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein concentrations. Whereas a conventional Framingham score value of ≥20 correctly classified only 25% as being at high CVD risk, this proportion increased to 64% in those with a Framingham score of ,11; the percentage of patients without plaque incorrectly classified as being ...
The Risk Factor Assessment Branch develops, evaluate, and disseminates research methods, technologies, and resources for assessing cancer-related risk factors in the population.
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BACKGROUND: Although primary care physicians understand the importance of preventive services for patients with multiple risk factors (MRF) for coronary heart disease, physician intervention is limited. This study investigated (1) physicians views of challenges faced in managing patients with MRF; (2) the counseling and management methods they utilize; and (3) possible strategies to enhance MRF intervention in the primary care setting. METHODS: Two focus groups were conducted with primary care physicians from varying settings to gain insight into these issues noted above. Each group was co-facilitated by a physician and a behavioral scientist using a previously developed semistructured interview guide. The group discussions were tape recorded and subsequently transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative method for analysis. RESULTS: Physicians are challenged by knowledge limitations (contribution of individual risk factors to overall risk); limited support (guidelines,
Our analysis demonstrates that participants with persistent CAC = 0 had an overall lower cardiovascular risk factor profile. The healthy arterial aging group had a significantly lower level for all of the individual cardiovascular risk factors and a higher level for all of the healthy lifestyle factors, except Mediterranean diet. The absence of traditional CVD risk factors was also associated with persistent CAC = 0 when compared with participants with ≥3 CVD risk factors. However, there was no single modifiable traditional cardiovascular risk factor whose absence was strongly associated with healthy arterial aging. This is similar to a large cross-sectional cohort study of almost 17,000 participants by Boutouyrie et al. (19) in which sex, dyslipidemia, and smoking were not significantly associated with arterial aging, which was classified as an increased central arterial stiffness. In addition, Lehmann et al. (20) found a significant inverse trend between the number of cardiovascular risk ...
Mortality reduction in patients with diabetes mellitus is complex, and multifactorial intervention strategies assume a special importance due to high prevalence of other comorbid conditions.1 Unlike its role in microvascular complication prevention, aggressive glucose control, by itself, probably contributes only modestly in reducing macrovascular events like myocardial infarction.2 Optimal medical therapy (OMT) to simultaneously target other risk factors (like hypertension and dyslipidemia) with medications and lifestyle modification, in addition to blood sugar control are needed for cardiovascular complication and mortality reduction in diabetic patients.. There arent many randomized control trials that have evaluated the benefit of simultaneous risk factor control. The Steno-2 trial compared simultaneous intensive risk factor modification (with the goal A1C , 6.5%, cholesterol , 175 mg/dl, triglyceride level , 150 mg/dl, blood pressure , 130/80 mm Hg) to lenient control in 160 diabetic ...
BACKGROUND:: Secular trends in cardiovascular risk factors have been described, but few studies have examined simultaneously the effects of both ageing and secular trends within the same cohort. METHODS:: Development of cardiovascular risk factors over the past three decades was analysed using serial measurements from 10 308 participants aged from 35 to 80 years over 25 years of follow-up from five clinical examination phases of the Whitehall II study. Changes of body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure and total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol distribution characteristics were analysed with quantile regression models in the 57-61 age group. Age-related trajectories of risk factors were assessed by fitting mixed-effects models with adjustment for year of birth to reveal secular trends. RESULTS:: Average body mass index and waist circumference increased faster with age in women than in men, but the unfavourable secular trend was more marked in men. Distributions showed a ...
Compared with people with healthy kidneys, people with chronic kidney disease have more cardiovascular complications, including heart attack and stroke. Traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease include high blood pressure, diabetes, and abnormal cholesterol levels. Many people with chronic kidney disease have these traditional cardiovascular risk factors. More recently, researchers have identified other "newer" risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The newer risk factors include high blood levels of substances that indicate inflammation: homocysteine, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen. The blood levels of specific fats are also newer risk factors: low levels of apolipoprotein A1 and high levels of apolipoprotein B or lipoprotein(a). The frequency of these newer cardiovascular risk factors in people with chronic kidney disease is unknown ...
See related article, pages 1752-1758. The concept of coronary risk equivalents has gained increased acceptance in recent years. In the 2001 National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, diabetes mellitus, peripheral arterial disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and "symptomatic carotid artery disease" were cited as coronary risk equivalents.1 These conditions carry a 10-year risk of coronary heart disease events of ,20%.. In 2004, the tent containing coronary risk equivalent conditions was expanded by the NCEP committee to symptomatic carotid disease or ",50% obstruction of a carotid artery."2 In addition, whereas in 2001, the low-density lipoprotein target for coronary risk equivalents was ,100 mg/dL, in 2004, an optional target of ,70 mg/dL was established for high-risk patients.. In this issue of Stroke, Dhamoon et al, using data from the Northern Manhattan Study, provide further ammunition to support the enlargement of the coronary risk equivalent ...
BACKGROUND: To identify new treatments to prevent stroke, it is important that we have reliable data on potential novel risk factors. METHODS: We studied seven novel vascular risk factors [apo-lipoprotein (b), C-reactive protein, Chlamydia pneumoniae, fibrin-D dimer, fibrinogen, Helicobacter pylori and lipoprotein (a)] and compared the amount of published data on their relations with ischaemic stroke versus acute coronary events by systematic review of all studies published up to 2003. RESULTS: From a total of 22,875 abstracts reviewed, 266 eligible studies were identified (167 case-control studies and 99 cohort studies). Two hundred and eleven (79%) studies included coronary events as an outcome for the purpose of a risk factor analysis. In 186 (70%) studies, coronary events were the only outcome that was analysed. Only 73 (27%) studies included stroke or TIA as an outcome event, and only 45 studies (17%) reported risk factor analyses for ischaemic stroke separately. These results were qualitatively
Results 5638 patients with RA and no prior CVD were included (mean age: 55.3 (SD: 14.0) years, 76% women). During mean follow-up of 5.8 (SD: 4.4) years, 148 men and 241 women developed a CVD event (10-year cumulative incidence 20.9% and 11.1%, respectively). Men had a higher burden of CVD risk factors, including increased blood pressure, higher total cholesterol and smoking prevalence than women (all p,0.001). Among the traditional CVD risk factors, smoking and hypertension had the highest population attributable risk (PAR) overall and among both sexes, followed by total cholesterol. The PAR for Disease Activity Score and for seropositivity were comparable in magnitude to the PAR for lipids. A total of 70% of CVD events were attributable to all CVD risk factors and RA characteristics combined (separately 49% CVD risk factors and 30% RA characteristics). ...
<I>Aim:</I> The effectiveness of the support of a healthcare practitioner and a family member in producing changes in cardiovascular risk factor modification was tested in a randomised, controlled trial in patients with hypertension. <br><I>Methods:</I> The primary outcome measured after the 24-week intervention was blood pressure change. Secondary outcomes included patients' adherence to the programme, their knowledge about hypertension, exercise capacity, body weight, self-reported ability to control stress, adherence to medication and salt restriction, as well as symptoms. <br><I>Results:</I> There were no marked improvements in blood pressure regulation in either group. The differences between the experimental and control groups were 3 mmHg (CI -6.18-12.18) for systolic blood pressure and 4 mmHg (CI -1.48-9.48) for diastolic blood pressure. The estimated blood pressure
AIMS: To compare data on cardiovascular risk factor changes in lipids, insulin, proinsulin, fibrinolysis, leptin and C-reactive protein, and on diabetes incidence, in relation to changes in lifestyle.. METHODS: The study was a randomized lifestyle intervention trial conducted in northern Sweden between 1995 and 2000, in 168 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and body mass index above 27 at start. The intensive intervention group (n = 83) was subjected to a 1-month residential lifestyle programme. The usual care group (n = 85) participated in a health examination ending with a single counselling session. Follow-up was conducted at 1, 3 and 5 years.. RESULTS: At 1-year follow-up, an extensive cardio-metabolic risk factor reduction was demonstrated in the intensive intervention group, along with a 70% decrease of progress to type 2 diabetes. At 5-year follow-up, most of these beneficial effects had disappeared. Reported physical activity and fibre intake as well as high-density ...
Increased Serum Sodium and Serum Osmolarity Are Independent Risk Factors for Developing Chronic Kidney Disease; 5 Year Cohort Study. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
There is really no way to know for sure if youre going to get breast cancer, though certain risk factors can make it more likely. However, having one or more risk factors does not necessarily mean that you will get breast cancer. In fact, you can have all the risk factors and never get breast cancer, or you can have no known risk factors and still get the disease.. If you agree with any of the following bolded statements, you may be at an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Some risk factors are out of your control, such as your age or family history. Others, like drinking one or more alcoholic drinks a day or taking hormones, are factors you can control.. Each time you agree with a statement, ask yourself if you are doing all that you can to control that particular risk factor. It may seem difficult, but your efforts can have a big payoff in terms of your health and quality of life. Ask your doctors and loved ones to help think of ways that you can lower your risk for breast ...
Results 86 of 670 patients (13%) who had undergone a lung resection developed a PPC. Those patients had a significantly longer hospital LOS in days (13, 95% CI 10.5-14.9 vs 6.3, 95% CI 5.9 to 6.7; p,0.001) and higher rates of ITU admissions (28% vs 1.9%; p,0.001) and 30-day hospital readmissions (20.7% vs 11.9%; p,0.05). Significant independent risk factors for development of PPCs were COPD and smoking (p,0.05), not age. Excluding early postoperative deaths, developing a PPC resulted in a significantly reduced overall survival in months (40, 95% CI 34 to 44 vs 46, 95% CI 44 to 47; p=0.006). Those who developed a PPC had a higher rate of non-cancer-related deaths (11% vs 5%; p=0.020). PPC is a significant independent risk factor for late deaths in non-small cell lung cancer patients (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.2; p=0.006). ...
A risk factor is anything that raises or lowers your chances of getting a disease. Some risk factors, such as lifestyle choices, are within your control. Genetics, and/or a family history of cancer, are risk factors over which you have no control.. Lifestyle risk factors include diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, and exercise-all of which can impact your chances of getting cancer.. Environmental risk factors include exposure to carcinogens in the atmosphere, at home, or at the workplace, and second-hand smoke.. Another disease or medical problem can weaken your immune system and become a risk factor for cancer.. Some people are more sensitive to risk factors than others. Just because you have one or even several risk factors does not necessarily mean you will succumb to cancer. Just as a healthy lifestyle with no other risk factors will not guarantee that you will remain cancer-free. However, the more you know about risk factors the more you can avoid unhealthy choices that may lead to cancer. ...
In the large community‐based MESA cohort we found a strong inverse association between overall CVH, as defined by the AHAs 7 metrics, and subclinical CVD and subsequent CVEs. Compared with individuals who had low CVH scores, those with high and moderate levels of CVH had a significantly lower burden of subclinical CVD and markedly lower risks for CVD and CHD events over 10 years of follow‐up. Importantly, we found that the association of CVH with future events and subclinical disease was similar across racial and ethnic groups and between men and women.. Of note, the significant and substantial associations of high and moderate levels of CVH with lower risk for CVD were maintained after adjustment for CAC, CIMT, and LV mass-measures of subclinical CVD that would be expected to link CVH status with subsequent risk. It is possible that CAC, CIMT, and LV mass do not fully encompass subclinical disease, and so we have not adjusted for it completely. Alternatively, our results may suggest that ...
OBJECTIVE-To determine the 10-year probability of coronary heart disease (CHD) in diabetic adults and how well basic and novel risk factors predict CHD risk.. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We measured risk factors in 14,054 participants (1,500 with diabetes) initially free of CHD in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study from 1987 to 1989 and followed them prospectively for CHD incidence through 1998. We used proportional hazards regression models and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for CHD risk prediction.. RESULTS-Based on our model using basic risk factors (age, race, total and HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, antihypertensives, and smoking status), ∼61% of diabetic women and 86% of diabetic men had a predicted 10-year CHD probability ≥10%. This CHD risk-prediction model had an area under the ROC curve of 0.72 in diabetic women and 0.67 in diabetic men. Novel risk factors or subclinical disease markers individually added only modest predictivity, but the ...
Screening programmes for type 2 diabetes inevitably find more individuals at high risk for diabetes than people with undiagnosed prevalent disease. While well established guidelines for the treatment of diabetes exist, less is known about treatment or prevention strategies for individuals found at high risk following screening. In order to make better use of the opportunities for primary prevention of diabetes and its complications among this high risk group, it is important to quantify diabetes progression rates and to examine the development of early markers of cardiovascular disease and microvascular diabetic complications. We also require a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie and drive early changes in cardiometabolic physiology. The ADDITION-PRO study was designed to address these issues among individuals at different levels of diabetes risk recruited from Danish primary care. ADDITION-PRO is a population-based, longitudinal cohort study of individuals at high risk for diabetes.
Purpose: Well-established risk factors for breast cancer include family history (FH), BRCA mutations and biopsies with atypical hyperplasia (AH) or lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Several mathematical models, including the Gail and Tyrer-Cuzick models, have been developed to quantify a patients risk for developing breast cancer. These models all differ in the list of variables and risk factors that are included in risk calculations. As a result, there is no single model that best estimates the risk for all high risk patients. The purpose of this study is to examine the application of the Gail and Tyrer-Cuzick models in a contemporary cohort of women who are enrolled in a comprehensive high-risk breast cancer database.. Methods: The institutional High Risk Breast Cancer Consortium (HRBCC) was established in January 2011. Patients who were at high risk for developing breast cancer based on family history (maternal and paternal), BRCA mutations, AH and LCIS were eligible to enroll in the ...
Alcohol abuse increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, heart attack and congestive heart failure as much as other well-established risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and obesity, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Despite advances in prevention and treatments, heart disease is the…
Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) continues a worldwide cause of mortality [1]. In-hospital and 6-month-mortality are approximately 5-7% versus 12-13%, respectively [2, 3]. Estimated risk of mortality for AMI is based on the clinical status of the patients [4]. Recent studies showed that conventional risk factors are inadequate for predicting cardiovascular (CV) mortality and morbidity. A novel risk factor called arterial stiffness, which is a defined reduction of the compliance of arterial wall, and relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) have been demonstrated. Arterial stiffness results in faster reflection of the forward pulse wave from bifurcation points in peripheral vessels. As a result of new waveform, systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreases, cardiac workload increases, and coronary perfusion falls down. It plays a major role in the determination of cardiovascular outcomes, and it is not inferior to the traditional risk factors to ...
Objective: The aim of this study was to determine breast cancer risk from modifiable and non-modifiable factors among women in Southeast Asia. Methods: This meta-analysis was performed on research articles on breast cancer risk factors in PubMed, ProQuest and EBSCO databases published between 1997 and October 2017. Pooled odds ratios (OR) are calculated using fixed and random-effect models. Data were processed using Review Manager 5.3 (RevMan 5.3). Results: From a total of 1,211 articles, 15 studies (1 cohort and 14 case control studies) met the criteria for systematic review. Meta-analysis results showed that of the known modifiable risk factors for breast cancer, parity (nulipara) had the highest odd ratio (OR = 1.85 [95% CI 1.47-2.32]) followed by body mass index (overweight) (OR = 1.61 [95% CI 1.43-1.80]) and use of oral contraceptives (OR = 1.27 [95% CI 1.07-1.51]). Of non-modifiable risk factors, family history of breast cancer had the highest odd ratio (OR = 2.53 [95% CI 1.25-5.09]), followed
Background: Type 2 diabetes and its antecedent, metabolic syndrome, are important risk factors for premature and accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, glycemic control by provision of endogenous or exogenous insulin induced only modest and not statistically significant reduction of the risk of myocardial infarction. We and other investigators have demonstrated that the use of insulin sensitizer, thiazolidinediones, resulted in favorable antiatherosclerotic effects in patients with type 2 diabetes or non-diabetic metabolic syndrome. It has become increasingly clear that morbidity and mortality associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) are often associated with lesions that are not obstructive but prone to rupture, the so-called vulnerable plaques. Conventional coronary angiography is not suitable for identifying vulnerable plaques. They may be detected by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and recently developed high-resolution 16-slice multi-detector computed tomography ...
OBJECTIVES: Risk factors for heart failure (HF) have not yet been studied in myocardial infarction (MI) patients in Iran. This study was conducted to determine these risk factors. METHODS: In this nationwide, hospital-based, case-control study, the participants were all new MI patients hospitalized from April 2012 to March 2013 in Iran. The data on 1,691 new cases with HF (enrolled by census sampling) were compared with the data of 6,764 patients without HF as controls. We randomly selected four controls per one case, matched on the date at MI and HF diagnosis, according to incidence density sampling. Using conditional logistic regression models, odds ratios (ORs) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to identify potential risk factors. RESULTS: The one-year in-hospital mortality rate was 18.2% in the cases and higher than in the controls (12.1%) (p,0.05). Significant risk factors for HF were: right bundle branch block (RBBB) (OR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.95 to 4.19), stroke (OR, 2.00; 95% ...
(HealthDay)-Retinal emboli are associated with conventional cardiovascular risk factors, stroke, and chronic kidney disease, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in JAMA Ophthalmology.
Back pain is experienced by up to of 85\% of the United States population. Most often it resolves with minimal to no medical treatment. For those whose pain endures, worsens, or becomes protracted, conservative care is typically first attempted. Individuals who continue to experience significant back pain are often considered for surgical procedures, the results of which are not uniformly positive. The consequences of failed surgical intervention can be quite devastating, and psychosocial factors have been found to predict poor outcome. The literature on psychosocial risk factors for failed back surgery is reviewed first, identifying psychological dysfunction in the domains of emotions, cognitions, behavior, and interpersonal processes as increasing the risk for failed back surgery. Empirical findings with the MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) are presented next, including descriptive analyses with a sample of 1341 individuals assessed as part of a pre-surgical psychological screening. Correlations
There are several risk factors for heart disease you should know to prevent heart disease and to take care more of your heart. The first factor is the High LDL cholesterol and low HDL cholesterol. The second factor is diabetes. Diabetes is also dangerous that can take your life; it becomes the risk factor of heart disease as well. You should really stay away from diabetes. Then, the next risk factor is the family history of heart disease. If your family has the history; you should be more careful and take care of your heart from now on. The other risk factors you should know are hypertension, lack of physical activity, smoking of tobacco, a metabolic syndrome such as lipids, diabetes, abdominal obesity, high blood pressure.. The last risk factor is the factor that usually happens in South Asian women. It has high risk than the men around them. Well, you should not underestimate your heart health from now. You know, in this modern era, not only men that have the high risk of having heart disease ...
Shoukry EE, M.D. SUMMARY Most of the patients with Alzheimers disease (AD) are found to have evidence of atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease on autopsy. Cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia are known risk factors for Alzheimers disease as well.. Higher Systolic Blood pressure (SBP) in midlife has been linked to an increased risk of developing AD in late life [1]. Conversely, increased diastolic Blood pressure (DBP) especially in the elderly was associated with decreased development of AD [2] and low DBP is related to increased incidence [3]. It is conceivable that a higher SBP in midlife will contribute to a rapid progression of atherosclerotic changes and that a decline in DBP, reflecting decreased vascular elasticity, will impair the cerebral perfusion later in life. Whether hypertension plays a role in the development or the progression of AD is unclear. Observational studies suggested that antihypertensive medications may protect ...
Below are the list of major cardiovascular risk factors that affect the Cardiac health of individuals and cause heart diseases across the world,. Based on Food Habits. ...
Social class and ethnicity are important risk factors for small-for-gestational-age and preterm delivery in many countries. This study was performed to assess whether this is also the case in the Netherlands, a country with a high level of social security, relatively small income differences and easy access to medical care for all its inhabitants. Other risk factors that were taken into account were smoking, drinking, occupation, age and height. Information was collected by interview in the first 3 weeks of life of the mothers of 2027 (response 97%) live-born singletons born in the period from April 1988 to October 1989 in the study area. After adjustment for possible confounding factors very low social class, compared with high social class, was significantly associated with reduced birthweight (-4.0%; 95% CI, -7.4% to -0.7%), but not with preterm delivery (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 0.67-6.48). The adjusted birthweight of Turkish infants (2.7%; 95 CI, -1.1% to 6.5%) and the adjusted birthweight of ...
Video created by The University of Sydney for the course Easing the burden of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this module we look more closely at the main risk factors for the non-communicable diseases and at the impact our ...
This study demonstrates that proANP plasma concentrations independently associate with all-cause mortality in an unselected population of acutely hospitalised patients. Furthermore, this association persisted in participants with seemingly normal cardiac function. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show such a correlation. Including the proANP measurement to well-established risk factors of short-term and long-term mortality also improved discrimination, which underscores the general usefulness of this marker in the prognostic evaluation of the acutely hospitalised patient.. Several other studies have evaluated the association between natriuretic peptide concentrations and death. Most of these have mainly focused on populations with a history of cardiovascular disease.7 ,22-24 Others include healthy populations in which the clinical validity of measuring natriuretic peptides regarding predictability of cardiovascular or all-cause mortality is debatable.25-27 In general, the present ...
Studies on the impact of risk factors in childhood and on the effect of potentially beneficial interventions have been facilitated by the development of a number of non-invasive diagnostic techniques that can detect "atherosclerosis" at a preclinical stage (or at least the changes in arterial structure and/or function indicative of vascular damage). For example, the arterial endothelium plays a key role in atherogenesis, and clinical evaluation of the function of the endothelium is now possible through the assessment of nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation produced by sheer stress (flow mediated dilatation (FMD)). FMD can be measured … ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Prevalence of and racial disparities in risk factor control in older adults with diabetes. T2 - The atherosclerosis risk in communities study. AU - Parrinello, Christina M.. AU - Rastegar, Ina. AU - Godino, Job G.. AU - Miedema, Michael D.. AU - Matsushita, Kunihiro. AU - Selvin, Elizabeth. PY - 2015/7. Y1 - 2015/7. N2 - OBJECTIVE: Controversy surrounds appropriate risk factor targets in older adults with diabetes. We evaluated the proportion of older adults with diabetes meeting different targets, focusing on possible differences by race, and assessed whether demographic and clinical characteristics explained disparities. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5,018 participants aged 67-90 years (1,574 with and 3,444 without diagnosed diabetes) who attended visit 5 of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (2011-2013). Risk factor targets were defined using both stringent (and less stringent) goals: hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ,7%, ,53 ...
Increases in overweight and obesity among youths have resulted in the diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at earlier ages. The impact of lifestyle-related factors has been implicated; however, its relation to morbidity and mortality and sex differences remain unclear. We aimed to document the changes in risk factors and sex differences associated with T2DM-related morbidity and mortality during 1995-2015. We used mortality rates and morbidity estimates from the Global Burden of Diseases Study 2016 using Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALY). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine associations between T2DM-related mortality and related risk factors. DALYs were grouped by country income level, and were stratified by sex. Increases in mortality were observed for both sexes, and females tended to have higher mortality rates per 100,000 persons. Body mass index (BMI) continued to be the leading risk factor for T2DM-related mortality, and increases in BMI were more common in low-
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in the United States. Approximately 50% of acute myocardial infarctions occur in people without any history of coronary artery disease. Sudden cardiac death is often the first sign of coronary heart disease. Coronary atherosclerosis is a slow progressive disease that oftentimes goes unrecognized until the person develops symptoms. By the time symptoms start to occur coronary artery disease is usually in a relatively advanced stage requiring either percutaneous or surgical revascularization. The opportunity for disease prevention or aggressive risk factor modification is missed. What is needed is a way to identify asymptomatic people who are at high risk for cardiovascular events early in their disease process. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are well established (elevated lipid levels, hypertension, smoking, obesity, lack of exercise, diabetes, family history heart disease) and helpful to predict future cardiovascular ...
Targeting risk factors could cut Alzheimers by a quarter. Barnes & Yaffe (2011) Lancet Neurol.. Details. If some of the known risk factors in Alzheimers disease were modified to a relatively modest degree, millions could avoid this disease. Alzheimers disease, like most degenerative conditions is largely preventable. Who gets it and who doesnt comes down to risk factors - factors which increase or decrease your risk of developing the condition. Some risk factors such as age and genes are not modifiable - theres nothing you can do about them - but these contribute only a very small part to your overall risk. Most other risk factors are modifiable, meaning you can change them. This study looked at the evidence regarding seven modifiable risk factors for Alzheimers. They calculated that about half of the 33 million cases worldwide could be prevented (thats 17 mllion!) and calculated that if these risk factors were to be modified to only a relatively modest degree, specifically by 10-25% as ...
In Switzerland, a country without systematic quality monitoring, we found that measuring proportions in control without evaluating whether physicians respond appropriately to poor risk factor control largely underestimated quality of care. When appropriate clinical action in response to poor control over a 12 month period was integrated into measuring quality of care compared to the measurement of proportions of patients with controlled risk factors, proportions with appropriate quality of care increased for hypertension (20% vs. 52%), for dyslipidemia (41% vs. 55%), and for diabetes mellitus (36% vs. 53%).. Suboptimal care for poorly controlled cardiovascular risk factors was provided to 15% to 62% of patients at 12 months in our study. Failure to respond to poorly controlled measurements is a barrier to good clinical and appropriate clinical action of cardiovascular risk factors [1]. Guidelines are frequently changing. For example, recent evidence suggests that treatment with moderate dose ...
Although the heart is not the only organ you cannot live without, it can be the most devastating when it is not well. By know the risk factors of heart disease,
This is a clinical, epidemiologic, genetic, and laboratory study of individuals and families at high risk of cancer and selected tumors to investigate the genetic susceptibility and environmental exposures which may alter cancer risk. Families with multiple members who have an unusual pattern or number of cancers or tumors are evaluated clinically. This evaluation is specific for the type of cancer or tumor predominant in the family in order to determine the affection status of each individual for genetic epidemiologic studies. Genetic and environmental risk factor information specific for the tumor type is obtained.. Individuals with, or at high risk of, cancer because of their personal, familial, or environmental histories are identified by healthcare worker referral or by personal inquiry. Relevant etiologic risk factor information is documented through review of pathology specimens and medical, vital, and genealogical records. Selected individuals and family members are asked to complete ...
What is a risk factor?. A risk factor is anything that may increase a persons chance of developing a disease. It may be an activity, such as smoking, diet, family history, or many other things. Different diseases, including cancers, have different risk factors.. Although these factors can increase a persons risk, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Some people with one or more risk factors never develop the disease, while others develop disease and have no known risk factors.. But, knowing your risk factors to any disease can help to guide you into the appropriate actions, including changing behaviors and being clinically monitored for the disease.. ...
About 80% of all cancers are diagnosed in the elderly and up to 75% of cancers are associated with behavioral factors. An approach to estimate the contribution of various measurable factors, including behavior/lifestyle, to cancer risk in the US elderly population is presented. The nationally representative National Long-Term Care Survey (NLTCS) data were used for measuring functional status and behavioral factors in the US elderly population (65+), and Medicare Claims files linked to each person from the NLTCS were used for estimating cancer incidence. The associations (i.e., relative risks) of selected factors with risks of breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers were evaluated and discussed. Behavioral risk factors significantly affected cancer risks in the US elderly. The most influential of potentially preventable risk factors can be detected with this approach using NLTCS-Medicare linked dataset and for further deeper analyses employing other datasets with detailed risk factors description.
Stewart, Ailsa (2012) Crossing the acts : the support and protection of adults at risk of mental disorder, across the legislative frameworks. [Review] Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author ...
BACKGROUND: African Americans (AA) are more likely to develop Alzheimers disease (AD) than Caucasians (CC). Dietary modification may have the potential to reduce the risk of developing AD. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between Southern and Prudent diet patterns and cognitive performance in individuals at risk for developing AD. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-six cognitively normal AA and CC individuals aged 46-77 years with a parental history of AD were enrolled. MEASUREMENTS: Participants completed a Food Frequency questionnaire, cognitive function testing, which consisted of 8 neuropsychological tests, and cardiovascular risk factor assessments, including evaluation of microvascular and macrovascular function and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. RESULTS: Results revealed a relationship between the Southern diet and worse cognitive performance among AAs. AAs who consumed pies, mashed potatoes, tea, and sugar ...
Background: The prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is at an all time high. In fact these diseases result from prolong exposure to one or more risk factors, Population measurement of risk factors can be used to describe the distribution of future diseases and knowledge of risk factors can then be applied to shift population distribution of these risk factors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Non-communicable diseases risk factors among adults in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a representative sample of 498 adults (age, 20-65 years) living in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Participants comprised of 167 (34%) female and 331 (66%) males. Physical activity was measured using the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ) short version. Using the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline, participants were classified as physically inactive, moderately active and highly active. Blood pressure was measured using
About risk factors Although there are some women who are at higher risk, the fact is all women are at risk for breast cancer. Thats why it is so important to follow the three-step plan for breast health. Early detection of problems provides the greatest possibility of successful treatment.. Some people with one or more risk factors never develop a disease, such as cancer, while others develop cancer and have no known risk factors.. Although certain factors may suggest or define a persons possible risks, they do not necessarily cause the disease.. Different diseases, including cancers, have different risk-factor lists. When reading about risk factors for breast cancer, keep in mind that the word "risk" is used in different ways.. Lifetime risk refers to the probability that a person, over the course of his or her lifetime, will be diagnosed or die from cancer.. Over her lifetime, a woman in the United States has a 1 in 8 risk of developing breast cancer, and a 1 in 35 risk of dying from breast ...
For key death risk factors, the researchers figured an attributable risk percent, defined as the percent of risk associated with each factor among those exposed to that factor. They also determined the population-attributable risk, defined as the percent of all HIV-positive people with that risk factor. Attributable risk was highest for a recent CD4 count below 200 (86%), followed by an AIDS diagnosis (65%), detectable viral load or age over 40 (each 50%), injection drug use (44%), and age over 50 (33%). Comparing attributable risk with population-attributable risk yielded an odds ratio of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.2 to 10.3) for a recent CD4 count under 200, 2.8 (95% CI 1.7 to 4.8) for an AIDS diagnosis, and 2.0 or lower for all other risk factors ...
Results We documented 20,033 deaths in 1,239,191 person-years of follow-up. The mortality from all causes was 1480.1 per 100,000 person-years among men and 1190.2 per 100,000 person-years among women. The five leading causes of death were malignant neoplasms (mortality, 374.1 per 100,000 person-years), diseases of the heart (319.1), cerebrovascular disease (310.5), accidents (54.0), and infectious diseases (50.5) among men and diseases of the heart (268.5), cerebrovascular disease (242.3), malignant neoplasms (214.1), pneumonia and influenza (45.9), and infectious diseases (35.3) among women. The multivariate-adjusted relative risk of death and the population attributable risk for preventable risk factors were as follows: hypertension, 1.48 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.44 to 1.53) and 11.7 percent, respectively; cigarette smoking, 1.23 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.18 to 1.27) and 7.9 percent; physical inactivity, 1.20 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.16 to 1.24) and 6.8 percent; ...
... Interview with: Dr. Xifeng Wu, MD PhD Department Chair, Department of Epidemiology, Division of OVP, Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences Director, Center for Translational and Public Health Genomics Professor, Department of Epidemiology Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Wu: Obesity is a well-established risk factor for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the most common form of kidney cancer. It has been estimated that more than 40% of RCC incident cases in the US may be attributed to excessive body weight. Growing body of evidence suggests that obesity may also influence clinical outcome of RCC; however, the findings are sometimes conflicting. So far, the molecular mechanism linking obesity to RCC risk or prognosis is not well understood. In this study, we evaluated the promoter CpG site methylation of 20 ...
Our study analyzed the FASRF at individual level to estimate the burden of cardiovascular disease in Argentina attributable to modifiable risk factors in order to model the impact of some preventive interventions to reducing this burden, as well as estimating their cost-effectiveness. Based on our data, the PAR of all the risk factors analyzed explained more than 75% of the acute CHD events and strokes in men and women. Only high blood pressure explained more than one-third of the events while each one of the other risk factors explained between 14% and 18%. WHO recently addressed the importance of chronic disease prevention as a neglected health issue in LMIC; achievement of the global goal to reduce chronic disease death rates by 2% every year would avert 36 million deaths between 2005 and 2015 [75, 76]. Achieving this target would also save almost 10% of the expected loss in national income in these settings [7]. Considering the growing burden of cardiovascular disease and costs in developing ...
Epidemiological observations increasingly implicate nutritional energy balance as a key risk factor for cancer development. Excess body weight is associated with increased risks of cancers of the endometrium, breast (postmenopausal women), kidney (renal cell tumours), colon, pancreas and oesophagus (adenocarcinomas), and is also a well-documented risk factor for high-grade prostate cancer. By contrast, regular physical activity reduces the risks of breast and colorectal cancers and potentially other tumour types, and overall, excess weight and lack of physical activity have been estimated to potentially account for one quarter to half of the occurrence of the most frequent tumour types in affluent, industrialized societies. Animal experiments have shown uniformly protective effects of dietary energy restriction against tumor development.. Physiologic mechanisms that are thought to account for these effects of nutritional energy balance on cancer risks include changes in the metabolism of ...
Objectives-Although progress has been made in identifying personal risk factors and in improving treatment for female breast cancer, incidence rates continue to increase. With women now occupying a sizable fraction of the workforce, it is worth inquiring whether there are occupational risk factors for breast cancer. This is a review of...
In the JAMA study, researchers looked at the survival and mortality rates of 542,008 heart attack patients and discovered that half of patients presented with less than two of the five major risk factors: high-blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol, a family history, and diabetes.. More from MensHealth.com: 5 Rules For A Healthy Heart. In an alarming reveal, researchers found patients who with few or no risk factors had higher rates of death after the first heart attack. If a patient is aware of a medical problem, it will be more closely monitored and managed by his doctor-which could improve heart attack outcomes-explains study author John Canto, M.D., of the Watson Clinic.. Patients who didnt have any of the five major risk factors might have had a different risk factor (like elevated calcium score or insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome) or a risk that was below detection, Dr. Canto explains.. More from MensHealth.com: 3 Strategies For Avoiding A Heart Attack. Youre probably ...
title:FACTORS INFLUENCING PROLONGED STAY IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT AFTER CARDIAC SURGERY. Author:Ritesh Shah, Ramesh Patel, Ramanand Sharma, Himani Pandya, Komal Shah. Keywords:Cardio Pulmonary Bypass, LVEF, Serum Creatinine. Type:Original Article. Abstract:Background: There are different risk factors that affect the intensive care unit (ICU) stay after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible risk factors influencing prolonged ICU stay. Methodology: We conducted 443 adult patients undergoing different cardiac surgery to determinate causes of prolonged ICU stay. These patients were divided into two groups according to ICU stay ? 4 days and >4 days. We evaluated preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative risk factors for prolong ICU stay. Results: Among the 443 patients studied, 277 (62.52%) had stayed ? 4 days and 166 (37.42%) had stayed >4 days in ICU. Frequency of prolonged ICU stay was 42.7% in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), 37.3% in ...
According to the researchers, performing cardiac CT scans on everyone with a low Framingham score is not a practical option for improving upon traditional risk-factor screening. To better determine who should get scanned, even if they have a low risk assessment, the Hopkins team began to search for additional predictors of who was most at risk. They found that people with two or more risk factors, such as obesity, smoking or metabolic syndrome, plus a family history for heart disease were those most likely to have a high calcium score. It is this group, the researchers say, who should be considered for a fast cardiac CT scan regardless of low Framingham scores and if the physician or patient is unsure about the need to go on long-term preventive therapies ...
phdthesis{566a5028-654c-419d-acab-1e78d08710fc, abstract = {Abstract,br/,,br, ,br/,,br, ,br/,,br, The present thesis explored the epidemiology of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), i.e., factors associated to incidence and prognosis.,br/,,br, ,br/,,br, In the population of Malmö (Malmö 1990 cohort), it was shown that immigrants from China/Vietnam and the Former Soviet Union had higher risk of ICH than citizens born in Sweden. ,br/,,br, ,br/,,br, Although hypertension is a well-known risk factor for stroke, the relation between blood pressure (BP) levels and stroke subtypes is less clear. In the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort ,br/,,br, increasing BP was strongly associated with higher incidence of cerebral infarction, as measured by the crude and standardised incidence rates. However, in terms of relative risks (RR), the risk was highest for primary ICH (PICH), especially for nonlobar PICH.,br/,,br, ,br/,,br, The results of previous studies have indicated differences in pathology and genetics ...
Today s lecture Lecture 6: Dichotomous Variables & Chi-square tests Sandy Eckel Dichotomous Variables Comparing two proportions using 2 2 tables Study Designs Relative risks, odds ratios
Risk Factors for Prostate Cancer What is a risk factor? A risk factor is anything that may increase a persons chance of developing a disease. It may be an activity, such as smoking, diet, family history, or many other things. Different diseases, including cancers, have different risk factors. Although these factors can increase a persons risk, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Some people with one or more risk factors never develop cancer, while others develop cancer and have no known risk fa...
So let me get this straight. What were looking at is data showing that LC beat or tied LF on every relevant parameter they reported except one, and somehow that means LF diets are healthier than LC? Even though overweight and hypertension are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease? Even though trig/HDL is probably the best predictor of heart disease of any of these measures ...
An important finding in the current study is that several of the previously suspected factors were not found to be independently correlated to PPP. Thus, despite a prevalence of other bodily pain similar to previous reports,43 we did not find a significant effect of pain from other body regions on the risk of PPP, which has otherwise been suggested as a marker for pain susceptibility in previous studies from various procedures.18,32,41,44 Furthermore, no correlation between other bodily pain and pain response to 47°C pain was seen, suggesting that other bodily pain may not alone be the result of increased nociceptive function but encompasses a wide range of syndromes (headache, low-back pain, arthrosis, and others) with various etiology (genetics and trauma), which thereby explains the demonstrated low specificity for persistent pain at least in herniotomy. In contrast to other studies,1,2,27 we did not find age to be an independent factor for PPP, although age was correlated to decreased ...
The primary data sources for this study were the HIV registries and electronic medical records (EMRs), which include information on prescription medications, inpatient and outpatient diagnoses and visits, laboratory tests, membership dates, and vital status. The main outcome was a primary inpatient discharge diagnosis of an MI (ICD-9: 410.x); MI discharge diagnoses are generally made in KP after troponin and/or CK-MB confirmation. Other data extracted included age, sex, race/ethnicity, HIV exposure risk [eg, men who have sex with men (MSM), heterosexual, injection drug use (IDU)], duration of known HIV infection, dates of death, laboratory test results (CD4 count and HIV RNA levels), prescription fills (dispensed ART and lipid-lowering therapy), and clinical diagnoses corresponding with other traditional CVD risk factors, including alcohol or drug abuse, overweight/obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco use. Race/ethnicity was known for 95% of HIV+ subjects and 63% of HIV- ...
Judith Campisi has received international recognition for her contributions to understanding why age is the largest single risk factor for developing a panoply of diseases, ranging from neurodegeneration to cancer. Her highly acclaimed research integrates the genetic, environmental and evolutionary forces that result in aging and age-related diseases, and identifies pathways that can be modified to mitigate basic aging processes. See video interview.. Dr. Campisi also makes significant contributions to understanding why aging is the largest single risk factor for developing cancer. She is widely recognized for her work on senescent cells -- older cells that have stopped dividing -- and their influence on aging and cancer. Senescence occurs when cells experience certain types of stress, especially stress that can damage the genome. The senescence response helps prevent cancer by blocking damaged cells from multiplying. But there is a trade off - the lingering senescent cells may also cause harm ...
CODE 01 No intervention. Refers to no intervention taken with regard to the behaviour-related risk factor intervention-purpose.. CODE 02 Information and education (not including written regimen). Refers to where there is no treatment provided to the patient for a behaviour-related risk factor intervention-purpose other than information and education.. CODE 03 Counselling. Refers to any method of individual or group counselling directed towards the behaviour-related risk factor intervention-purpose. This code excludes counselling activities that are part of referral options as defined in code 05 and 06.. CODE 04 Pharmacotherapy. Refers to pharmacotherapies that are prescribed or recommended for the management of the behaviour-related risk factor intervention-purpose.. CODE 05 Referral provided to a health professional. Refers to a referral to a health professional who has the expertise to assist the patient manage the behaviour-related risk factor intervention-purpose.. CODE 06 Referral to a ...
Both smoking and obesity are important risk factors for cancer, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimers - commonly referred to as diseases of aging and one might not want to believe this but what one eats goes a long way in keep one young energetic and healthy. ...
Its shocking how many millions of youngsters receive a diagnosis of ADHD and are treated with stimulant drugs but are never given a proper medical evaluat
B65 An increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has bee n linked with obesity. However, there is limited information about the contribution of a high fat diet to RCC risk. A population-based case-control study of 406 cases and 2,434 controls aged 40 to 85 years was conducted in Iowa in 1986-89. For 323 cases and 1820 controls from this study, information on dietary intake from foods high in fat nutrients and other lifestyle factors had been obtained using a mailed questionnaire. Cancer risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), taking into account other known risk factors, especially obesity, hypertension, and smoking habits. Fat intake, measured either by nutrient: total fat (OR=2.4; CI=1.6-3.7, ptrend ,0.001) orfood group: high-fat spreads (OR=1.9; CI=1.3-2.7, ptrend ,0.001), was associated with an elevated risk of RCC, when the top quartile of dietary fat intake was compared to the bottom quartile. Although total fat, saturated fat, animal fat, retinol and ...
There is a misconception among many people that all the heart disease risk factors can be controlled. But, the real fact is that a few of the factors can be
Twenty four risk factors are responsible for 44% of the estimated 60 million global deaths that occur each year and cause 34% of the loss of healthy life years worldwide, says a World Health Organization report.. The five leading global risks for mortality are high blood pressure, which is responsible for 12.8% of all deaths globally; tobacco use (8.7%); high blood glucose (5.8%); physical inactivity (5.5%), and overweight and obesity (5%), it says.. Other key global risk factors among the top 10 causes of death include high cholesterol (4.5%), unsafe sex (4%), alcohol use (3.8%), childhood underweight (3.8%), and indoor smoke from solid fuels (3.3%).. The report concludes that these leading risks are responsible for raising the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancers.. For instance, 57% of cardiovascular deaths, it says, can be traced back to three risk factors-high blood pressure, high body mass index, and physical inactivity.. Similarly, it says that raised blood ...
Breast cancer risk factors in Korean women: a literature review.: The next steps will be to construct a questionnaire consisting of relevant variables based on
Asthma is a serious public health problem. An estimated 300 million people worldwide suffer from this sometimes deadly lung disease, a number expected to increase to 400 million by 2025. One well-established risk factor for ...
http://magnesiumforlife.com/medical-application/magnesium-and-cancer/ Dr. Mark Sircus Magnesium repletion produced rapid disappearance of the periosteal tumors.[1] Aleksandrowicz et al in Poland conclude that inadequacy of magnesium and antioxidants are important risk factors in predisposing to leukemias.[2] Other researchers found that 46% of the … Continue reading →. ...
The decision to screen an asymptomatic patient for coronary artery disease (CAD) depends on the patients pretest risk. Risk for CAD may be defined by using the Framingham risk score and divided into three categories: low (10-yr risk of CAD , 10%), intermediate (10-yr risk 10%-20%) and high (10-yr risk , 20%).1 Factors included in the score (www.cvdriskchecksecure.com/FraminghamRiskScore.aspx) are age, sex, total cholesterol level, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level, smoking status, diabetes, systolic blood pressure and treatment for hypertension.. Risk factors may be categorized as modifiable or nonmodifiable. Modifiable risk factors for CAD include tobacco use or smoking history, dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, physical inactivity, poor diet, obesity or metabolic syndrome and depression. Nonmodifiable risk factors include age (men ≥ 40 yr; women ≥ 50 yr or postmenopause), ethnicity (i.e., First Nations or South Asian) and family history of ...
Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in populations eligible for lung cancer screening. The aim of this study was to determine whether a brief CV risk assessment, delivered as part of a targeted community-based lung cancer screening programme, was effective in identifying individuals at high risk who might benefit from primary prevention. Methods: The Manchester Lung Screening Pilot consisted of annual low dose CT (LDCT) over 2 screening rounds, targeted at individuals in deprived areas at high risk of lung cancer (age 55-74 and 6-year risk ≥1.51%, using PLCOM2012 risk model). All participants of the second screening round were eligible to take part in the study. Ten-year CV risk was estimated using QRISK2 in participants without CVD and compared to age (±5 years) and sex matched Health Survey for England (HSE) controls; high risk was defined as QRISK2 score ≥10%. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was assessed on LDCT scans and compared to ...
Lung cancer risk prediction models will be essential tools for the identification of high-risk individuals if ongoing lung cancer CT screening trials report positive findings. The Liverpool Lung Project (LLP) risk model estimates an individuals 5-year absolute risk of lung cancer based on five epidemiological risk factors; smoking duration, prior diagnosis of pneumonia or another cancer; family history of lung cancer including age at onset; and occupational exposure to asbestos (Cassidy et al. The LLP Risk Model: an individual risk prediction model for lung cancer. British J Cancer; 98 (2):270-6, 2008). DNA genotyping indicated a role of the SEZ6L, a Met430IIe polymorphic variant found on 22q12.2 region to have increased risk of lung cancer (Gorlov et al. Cancer Research 7: 8406-11, 2007). Therefore, we quantified the improvement in risk prediction attributed to addition of SEZ6L in the LLP risk model.. SEZ6L was genotyped in 200 lung cancer patients and 188 controls from the Liverpool Lung ...
Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death among adults in most regions of the world. Among adults over 40 years of age, almost half of men and one-third of women will develop CHD in their lifetime. CHD causes half of all cardiovascular events in men and women under 75 years of age. There is now considerable evidence to suggest that most coronary events may be preventable. For instance, the relationship between CHD and traditional risk factors, such as cholesterol and lipid levels, blood pressure, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle, is well established and has been reported in several populations. Aggressive efforts to assess and control/prevent these major risk factors can significantly reduce CHD morbidity and mortality, increase overall longevity, and ultimately lower healthcare costs. ...
The researchers first decided which risk factors to assess. Their final list was diabetes, hypertension, obesity, present smoking, depression, cognitive inactivity and physical inactivity. They decided not to look at diet owing to the variability in dietary factors studied and the absence of data on prevalence of dietary habits.. The researchers searched the Cochrane database (a scientific database of systematic reviews) and the scientific database PubMed. They looked for systematic reviews and meta-analyses, written in English and published between 2005 and 2011, which had examined the associations between these risk factors and Alzheimers disease or dementia.. Systematic reviews on risk factors tend to report their findings in terms of relative risks, which express the risk of a disease in people with a risk factor relative to people without this risk factor (e.g. smokers vs. non-smokers). Three of these "relative risk" calculations include Relative Risk (RR), Odds Ratios (OR) and Hazard ...
Introduction. Cardiovascular risk has increased in recent years in children and adolescents, and most studies associate such risk with the prevalence of obesity, which is reaching pandemic levels.1,2 In addition, different longitudinal3,4 and cross-sectional5 studies have shown that cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) associated with these diseases (central obesity, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia) persist from childhood into adulthood.6,7. Other observations have clearly shown a relationship between overweight/obesity and early lipid and carbohydrate changes.8,9 In children and adolescents, obesity is a significant predictor of high blood pressure and dyslipidemia. In US schoolchildren, increased obesity and central adiposity have resulted in an increased occurrence of hypercholesterolemia and high blood pressure.10,11 The use of early indicators for preventing obesity in children has therefore been considered a public health priority in many countries.12. The primary objective of this study ...