The Overview of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2015 provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The Overview shows that the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continues to improve slowly and that there have been declines in infant mortality rates and an increase in life expectancy. There have also been improvements in a number of areas contributing to health status such as increased immunisation coverage and a slight decrease in the prevalence of tobacco use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.. The Overview, which draws on the most up-to-date, authoritative sources and undertakes some special analyses, is freely available on the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet web resource, along with downloadable PowerPoint presentations of key facts, tables and figures. It is an important part of the HealthInfoNets commitment to collaborative knowledge ...
The Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2019 (Summary) provides a brief and current overview of the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia in a plain language and visual style. The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet has prepared the Summary as part of our contribution to support those in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce and those participating in research and working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their communities...
Good quality data on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are needed to assess the effectiveness of programs and interventions, and to evaluate policies that are designed to improve the status of, and service delivery to, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This paper is an addendum to The health and welfare of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2005 and has been jointly prepared by The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the Australian Bureau of Statistics.. ...
References. 1. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers, Australia: Summary of findings. Cat. no. 44330.0, 2009, Author: Canberra.. 2. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and Australian Bureau of Statistics, The health and welfare of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2008, 2008, Author: Canberra.. 3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Rural, regional and remote health: indicators of health status and determinants of health, 2008, Author: Canberra.. 4. Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2006 Census Community Profile Series: Indigenous Profile, cat. no. 2002.0, 2007, Author: Canberra.. 5. Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011 Census of Population and Housing: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (Indigenous) Profile, cat. no. 2002.0, 2011, Author: Canberra.. 6. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability: wellbeing, participation and support, 2011, Author: ...
Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2006 to 2010 is the third in a series of reports published in Communicable Diseases Intelligence. It provides data on disease notifications, hospitalisations, deaths and childhood vaccinations, comparing rates in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous people. It identifies areas of success and improvement, and areas that need further attention.
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report provides the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according...
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report provides the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according...
The latest instalment in the CouncilFest Croakey series was published today. The health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has always been a priority for the Alliance. At CouncilFest 2014 it was agreed that ensuring strong governmental commitment to an operational plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan should be a policy priority.
The gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians is widening, not closing.. States currently spend $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population whereas the Commonwealth in the past has spent only $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population. NACCHO calls for the Commonwealth to increase funding to Close the Gap.. The originating Close the Gap Statement of Intent - between the Government of Australia and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, supported by non-Indigenous Australians and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous health organisations - was never truly adopted and the Close the Gap strategy has only been partially implemented.. Underfunding in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services and infrastructure has persisted. Funding is not based on need and service gaps, has been cut and in ...
This research report is a study of planned reforms in primary health care (PHC) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the Northern Territory (between 2009 and 2014) and Cape York, Queensland (between 2006 and 2014). In both places the intention of the reforms was twofold: to establish a regional system of PHC provision with reliable access to care for all Aboriginal communities in the regions and to increase community control of health care by transferring some, or all of the responsibility for providing PHC from government health authorities to regional Aboriginal community controlled health organisations.. The study aimed to provide a coherent description of reforms in PHC for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the Northern Territory and in Cape York, Queensland, and an analysis of what helped and what got in the way of progress, and what might be done differently in the future.. The study considered implications for future development, in particular in ...
The importance of leadership and participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including children and young people, in policy development, system monitoring, service design, program evaluation and at the level of individual cases has been emphasised repeatedly (Cummins, Scott, & Scales, 2012; McGuinness & Leckning, 2013; Northern Territory Government, 2010; SNAICC, 2013; United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child, 2012). This has included calls for the expansion in the roles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander agencies in child protection matters, oversight by Aboriginal Childrens Commissioners and community involvement in determining priorities for local action and family decision-making approaches that emphasise family involvement in decision-making. Combining decision-making authority for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander agencies and individuals with the delivery of culturally based programs (e.g., Indigenous parenting programs), identification and ...
Indigenous Australians are receiving up to two and a half times more health funding than non-indigenous Australians and they are six times more likely to be hospitalised for kidney disease and childhood preventable diseases, a new report shows.. On average, for every $1 spent per person on non-indigenous healthcare $1.39 was spent on indigenous health in 2008-09, an Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report released today shows.. But in remote and very remote areas, health spending per person was as high as $2.41 on indigenous Australians for every $1 spent on indigenous Australians.. The statistics reflect the poor health of indigenous Australians and the fact they are likely to die 11.5 years earlier than other Australians.. Kidney disease and mental and behavioural disorders top the spending list for indigenous Australians while cardiovascular disease and unintentional injuries were the most costly areas of expenditure for non-indigenous Australians.. Indigenous Australians received ...
Presents results for the Northern Territory from the publication 2004-05 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Summary of Results, Australia (4715.0). Topics include measures of health status, health actions taken, and lifestyle factors which may influence health. ...
Suicide is a multidimensional issue, which has a devastating impact on individuals and families and ongoing implications for the communities in which they live. High rates of suicide among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are commonly attributed to a complex set of factors which not only includes disadvantage and risk factors shared by the non-Indigenous population, but also a broader set of social, economic and historic determinations that impact on Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing and mental health. The Social Health Reference Group for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council and National Mental Health Working Group (2004) responsible for developing the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2004-2009 draws an important distinction between the concepts of social and emotional wellbeing used in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander settings and the term ...
Presents results for Western Australia from the publication 2004-05 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Summary of Results, Australia (4715.0). Topics include measures of health status, health actions taken, and lifestyle factors which may influence health. ...
The annual Overview is free to download and provides scholarly, up-to-date, detailed information about the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It highlights improvements to certain aspects of Indigenous health, and outlines where ongoing work is needed to close the gap in health status between Indigenous and other Australians.
Posted in: Media Releases HIV infection in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will be the focus of a series of workshops throughout Queensland from Monday, 25 July.. The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), in collaboration with the HIV Foundation Queensland, will engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Queensland HIV Treatment as Prevention (TasP) Roadshow, starting next week and continuing into early August.. QAIHC Senior Policy Officer Dion Tatow said raising community awareness was required because of the spikein Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland in the past 12 months.. "The Queensland HIV TasP Roadshow includes eight meetings with Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Services, and evening dinner meetings for health professionals in the same locations, starting in Brisbane on Monday, July 25," Mr Tatow ...
The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) calls for urgent and radically different action to Close the Gap.. "The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) commitment to Close the Gap in 2007 was welcome. It was a positive step towards mobilising government resources and effort to address the under investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples health", said NACCHO Chairperson, Mr John Singer.. "But ten years on the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians is widening, not closing.. Jurisdictions currently spend $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population whereas the Commonwealth in the past has spent only $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population. NACCHO calls for the Commonwealth to increase funding to Close the Gap", said John Singer.. NACCHO is a proud member of the Close the ...
This annual report aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
Aims: To examine risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in relation to alcohol in a cohort of Australian Aborigines. Methods: In 1988-1989, alcohol intake, drinking pattern, and beverage preference were elicited by interviewer-administered questionnaire in Western Australian Aborigines (258 men, 256 women) and cardiovascular outcomes ascertained through linkage to mortality and hospital admission records to 2002. Results: In proportional hazards models, risk for CHD, relative to lifetime abstainers, was significantly increased in ex-drinkers [Hazard ratio (HR) 2.29, 95% CL 1.23, 4.27], those drinking 41-60 g/day in men or 21-40 g/day in women (HR 2.80, 95% CL 1.04, 7.53), and those drinking ,150 g/day for men or ,100 g/day for women (HR 2.25, 95% CL 1.03, 4.90) with a J-shaped relationship. Low-to-moderate drinkers had lower waist girth, exercised more, and had a lower prevalence of overweight and smoking than at-risk drinkers. A preference for wine was associated ...
The details of bibliography - The problem of dementia in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: an overview
Australias health 2014 was released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare as the fourtenth edition of its biennial national health report. The report shows that Australia is one of the healthiest nations in the world, with most Australians generally have good health and access to a range of good health care services, but Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continue to have much poorer health than the general population.. Health information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is included in various sections of the report but particularly in chapter 7 which compiles information about demographic profiles, health status, disability rates and service use. The section highlights that Indigenous Australians are continuing to die at much younger ages than non-Indigenous Australians. Indigenous Australians also continue to have a greater disease burden, higher rates of disability and a lower quality of life than other Australians. The section concludes with ...
Physical inactivity during childhood is associated with the development of chronic disease, including overweight and obesity,1,2 and type 2 diabetes.3 In Australia, about 75% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over 15 years old are considered inactive,4 57% are overweight or obese5 and the rate of diabetes is at least three times that of non-Indigenous Australians.5 Improving the health of Australias Indigenous peoples is a national priority and efforts to increase physical activity levels have the potential to reduce the burden of illness associated with physical inactivity.. National and international physical activity guidelines recommend that children aged 5-18 years spend at least 60 minutes every day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).6-9 Studies indicate that most children meet this recommendation, but compliance is associated with the childs age and gender, with a decline commencing in adolescence, and boys typically being more active than girls.1,10-12 Data ...
Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) acknowledges the traditional land owners of Australia and welcomes all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our activities. AAG aims to improve equity in access to services and support for ageing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. For further information see AAGs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group. ...
Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) acknowledges the traditional land owners of Australia and welcomes all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our activities. AAG aims to improve equity in access to services and support for ageing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. For further information see AAGs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group. ...
Indigenous Australians are a small, widely dispersed population. Regarding childbearing women and infants, inequities in service delivery and culturally unsafe services contribute to significantly poorer outcomes, with a lack of high-level research to guide service redesign. This paper reports on an Evaluation of a specialist (Murri) antenatal clinic for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. A triangulated mixed method approach generated and analysed data from a range of sources: individual and focus group interviews; surveys; mother and infant audit data; and routinely collected data. A retrospective analysis compared clinical outcomes of women who attended the Murri clinic (n=367) with Indigenous women attending standard care (n=414) provided by the same hospital over the same period. Both services see women of all risk status. The majority of women attending the Murri clinic reported high levels of satisfaction, specifically with continuity of carer antenatally. However,
Our review highlights that studies examining the prevalence of anti-HCV were significantly biased towards studies that included people at high risk of HCV infection. The highest prevalence estimates of anti-HCV were among Aboriginal people who inject drugs. As a result this study represents the prevalence of anti-HCV among Aboriginal people with a high risk of anti-HCV infection instead of the overall anti-HCV prevalence among the general Aboriginal population.. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining the prevalence of anti-HCV among Aboriginal people in Australia. A number of limitations should be considered when interpreting our results. Firstly, the majority of the studies were among Aboriginal people in prison or Aboriginal people who inject drugs. This significantly increases the risk of our study over-estimating the pooled anti-HCV prevalence among Aboriginal people. Also, among people in prison there is a higher risk of HCV exposure through unsafe ...
Background To describe the prevalence, type, and mental health correlates of substance use disorders in a large sample of incarcerated Indigenous Australians.
The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) has announced almost $5 million in funding for the prevention and management of chronic lung diseases.. NHMRC participated in a request for research applications from the Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases (GACD). The GACD is a collaboration of major international public research funding agencies that funds joint research programs to address chronic non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries and in vulnerable populations in high-income countries.. NHMRC CEO Professor Anne Kelso says one aim of NHMRCs participation is to build the evidence base for sound policies on prevention and management of chronic lung diseases in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Two of the projects announced today will support this goal.. Improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is a critical component of NHMRCs research funding strategy, Prof Kelso says.. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ...
Acute coronary syndromes affect thousands of Australians each year. It is estimated that 69,900 people aged 25 and over had a heart attack in 2011, which equates to around 190 heart attacks a day. Coronary heart disease (the main cause of acute coronary syndromes) kills more people in Australia than any other disease, and contributed to 15 per cent of all deaths in 2011.1. While there are well-developed guidelines for managing acute coronary syndromes, not all people receive appropriate treatment and there is variation in the type of care received by people in metropolitan compared to non-metropolitan areas.2 There is also strong evidence that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience coronary events, such as heart attacks, at rates three times those of other Australians.3 Compared with other patients, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples admitted to hospital with acute coronary syndromes are twice as likely to die in hospital from coronary heart disease, while also ...
We acknowledge and respect the Traditional Custodians whose ancestral lands we live and work upon and we pay our respects to their Elders past and present. We acknowledge and respect the deep spiritual connection and the relationship that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have to Country.. We also pay our respects to the cultural authority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their nations in South Australia, as well as those across Australia.. Seven sisters and the Coloured Stone by Dorcas Miller, a Mirning Woman from Koonibba, South Australia. ...
This is the second report on vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The first, published in 2004, covered data from 1999 to 2002.1 Documented improvements in the quality of Indigenous status data, noted in previous publications1,2 and further documented in this report, have enabled this report to be substantially more comprehensive. The report includes notifiable disease data from five jurisdictions, up from four in the previous report, hospitalisation data by year for the first time, as well as vaccination coverage data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey. Coverage data is reported for individual jurisdictions for the first time. This report is modelled on two other regularly published national reports. It provides a comparison between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people not available in the Vaccine Preventable Diseases and Vaccination Coverage in ...
We act with respect towards every person or idea we encounter. Together through the strength of our diversity, we create better outcomes for our patients and colleagues.. We are committed to our Indigenous employment and encourage all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply. We are proud to be recognised in 2015 as Best in Indigenous Employment.. We welcome applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, workers of all ages, people with disabilities, people who identify as LGBTIQ and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. We acknowledge that diversity increases our ability to transform our organisation to achieve better health outcomes.. We provide services through our Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne where you will have the opportunity to work with the best oral health practitioners in Victoria. We embrace collaboration because working together helps us to create value that wouldnt be possible through individual effort alone.. Submit your ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Better Indigenous Risk stratification for Cardiac Health study (BIRCH) protocol. T2 - Rationale and design of a cross-sectional and prospective cohort study to identify novel cardiovascular risk indicators in Aboriginal Australian and Torres Strait Islander adults. AU - Rémond, Marc G.W.. AU - Stewart, Simon. AU - Carrington, Melinda J.. AU - Marwick, Thomas H.. AU - Kingwell, Bronwyn A.. AU - Meikle, Peter. AU - OBrien, Darren. AU - Marshall, Nathaniel S.. AU - Maguire, Graeme P.. PY - 2017/8/23. Y1 - 2017/8/23. N2 - Background: Of the estimated 10-11 year life expectancy gap between Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people) and non-Indigenous Australians, approximately one quarter is attributable to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Risk prediction of CVD is imperfect, but particularly limited for Indigenous Australians. The BIRCH (Better Indigenous Risk stratification for Cardiac Health) project aims to identify and assess existing and novel markers of early ...
June Oscar is the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner.. The Bunuba woman from Fitzroy Crossing takes over from the popular Mick Gooda, who is now a Commissioner investigating the Northern Territorys youth justice system.. "I have known Ms Oscar for many years and have admired her passionate advocacy for Indigenous Australians," Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said yesterday in announcing the appointment.. "Ms Oscars appointment demonstrates the central role Indigenous women play in bringing about social change and I look forward to working closely with her in the future.". National Congress of Australias First Peoples co-chair Rod Little welcomed the decision.. "This appointment has been a long time coming," he said.. "Whilst we have been waiting, the gap between health, education and justice outcomes has continued to widen between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and non-Indigenous Australians.". "Ms Oscar has an outstanding record of ...
REMEMBER: Determining whether a client identifies as an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander is only part of the issue. As a matter of principle, an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person should be treated as an individual with individual needs, and not stereotyped. Remember that all Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people are not the same and what may be appropriate for one may not be appropriate or relevant for another. [2 ...
As part of the colonisation process, there were many small scale conflicts between colonists and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders across the continent. Since the 1970s there has been more systematic research into this conflict which is described as the Australian frontier wars. In Queensland, the killing of Aboriginal peoples was largely perpetrated by civilian "hunting" parties and the Native Police, armed groups of Aboriginal men who were recruited at gunpoint and led by colonialist to eliminate Aboriginal resistance.[70] There is evidence that massacres of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, which began with arrival of British colonists, continued until the 1930s. Researchers at the University of Newcastle have begun mapping the massacres.[71] So far they have mapped almost 500 places where massacres happened, with 12,361 Aboriginal people killed and 204 Colonists killed.[72]. Estimating the total number of deaths during the frontier wars is difficult due to lack of records ...
1 Answer to 1. Describe the concept of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety (20-50 words). 2. Describe how cultural safety is related to cultural awareness (20-50 words) 3. Describe how cultural safety is related to cultural competence (20-50 words) - 5441808
Background In Australia, rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is almost exclusively restricted to Aboriginal Australian and Torres Strait Islander people with children being at highest risk. International criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of RHD have been developed but the significance of minor heart valve abnormalities which do not reach these criteria remains unclear. The Rheumatic Fever Follow-Up Study (RhFFUS) aims to clarify this question in children and adolescents at high risk of RHD. Methods/design RhFFUS is a cohort study of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents aged 8-17 years residing in 32 remote Australian communities. Cases are people with non-specific heart valve abnormalities detected on prior screening echocardiography. Controls (two per case) are age, gender, community and ethnicity-matched to cases and had a prior normal screening echocardiogram. Participants will have echocardiography about 3 years after initial screening echocardiogram and ...
CANBERRA, March 26 (Xinhua) -- More than 40 percent of indigenous Australians have hearing loss, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has found.. The ABS on Thursday published the results of a survey conducted in 2018-19, revealing that 43 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the age of seven have hearing loss in one or both ears.. Almost 60 percent of those living remote areas had hearing loss compared to 39 percent in non-remote areas.. By comparison, the Hearing Care Industry Association (HCIA) found in 2017 that approximately 14.5 percent of the wider Australian population was affected by hearing loss.. "Hearing loss measured on the day of testing does not necessarily mean a person has experienced long-term hearing loss," Stephen Collett, the ABS Indigenous and Social Information Program manager, said in a media release.. "For example, hearing loss on the day of the test may have been due to a temporary cause like a cold, or limitations with the hearing test ...
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Details of Quality Assurance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Medical Services (QAAMS) Pathology programme and Australian Governments Support to this programme
Printed content may be out of date. For up to date information, always refer to the digital version: https://immunisationhandbook.health.gov.au/resources/handbook-tables/table-catch-up-schedule-for-13vpcv-for-aboriginal-and-torres-strait.. ...
2019 is the International Year of Indigenous Languages which highlights the need to preserve, celebrate, and value the rich array of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages that are spoken in Australia today. However, Indigenous Knowledges and languages are at risk of decline and loss unless they are passed down from older to younger generations and actively used.
We acknowledge Australian Aboriginal People and Torres Strait Islander People as the first inhabitants of the nation, and acknowledge Traditional Owners of the lands where our staff and students live, learn and work. ...
Volume 12, Number 1-2, Fall 2014. Creating Community Criteria for Research Participation at Community Health Centers By Mary Frances Oneha, Ho`oipo DeCambra, Liss Ieong, Hui Song, Thu Quach, Rosy Chang-Weir, Ninez A. Ponce, Rachelle Enos, Shao-Chee Sim, and Marjorie Kagawa-Singer. Abstract: Research conducted to benefit communities is often done without community involvement, threatening its relevance for the groups the studies purport to serve. A great need exists for education of both researchers and community members on how research can be more appropriately conducted in partnership with community members. This paper presents Community Criteria for Research Participation developed by community health centers (CHCs) with input from academic partners to support CHCs capacity to conduct research of community significance.. Building a Community Health Center Data Warehouse to Promote Patient-Centered Research in the Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders Population By Vivian Li, ...
Outputs from the 2011 Indigenous Mortality project that have been produced include: - the creation of linked files between the 2011-2012 death registrations data and the 2011 Census of Population and Housing;. - input into the compilation of life tables and life expectancy estimates as released in the ABS publication, Life Tables for Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander Australians, 2010-2012 , (cat. no. 3302.0.55.003);. - the release of an information paper containing aggregate statistics from the examination of social and demographic characteristics associated with differences in Indigenous status identification, see Information Paper: Death registrations to Census linkage project - Key Findings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, 2011-2012 (cat. no. 3302.0.55.005); - the release of an information paper outlining the methods used to conduct the linking of death registrations to the Census of Population and Housing and an assessment of linking quality, see Information Paper: ...
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people comprise about 2.5% of the Australian population. Cancer registry data indicate that their breast cancer survivals are lower than for other women but the completeness and accuracy of Indigenous descriptors on registries are uncertain. We followed women receiving mammography screening in BreastScreen to determine differences in screening experiences and survivals from breast cancer by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, as recorded by BreastScreen. This status is self-reported and used in BreastScreen accreditation, and is considered to be more accurate. The study included breast cancers diagnosed during the period of screening and after leaving the screening program. Design: Least square regression models were used to compare screening experiences and outcomes adjusted for age, geographic remoteness, socio-economic disadvantage, screening period and round during 1996-2005. Survival of breast cancer patients from all causes and from breast ...
Chronic conditions are responsible for the majority of disability and death in Australia [1] causing a significant impact on quality of life of Australians and placing a strain on health and welfare services [2]. Chronic diseases affect Indigenous Australians at a disproportionately higher level than non-indigenous Australians [3]. Chronic disease occurs at earlier ages in Indigenous Australians, accounting for two thirds of the gap in mortality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations and contributing to early morbidity [4]. For example, in 2012-2013 Indigenous Australians were more likely to suffer asthma, hearing loss, heart and circulatory related chronic disease, and insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus than non-Indigenous Australians [3]. The greatest discrepancy was in diabetes and chronic kidney disease with Indigenous Australians three times more likely to suffer diabetes and more than seven times as likely to receive treatment for end-stage kidney failure [2]. This ...
1 Peeling, R., Holmes, K., Mabey, D., Ronald, A. (2006). Rapid tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs): the way forward. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 82 Suppl 5, v1-6.. 2 Ministerial Advisory Committee on AIDS Sexual Health and Hepatitis. (2011). National HIV Testing Policy: Commonwealth Government Department of Health and Ageing, 2011.. 3 Guidasci, T. (2009). Fourth generation point of care HIV screening. Clinical Laboratory International, 33(3), 26-28.. 4 Therapeutic Goods Administration. (2012, 17 December). Alere Determine HIV 1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test: information for consumers. Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (DoHA). Retrieved from: www.tga.gov.au. 5 Prestage, G., Brown, G., Keen, P. (2012). Barriers to HIV testing among Australian gay men. Sexual Health, 9(5), 453-58.. 6 Conway, D., Holt, M., McNulty, A., Couldwell, D., Smith, D., Davies, S, et al. (2013). Field performance of the Alere Determine HIV Combo assay in a large Australian multicentre study in a ...