Rhizobium, Agrobacterium and Allorhizobium are genera within the bacterial family Rhizobiaceae, together with Sinorhizobium. The species of Agrobacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (syn. Agrobacterium radiobacter), Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Agrobacterium rubi and Agrobacterium vitis, together with Allorhizobium undicola, form a monophyletic group with all Rhizobium species, based on comparative 16S rDNA analyses. Agrobacterium is an artificial genus comprising plant-pathogenic species. The monophyletic nature of Agrobacterium, Allorhizobium and Rhizobium and their common phenotypic generic circumscription support their amalgamation into a single genus, Rhizobium. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was conserved as the type species of Agrobacterium, but the epithet radiobacter would take precedence as Rhizobium radiobacter in the revised genus. The proposed new combinations are Rhizobium radiobacter, Rhizobium rhizogenes, Rhizobium rubi, Rhizobium undicola and Rhizobium vitis.
Rhizobium fredii is a fast-growing rhizobium isolated from the primitive Chinese soybean cultivar Peking and from the wild soybean Glycine soja. This rhizobium harbors nif genes on 150- to 200-megadalton plasmids. By passage on acridine orange plates, we obtained a mutant of R. fredii USDA 206 cured of the 197-megadalton plasmid (USDA 206C) which carries both nif and nod genes. This strain, however, has retained its symbiotic effectiveness. Probing EcoRI digests of wild-type and cured plasmid DNA with a 2.2-kilobase nif DH fragment from Rhizobium meliloti has shown four homologous fragments in the wild-type strain (4.2, 4.9, 10, and 11 kilobases) and two fragments in the cured strain (4.2 and 10 kilobases). EcoRI digests of total DNA show four major bands of homology (4.2, 4.9, 5.8, and 13 kilobases) in both the wild-type and cured strains. The presence of major bands of homology in the total DNA not present in the plasmid DNA indicated chromosomal nif genes. Probing of HindIII digests of total and
Nodulation (nod) gene expression in Rhizobium meliloti requires plant inducers and the activating protein product of the nodD gene. We have examined three genes in R. meliloti which have nodD activity and sequence homology. These three nodD genes are designated nodD1, nodD2 and nodD3, and have distinctive properties. The nodD1 gene product activates expression of the nodABC operon, as measured by a nodC-lacZ fusion or by transcript analysis, in the presence of crude seed or plant wash or the inducer, luteolin. The nodD3 gene product can cause a high basal (uninduced) level of nodC-lacZ expression and nodABC transcripts which is relatively unaffected by inducers. The effect of nodD3 is dependent on the presence of another gene, syrM (symbiotic regulator). By primer extension analysis we determined that the transcription start site is the same for nodD1 plus luteolin or nodD3-syrM mediated expression of nodA and nodH mRNAs. syrM also enhances the expression of another symbiotically important ...
Other names: A. rhizogenes, ATCC 11325, Agrobacterium biovar 2, Agrobacterium genomic group 10, Agrobacterium genomic species 10, Agrobacterium genomosp. 10, Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Agrobacterium rhizogenes (RI plasmid PRI1724), Agrobacterium rhizogenes (RI plasmid PRI8196), Agrobacterium rhizogenes (RI plasmid PRIA4B), CFBP 5520, CIP 104328, DSM 30148, ICMP 5794, IFO 13257, JCM 20919, LMG 150, NBRC 13257, NCPPB 2991, Rhizobium rhizogenes, Rhizobium sp. LMG 9509 ...
Other names: A. rhizogenes, ATCC 11325, Agrobacterium biovar 2, Agrobacterium genomic group 10, Agrobacterium genomic species 10, Agrobacterium genomosp. 10, Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Agrobacterium rhizogenes (RI plasmid PRI1724), Agrobacterium rhizogenes (RI plasmid PRI8196), Agrobacterium rhizogenes (RI plasmid PRIA4B), CFBP 5520, CIP 104328, DSM 30148, ICMP 5794, IFO 13257, JCM 20919, LMG 150, NBRC 13257, NCPPB 2991, Rhizobium rhizogenes, Rhizobium sp. LMG 9509 ...
Pesticide properties for Agrobacterium radiobacter strain K1026, including approvals, environmental fate, eco-toxicity and human health issues
The Rhizobium common nod gene products NodABC are involved in the synthesis of the core lipochitooligosaccharide (Nod factor) structure, whereas the products of the host-specific nod genes are necessary for diverse structural modifications, which vary in different Rhizobium species. The sulfate group attached to the Rhizobium meliloti Nod signal is necessary for activity on the host plant alfalfa, while its absence renders the Nod factor active on the non-host plant vetch. This substituent is therefore a major determinant of host specificity. The exact biosynthetic pathway of Nod factors has not been fully elucidated. In particular, it is not known why some chemical modifications are introduced with high fidelity whereas others are inaccurate, giving rise to a family of different Nod factor structures produced by a single Rhizobium strain. Using protein extracts and partially purified recombinant NodH protein obtained from Escherichia coli expressing the R. meliloti nodH gene, we demonstrate ...
The plant supplies the rhizobia with energy in the form of amino acids and the . Legumes can become infected with nitrogen-fixing bacteria known as rhizobia. These bacteria live in the soil, and when a legume grows nearby a molecular communication ensues that enables the legume roots to become infected. In a process guided by both the bacteria and the plant, the rhizobia invade . Wally Eberhart, Corbis, NTB scanpix.. Update in progress: This page lists all of the current validly-published binomial names for the rhizobia , which currently consists of species in genera. Most of these bacterial species are in the Rhizobiacae family in the . The biological reduction of atmospheric Nto ammonium (nitrogen fixation) provides about of the biospheres available nitrogen. Most of this ammonium is contributed by legume- rhizobia symbioses, which are initiated by the infection of legume hosts by bacteria ( rhizobia ), resulting in formation of root nodules. Rhizobia are nitrogen-fixing bacteria that form ...
The role of soil microorganisms in plant growth, nutrient utilization, drought tolerance as well as biocontrol activity cannot be over-emphasized, especially in this era when food crisis is a global challenge. This research was therefore designed to gain genomic insights into plant growth promoting (PGP) Rhizobium species capable of enhancing soybean (Glycine max L.) seeds germination under drought condition. Rhizobium sp. strain R1, Rhizobium tropici strain R2, Rhizobium cellulosilyticum strain R3, Rhizobium taibaishanense strain R4 and Ensifer meliloti strain R5 were found to possess the entire PGP traits tested. Specifically, these rhizobial strains were able to solubilize phosphate, produce exopolysaccharide (EPS), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC), siderophore and indole-acetic-acid (IAA). These strains also survived and grew at a temperature of 45 °C and in an acidic condition with a pH 4. Consequently, all the Rhizobium strains enhanced the germination of soybean seeds (PAN 1532 R) under
Monoclonal antibodies were used as cytochemical markers to study surface interactions between endosymbiotic Rhizobium bacteroids from pea root nodules and the encircling peribacteroid membranes, which are of plant origin. Monoclonal antibodies that react with Rhizobium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or with a plant membrane glycoprotein were used as markers for material from the bacteroid outer membrane or the peribacteroid membrane, respectively. Membrane-enclosed bacteroids were isolated from nodule homogenates by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and the encircling peribacteroid membrane was released by mild osmotic shock treatment. Using an immunochemical technique (sandwich ELISA), it was shown that 1-5% of the LPS antigen released into the peribacteroid fraction by mild osmotic shock treatment was physically associated with peribacteroid membrane through a detergent-sensitive linkage. This association could be visualized when freshly prepared peribacteroid material was immobilized on gold grids ...
Rhizobium is a genus of Gram-negative soil bacteria that fix nitrogen. Rhizobium species form an endosymbiotic nitrogen-fixing association with roots of legumes and Parasponia. The bacteria colonize plant cells within root nodules, where they convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia and then provide organic nitrogenous compounds such as glutamine or ureides to the plant. The plant, in turn, provides the bacteria with organic compounds made by photosynthesis. This mutually beneficial relationship is true of all of the rhizobia, of which the Rhizobium genus is a typical example. Beijerinck in the Netherlands was the first to isolate and cultivate a microorganism from the nodules of legumes in 1888. He named it Bacillus radicicola, which is now placed in Bergeys Manual of Determinative Bacteriology under the genus Rhizobium. Rhizobium forms a symbiotic relationship with certain plants such as legumes, fixing nitrogen from the air into ammonia, which acts as a natural fertilizer for the plants. ...
A motile, Gram-stain-negative, non-pigmented bacterial strain, designated MGL06T, was isolated from seawater of the South China Sea on selection medium containing 0.1 % (w/v) malachite green. Strain MGL06T showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Rhizobium vignae CCBAU 05176T (97.2 %), and shared 93.2-96.9 % with the type strains of other recognized Rhizobium species. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and housekeeping gene sequences showed that strain MGL06T belonged to the genus Rhizobium. Mean levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain MGL06T and R. vignae CCBAU 05176T, Rhizobium huautlense S02T and Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393T were 20 ± 3, 18 ± 2 and 14 ± 3 %, respectively, indicating that strain MGL06T was distinct from them genetically. Strain MGL06T did not form nodules on three different legumes, and the nodD and nifH genes were also not detected by PCR or based on the draft genome sequence. Strain MGL06T contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone. The major fatty
Rhizobia are composed of specific groups of bacteria that have the ability to induce symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots or stems of leguminous plants. Rhizobia have attracted a great attention for more than 4 decades because of their enormous agricultural and economic value in sustainable agriculture. Up to the present time, many legumes have been found to be nodulated by several rhizobial species in diverse taxonomic groups. An assessment of rhizobial diversity provides pivotal information in understanding the horizontal gene transfer among bacterial genera and species, the bacterial evolution and the symbiotic effectiveness. The classification of rhizobia is becoming increasingly complex and is revised periodically because of new findings that propose new genera and new species. Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity of Rhizobia presents the application of conventional and molecular analyses, including numerical analysis, enzyme patterns, serological studies, plasmid profile, ...
Rhizobium spp. are found in soil. They are both free-living and found symbiotically associated with the nodules of leguminous plants. Traditionally, studies have focused on the association of these organisms with plants in nitrogen-fixing nodules, since this is regarded as the most important role of these bacteria in the environment. Rhizobium sp. are known to possess several replicons. Some, like the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid p42d and the plasmid pNGR234b of Rhizobium NGR234, have been sequenced and characterized. The plasmids from these organisms are the focus of this short review.. ...
FINAL DIAGNOSIS: AGROBACTERIUM RADIOBACTER. CONTRIBUTORS NOTE:. The genus Agrobacterium are aerobic, gram negative, peritrichous bacilli which are mainly plant pathogens found in soil all over the world. Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium radiobacter are two species that have been isolated from human specimens although only A. radiobacter is associated with clinical symptoms (1).. Despite A. radiobacters association with significant clinical symptoms, it is considered to be of low virulence and there have been no reports of mortality from the organism alone. The only difference between the two species is the presence of a tumor-producing plasmid, the Ti plasmid, in A. tumefaciens which results in a tumorous growth in plants (2).. Agrobacterium radiobacter is infrequently recognized in clinical specimens however it has been associated with immunocompromised patients that have implanted medical devices or transcutaneous catheters (1,3,4). It was first isolated in 1967 but was not ...
The most important step of this study was to isolate Rhizobium species and determination of their potency for growth factor production. We isolated 260 type bacteria on PCA (Plate Count Agar) media from adjacent soil samples of ten leguminous plants, two non-leguminous plants and control soil (without plant). Then pure cultures of 53 nitrogen fixing bacterial strains were isolated on selective Yeast Extract Mannitol Agar (YEMA) medium. Five isolates (Ma-G1, Ch-H2, Lo-F1, Sh-J1and Ra-I2) were selected as Rhizobium hainanense and better result was regarded in their assessment for production potency of various growth factors. All Rhizobium spp. were able to fix nitrogen in media. Among these isolates, indole acetic acid (IAA) was produced by Ma-G1 and Ra-I2. The exopolysaccharide production rate of Ma-G1 was enhanced expectedly (1.25-fold increase) by treating with IAA. Unfortunately, these five strains were unable to separate soluble phosphorus content from insoluble tri-calcium phosphate (TCP). ...
SALEM, S.H. (1971) Néhány inszekticid hatása a Rhizobium trifolii effektív és ineffektív törzseinek fiziológiai aktivitására. Agrokémia és talajtan, 20 (3). pp. 368-376. ...
Agrobacterium species that are pathogenic on plants, including Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. vitis, A. rubi, and A. rhizogenes, all carry megaplasmids. By contrast, nonpathogenic strains either lack these plasmids entirely or carry mutant forms of plasmids. A strict requirement of the Ti plasmid for virulence was established through mutational analyses and by a demonstration that the introduction of Ti plasmids into Rhizobium or Phyllobacterium spp. converts these nonpathogenic species into tumor-inducing pathogens ( 2 , 3 ). Ti plasmids induce a disease called crown gall, which is typified by the formation of undifferentiated plant tumors at the plant crown (the subterranean-to-aerial transition zone). The related root-inducing or Ri megaplasmids carried by A. rhizogenes instead induce hairy root disease, which is typified by the formation of entangled masses of roots at the infection site ( 4 ).
Rhizobium rhizogenes (formerly Agrobacterium rhizogenes) is a Gram-negative soil bacterium that produces hairy root disease in dicotyledonous plants. R. rhizogenes induces the formation of proliferative multiple-branched adventitious roots at the site of infection, so-called hairy roots. In the rhizosphere, plants may suffer from wounds by soil pathogens or other sources. This leads to the secretion of phenolic compounds like acetosyringone which have chemotactic effects that attract the bacteria. Under such conditions, certain bacterial genes are turned on leading to the transfer of its tDNA from its root-inducing plasmid (Ri plasmid) into the plant through the wound. After integration and expression, in vitro or under natural conditions, the hairy root phenotype is observed, which typically includes overdevelopment of a root system that is not completely geotropic, and altered (wrinkled) leaf morphology, if leaves are present. Bacterial genes may be retained within the plant. The hairy roots ...
The genetic diversity and symbiotic efficiency among indigenous rhizobia isolates obtained from native field with or without organic fertilization and superficial mineral fertilization were investigated. Eighty-six indigenous rhizobia were isolated from these fields using four common bean varieties as trap-host. The common bean varieties Mexico 309 and Rio Tibagi selected the most efficient rhizobia strains because they showed the best yields and N contents results. The genetic characterization of 36 rhizobia isolates was evaluated by using electrophoretic profiles of amplification products using primers ERIC1-R and ERIC-2. Our results demonstrated that besides the large diversity in the indigenous rhizobial community, the genotype of the trap-host probably influences the selection of the most efficient strains.
Three bacterial isolates, designated W44T, W15 and W11, were isolated from the root of Oryza officinalis grown in Wuzhou, China. These isolates were Gram-negative, aerobic, motile and rod-shaped; demonstrated cellulase and urea activities; and formed cream-coloured colonies. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the similarities between strain W44T and strains W15 and W11 were 100 %; all of them belonged to the genus Rhizobium and had the highest sequence similarity to Rhizobium rosettiformans W3T (98.7 %), followed by Rhizobium ipomoeae shin9-1T (98.2 %). Sequencing of housekeeping genes (recA, atpD, rpoB and glnA) of the novel isolates revealed similarities to members of established Rhizobium species to be less than 94.3 %. The values of DNA-DNA hybridization between strain W44T and the reference strains ( R. rosettiformans W3T and R. ipomoeae shin9-1T) were 41.3 and 29.2 %, respectively. The major cellular fatty acid of strain W44T was summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω9t and/or C18 : 1ω9c
We, Anand Agro Care is one of the ISO 9001:2015 Certified prominent leading Manufacturer, Supplier and Exporter of Rhizobium SPP based In Opp. Dream Castle, Makhmalabad Road, Panchavati, Nashik, Maharashtra, India
Rhizobium forms a symbiotic relationship with certain plants such as legumes, fixing nitrogen from the air into ammonia, which acts as a natural fertilizer for the plants. Current research is being conducted by Agricultural Research Service microbiologists to discover a way to use Rhizobiums biological nitrogen fixation. This research involves the genetic mapping of various rhizobial species with their respective symbiotic plant species, like alfalfa or soybean. The goal of this research is to increase the plants productivity without using fertilizers.[3]. In molecular biology, Rhizobium has also been identified as a contaminant of DNA extraction kit reagents and ultrapure water systems, which may lead to its erroneous appearance in microbiota or metagenomic datasets.[4] The presence of nitrogen fixing bacteria as contaminants may be due to the use of nitrogen gas in ultra-pure water production to inhibit microbial growth in storage tanks.[5]. ...
To study the effect of different temperature and carbohydrate sources, a laboratory experiment was taken and parameters are taken separately. To study the effect of different temperature on the growth of Rhizobium, YEMA medium was used for growth of Rhizobium, there is less growth as compared to 30 c, where significantly increase in biomass growth, up to 30 c temperature. To study the effect of different carbohydrate sources, the Richard medium was used to study the growth of Rhizobium. From data it was clear that, mannitol as a source there was significantly more growth of Rhizobium compared to other sources.. ...
Rhizobium spp. show chemotaxis to plant root exudates. A glycoprotein has been isolated from the root exudates of birdsfoot trefoil, Lotus corniculatus, which, at micromolar concentrations, attracts six strains of rhizobia. This glycoprotein has been given the trivial name trefoil chemotactin and contains approximately twice as much protein as carbohydrate. Gel filtration of trefoil chemotactin on a Bio-Gel A-1.5m column gave a molecular weight of approximately 60,000. Trefoil chemotactin represents a new class of chemoattractants for bacteria. ...
Revised received July 12, 2010. Abstract. A major strategy towards addressing soil fertility depletion is the conservation and sustainable use of rhizobia that are able to fix nitrogen in the soil in association with legumes. The study assessed abundance and diversity of legume nodulating rhizobia (LNB) in soils collected from six different land use systems in Embu District, Kenya. The populations were estimated by the most-probable-number (MPN) plant infection technique using Macroptilium atropurpureum (DC.) Urban (Siratro) as the trap host species. Symbiotic effectiveness was measured for the isolates in association with Siratro. Isolated rhizobia were characterized morphologically and genetically by PCR-RFLP and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes.. The LNB populations in soils collected from the different land uses in Embu ranged from 0 to 2.3 x 102 cells g-1 soil. There was apparent land use effect on abundance of LNB with fallow system giving high abundance. A total of 250 pure isolates ...
Rhizobia elicit on their specific leguminous hosts the formation of new organs, called nodules, in which they fix nitrogen. The rhizobial nodulation genes specify the synthesis of lipo-chitooligosaccharide signals, the Nod factors (NFs). Each rhizobial species has a characteristic set of nodulation …
ID B9JCV2_AGRRK Unreviewed; 237 AA. AC B9JCV2; DT 24-MAR-2009, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 24-MAR-2009, sequence version 1. DT 07-JUN-2017, entry version 46. DE SubName: Full=DNA replication initiation ATPase protein {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ACM26089.1}; GN OrderedLocusNames=Arad_1727 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ACM26089.1}; OS Agrobacterium radiobacter (strain K84 / ATCC BAA-868). OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; OC Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium/Agrobacterium group; Agrobacterium; OC Agrobacterium tumefaciens complex. OX NCBI_TaxID=311403 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ACM26089.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000001600}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ACM26089.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000001600} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=K84 / ATCC BAA-868 {ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000001600}; RX PubMed=19251847; DOI=10.1128/JB.01779-08; RA Slater S.C., Goldman B.S., Goodner B., Setubal J.C., Farrand S.K., RA Nester E.W., Burr T.J., Banta L., Dickerman A.W., Paulsen I., RA Otten L., ...
Rhizobia are Gram-negative bacteria that can exist either as free-living bacteria or as nitrogen-fixing symbionts inside root nodules of leguminous plants. The composition of the rhizobial outer surface, containing a variety of polysaccharides, plays a significant role in the adaptation of these bacteria in both habitats. Among rhizobial polymers, exopolysaccharide (EPS) is indispensable for the invasion of a great majority of host plants which form indeterminate-type nodules. Various functions are ascribed to this heteropolymer, including protection against environmental stress and host defense, attachment to abiotic and biotic surfaces, and in signaling. The synthesis of EPS in rhizobia is a multi-step process regulated by several proteins at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Also, some environmental factors (carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate starvation, flavonoids) and stress conditions (osmolarity, ionic strength) affect EPS production. This paper discusses the recent data
Rhizobium meliloti VisR protein: global regulator of chemotaxis, flagellar and motility genes; amino acid sequence in first source
Nodules are a growth on the roots of leguminous plants where the bacteria reside. The plant roots secrete amino acids and sugars into the rhizosphere. The rhizobia move toward the roots and attach to the root hairs. The plant then releases flavanoids, which induce the expression of nod genes within the bacteria. The expression of these genes results in the production of enzymes called Nod factors that initiate root hair curling. During this process, the rhizobia are curled up with the root hair. The rhizobia penetrate the root hair cells with an infection thread that grows through the root hair into the main root. This causes the infected cells to divide and form a nodule. The rhizobia can now begin nitrogen fixation.. ...
Rhizobium vitis ATCC ® BAA-846D™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Rhizobium vitis strain S4 TypeStrain=False Application:
Rhizobium vitis ATCC ® BAA-846D™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Rhizobium vitis strain S4 TypeStrain=False Application:
Pupuk organik RhizobiumBakteri Rhizobium berfungsi untuk mengurangi kebutuhan Nitrogen tanaman karena bakteri Rhizobium dapat mensuplai Nitrogen untuk P289775
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Figure 4.47 Successful and aborted infection threads. a) A successful infection thread of compatible rhizobia on their host. Rhizobia are expressing the Green Fluorescent Protein. b) An aborted infection thread as a result of infection with a rhizobium strain unable to synthesise the correct exopolysaccharides, leading to a defence response. (Reproduced by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd from K.M. Jones et al. Nature Rev Microbiol 5: 619-633, 2007). ...
The bacterial family of Rhizobiaceae, consisting of the two genera Rhizobium and Agrobacterium, creates a challenge to geneticists and biochemists be cause of its genetic and regulatory complexity....
When purchasing green manure seeds from sources like Eden Seeds or Green Harvest, youll be supplied with a small pack of the inoculant. (Keep both seeds and inoculant in the fridge until sowing time to keep them fresh.). Will your plants fix nitrogen without the rhizobium inoculant?. Several conditions are required for fixing nitrogen (N) by legumes. Many N fixing rhizobium are acid intolerant, so the regulation of pH with lime or dolomite is needed if your soil is under pH5.. If youve never grown a crop of legumes with an inoculant in the spot before, you may not have the rhizobium resident in the soil. You will need an inoculant.. If you have grown an inoculated crop of the same plant in the same spot in the past, you may have enough rhizobium in the soil already.. ...
Rhizobium is a 'symbiotic bacteria' living in the root nodule of leguminous plants, it fixes atmospheric nitrogen into organic forms to be used by plants. It is a biofertilizer as it is a living organism that enriches nu…
Agricultural soils in Iran are predominantly calcareous with very low plant available phosphorus (P) content. In addition to their beneficial N2-fixing activity with legumes, rhizobia can improve...
ID A0A0Q7NNL6_9RHIZ Unreviewed; 483 AA. AC A0A0Q7NNL6; DT 20-JAN-2016, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 20-JAN-2016, sequence version 1. DT 25-OCT-2017, entry version 16. DE RecName: Full=Chromosomal replication initiator protein DnaA {ECO:0000256,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00377, ECO:0000256,RuleBase:RU000577, ECO:0000256,SAAS:SAAS00724181}; GN Name=dnaA {ECO:0000256,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00377}; GN ORFNames=ASD32_03365 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KQY40799.1}; OS Rhizobium sp. Root483D2. OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; OC Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium/Agrobacterium group; Rhizobium. OX NCBI_TaxID=1736545 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KQY40799.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000051333}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KQY40799.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000051333} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=Root483D2 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KQY40799.1, RC ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000051333}; RA Millard Andrew; RL Submitted (OCT-2015) to the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. RN [2] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KQY40799.1, ...
Effective nodulation of legumes is important to maximise the amount of nitrogen fixed by the legume; however, lupins are not usually treated with inoculant due to the presence of native inoculant in the soil. It is unclear if this native inoculant is as effective as newer types of inoculant, and the objective of this project is to evaluate TagTeam on the nodulation and grain yield of lupin and chickpea on a sandplain soil. At this trial there was no yield benefit in applying an inoculant on lupin seed. Although there was a noticeable improvement in crop establishment and nodulation when doing so (from a 2.9 rating to a 3.9 nodulation rating), it did not translate to yield. It is possible that this is because the frequency of lupins grown in this environment has been high, and therefore enough numbers of rhizobia are present in the soil to achieve suitable nodulation. The dry finish to the season may have also influenced the final yield. Download PDF. ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium/Agrobacterium group; Rhizobium; Rhizobium ...
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium/Agrobacterium group; Rhizobium; Rhizobium ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
1FO6: Crystal structure and site-directed mutagenesis studies of N-carbamoyl-D-amino-acid amidohydrolase from Agrobacterium radiobacter reveals a homotetramer and insight into a catalytic cleft.
1FO6: Crystal structure and site-directed mutagenesis studies of N-carbamoyl-D-amino-acid amidohydrolase from Agrobacterium radiobacter reveals a homotetramer and insight into a catalytic cleft.
SWISS-MODEL Template Library (SMTL) entry for 2r1k.1. OpdA from Agrobacterium radiobacter with bound diethyl phosphate from crystal soaking with the compound- 1.9 A
Nucleoside-diphosphate-sugar pyrophosphorylase involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis/translation initiation factor 2B, gamma/epsilon subunits (eIF-2Bgamma/eIF-2Bepsilon ...