Principal Investigator:KATORI Hiroto,鹿取 広人, Project Period (FY):1992 - 1993, Research Category:Grant-in-Aid for General Scientific Research (A), Research Field:Psychology
Investigations were performed on the structural features responsible for kinetic thermal stability of a thermostable carboxypeptidase from the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus which had been purified previously and identified as a zinc metalloprotease [Colombo, DAuria, Fusi, Zecca, Raia and Tortora (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 206, 349-357]. Removal of Zn2+ by dialysis led to reversible activity loss, which was promptly restored by addition of 80 microM ZnCl2 to the assay mixture. For the first-order irreversible thermal inactivation the metal-depleted enzyme showed an activation energy value of 205.6 kJ.mol-1, which is considerably lower than that of the holoenzyme (494.4 kJ.mol-1). The values of activation free energies, enthalpies and entropies also dropped with metal removal. Thermal inactivation of the apoenzyme was very quick at 80 degrees C, whereas the holoenzyme was stable at the same temperature. These findings suggest a major stabilizing role for the bivalent ...
1CAA: X-ray crystal structures of the oxidized and reduced forms of the rubredoxin from the marine hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus.
Biology Assignment Help, Heliozoans - protozoan, Heliozoans - Protozoan Heliozoans are spherical protozoan that occur in the sea or in still bodies of fresh water. They are mainly located in the bottom debris. Fine needle like pseudopodia radiate from the surface of the body. These are known a
Boetius, Antje; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Lochte, Karin (2000): Bacterial activity parameters in sediment core SO129_MC-17. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.59168, In supplement to: Boetius, A et al. (2000): Bacterial activity in sediments of the deep Arabian Sea in relation to vertical flux. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, 47(14), 2835-2875, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0967-0645(00)00051-5
Boetius, Antje; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Lochte, Karin (2000): Bacterial activity parameters in sediment core SO118_MC-20. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.59245, In supplement to: Boetius, A et al. (2000): Bacterial activity in sediments of the deep Arabian Sea in relation to vertical flux. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, 47(14), 2835-2875, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0967-0645(00)00051-5
Marine microorganisms and their extracellular enzymes (ECEs) play an important role in the remineralization of organic material by hydrolyzing high-molecular-weight substrates to sizes sufficiently small to be transported through cell membrane, yet the diversity of the enzyme-producing bacteria and the types of ECEs involved in the degradation process are largely unknown. In this work, we investigated the diversity of cultivable bacteria and their ECEs and the potential activities of aminopeptidase in the water column at eight different depths of the New Britain Trench. There was a great diversity of cultivable bacteria and ECEs, and depth appears an important driver of the diversity. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed that the cultivable bacteria were affiliated mostly with the phyla Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, and the predominant genera were Pseudoalteromonas (62.7%) and Halomonas (17.3%). Moreover, 70.7% of the isolates were found to produce hydrolytic zone on casein and gelatin plates,
A group of organisms of small size has been discovered which can be cultivated in indefinite series. The organisms form a well-defined group and have both relatively large and small forms. The smaller forms appear to be as small as vaccinia virus and from them the larger forms readily develop. Occurrence The organisms have been obtained from all samples of raw sewage so far examined from four London districts during the summer. They have not been detected in London tap-water, or faecal material from man, pig, rabbit, or rat. ...
Unit 1: How do living things stay alive?. In this unit students are introduced to some of the challenges to an organism in sustaining life. Students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of life, from the single celled to the multicellular organism, and the requirements for sustaining cellular processes in terms of inputs and outputs. They analyse types of adaptations that enhance the organisms survival in a particular environment and consider the role homeostatic mechanisms play in maintaining the internal environment. Students investigate how a diverse group of organisms form a living interconnected community that is adapted to, and utilises, the abiotic resources of its habitat. The role of a keystone species in maintaining the structure of an ecosystem is explored. Students consider how the planets biodiversity is classified and the factors that affect the growth of a population. Area of study 1. How do organisms function?. Outcome 1 On completion of this unit the student ...
modified with decent to adapt to their environment another statement at 100% conflict with any number of statements by leading evolutionists. Evolution has no direction, no purpose, no plan it is the product of random mutation at the genetic level giving rise to totally unplanned changes in the organisms form and function. The environment then is either hostile to or supportive of those changes and the organism is either as a species more reproductively successful or it is made extinct. In no sense does the organism adapt to the environment in fact the environment adapts it either to continued life or to death, as a species ...
Immunoglobulins are made by white blood cells known as B cells (B lymphocytes). Any disease that harms the development or function of B cells will, therefore, affect the production of immunoglobulin antibodies. T cells, another type of white blood cell, may also be involved in immunodeficiency disorders. About 70 percent of immunoglobulin deficiencies involve B lymphocytes and 20-30 percent involve T lymphocytes. Another 10 percent may involve both B and T lymphocytes. Many of the infections that occur in children with immunoglobulin deficiency syndromes are caused by bacterial organisms or microbes. Certain of these invasive organisms form capsules when they enter the body, a mechanism used to confuse the immune system. In a healthy body with an adequately functioning immune system, immunoglobulin antibodies bind to the capsule and overcome the bacterias defenses. Streptococci, meningococci, and Haemophilus influenzae , organisms that cause diseases such as otitis media , sinusitis , pneumonia ...
With these matters in mind, what I wish to convey is that stem cells can obey various inputs in the terrestrial cogniscium. It is unclear precisely what the hierarchy of sources is, but we may imagine that up near the top of the local group is the Sun, the Earth, and the moon (as a force if not a cogniscium of its own). The Sun certainly comprises a cogniscium since it is intimately connected to every life form on Earth both by history and by actively existing transports. Thus, the organisms of Earth probably have the capacity to experience actually prophetic awareness and, where possible, understanding - related to opportunities, threats, and questions raised by changes in the broadest local scales of inputs. In other words, organisms form the distributed mind of a being whose basic character we are in no position to even begin to model - and, to make matters more complex, we are each, and in groups, instances of this being as well as participants. This means that our actions, thoughts, ...
Anthrax is a disease that is no stranger to the human race. It can be traced back to Biblical times and is the oldest known disease of animals. Moses mentions it in Exodus and so do Homer, Ovid, Pliny, and Virgil in their writings. Obviously, this disease has been around. It has many names, such as woolsorters disease, splenic fever, charbon in French, Milzbrand in German, and malignant pustule. Anthrax was the first infectious disease that a vaccine was found to be effective against by Louis Pasteur in 1881. The studies of Anthrax in the 18th century are the foundation for the science of bacteriology and immunology. Anthrax is an infectious disease caused by the organism Bacillus anthracis. In certain conditions, this organism forms virulent spores that are highly resistant and contaminate soil or other materials for years. Anthrax is most common in grass grazing animals such as cows and sheep but all animals can t get Anthrax. It can be passed on to a person who handles wool, hides, or carcass ...
With these matters in mind, what I wish to convey is that stem cells can obey various inputs in the terrestrial cogniscium. It is unclear precisely what the hierarchy of sources is, but we may imagine that up near the top of the local group is the Sun, the Earth, and the moon (as a force if not a cogniscium of its own). The Sun certainly comprises a cogniscium since it is intimately connected to every life form on Earth both by history and by actively existing transports. Thus, the organisms of Earth probably have the capacity to experience actually prophetic awareness and, where possible, understanding - related to opportunities, threats, and questions raised by changes in the broadest local scales of inputs. In other words, organisms form the distributed mind of a being whose basic character we are in no position to even begin to model - and, to make matters more complex, we are each, and in groups, instances of this being as well as participants. This means that our actions, thoughts, ...
...Blacksburg Va. Dec. 4 2006 -- From gemstones to transistors crysta...One ongoing question is how organisms form these mineralized structure...In the December 4-8 2006 online Early Edition of the Proceedings of ...,Scientists,uncover,speedometer,for,crystal,growth,controlled,by,biomolecule,properties,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
Leaving aside the troublesome adjective, what is the modernism that the Altenburg meeting is meant to move beyond - or to use Pigliuccis preferred term, extend1? Between about 1920 and 1940, researchers such as the American Sewall Wright and the Englishmen Ronald Fisher and J. B. S. Haldane took Charles Darwins ideas about natural selection and Gregor Mendels insights into how traits pass from parents to offspring - which many biologists of the time believed antithetical - and fused them into a mathematical description of the genetic makeup of populations and how it changes. That fusion was the modern synthesis. It treats an organisms form, or phenotype, as a readout of its hereditary information, or genotype. Change is explained as one version of a gene being replaced by another. Natural selection acts by changing the frequency of genes in the next generation according to the fitness of phenotypes in this one. In this world view, the gene is a black box, its relationship to phenotype is a ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Nitrate, nitrite and nitric oxide reductases. T2 - From the last universal common ancestor to modern bacterial pathogens. AU - Vázquez-Torres, Andrés. AU - Baumler, Andreas J. PY - 2016/2/1. Y1 - 2016/2/1. N2 - The electrochemical gradient that ensues from the enzymatic activity of cytochromes such as nitrate reductase, nitric oxide reductase, and quinol oxidase contributes to the bioenergetics of the bacterial cell. Reduction of nitrogen oxides by bacterial pathogens can, however, be uncoupled from proton translocation and biosynthesis of ATP or NH4 +, but still linked to quinol and NADH oxidation. Ancestral nitric oxide reductases, as well as cytochrome c oxidases and quinol bo oxidases evolved from the former, are capable of binding and detoxifying nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. The NO-metabolizing activity associated with these cytochromes can be a sizable source of antinitrosative defense in bacteria during their associations with host cells. Nitrosylation of terminal ...
Archaea exist in a broad range of habitats, and as a major part of global ecosystems,[14] may represent about 20% of microbial cells in the oceans.[159] The first-discovered archaeans were extremophiles.[112] Indeed, some archaea survive high temperatures, often above 100 °C (212 °F), as found in geysers, black smokers, and oil wells. Other common habitats include very cold habitats and highly saline, acidic, or alkaline water. However, archaea include mesophiles that grow in mild conditions, in swamps and marshland, sewage, the oceans, the intestinal tract of animals, and soils.[14]. Extremophile archaea are members of four main physiological groups. These are the halophiles, thermophiles, alkaliphiles, and acidophiles.[160] These groups are not comprehensive or phylum-specific, nor are they mutually exclusive, since some archaea belong to several groups. Nonetheless, they are a useful starting point for classification.. Halophiles, including the genus Halobacterium, live in extremely saline ...
Archaea are nowadays known as the third domain of life. Before 1970 archaea were thought to belong to the domain bacteria, since archaeal cells have similar sizes as bacterial cells and like bacteria possess neither a nucleus nor cell organelles. In the 1970s Carl Woese sequenced ribosomal RNAs of prokaryotic organisms and discovered two different types of rRNA sequences. Because of this discovery Woese proposed that the prokaryotic domain has to be subdivided into two separate domains, namely Bacteria and Archaea. Since then more and more data accumulated which show that Archaea indeed belong to a separate domain. Initially people thought that archaea are freaks living only at sites with extreme living conditions like f.i. hot geysers in Yellowstone National Park and Black Smokers at the bottom of the ocean. But nowadays it is known that archaea also constitute a big part of the biomass in normal environments. Asgard archaea: Close relatives to the first eukaryotic cell? ...
Emerging virus discovery through meta-transcriptomics: a novel virus impacting Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) farming in Chile.
Archaea exist in a broad range of habitats, and as a major part of global ecosystems,[15] may represent about 20% of microbial cells in the oceans.[161] The first-discovered archaeans were extremophiles.[114] Indeed, some archaea survive high temperatures, often above 100 °C (212 °F), as found in geysers, black smokers, and oil wells. Other common habitats include very cold habitats and highly saline, acidic, or alkaline water. However, archaea include mesophiles that grow in mild conditions, in swamps and marshland, sewage, the oceans, the intestinal tract of animals, and soils.[15]. Extremophile archaea are members of four main physiological groups. These are the halophiles, thermophiles, alkaliphiles, and acidophiles.[162] These groups are not comprehensive or phylum-specific, nor are they mutually exclusive, since some archaea belong to several groups. Nonetheless, they are a useful starting point for classification.. Halophiles, including the genus Halobacterium, live in extremely saline ...
The cell wall also makes Gram staining possible. Gram staining is a method of staining bacteria involving crystal violet dye, iodine, and the counterstain safranin. Many bacteria can be classified into one of two types: gram-positive, which show the stain and appear violet in color under a microscope, and gram-negative, which only show the counterstain, and appear red. Gram-positive bacteria appear violet because they have thick cell walls that trap the crystal violet-iodine complex. The thin cell walls of gram-negative bacteria cannot hold the violet-iodine complex, but they can hold safranin. This makes gram-negative bacteria appear red under Gram staining. Gram staining is used for general identification of bacteria or to detect the presence of certain bacteria; it cannot be used to identify bacteria in any specific way, such as at a species level. Examples of gram-positive bacteria include the genera Listeria, Streptococcus, and Bacillus, while gram-negative bacteria include Proteobacteria, ...
Over the last decades, the study of extremophiles has providing ground breaking discoveries that challenge the paradigms of modern biology and make us rethink intriguing questions such as what is life?, what are the limits of life?, and what are the fundamental features of life?. These findings and possibilities have made the study of life in extreme environments one of the most exciting areas of research in recent decades. However, despite the latest advances we are just in the beginning of exploring and characterizing the world of extremophiles. This special issue discusses several aspects of these fascinating organisms, exploring their habitats, biodiversity, ecology, evolution, genetics, biochemistry, and biotechnological applications in a collection of exciting reviews and original articles written by leading experts and research groups in the field. [...]
Our division studies the Biology of Archaea as well as bacterial symbioses with a focus on ecological, physiological and evolutionary aspects to shed light on the diversity and fundamental distinctions between these two prokaryotic groups. In particular we are interested in: - The ecological distribution of archaea from terrestrial, aquatic and hot environments - The phylogeny of archaea - The metabolism and genomes of ammonia oxidizing thaumarchaeota - virus-defense (CRISPR-) systems of hyperthermophilic archaea - physiology and biotechnological application of methanogenic archaea - bacterium-nematode symbioses ...
Our division studies the Biology of Archaea as well as bacterial symbioses with a focus on ecological, physiological and evolutionary aspects to shed light on the diversity and fundamental distinctions between these two prokaryotic groups. In particular we are interested in: - The ecological distribution of archaea from terrestrial, aquatic and hot environments - The phylogeny of archaea - The metabolism and genomes of ammonia oxidizing thaumarchaeota - virus-defense (CRISPR-) systems of hyperthermophilic archaea - physiology and biotechnological application of methanogenic archaea - bacterium-nematode symbioses ...
Previous work has explored the use of bacteria as biosensors to report information from their environments. However, these efforts have typically used electrochemical or optical properties of well-characterized strains in response to defined targets that are generally metabolized. In contrast, this study built on previous analyses of the relationships between bacterial communities and their environments (8, 30) to show that, with appropriate training data and analytical models, natural bacterial communities can be used as biosensors for a diverse array of geochemical measurements, including many which are not directly metabolized. There is no need for prior knowledge of the relevant strains or pathways-these are identified as a product of the statistical models employed.. In this effort, we have focused on samples collected from within a single geographic area. Future efforts should prioritize the evaluation of biosensors trained in one environment against data collected from a similar ...
A standardized bacterial taxonomy based on genome ...Development of a robust bacterial taxonomy has been hindered by an inability to obtain most bacteria in pure culture and, to a lesser extent, by the historical use of phenotypes to guid … A standardized bacterial taxonomy based on genome phylogeny substantially revises the tree of life
Domain Archaea is currently represented by one phylum (Euryarchaeota) and two superphyla (TACK and DPANN). However, gene surveys indicate the existence of a vast diversity of uncultivated archaea for which metabolic information is lacking. We sequenced DNA from complex sediment- and groundwater-associated microbial communities sampled prior to and during an acetate biostimulation field experiment to investigate the diversity and physiology of uncultivated subsurface archaea. We sampled 15 genomes that improve resolution of a new phylum within the TACK superphylum and 119 DPANN genomes that highlight a major subdivision within the archaeal domain that separates DPANN from TACK/Euryarchaeota lineages. Within the DPANN superphylum, which lacks any isolated representatives, we defined two new phyla using sequences from 100 newly sampled genomes. The first new phylum, for which we propose the name Woesearchaeota, was defined using 54 new sequences. We reconstructed a complete (finished) genome for an ...
Archaea is a single-celled micro-organism that lives underwater and in soil. A single individual or species is called an archaeon (sometimes spelled archeon). Archaea, like bacteria, are prokaryotes. They have no cell nucleus or any other organelles within their cells. In the past they were viewed as an unusual group of bacteria and named archaebacteria but since the Archaea have an independent evolutionary history and show many differences in their biochemistry from other forms of life, they are now classed into their own group. They have been found in a broad range of habitats, such as soils, lakes, oceans, and marshlands. Archaea are particularly numerous in the oceans, and the archaea in plankton may be one of the most abundant groups of organisms on the planet. These prokaryotes are now recognized as a major part of life on Earth and may play an important role in both the carbon cycle and nitrogen cycle. No clear examples of archaeal pathogens or parasites are known. ...
Beneficial changes in rumen bacterial community profile in sheep and dairy calves as a result of feeding the probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ...
View Notes - 22 from BIOL 4125 at LSU. PROKARYOTIC DIVERSITY BIOL 4125 SPRING 2009 LECTURE 22 Hyperthermophilic Archaea Part II The early overview of archaeal diversity was exemplified by a
Abstract: Fresh fruits and vegetables can harbor large and diverse populations of bacteria. However, most of the work on produce-associated bacteria has focused on a relatively small number of pathogenic bacteria and, as a result, we know far less about the overall diversity and composition of those bacterial communities found on produce and how the structure of these communities varies across produce types. Moreover, we lack a comprehensive view of the potential effects of differing farming practices on the bacterial communities to which consumers are exposed. We addressed these knowledge gaps by assessing bacterial community structure on conventional and organic analogs of eleven store-bought produce types using a culture-independent approach, 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Our results demonstrated that the fruits and vegetables harbored diverse bacterial communities, and the communities on each produce type were significantly distinct from one another. However, certain produce types (i.e., ...
Ti Archaea ket buklen ti domimio wenno pagarian dagiti agmaymaysa a selula a mikroorganismo. Dagitoy a mikrobio ket awananda ti pagtengngaan a selula wenno dagiti dadduma pay a mangbedbed a kulanit nga organulo iti kaunegan dagiti selula. Iti napalabas ti Archaea ket naiklase idi kadagiti bakteria a kas dagiti prokaryote (wenno Pagarian ti Monera) ken nanganan iti archaebakteria, ngem daytoy a pannakaidasig ket naikeddengen a duog.[5] Iti kinapudno, ti Archaea ket adda ti nawaya nga ebolusionario a pakasaritaan ken mangipakpakita kadagiti adu a paggigiddiatan kadagiti bukodda a biokimika manipud kadagiti sabali a porma ti biag, ken isu a tattan ket naidasigda a kas maysa a nailasin a dominio iti sistema ti tallo a dominio. Iti daytoy a sistema, ti maipapan ti pilohenetiko a naisangayan a sangsanga iti ebolusionario a tinaudan ket ti Archaea, Bakteria ken ti Eukaryota. Itan ket ti Archaea ket nabingbingay pay kadagiti uppat a mabigbigan a pilo; mabalin pay nga adu kadagiti pilo ti mabangon ...
The National Collection of Pathogenic Viruses (NCPV) from European Collection of Cell Cultures (ECACC),Human Pathogenic Viruses The National Collection of Pathogenic Viruses (NCPV) preserves well characterised, authenticated human pathogenic viruses in a secure facility, and NCPV is able to supply the agents or nucleic acids derived from them, to the scientific community according to national and,biological,biology supply,biology supplies,biology product
Life Science: Protists -eukaryotic micro-organisms whose cells have a nucleus. Text book summary notes with links to a related rap song, free mp3 download, & lyrics.
Abstract : The Anopheles midgut hosts diverse bacterial communities and represents a complex ecosystem. Several evidences indicate that mosquito midgut microbiota interferes with malaria parasite transmission. However, the bacterial composition of salivary glands and ovaries, two other biologically important tissues, has not been described so far. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the bacterial communities in the mosquito tissues from emerging mosquitoes until 8 days after a blood meal containing Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and described the temporal colonization of the mosquito epithelia. Bacterial communities were identified in the midgut, ovaries, and salivary glands of individual mosquitoes using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that the mosquito epithelia share a core microbiota, but some bacteria taxa were more associated with one or another tissue at a particular time point. The bacterial composition in the tissues of emerging mosquitoes varied according to ...
Bacteria help our bodies with digestion and produce needed vitamins. Bacteria also help us by destroying harmful organisms within our bodies.. There are more bacterial cells in your body than there are human cells.. Most bacteria reproduce using a process called binary fission. To do this, a single bacterium will grow to twice its normal size and then split into two daughter cells. The two new cells are exact copies of the original bacterium.. Bacteria are used to make cheese, milk, sourdough bread and yogurt.. 99% of all bacteria are helpful.. Dead or weakened bacteria and viruses are used for making helpful vaccines.. Scientists estimate that bacteria produce nearly half the oxygen found in the atmosphere.. Helpful bacteria are used to purify water at sewage treatment plants and to break down oil after oil spills.. One healthy bacterium, given the proper environment, could reproduce into a colony of more than 2 million in just seven hours.. There are more microbes on your body than there ...
Dr. Sayeed Ahmad D. I. Hom. (London). Bacteria are simple organisms that consist of one cell. They are among the smallest living things. Most bacteria measure from 0.3 to 2.0 microns in diameter and can be seen only through a microscope. (One micron equals 0.001 millimeter or 1/25,400 inch.) Scientists classify bacteria as prokaryotes.. Bacteria exist almost everywhere. There are thousands of kinds of bacteria, most of which are harmless to human beings. Large numbers of bacteria live in the human body but cause no harm. Some species cause diseases, but many others are helpful.. The importance of bacteria. Helpful bacteria. Certain kinds of bacteria live in the intestines of human beings and other animals. These bacteria help in digestion and in destroying harmful organisms. Intestinal bacteria also produce some vitamins needed by the body.. Bacteria in soil and water play a vital role in recycling carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and other chemical elements used by living things. Many bacteria help ...
Many studies on bacterial community composition (BCC) do not distinguish between particle-associated (PA) and free-living (FL) bacteria or neglect the PA fraction by pre-filtration removing most particles. Although temporal and spatial gradients in environmental variables are known to shape BCC, it remains unclear how and to what extent PA and FL bacterial diversity responds to such environmental changes. To elucidate the BCC of both bacterial fractions related to different environmental settings, we studied surface samples of three Baltic Sea stations (marine, mesohaline and oligohaline) in two different seasons (summer and fall/winter). Amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed significant differences in BCC of both bacterial fractions among stations and seasons, with a particularly high number of PA operational taxonomic units (OTUs at genus-level) at the marine station in both seasons.
What: Academic Seminar, Dr. Emma Allen Vercoe, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Guelph Topic: Understanding gut microbial community dynamics using an in vitro bioreactor model When: Monday, August 14, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Where: Robert B. Schultz Lecture Theatre
Since protozoa are eukaryotic organisms, they contain vacuoles, a cell membrane and all the other cellular machinery found in the cells of plants, fungi, animals and other eukaryotes. For example, protozoa use their cell membrane and vacuoles for food absorption and digestion. Their cell membranes assist in the engulfing of food and their vacuoles can give off useable nitrogen during digestion. Generally, protozoa feed on other organic matter, bacteria, fungi and other protozoans in some cases.. Protozoa are not a huge concern when it comes to human illnesses because they are usually harmless. With this being said however, protozoa are the cause of malaria and dysentery. Malaria is a disease transmitted by mosquitoes, but these infected mosquitoes carry a microorganism from the genus Plasmodium, in which five specific species are infectious. Protozoa are truly remarkable microorganisms. They are capable of reproducing by the process of fission, they can move in a variety of ways despite having ...
This bacterium can be airborne so if you are around someone with TB, then there is a good chance that you will get it as well. When you do, the bacterium enters and if you have a strong immune system, you may not notice the disease right away because your immune is fighting off the bacteria. when the bacteria cant take over, it starts to reproduce more of its kind and sooner or later, your immune system wont stand a chance against the bacteria. As this battle continues, bacteria reproduces its kind to make a large group.When the immune system cannot take anymore, the bacteria invades and since there are so many bacteria cells, it is like an explosion of disease in the body. The macrophage are phagocytic cells and if they cant kill the bacteria, then the bacteria will replicate by cell division until the macrophage bursts. The bacteria are then taken over by the macrophage and soon the bacteria is being eaten by macrophage in the bloodstreams. The bacteria spreads into the bloodstream but the ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Optimization of conditions for culture of test bacteria used for direct bioautographic TLC detection. 2. Gram-negative test bacterium. T2 - Escherichia coli. AU - Nagy, Sándor. AU - Koszegi, Tamás. AU - Botz, Lajos. AU - Kocsis, Béla. PY - 2003/3/1. Y1 - 2003/3/1. N2 - Direct bioautography is a potent means of obtaining information about the antimicrobial activity of a compound separated from a complex mixture. In this process the developed TLC plate is dipped into a broth culture of a test bacterium and the bacterium will grow directly on the plate. Optimum experimental conditions must, however, be used for each test bacterium. The main purpose of this study was to find optimum culture conditions for a Gram-negative test bacterium, Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) enabling us to establish a direct bioautographic method with the shortest possible performance time. Because the intracellular adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) level is a direct and sensitive measure of bacterial ...
Collections of Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COGs) provide indispensable tools for comparative genomic analysis, evolutionary reconstruction and functional annotation of new genomes. Initially, COGs were made for all complete genomes of cellular life forms that were available at the time. However, with the accumulation of thousands of complete genomes, construction of a comprehensive COG set has become extremely computationally demanding and prone to error propagation, necessitating the switch to taxon-specific COG collections. Previously, we reported the collection of COGs for 41 genomes of Archaea (arCOGs). Here we present a major update of the arCOGs and describe evolutionary reconstructions to reveal general trends in the evolution of Archaea. The updated version of the arCOG database incorporates 91% of the pangenome of 120 archaea (251,032 protein-coding genes altogether) into 10,335 arCOGs. Using this new set of arCOGs, we performed maximum likelihood reconstruction of the genome content of
Although I am fully convinced of the truth of the views given in this volume, I by no means expect to convince experienced naturalists whose minds are stocked with a multitude of facts all viewed, during a long course of years, from a point of view directly opposite to mine. It is so easy to hide our ignorance under such expressions as plan of creation, unity of design, etc., and to think that we give an explanation when we only restate a fact. Any one whose disposition leads him to attach more weight to unexplained difficulties than to the explanation of a certain number of facts will certainly reject the theory. ...
ATCC offers a variety of extremophiles including archaea, halophiles, acidophiles, thermophiles, psychrophiles, and alkaliphiles.
ATCC offers a variety of extremophiles including archaea, halophiles, acidophiles, thermophiles, psychrophiles, and alkaliphiles.
The meeting of International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes, Subcommittee on the taxonomy of Bifidobacterium , Lactobacillus and related organisms was held within the frame of the FoodMicro 2018 Congress (FoodMicro 2018, 3-6 September 2018, Berlin, Germany). The meeting comprised an open session with a workshop entitled Modern approaches of LAB identification and conservation and a closed session on issues related to ICSP Subcommittee activities.
article{6a5935e7-cef5-41b4-83a4-8e7a5354ed16, abstract = {Bacterial activity was studied in a growth system containing Pinus contorta seedlings inoculated with different mycorrhizal fungi. Nylon nets enabled separation of soil compartments with extramatrical mycorrhizal hyphae from soil compartments with roots and mycelium. In three separate experiments bacterial activity, estimated as thymidine incorporation, was reduced in soils with Paxillus involutus hyphae compared to controls without mycorrhizal hyphae. This effect was found irrespective of compartments with and without roots were compared. Laccaria bicolor only reduced the activity in one of these three experiments. Thelephora terrestris (tested in two experiments), Laccaria proxima, Suillus variegatus and Hebeloma crustuliniforme (one experiment), also reduced the thymidine and leucine incorporation rates of bacteria. The reduction for these fungi varied between 20% and 50% in all experiments. Numbers of viable bacteria appeared to be ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Copper requirements of the ammonia-oxidizing archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 and implications for nitrification in the marine environment. AU - Amin, Shady A.. AU - Moffett, James W.. AU - Martens-Habbena, Willm. AU - Jacquot, Jeremy E.. AU - Han, Yang. AU - Devol, Allan. AU - Ingalls, Anitra E.. AU - Stahl, David A.. AU - Armbrust, E. Virginia. PY - 2013. Y1 - 2013. N2 - Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) have recently been recognized as the primary nitrifiers in the marine environment; they thus play an important role in the nitrogen cycle. Available genome sequences of AOA indicate that numerous Cu-dependent enzymes are essential for both ammonia oxidation and electron transfer, suggesting a particularly high requirement for copper. However, our knowledge of the copper requirements of AOA and their response to copper limitation in the ocean is nonexistent. Here, we examine the copper requirements of the chemolithoautotrophic AOA Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 ...
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The global microbial CH4 production is estimated to reach one billion tons annually. Methanogenic archaea produce CH4 in wetlands, rice fields, ruminant and termite digestive systems and have a decisive impact on the planets atmospheric carbon cycle [42]. At the same time, the industrial scale anaerobic digestion of biomass to CH4 plays a vital role in the future global energy mix. All methanogenic archaea capable of CO2 reduction contain the cofactor F420 as an integral part of the methanogenic pathway. In this study, F420 autofluorescence was tested as a universal marker for methanogenic archaea. Genes encoding for F420 biosynthesis enzymes were identified in 653 bacterial and 173 archaeal species [43]. Non-methanogenic but F420 containing microorganisms have reported F420 concentrations of about one fortieth of the concentrations in hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea [19], which is below detection limit of the developed protocol. For the methanogenic archaea, however, the F420 cofactor ...
The Archaebacterium Haloferax volcanii concentrates K+ up to 3.6 M. This creates a very large K+ ion gradient of between 500- to 1,000-fold across the cell membrane. H. volcaniicells can be...
The last eukaryotic common ancestor already had an amazingly complex cell possessing genomic and cellular features such as spliceosomal introns, mitochondria, cilia-dependent motility, and a cytoskeleton together with several intracellular transport systems. In contrast to the microtubule-based dyneins and kinesins, the actin-filament associated myosins are considerably divergent in extant eukaryotes and a unifying picture of their evolution has not yet emerged. Here, we manually assembled and annotated 7852 myosins from 929 eukaryotes providing an unprecedented dense sequence and taxonomic sampling. For classification we complemented phylogenetic analyses with gene structure comparisons resulting in 79 distinct myosin classes. The intron pattern analysis and the taxonomic distribution of the classes suggest two myosins in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, a class-1 prototype and another myosin, which is most likely the ancestor of all other myosin classes. The sparse distribution of class-2 and
Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, a thermophilic and obligately chemoautotrophic bacterium, assimilates ammonium using glutamine synthetase (GS). GS was purified using three chromatography steps. The purified GS was found to belong to GS type I on the basis of its subunit composition and molecular …
6,7-Dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine is the biosynthetic precursor of riboflavin, which, as a coenzyme, plays a vital role in the electron transfer process for energy production in all cellular organisms. The enzymes involved in lumazine biosynthesis have been studied in considerable detail. However, the conclusive mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by lumazine synthase has remained unclear. Here, we report four crystal structures of the enzyme from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus in complex with different inhibitor compounds. The structures were refined at resolutions of 1.72 Angstrom, 1.85 Angstrom, 2.05 Angstrom and 2.2 Angstrom, respectively. The inhibitors have been designed in order to mimic the substrate, the putative reaction intermediates and the final product. Structural comparisons of the native enzyme and the inhibitor complexes as well as the kinetic data of singlesite mutants of lumazine synthase from Bacillus subtilis showed that several highly conserved residues at ...
Chrysophycean stomatocyst assemblages were analysed from the sediments of 17 lakes and ponds from Svalbard as one component of a multi-proxy investigation of recent environmental change in the high Arctic. Sediment cores and water chemistry were collected from each of the study lakes, and chrysophyte stomatocysts were investigated from the top 0.25 cm of sediment (present-day) and bottom (i.e. bottom of short sediment core, pre-industrial) sediment samples. This study represents the first undertaking of chrysophyte cyst morphology and distribution on Svalbard. A total of 153 cyst morphotypes were described with light microscopy and/or scanning electron microscopy, of which 21 are new forms. Canonical correspondence analysis indicates that the present-day distribution of cysts is significantly related to pH (p = 0.02), altitude (p = 0.02), and Na+ (p = 0.04). Marked shifts in chrysophyte cyst assemblages were recorded between the top and bottom sediment samples of most lakes. Rose et al. (2004) ...
Breakdown of microtubules takes place at the tips of tubules at the distal ends of axopodia when axopodial shortening is induced with colchicine. When small flagellates are captured for ingestion, rapid contraction of axopodia (100 μm in under a second) occurs which apparently involves breakdown of axonemal microtubules. Elongation of a single axopodium after rapid contraction, when all other axopodia are of normal length, proceeds at the same rate as it does when all the axopodia are growing out after microtubule-breakdown induced by cold treatment. In both cases the rate of elongation decreases as axopodia increase in length. Axopodia elastically resist mild bending along their longitudinal axes. They yield nonelastically when more severe bending is applied; bends are formed at certain points along their longitudinal axes. These bends move out along axopodia to their tips.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Colonization of rice roots with methanogenic archaea controls photosynthesis-derived methane emission. AU - Pump, Judith. AU - Pratscher, Jennifer. AU - Conrad, Ralf. PY - 2015/7. Y1 - 2015/7. N2 - The methane emitted from rice fields originates to a large part (up to 60%) from plant photosynthesis and is formed on the rice roots by methanogenic archaea. To investigate to which extent root colonization controls methane (CH4) emission, we pulse-labeled rice microcosms with 13CO2 to determine the rates of 13CH4 emission exclusively derived from photosynthates. We also measured emission of total CH4 (12+13CH4), which was largely produced in the soil. The total abundances of archaea and methanogens on the roots and in the soil were analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene and the mcrA gene coding for a subunit of the methyl coenzyme M reductase respectively. The composition of archaeal and methanogenic communities was determined with terminal ...
Tindall,B.J. ( 2008 ) Judicial Commission of the International Committee on Systematics of Bacteria. The type strain of Lactobacillus casei is ATCC 393, ATCC 334 cannot serve as the type because it represents a different taxon, the name Lactobacillus paracasei and its subspecies names are not rejected and the revival of the name Lactobacillus zeae contravenes Rules 51b (1) and (2) of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria. Opinion 82 International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 58 (7) :1764-1765 ...
ABSTRACT: The relationship between bacterial community profile in biofilm and attachment of the acorn barnacle Balanus amphitrite was investigated using a double-dish choice larval attachment bioassay and the DNA fingerprinting technique T-RFLP (terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism). Biofilms for bioassays were either developed at 3 intertidal heights (i.e. high, mid and low) for 6 d or at the mid-intertidal height for 3 to 12 d. A clear distinction among biofilm communities at the 3 intertidal heights was revealed in the bacterial community profiles (determined by T-RFLP), biomass (determined by total organic carbon analysis), and abundance of bacteria and diatoms. Overall, cyprids of B. amphitrite preferred intertidal biofilms (i.e. 6 d old) over unfilmed surfaces for attachment. Moreover, cyprids also preferred to attach on biofilms of mid-intertidal height over high-intertidal or subtidal heights. There was no correlation between cypris attachment and any of the 3 biofilm ...
Archaea are divided into two main groups based on rRNA trees, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. Two other groups have been tentatively created for certain environmental samples and the peculiar species Nanoarchaeum equitans, discovered in 2002 by Karl Stetter, but their affinities are uncertain. Woese argued that the bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes each represent a primary line of descent that diverged early on from an ancestral progenote with poorly developed genetic machinery. This hypothesis is reflected in the name Archaea, from the Greek archae or ancient. Later he treated these groups formally as domains, each comprising several kingdoms. This division has become very popular, although the idea of the progenote itself is not generally supported. Some biologists, however, have argued that the archaebacteria and eukaryotes arose from specialized eubacteria. The relationship between Archaea and Eukarya remains an important problem. Aside from the similarities noted above, many genetic ...
A quantitative molecular technique was developed for rapid analysis of microbial community diversity in various environments. The technique employed PCR in which one of the two primers used was fluorescently labeled at the 5 end and was used to amplify a selected region of bacterial genes encoding 16S rRNA from total community DNA. The PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes, and the fluorescently labeled terminal restriction fragment was precisely measured by using an automated DNA sequencer. Computer-simulated analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) for 1,002 eubacterial sequences showed that with proper selection of PCR primers and restriction enzymes, 686 sequences could be PCR amplified and classified into 233 unique terminal restriction fragment lengths or ribotypes. Using T-RFLP, we were able to distinguish all bacterial strains in a model bacterial community, and the pattern was consistent with the predicted outcome. Analysis of complex ...
She ream dy vynvioee eh archaea (un.: archaeon). Cha nel çheshvean killag ny mynolt far-chrackanagh erbee elley oc. Traa dy row, vad currit marish bacteyryn myr prokaryota ny myr reeriaght Monera, fon ennym archaebacteria (shenn vacteyryn). Ec y traa tayn, cha nel bea-oayllee goaill rish y rang-oardraghey shen.[1] Ta shennaghys aafilleydagh er lheh oc, as shimmey scansh teddyr ocsyn as bioagyn elley; myr shen, ta rang-oardraghey noa oc nish myr ream er lheh sy chorys tree reamyn. Tan corys shoh eddyraghey tree banglaneyn aafilleydagh: Archaea, Bacteria as Eukaryota. Tad rheynn Archaea ayns kiare phyla, agh scosoylagh eh dy vel foddey ny smoo ayn. Cha nel monney studeyrys er ny yannoo orroo. She Crenarchaeota as Euryarchaeota ad ny phyla smoo er studeyrys. Ta archaea jeeaghyn gollrish bacteyryn dy mennick, agh ta cummey goan ec kuse jeu; myr shen, killagyn rea kerrooagh Haloquadratum walsbyi. Ta gientagyn as cassanyn soe oc ta faggys dadsyn tec eukaryota, myr sampleyr, ensymeyn ta ...
Bacteria are common single-celled organisms and are a natural component of lakes, rivers, and streams. Most of these bacteria are harmless to humans; however, certain bacteria, some of which normally inhabit the intestinal tract of warm-blooded animals, have the potential to cause sickness and disease in humans. High numbers of these harmless bacteria often indicate high numbers of harmful bacteria as well as other disease-causing organisms such as viruses and protozoans.. One method of determining bacteria counts is to count the number of bacteria colonies that grow on a prepared medium.. Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. E. coli are a large and diverse group of bacteria. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick. Some kinds of E. coli can cause diarrhea, while others cause urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia, and other illnesses.. Total ...
Bacteria and archaea dominate the biomass of benthic deep-sea ecosystems at all latitudes, playing a crucial role in global biogeochemical cycles, but their macroscale patterns and macroecological drivers are still largely unknown. We show the results of the most extensive field study conducted so far to investigate patterns and drivers of the distribution and structure of benthic prokaryote assemblages from 228 samples collected at latitudes comprising 34°N to 79°N, and from ca. 400- to 5570-m depth. We provide evidence that, in deep-sea ecosystems, benthic bacterial and archaeal abundances significantly increase from middle to high latitudes, with patterns more pronounced for archaea, and particularly for Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota. Our results also reveal that different microbial components show varying sensitivities to changes in temperature conditions and food supply. We conclude that climate change will primarily affect deep-sea benthic archaea, with important consequences on global ...
Some taxonomic recommendations and a proposal of neotype strains for nineteen species of Enterobacteriaceae. ICSB Subcommittee on taxonomy of ...
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A study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry is the first to describe a signaling pathway that affects communication - a process called quorum sensing - between Streptococcus bacteria cells.. This type of bacterium is responsible for illnesses like strep throat, scarlet fever, and some cases of soft tissue infections and pneumonia. In extreme cases, or when bacteria become resistant to antibiotics, these common but serious infections can lead to death.. The University of Illinois at Chicago researchers who wrote the paper have been studying Streptococcus bacteria and have hypothesized that quorum sensing pathways are ideal drug targets for manipulating bacterial activity and suppressing virulence.. Quorum sensing is how bacteria regulate their behavior as a collective, said Michael Federle, corresponding author on the study. This social regulation may provide many benefits to bacteria and, in the case of bad bacteria, may help promote survival and help defend against the immune ...
Once they had finished their analysis, Bill Martins team was left with just 355 genes from the original 11,000, and they argue that these 355 definitely belonged to LUCA and can tell us something about how LUCA lived.. Such a small number of genes, of course, would not support life as we know it, and critics immediately latched onto this apparent gene shortage, pointing out that essential components capable of nucleotide and amino acid biosynthesis, for example, were missing. We didnt even have a complete ribosome, admits Martin.. However, their methodology required that they omit all genes that have undergone LGT, so had a ribosomal protein undergone LGT, it wouldnt be included in the list of LUCAs genes. They also speculated that LUCA could have gotten by using molecules in the environment to fill the functions of lacking genes, for example molecules that can synthesize amino acids. After all, says Martin, biochemistry at this early stage in lifes evolution was still primitive and all ...
By Michael Biamonte CCN. While bacteria are an essential part of a healthy small bowel and perform important functions, the growth of the wrong small intestinal bacteria can lead to leaky gut and a number of other symptoms. This is a different yet similar condition to candida.. The predominant bacteria in the small intestines are from the Lactobacillus family. There are many types. Lactobacillus Acidophilus is the most well know. This is the bacteria found in yogurt and many supplements. It prevents candida growth in the small intestines, or small bowel. The normal small bowel, which connects the stomach to the large bowel, is approximately 20 feet long. Bacteria are normally present throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract, but in varied amounts. Relatively few bacteria normally live in the small bowel (less than 10,000 bacteria per milliliter of fluid) when compared with the large bowel, or colon (at least 1,000,000,000 bacteria per milliliter of fluid). And the types of bacteria normally ...
URBANA, Ill. - One in three American adults suffers from high blood pressure, or hypertension. The disease can be passed down in families, and certain lifestyle factors such as smoking, high-sodium diets, and stress can increase the risk. In recent years, scientists have discovered that certain gut bacteria may contribute to hypertension, as well. In a few studies, when gut bacteria were killed off with antibiotics, patients with hypertension saw a drop in blood pressure. And when gut bacteria were transplanted from hypertensive people into normal mice, they developed high blood pressure. The evidence is compelling, but until now, scientists have not identified a mechanism to explain how bacteria increase blood pressure. Researchers from the University of Illinois and Brown University are pursuing a promising lead. Jason Ridlon, an assistant professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at U of I, first discovered the gene for an enzyme in certain bacteria that changes cortisol, a steroid ...
The composition of bacterial communities in Lake Baikal in different hydrological periods and at different depths (down to 1515 m) has been analyzed using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3 variable region. Most of the resulting 34 562 reads of the Bacteria domain have clustered into 1693 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified with the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Cyanobacteria. It has been found that their composition at the family level and relative contributions to bacterial communities distributed over the water column vary depending on hydrological period. The number of OTUs and the parameters of taxonomic richness (ACE, Chao1 indices) and diversity (Shannon and inverse Simpson index) reach the highest values in water layers. The composition of bacterial communities in these layers remains relatively constant, whereas that in surface layers differs between hydrological seasons. The dynamics of physicochemical conditions
Introduction to state-of-the-art technologies that are being used to study microbial systems biology Provides step-by-step detail essential for
Paneth cells are like the guardians of the intestine and autophagy is like their armor, said Yarovinsky, associate professor in the Center for Vaccine Biology and Immunology and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at URMC. When we removed their armor, the Paneth cells couldnt control the intestinal bacteria and it went wild, causing severe disease.. The study suggests that normal autophagy in Paneth cells is required to regulate bacteria in the gut, keeping it at bay and preventing the gut bacteria from invading host tissue. Paneth cells make up just 2 percent of the cells in the intestine, and the fact that restricting autophagy in these cells led to big problems was an unexpected result.. Gut bacteria play a role in inflammatory bowel disease. Scientists know that gut bacteria play a role in the development of IBD, which includes Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis. But how bacteria in the gut are controlled in these conditions remains elusive. This study and others point to ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Corrigendum to Rates of susceptibility of carbapenems, ceftobiprole, and colistin against clinically important bacteria collected from intensive care units in 2007. T2 - Results from the Surveillance of Multicenter Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) [J Microbiol Immunol Infect 49. AU - Jean, Shio Shin. AU - Lee, Wen Sen. AU - Yu, Kwok Woon. AU - Liao, Chun Hsing. AU - Hsu, Chin Wan. AU - Chang, Feng Yi. AU - Ko, Wen Chien. AU - Chen, Ray Jade. AU - Wu, Jiunn Jong. AU - Chen, Yen Hsu. AU - Chen, Yao Shen. AU - Liu, Jien Wei. AU - Lu, Min Chi. AU - Lam, Carlos. AU - Liu, Cheng Yi. AU - Hsueh, Po Ren. PY - 2018/6. Y1 - 2018/6. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015290210&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85015290210&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1016/j.jmii.2017.01.001. DO - 10.1016/j.jmii.2017.01.001. M3 - Article. AN - SCOPUS:85015290210. VL - 51. SP - 423. EP - 424. JO - Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and ...
Abstract. The distribution of the various cell wall and cell envelope (S-layer) polymers among the main lineages of the domain Archaea (Archaebacteria) and the chemical composition and primary structure of polymers forming rigid cell wall sacculi is described. Differences between bacteria and archaea in their sensitivity to antibiotics which inhibit cell wall synthesis in bacteria are discussed.
original description Stetter, K.O., Konig, H., and Stackebrandt, E. 1984. Pyrodictium gen. nov., a new genus of submarine disc-shaped sulphur reducing archaebacteria growing optimally at 105°C. Syst. Appl. Microbiol. 4:535-551. [details] ...
Bacteriophages escaping from a dying bacterial cell (Streptococcus sp.), coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). This bacteriophage was discovered in freshwater near a sewage outlet. A bacteriophage, also known as a phage, is a virus (virion) that infects a bacterium. It consists of a head (capsid), containing the genetic material (either RNA or DNA) and usually a tail and tail fibres (not seen), which the phage uses to attach to a specific receptor sites on the bacterium. This specific binding means that a bacteriophage can only infect certain bacteria bearing specific receptors. Once attached to the cell surface genetic material is injected into the bacterium, taking over the bacteriums own cellular machinery and forcing it to produce more copies of the bacteriophage. When sufficient numbers have been produced the phages escape from the bacterium by cellular lysis, killing the bacterium in the process. Magnification: x21,335 when shortest - Stock Image C032/0258
On the basis of Gram staining method bacteria are classified into two types. They are Gram positive bacteria and Gram negative bacteria. Bacteria are also classified according to their growth and reproduction. Such classification includes Autotrophic bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria. Autotrophic bacteria take the required carbon from carbon dioxide by itself. Some types of autotrophs will use sunlight to transform carbon dioxide to sugar. While heterotrophic bacteria will take sugar or carbon from the environment they live ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - The effect of phylogenetically different bacteria on the fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens in sand microcosms. AU - Tyc, Olaf. AU - Wolf, Alexandra. AU - Garbeva, Paolina. N1 - 5773, ME.; Data archiving: data archived at publisher.. PY - 2015. Y1 - 2015. N2 - n most environments many microorganisms live in close vicinity and can interact in various ways. Recent studies suggest that bacteria are able to sense and respond to the presence of neighbouring bacteria in the environment and alter their response accordingly. This ability might be an important strategy in complex habitats such as soils, with great implications for shaping the microbial community structure. Here, we used a sand microcosm approach toinvestigate how Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 responds to the presence of monocultures or mixtures of two phylogenetically different bacteria, a Gram-negative (Pedobacter sp. V48) and a Gram-positive (Bacillus sp. V102) under two nutrient conditions. Results revealed that under ...
Viruses infection millions annually, causing severe illness and threatening global public health. Limiting the impact of viral infection requires a multi-layered understanding of viral immunity, from basic research on viral recognition and host immune response, to the clinical applications of novel antiviral and host-targeted therapies and vaccines. Despite recent advances, the mechanisms of both both rapid host recovery as well as severe and fatal disease outcomes, are far from clear. This Keystone Symposia conference will cover a wide range of topics in viral immunity including innate immunity and inflammation, viral sensing and antigen presentation, adaptive T and B cell immunity, novel vaccine development, human immunology across anatomical sites, and innovative computational analyses. Animal models will be examined alongside human and clinical studies, and multi-disciplinary integration will enhance perspectives. A key outcome will be fostering collaborations across different approaches ...
Johnson, Leander Floyd, The Effect of Antagonistic Soil Microorganisms on the Severity of Pythium Root Rot of Sugarcane. (1954). LSU Historical Dissertations and Theses. 8087 ...
To Veljo Kisand , Does anybody have or know how I can get minicells which I like to stain , with some fluorescence marker and use for protozoa grazing experiments on , these bacterial mini cells? I have used E. Coli minicells for protozoa grazing expriments. At first,you had better get E. Coli x1488 strain. And, refer to the next paper when you separate minicells from E.coli cells. A.A.Christen, M.L.Pall, T.Manzara & P.Lurquin. Gene 23, 195-198 (1983). I tried to stain minicells with DTAF. About Staining method of DTAF,I refered to the next paper. B.F.Sherr, E.B.Sherr & R.D.Fallon. Appled and Environmental Microbiology 53, 958-965 (1987). Hope it will help. -- Tetsuji ISHIGAKI Address : ishigaki at ori.u-tokyo.ac.jp University of Tokyo , Ocean research Institute , Plankton Division TEL : 81-3-5351-6477 FAX : 81-3-5351-6480 ...
Permafrost-affected soils in the Northern latitudes store huge amounts of organic carbon (OC) that is prone to microbial degradation and subsequent release of greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere. In Greenland, the consequences of permafrost thaw have only recently been addressed, and predictions on its impact on the carbon budget are thus still highly uncertain. However, the fate of OC is not only determined by abiotic factors, but closely tied to microbial activity. We investigated eight soil profiles in northeast Greenland comprising two sites with typical tundra vegetation and one wet fen site. We assessed microbial community structure and diversity (SSU rRNA gene tag sequencing, quantification of bacteria, archaea and fungi), and measured hydrolytic and oxidative enzyme activities. Sampling site and thus abiotic factors had a significant impact on microbial community structure, diversity and activity, the wet fen site exhibiting higher potential enzyme activities and presumably being a hot ...
The factors controlling the relative abundances of Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediments are poorly understood. We determined depth distributions of archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes by quantitative PCR at eight stations in Aarhus Bay, Denmark. Bacterial outnumber archaeal genes 10-60-fold in uppermost sediments that are irrigated and mixed by macrofauna. This bioturbation is indicated by visual observations of sediment color and faunal tracks, by porewater profiles of dissolved inorganic carbon and sulfate, and by distributions of unsupported 210Pb and 137Cs. Below the depth of bioturbation, the relative abundances of archaeal genes increase, accounting for one third of 16S rRNA genes in the sulfate zone, and half of 16S rRNA genes in the sulfate-methane transition zone and methane zone. Phylogenetic analyses reveal a strong shift in bacterial and archaeal community structure from bioturbated sediments to underlying layers. Stable isotopic analyses on organic matter and porewater ...
1999 97. Schwerdtfeger, R. M., Chiaraluce, R., Consalvi, V., Scandurra, R., Antranikian, G. (1999) Stability, refolding and Ca2+ binding of pullulanase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus woesei . Eur. J. Biochem. 264:479-487. 96. Linden, A., Niehaus, F., Antranikian, G. (20 00) Single-step purification of a recombinant thermostable α-amylase after solubilization of the enzyme from insoluble aggregates. Journal of Chromtography B. 737: 253-259. 95. Andrade, C.M., Pereira, N. Jr., Antranikian, G. (1999) Extremely thermophilic microorganisms and their polymerhydrolytic enzymes. Revista de Microbiologia 30: 287-298. 94. Stefanova, M. E., Schwerdtfeger, R., Antranikian, G., Scandurra, R. (1999) Heat-stable pullulanase from Bacillus acidopullulyticus : characterization and refolding after guanidinium chloride-induced unfolding. Extremophiles 3: 147-152. 93. Niehaus, F., Bertoldo, C., Kähler, M., Antranikian, G. (1999) Extremophiles as a source of novel enzymes for industrial application. ...
Archaea-specific radA primers were used with PCR to amplify fragments of radA genes from 11 cultivated archaeal species and one marine sponge tissue sample that contained essentially an archaeal monoculture. The amino acid sequences encoded by the PCR fragments, three RadA protein sequences previously published (21), and two new complete RadA sequences were aligned with representative bacterial RecA proteins and eucaryal Rad51 and Dmc1 proteins. The alignment supported the existence of four insertions and one deletion in the archaeal and eucaryal sequences relative to the bacterial sequences. The sizes of three of the insertions were found to have taxonomic and phylogenetic significance. Comparative analysis of the RadA sequences, omitting amino acids in the insertions and deletions, shows a cladal distribution of species which mimics to a large extent that obtained by a similar analysis of archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. The PCR technique also was used to amplify fragments of 15 radA genes from ...
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Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is critical for controlling the flux of methane from anoxic environments. AOM coupled to iron, manganese and sulphate reduction have been demonstrated in consortia containing anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea. More recently it has been shown that the bacter …
Newborns delivered by C-section acquire human skin microbes just after birth, but the sources remain unknown. We hypothesized that the operating room (OR) environment contains human skin bacteria that could be seeding C-section born infants. To test this hypothesis, we sampled 11 sites in four operating rooms from three hospitals in two cities. Following a C-section procedure, we swabbed OR floors, walls, ventilation grids, armrests, and lamps. We sequenced the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of 44 samples using Illumina MiSeq platform. Sequences were analyzed using the QIIME pipeline. Only 68 % of the samples (30/44, |1000 sequences per site) yielded sufficient DNA reads to be analyzed. The bacterial content of OR dust corresponded to human skin bacteria, with dominance of Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium. Diversity of bacteria was the highest in the ventilation grids and walls but was also present on top of the surgery lamps. Beta diversity analyses showed OR dust bacterial content clustering first
Many bacteria synthesize extracellular polymers forming variable outer layer when growing in their natural environment. (i) Capsule. Capsule forms a well-defined layer closely surrounding the cell. Functions: Capsule plays role in the virulence of pathogenic bacteria by contributing to invasiveness and preventing phagocytosis. Typing of certain bacteria are done on antigenic character of the capsule. Capsulated bacteria form smooth or mucoid colonies, and if they become noncapsulated then form rough colonies, e.g. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae. The extracellular material is polysaccharide except the capsule of Bacillus anthraces which is poly D-glutamic acid, a polypeptide. Capsule is demonstrated by special stain. (2) Glycocalyx. When the polymer forms a loose meshwork of fibrils, it is called glycocalyx. Glycocalyx plays role in adherence of bacteria on surface, e.g. Streptococcus mutans adheres to tooth enamel. (3) If the polymer is detached from the cells then it is called ...
In spite of their common hypersaline environment, halophilic archaea are surprisingly different in their nutritional demands and metabolic pathways. The metabolic diversity of halophilic archaea was i
I worked in different labs, and in 2008, at the Wageningen University, I grew my skins bacteria using agar from 30 different parts of my body.. This was aesthetically pleasing to the eye. It was amazing to see my bodys bacteria growing independently of my body in a Petri dish.. In another project, Cartography of the Human Body, I walked outside on one day in Vienna to cultivate bacteria from my own skin. I (came back inside) then collected the bacteria of my temporary skin flora and grew them first on agar plates. The different morphologies, colors and quantities of bacteria on different body areas were examined, analyzed, counted and documented. The bacteria were bred, partially reanimated and stored at -70 degrees C. In the framework of an interaction study, experiments were made to study the bacterias hierarchies. Weak bacteria that didnt seem to grow much at all or grew smaller were applied first to guarantee their unhindered growth and to achieve the desired colors on the bacterias ...
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