The Overview of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2015 provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The Overview shows that the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continues to improve slowly and that there have been declines in infant mortality rates and an increase in life expectancy. There have also been improvements in a number of areas contributing to health status such as increased immunisation coverage and a slight decrease in the prevalence of tobacco use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.. The Overview, which draws on the most up-to-date, authoritative sources and undertakes some special analyses, is freely available on the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet web resource, along with downloadable PowerPoint presentations of key facts, tables and figures. It is an important part of the HealthInfoNets commitment to collaborative knowledge ...
The Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2019 (Summary) provides a brief and current overview of the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia in a plain language and visual style. The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet has prepared the Summary as part of our contribution to support those in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce and those participating in research and working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their communities...
Under-reporting of hearing impairment is a substantial issue for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, according to new analysis by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and Western Sydney University.. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged seven years and over across Australia participated in the voluntary hearing test as part of the 2018-19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey.. The independent hearing test found more than four in 10 (43 per cent) people had a hearing impairment in at least one ear on the day of testing - noting hearing impairment on the day of the test may have been due to a temporary cause like ear congestion associated with a cold.. Analysis by the ABS, in partnership with Dr Scott Avery from Western Sydney University, found almost eight in 10 (79 per cent) people with a hearing impairment according to the test did not report having a long-term hearing impairment.. ABS Indigenous and Social Information Program Manager, ...
Good quality data on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are needed to assess the effectiveness of programs and interventions, and to evaluate policies that are designed to improve the status of, and service delivery to, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This paper is an addendum to The health and welfare of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2005 and has been jointly prepared by The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the Australian Bureau of Statistics.. ...
This release will focus on biomedical data collected from adult respondents (on a voluntary basis) in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS) and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NATSINPAS) - both components of the 2012-13 Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (AATSIHS ...
References. 1. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers, Australia: Summary of findings. Cat. no. 44330.0, 2009, Author: Canberra.. 2. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and Australian Bureau of Statistics, The health and welfare of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2008, 2008, Author: Canberra.. 3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Rural, regional and remote health: indicators of health status and determinants of health, 2008, Author: Canberra.. 4. Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2006 Census Community Profile Series: Indigenous Profile, cat. no. 2002.0, 2007, Author: Canberra.. 5. Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011 Census of Population and Housing: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (Indigenous) Profile, cat. no. 2002.0, 2011, Author: Canberra.. 6. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability: wellbeing, participation and support, 2011, Author: ...
Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2006 to 2010 is the third in a series of reports published in Communicable Diseases Intelligence. It provides data on disease notifications, hospitalisations, deaths and childhood vaccinations, comparing rates in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous people. It identifies areas of success and improvement, and areas that need further attention.
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report provides the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according...
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report provides the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according...
The latest instalment in the CouncilFest Croakey series was published today. The health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has always been a priority for the Alliance. At CouncilFest 2014 it was agreed that ensuring strong governmental commitment to an operational plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan should be a policy priority.
The gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians is widening, not closing.. States currently spend $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population whereas the Commonwealth in the past has spent only $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population. NACCHO calls for the Commonwealth to increase funding to Close the Gap.. The originating Close the Gap Statement of Intent - between the Government of Australia and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, supported by non-Indigenous Australians and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous health organisations - was never truly adopted and the Close the Gap strategy has only been partially implemented.. Underfunding in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services and infrastructure has persisted. Funding is not based on need and service gaps, has been cut and in ...
This research report is a study of planned reforms in primary health care (PHC) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the Northern Territory (between 2009 and 2014) and Cape York, Queensland (between 2006 and 2014). In both places the intention of the reforms was twofold: to establish a regional system of PHC provision with reliable access to care for all Aboriginal communities in the regions and to increase community control of health care by transferring some, or all of the responsibility for providing PHC from government health authorities to regional Aboriginal community controlled health organisations.. The study aimed to provide a coherent description of reforms in PHC for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the Northern Territory and in Cape York, Queensland, and an analysis of what helped and what got in the way of progress, and what might be done differently in the future.. The study considered implications for future development, in particular in ...
The importance of leadership and participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including children and young people, in policy development, system monitoring, service design, program evaluation and at the level of individual cases has been emphasised repeatedly (Cummins, Scott, & Scales, 2012; McGuinness & Leckning, 2013; Northern Territory Government, 2010; SNAICC, 2013; United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child, 2012). This has included calls for the expansion in the roles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander agencies in child protection matters, oversight by Aboriginal Childrens Commissioners and community involvement in determining priorities for local action and family decision-making approaches that emphasise family involvement in decision-making. Combining decision-making authority for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander agencies and individuals with the delivery of culturally based programs (e.g., Indigenous parenting programs), identification and ...
Indigenous Australians are receiving up to two and a half times more health funding than non-indigenous Australians and they are six times more likely to be hospitalised for kidney disease and childhood preventable diseases, a new report shows.. On average, for every $1 spent per person on non-indigenous healthcare $1.39 was spent on indigenous health in 2008-09, an Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report released today shows.. But in remote and very remote areas, health spending per person was as high as $2.41 on indigenous Australians for every $1 spent on indigenous Australians.. The statistics reflect the poor health of indigenous Australians and the fact they are likely to die 11.5 years earlier than other Australians.. Kidney disease and mental and behavioural disorders top the spending list for indigenous Australians while cardiovascular disease and unintentional injuries were the most costly areas of expenditure for non-indigenous Australians.. Indigenous Australians received ...
Suicide is a multidimensional issue, which has a devastating impact on individuals and families and ongoing implications for the communities in which they live. High rates of suicide among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are commonly attributed to a complex set of factors which not only includes disadvantage and risk factors shared by the non-Indigenous population, but also a broader set of social, economic and historic determinations that impact on Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing and mental health. The Social Health Reference Group for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council and National Mental Health Working Group (2004) responsible for developing the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2004-2009 draws an important distinction between the concepts of social and emotional wellbeing used in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander settings and the term ...
Objective: To evaluate the contribution of non-traditional risk factors to coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence in Indigenous adults.. Design, setting and participants: Cohort study of 1706 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults from 26 remote communities in far north Queensland who were initially free of CHD, with a mean of 7.5 years of follow-up.. Main outcome measures: CHD-related deaths and hospitalisations obtained by record matching.. Results: CHD incidence was similar in men and women and in Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders; overall incidence was 12.1 (95% CI, 10.1-14.1) events per 1000 person-ears. At baseline, prevalence of diabetes was 12.4% in Aboriginals and 22.3% in Torres Strait Islanders, prevalence of any albuminuria was similarly high (33.5%) in both groups, and participants with diabetes were 5.5 (95% CI, 4.2-7.3) times more likely to have albuminuria than those without diabetes. At follow-up, adjusted hazard ratios for CHD were 1.7 (95% CI, 1.01-2.8) for obesity ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Getting it Right. T2 - validating a culturally specific screening tool for depression (aPHQ-9) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. AU - The Getting it Right Collaborative Group. AU - Hackett, Maree L.. AU - Teixeira-Pinto, Armando. AU - Farnbach, Sara. AU - Glozier, Nicholas. AU - Skinner, Timothy. AU - Askew, Deborah A.. AU - Gee, Graham. AU - Cass, Alan. AU - Brown, Alex. PY - 2019/7. Y1 - 2019/7. N2 - Objectives: To determine the validity, sensitivity, specificity and acceptability of the culturally adapted nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (aPHQ-9) as a screening tool for depression in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Design: Prospective observational validation study, 25 March 2015 - 2 November 2016. Setting, participants: 500 adults (18 years or older) who identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people and attended one of ten primary health care services or service events in urban, rural and remote Australia that predominantly ...
The annual Overview is free to download and provides scholarly, up-to-date, detailed information about the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It highlights improvements to certain aspects of Indigenous health, and outlines where ongoing work is needed to close the gap in health status between Indigenous and other Australians.
Posted in: Media Releases HIV infection in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will be the focus of a series of workshops throughout Queensland from Monday, 25 July.. The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), in collaboration with the HIV Foundation Queensland, will engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Queensland HIV Treatment as Prevention (TasP) Roadshow, starting next week and continuing into early August.. QAIHC Senior Policy Officer Dion Tatow said raising community awareness was required because of the spikein Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland in the past 12 months.. The Queensland HIV TasP Roadshow includes eight meetings with Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Services, and evening dinner meetings for health professionals in the same locations, starting in Brisbane on Monday, July 25, Mr Tatow ...
The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) calls for urgent and radically different action to Close the Gap.. The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) commitment to Close the Gap in 2007 was welcome. It was a positive step towards mobilising government resources and effort to address the under investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health, said NACCHO Chairperson, Mr John Singer.. But ten years on the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians is widening, not closing.. Jurisdictions currently spend $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population whereas the Commonwealth in the past has spent only $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population. NACCHO calls for the Commonwealth to increase funding to Close the Gap, said John Singer.. NACCHO is a proud member of the Close the ...
This annual report aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
Aims: To examine risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in relation to alcohol in a cohort of Australian Aborigines. Methods: In 1988-1989, alcohol intake, drinking pattern, and beverage preference were elicited by interviewer-administered questionnaire in Western Australian Aborigines (258 men, 256 women) and cardiovascular outcomes ascertained through linkage to mortality and hospital admission records to 2002. Results: In proportional hazards models, risk for CHD, relative to lifetime abstainers, was significantly increased in ex-drinkers [Hazard ratio (HR) 2.29, 95% CL 1.23, 4.27], those drinking 41-60 g/day in men or 21-40 g/day in women (HR 2.80, 95% CL 1.04, 7.53), and those drinking ,150 g/day for men or ,100 g/day for women (HR 2.25, 95% CL 1.03, 4.90) with a J-shaped relationship. Low-to-moderate drinkers had lower waist girth, exercised more, and had a lower prevalence of overweight and smoking than at-risk drinkers. A preference for wine was associated ...
The National Law is the cornerstone of how we regulate registered health practitioners in Australia and we welcome the opportunity for the public and practitioners to have their say, said Mr Fletcher.. Were particularly pleased to see the proposal for recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the guiding principles of the National Law.. This is proposal reflects our recent shared commitment with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders to help achieve equity in health outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and other Australians by 2031.. Its important that the proposals in the consultation paper are considered fully in terms of whether they help to ensure the public continue to have access to high quality and safe health services from registered health practitioners, while maintaining fairness for practitioners.. National Boards and AHPRA say they plan to examine the paper carefully and provide considered responses on the ...
Important updates have been made to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) relating to recording Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (hereafter respectfully referred to as Indigenous) status, catch-up schedule information and amended pneumococcal rules.. Recording Indigenous status on AIR Improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is a national priority. The National Immunisation Program (NIP) for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people provides additional vaccines to help improve the health of Indigenous people, and close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in health and life expectancy.. To identify Indigenous people who may require additional vaccines, vaccination providers can now record Indigenous status directly on AIR and it will not be over-ridden by their status recorded by Medicare. AIR Indigenous status will not be recorded on any other government database and it does not need to be the same as Medicare.. Recording an ...
The details of bibliography - The problem of dementia in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: an overview
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are the first people of Australia. Consequences of historic and contemporary settler-colonialism including racism, trauma, grief and loss (of land, culture, spirituality, and freedoms) have led to substantial negative health and wellbeing impacts. The Kessler Psychological Distress Scales are population and individual-level tools designed to measure general psychological health status. There has been limited assessment of the psychometric properties and validity of the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale for use with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in Australia, despite its widespread use. A national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults (n = 6988 ≥ 16 years) was used in the psychometric assessment of the MK-K5, which involved face validity, acceptability, internal consistency/reliability, construct validity, and convergent and divergent validity testing. Receiver Operator Characteristics (ROC) curves were produced to
Australias health 2014 was released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare as the fourtenth edition of its biennial national health report. The report shows that Australia is one of the healthiest nations in the world, with most Australians generally have good health and access to a range of good health care services, but Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continue to have much poorer health than the general population.. Health information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is included in various sections of the report but particularly in chapter 7 which compiles information about demographic profiles, health status, disability rates and service use. The section highlights that Indigenous Australians are continuing to die at much younger ages than non-Indigenous Australians. Indigenous Australians also continue to have a greater disease burden, higher rates of disability and a lower quality of life than other Australians. The section concludes with ...
Physical inactivity during childhood is associated with the development of chronic disease, including overweight and obesity,1,2 and type 2 diabetes.3 In Australia, about 75% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over 15 years old are considered inactive,4 57% are overweight or obese5 and the rate of diabetes is at least three times that of non-Indigenous Australians.5 Improving the health of Australias Indigenous peoples is a national priority and efforts to increase physical activity levels have the potential to reduce the burden of illness associated with physical inactivity.. National and international physical activity guidelines recommend that children aged 5-18 years spend at least 60 minutes every day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).6-9 Studies indicate that most children meet this recommendation, but compliance is associated with the childs age and gender, with a decline commencing in adolescence, and boys typically being more active than girls.1,10-12 Data ...
Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) acknowledges the traditional land owners of Australia and welcomes all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our activities. AAG aims to improve equity in access to services and support for ageing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. For further information see AAGs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group. ...
Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) acknowledges the traditional land owners of Australia and welcomes all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our activities. AAG aims to improve equity in access to services and support for ageing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. For further information see AAGs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group. ...
Indigenous Australians are a small, widely dispersed population. Regarding childbearing women and infants, inequities in service delivery and culturally unsafe services contribute to significantly poorer outcomes, with a lack of high-level research to guide service redesign. This paper reports on an Evaluation of a specialist (Murri) antenatal clinic for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. A triangulated mixed method approach generated and analysed data from a range of sources: individual and focus group interviews; surveys; mother and infant audit data; and routinely collected data. A retrospective analysis compared clinical outcomes of women who attended the Murri clinic (n=367) with Indigenous women attending standard care (n=414) provided by the same hospital over the same period. Both services see women of all risk status. The majority of women attending the Murri clinic reported high levels of satisfaction, specifically with continuity of carer antenatally. However,
Our review highlights that studies examining the prevalence of anti-HCV were significantly biased towards studies that included people at high risk of HCV infection. The highest prevalence estimates of anti-HCV were among Aboriginal people who inject drugs. As a result this study represents the prevalence of anti-HCV among Aboriginal people with a high risk of anti-HCV infection instead of the overall anti-HCV prevalence among the general Aboriginal population.. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining the prevalence of anti-HCV among Aboriginal people in Australia. A number of limitations should be considered when interpreting our results. Firstly, the majority of the studies were among Aboriginal people in prison or Aboriginal people who inject drugs. This significantly increases the risk of our study over-estimating the pooled anti-HCV prevalence among Aboriginal people. Also, among people in prison there is a higher risk of HCV exposure through unsafe ...
Remoteness also plays a part. Geographic differences in outcomes within the [Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people] population are sometimes greater than the national gap between the [Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people] and non-Indigenous populations, the report states ...
In Australia, higher rates of chronic hepatitis B (HBsAg) have been reported among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) compared with non-Indigenous people. In 2000, the Australian government implemented a universal infant/adolescent hepatitis B vaccination program. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the disparity of HBsAg prevalence between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, particularly since 2000. We searched Medline, Embase and public health bulletins up to March 2011. We used meta-analysis methods to estimate HBsAg prevalence by Indigenous status and time period (before and since 2000). There were 15 HBsAg prevalence estimates (from 12 studies) among Indigenous and non-Indigenous people; adults and pregnant women (n = 9), adolescents (n = 3), prisoners (n = 2), and infants (n = 1). Of these, only one subgroup (adults/pregnant women) involved studies before and since 2000 and formed the basis of the meta-analysis. Before 2000, the pooled HBsAg prevalence
Background To describe the prevalence, type, and mental health correlates of substance use disorders in a large sample of incarcerated Indigenous Australians.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Ten-year all-cause mortality and its association with vision among Indigenous Australians within Central Australia: the Central Australian Ocular Health Study. AU - Liu, Ebony. AU - Ng, Soo. AU - Kahawita, Shyalle. AU - Henderson, Timothy. AU - Andrew, Nicholas. AU - Craig, Jamie. AU - Landers, John. PY - 2017. Y1 - 2017. N2 - Background: No studies to date have explored the association of vision with mortality in Indigenous Australians. We aimed to determine the 10-year all-cause mortality and its associations among Indigenous Australians living in Central Australia. Design: Prospective observational cohort study. Participants: A total of 1257 (93.0%) of 1347 patients from The Central Australian Ocular Health Study, over the age of 40 years, were available for follow-up during a 10-year period. Methods: All-cause mortality and its associations with visual acuity, age and gender were analysed. Main Outcome Measures: All-cause mortality. Results: All-cause mortality was 29.3% at ...
Closing the health and care gaps between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians and non‐Indigenous Australians has been a longstanding challenge.1,2 In 2018, a decade after Australian governments committed themselves to Closing the Gap, mortality and life expectancy for Indigenous Australians had not markedly improved, and nearly 80% of the difference in mortality between adult Indigenous and non‐Indigenous Australians was attributable to chronic disease.3. The Practice Incentives Program-Indigenous Health Incentive (PIP‐IHI), introduced in May 2010, assists general practitioners undertake chronic disease care planning for their Indigenous patients. Initial uptake was poor: only 64% of general practices expected to register (1275 of 2000) did so during 2010-11.4 However, the proportion had increased by May 2012.5 The rebate for health assessments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People (Medicare Benefits Schedule [MBS] item 715),6 constitutes an additional ...
Australian Capital Territory, Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service (AHS): http://www.winnunga.org.au/. New South Wales, Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of New South Wales (AH&MRC): http://www.ahmrc.org.au/ Northern Territory, Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT): http://www.amsant.org.au/about-us/members/. Queensland, Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC): http://www.qaihc.com.au/about/our-members. South Australia, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia: http://ahcsa.org.au/members-overview/members-directory/. Tasmania, Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Inc.: http://tacinc.com.au/. Victoria, Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc. (VACCHO): http://www.vaccho.org.au/ Western Australia, The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia (AHCWA) http://www.ahcwa.org.au/#!member-locations/cnwb ...
Hoy, W, McDonald, S, Maguire, G, Duartes, N and Wang, X (2004). C-reactive protein, cardiovascular risk, and renal disease in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Clinical Science,106(2):121-128. ...
One of these - the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Hepatitis C Awareness Raising Project - is an initiative based in Darwin, and began in mid-2006. It involves the employment by NTAHC of an Aboriginal hepatitis C project worker, and aims to raise awareness and enhance knowledge of the disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and with service providers interacting with Indigenous communities, in the Darwin urban region. Target populations include HCV-positive Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, Indigenous injecting drug users, influential members of Indigenous communities, Top End urban transient and town camp populations, service providers interacting with Indigenous people such as youth workers, sporting organisations and alcohol and drug workers. The key focus is on getting messages on hepatitis C out to young people, and the project includes work in both juvenile and adult correction facilities. Building on an earlier, mainstream health promotion program, it ...
The HPF was designed to measure the impact of the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (NSFATSIH) and will be an important tool for developing the new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP).. Page last updated: 15 November 2012 ...
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have a five times higher risk of developing dementia than non-Indigenous Australians. This is one symptom of a greater problem - Australias First Nations peoples have long experienced poorer health than other Australians due to continued social inequalities over generations, a situation common to First Nations peoples around the world.. Associate Professor Goldbergs research focuses on dementia risk and reduction, working with First Nations people in North-West Tasmania. In partnership with the Circular Head Aboriginal community and other members of her UTAS team, this work is developing a model that can be applied more widely in Australia and overseas.. Ive always been interested in preventing ill-health, says Dr Goldberg. But money tends to be more readily available for rehabilitation services.. I came to the Wicking Centre in 2014 as part of a multidisciplinary team. My background in speech pathology led to an initial focus on oral health ...
We acknowledge Australian Aboriginal People and Torres Strait Islander People as the first inhabitants of the nation, and acknowledge Traditional Owners of the lands where our staff and students live, learn and work. ...
We acknowledge Australian Aboriginal People and Torres Strait Islander People as the first inhabitants of the nation, and acknowledge Traditional Owners of the lands where our staff and students live, learn and work. ...
Archaeological evidence confirms exploitation of Dugongs by early humans. As long as 6,000 years ago, Dugongs on the small island of Akab in the United Arabian Emirates were hunted for food (Méry et al. 2009). Excavations in the Torres Strait, Australia, has revealed that Dugong hunting in this region dates back at least 4,000 years and possibly up to 7,000 years (Crouch et al. 2007, Wright 2010) and that the harvest has been substantial for at least 400-500 years (McNiven and Bedingfield 2008). Although hunting is now legally banned in most countries, there are important exceptions for the subsistence use by traditional peoples. In Australia, the Dugong hunting rights of Native Title Holders (indigenous people who can prove continuous connections to their traditional land and sea country) have been consistently upheld by the courts in a series of landmark decisions since 1993. Dugong hunting still has considerable cultural significance to coastal Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples ...
Context: Ethnoracial differences may exist in exposure to trauma and posttraumatic outcomes. However, Asian Americans and Native Hawaiians/other Pacific Islanders (NHOPIs) are vastly underrepresented in research pertaining to trauma and health status sequelae.. Objective: To determine whether there are ethnoracial disparities in sexual trauma exposure and its sequelae for health and functioning among Asian Americans and NHOPIs.. Method: We examined data on sexual assault exposure from the 2006-2007 Hawaii Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (H-BRFSS), which yielded a cross-sectional, adult, community-based probability sample (N = 12,573). Data were collected via computer-assisted random-digit landline telephone survey. Survey response rate was found to be about 48% in 2006 and 52% in 2007. The main outcome measures were demographic information, the sexual violence module of the H-BRFSS regarding unwanted sexual experiences, and questions about health lifestyles, chronic diseases and ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Use of health services by remote dwelling Aboriginal infants in tropical northern Australia. T2 - a retrospective cohort study. AU - Bar-Zeev, Sarah. AU - Kruske, Sue. AU - Barclay, Lesley M. AU - Bar-Zeev, Naor. AU - Carapetis, Jonathan. AU - Kildea, Sue. PY - 2012. Y1 - 2012. N2 - Background: Australia is a wealthy developed country. However, there are significant disparities in health outcomes for Aboriginal infants compared with other Australian infants. Health outcomes tend to be worse for those living in remote areas. Little is known about the health service utilisation patterns of remote dwelling Aboriginal infants. This study describes health service utilisation patterns at the primary and referral level by remote dwelling Aboriginal infants from northern Australia.Results: Data on 413 infants were analysed. Following birth, one third of infants were admitted to the regional hospital neonatal nursery, primarily for preterm birth. Once home, most (98%) health service ...
Indigenous health promotion resources : a national information guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers / compiled and edited by Rose Ellis for the Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal ...
This hepatitis B health promotion project has a focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to support better access to treatment and monitoring.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Performance of formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate in Indigenous Australians with and without Type 2 diabetes: The eGFR Study. AU - Maple-Brown, Louise. AU - Ekinci, Elif. AU - Hughes, Jaquelyne. AU - Chatfield, Mark. AU - Lawton, Paul. AU - Jones, Graham. AU - Ellis, Andrew. AU - Sinha, Ashim. AU - Cass, Alan. AU - Hoy, Wendy. AU - ODea, Kerin. AU - Jerums, George. AU - MacIsaac, Richard. PY - 2014/7/1. Y1 - 2014/7/1. N2 - Aims: It has been proposed that the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula estimates glomerular filtration rate more accurately than the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. With the very high incidence of diabetes and end-stage kidney disease in Indigenous Australians, accurate estimation of glomerular filtration rate is vital in early detection of kidney disease. We aimed to assess the performance of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and Cockcroft-Gault ...
This study of Australian women presenting for routine Pap testing prior to the introduction of the National HPV Vaccination Program found HPV16 to be the most prevalent HPV genotype in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian women equally, and that the five most common high-risk types were the same in both groups. Detection of any HPV genotype was strongly associated with smoking, Pap-test abnormalities and younger age. Indigenous women living in remote areas did not have more HPV genotypes detected, or more or fewer vaccine-preventable types, but for non-Indigenous women, living in a major city was associated with a higher probability of having HPV detected, and for that type to be 16 or 18. Marked differences in the prevalence of HPV between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women were not found, although older Indigenous women (31 to 40 years old) had more non-HPV 16/18 types detected. The dominance of HPV16 is consistent with worldwide prevalence studies, but HPV51, the second most common ...
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate disparities in cardiovascular risk factors among Asians and Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NHPI) in Hawaii who are hospitalized with ischemic stroke. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study on consecutive patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke at a single tertiary center in Honolulu between 2004 and 2010. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was compared for NHPI, Asians, and whites who were hospitalized for ischemic stroke. RESULTS: A total of 1,921 patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke were studied. NHPI were less likely to be older (odds ratio [OR] 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94-0.96), more likely to be female (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.07-2.24), and more likely to have diabetes (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.87-4.00), hypertension (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.27-3.10), and obesity (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.25-2.65) than whites. NHPI had higher low-density lipoprotein levels (114 +/- 50 mg/dL vs 103 +/- 45 mg/dL, p = 0.001) and lower high-density lipoprotein ...
Across the country, Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners have vital and unmatched primary health care roles at the front line of rural and remote health care.
Acacia estrophiolata, commonly known as ironwood or southern ironwood, is a tree native to Central Australia. It is a graceful, pendulous shade tree, which grows from about 4-16 m tall and has a trunk with a diameter of up to about 0.45 m. Young plants are spiky leaved. It has pale yellow flowers after winter rains. It is usually found in areas with about 220-350 mm/year of average rainfall. Traditionally, Australian Aborigines would use the gum from the tree as a sweet bushtucker treat. Its name in the Arrernte language of Central Australia is Ngkwarle athenge arlperle. It is still sometimes eaten today. The gum is snapped off the branches, either clear or red. It is then ground and mixed with a little water, then left to set again to a chewable gum, and eaten with a small stick. The tree makes good forage for livestock. The seeds are edible and are 28.9% protein. Parts of the tree are used topically to treat skin problems such as burns, cuts, scabies, sores and it is also used for treating ...
Data Dictionary - Survey ACS 2008 (3-Year Estimates); American Community Survey Tables: 2006 -- 2008 (3-Year Estimates) (ACS08_3yr); Sex By Marital Status For the Population 15 Years and Over (Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Alone); B12002E008; Female
Data Dictionary - Survey ACS 2006 (1-Year Estimates); American Community Survey Tables: 2006 (1-Year Estimates) (ACS06); Sex By Age By Citizenship Status (Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Alone); B05003E012; Not a U.S. citizen
Your tax-deductible donation will help thousands of vulnerable and low-income community members receive the quality eye care all Australians deserve. With your support, we can continue to provide optometry services to remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities as well as outreach services such as providing eyecare to outreach services such as providing eyecare to people experiencing homelessness or to our Home Support Program for limited-mobility patients.. You may also like to support world-leading eye health research through the National Vision Research Institute. The NVRI is conducting research that will lead to the preservation of sight and the prevention of blindness. Current projects include the development of a bionic eye, understanding the flow of vision information in the brain and a range of projects focussed on eye health and disease.. ...