DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The rationales for the development of technology that will enable extremely cheap, high speed sequencing are well established. Chief among these is the enablement of personalized medicine. There are currently in development several technologies that promise to markedly decrease the cost of sequencing a human genome. It is unclear, however, that any of these will be able to do so drastically enough to allow whole genome sequencing to become a routine clinical tool. Additionally, those technologies which are most promising on this cost parameter look as if they will face difficulties with respect to performance characteristics such as read length. One technology that promises to be cheap and fast and to provide long read lengths is nanopore-based sequencing. To date, however, nanopore sequencing has faced a number of technical challenges. The method of Hybridization-Assisted Nanopore Sequencing (HANS) overcomes these hurdles. HANS utilizes libraries of probes ...
Using nanopores for single-molecule sequencing of proteins - similar to nanopore-based sequencing of DNA - faces multiple challenges, including unfolding of the complex tertiary structure of the proteins and enforcing their unidirectional translocation through nanopores. Here, we combine molecular dynamics (
Scientific organizers: Prof. U. Kleinekathöfer • Prof. M. Winterhalter, Jabobs University Bremen • Prof. M. Wanunu, Northeastern University Boston/USASeminarbericht Scope Nanoscale pores and channels are ubiquitous in biological systems while artificial nanopores and -channels are being fabricated for an increasing number of applications. Biological pores are responsible for the transport of various ions and substrates between the different compartments of biological systems separated by membranes while artificial pores are aimed at emulating such transport properties. The aim of this WE-Heraeus seminar is to bring together scientists working synthetic and biological nanopores and -channel both from theory and experiment. With this seminar we would like to bridge gaps and search for common ways on how to elucidate mechanisms of molecular transport through nanopores and -channels. One key feature is to understand the relationship between structures and functions of nanopores and -channels.
The study of the transport of ionic species through nanopores is a subject of wide interest covering several diverse fields such as biophysics, electrochemistry and polymer science. While, during recent decades, considerable advances have been made, several fundamental questions remain unanswered. In the present investigation we focus our attention upon the transport of protons through the hydrated nanopores of polymer electrolyte membranes, the separator in a PEM fuel cell. The nanopores in these membranes are often characterized by the presence of pendant groups carrying negative charges, in sulfonic acid based ionomers due to the presence of ions. Since these groups are attached to the pore walls they produce strong inhomogeneous electrical fields in the enclosed volume space through which the ions are transported. It follows, therefore that these fields will profoundly affect the membrane conductivity and thus the functioning of the fuel cell. An understanding of the nature and influence of these
Nanofluidics and nanopores, ranging in size from a few hundred nanometers down to subnanometer scales, have recently found a broad range of applications which include DNA sequence analysis, single-molecule spectroscopy, nanoplasmonics, and optical trapping amongst others. With recent advances in nanofabrication, the resolution, throughput, and reproducibility to engineer nanometric pores and channels have improved greatly. This themed issue of Analyst brings together analytical advances related to nanofluidics and nanopores. Making up this issue are 19 articles covering optical spectroscopy, transport through nanopores, translocation behavior, and the ever-growing use of nanopipettes. For example, following the discovery of the extraordinary optical transmission effect through subwavelength metallic hole arrays, researchers have extensively studied the optical properties of metallic nanoholes for sensing and spectroscopy applications. Dahlins review article (c4an02258k) provides a perspective ...
Agenda: 9:30am - 10:00am Registration and Welcome Coffee 10:00am - 10:15am Opening Introduction, Vladimir Benes, EMBL GeneCore 10:15am - 11:15am Updates on Nanopore Technology, Clive Brown, CTO, Oxford Nanopore 11:15am - 12:30pm Presentations from Nanopore community Jan Provaznik, EMBL GeneCore Alexander Vogel, RWTH Aachen University, Germany 12:30pm- 13:30pm Lunch and product display
Abnormal mRNA splicing can disrupt gene function and influence the course of disease. Analysis of abnormal splicing is an important part of determining whether a particular genetic variant found in the population is pathogenic or not. However, to correctly identify abnormal splicing, we must first understand what is normal. This project assessed the isoforms of the genes BRCA1 and BARD1, which are particularly relevant to the onset of breast cancer.. BRCA1 is a tumour suppressor gene implicated in breast cancer onset. BARD1 codes for a protein that interacts with BRCA1 and produces a smaller mRNA transcript. Normal exon skipping events have been identified for both BRCA1 and BARD1, however, current methods are unable to reliably identify full transcripts. This has resulted in knowledge of individual exon skipping events but often does not tell us whether multiple events occur in the same transcript. The MinION nanopore sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies), uses a nanopore to produce ...
A nanopore is a nano-scale hole. In its devices, Oxford Nanopore passes an ionic current through nanopores and measures the changes in current as biological molecules pass through the nanopore or near it. The information about the change in current can be used to identify that molecule.. Holes can be created by proteins puncturing membranes (biological nanopores) or in solid materials (solid-state nanopores).. ...
Alpha hemolysin (αHL), a nanopore from bacteria that causes lysis of red blood cells, has been studied for over 15 years.[10] To this point, studies have shown that all four bases can be identified using ionic current measured across the αHL pore.[11][12] The structure of αHL is advantageous to identify specific bases moving through the pore. The αHL pore is ~10 nm long, with two distinct 5 nm sections. The upper section consists of a larger, vestibule-like structure and the lower section consists of three possible recognition sites (R1, R2, R3), and is able to discriminate between each base.[11][12]. Sequencing using αHL has been developed through basic study and structural mutations, moving towards the sequencing of very long reads. Protein mutation of αHL has improved the detection abilities of the pore.[13] The next proposed step is to bind an exonuclease onto the αHL pore. The enzyme would periodically cleave single bases, enabling the pore to identify successive bases. Coupling an ...
This project intends to share expertise, developments, equipement and bioinformatics tools to apply Oxford Nanopore Technology sequencing to the detection, diagnostic and characterization of pathogens of public health importance. It corresponds to a collaboration between Institut Pasteur reference laboratories (National Reference Centers, CIBU, WHO collaborative centers) with the aim of mutualizing efforts on the application of this technology in the context of microbiology research and public health applications.. ...
Ionic current blockade signal processing, for use in nanopore detection, offers a promising new way to analyze single molecule properties, with potential implications for DNA sequencing. The alpha-Hemolysin transmembrane channel interacts with a translocating molecule in a nontrivial way, frequently evidenced by a complex ionic flow blockade pattern. Typically, recorded current blockade signals have several levels of blockade, with various durations, all obeying a fixed statistical profile for a given molecule. Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based duration learning experiments on artificial two-level Gaussian blockade signals helped us to identify proper modeling framework. We then apply our framework to the real multi-level DNA hairpin blockade signal. The identified upper level blockade state is observed with durations that are geometrically distributed (consistent with an a physical decay process for remaining in any given state). We show that mixture of convolution chains of geometrically distributed
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) - Roche said today that it will acquire Genia Technologies for $125 million in cash and up to $225 million in additional payments tied to milestones. Once the deal closes, Genia will be integrated into the Roche Sequencing Unit.
The haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN.PK113-7D is a popular model system for metabolic engineering and systems biology research. Current genome assemblies are based on short-read sequencing data scaffolded based on homology to strain S288C.
Dear All,. You are invited to the Sydney Next Generation Sequencing Special Interest Group Meeting, which will be held at the University of Technology, Sydney.. Further details are below:. Speakers: ...
The genetic sources of phenotypic variation have been a major focus of both plant and animal studies aimed at identifying the causes of disease, improving agriculture and understanding adaptive processes. To address those questions, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) emerged through the recent advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. This approach searches for hundreds or thousands of SNPs across the genome to survey the most common genetic variation for a role in a disease or to identify the heritable quantitative traits that are risk factors for diseases. Continue reading ...
Nanopore sensors are beginning to see traction in DNA sequencing, but we shouldnt neglect the other ways they can be used to measure single molecules for diagnostics, computing and industry.
Protein nanopores can be found naturally in cell membranes, and act as biological gateways. Yet they can also be useful for the detection of specific bioactive molecular chains, like sugar chains, which are responsible for key interactions at the cell level, such as molecules from the glycosaminoglycan family.
An article on this discovery was published in Nature Communications.. Mass spectrometers are invaluable for studying proteins, but they are both bulky and expensive, which limits their use to specialized laboratories.. "Yet, the next revolution in biomedical studies will be in proteomics, the large-scale analysis of proteins that are expressed in different cell types," says Maglia.. For although each cell in your body carries the same DNA, the production of proteins differs hugely between cell types. "And also, proteins are modified after they have been produced, for example by adding sugars that can affect their function.". Nanopore technology could offer a way to analyses single molecules. In previous work, Maglia already showed that biological nanopores can be used to measure metabolites and to identify proteins and peptides. These pores are large protein structures, incorporated in a membrane. Molecules entering a pore or passing through it cause a change in an electric current across the ...
A British company plans to sell a disposable gene sequencing device that is the size of a USB memory stick and plugs into a laptop computer to deliver its results.
A low-cost technology may make it possible to read long sequences of DNA far more quickly than current techniques.. The research advances a technology, called nanopore DNA sequencing. If perfected it could someday be used to create handheld devices capable of quickly identifying DNA sequences from tissue samples and the environment, the University of Washington researchers who developed and tested the approach said.. "One reason why people are so excited about nanopore DNA sequencing is that the technology could possibly be used to create tricorder-like devices for detecting pathogens or diagnosing genetic disorders rapidly and on-the-spot," said Andrew Laszlo, lead author and a graduate student in the laboratory of Jen Gundlach, a UW professor of physics who led the project.. The paper "Decoding long nanopore sequencing reads of natural DNA" describes the new technique. It appears June 25 in the advanced online edition of the journal Nature Biotechnology.. Most of the current gene sequencing ...
An international group of researchers on board a mobile laboratory equipped with an innovative handheld genetic sequencing device are tracking the movement of the Zika virus since it disembarked in Brazil and began spreading through the Americas.
Nanopore sensing is a single-molecule technique that allows to probe the nano-bio-world with accuracy. It is a non-invasive technique, which means that the molecule of interest does not need to be labeled to be detected by the nanopore. Most of the studies done with nanopores use electrophoresis. With an electric field applied across the nanopore, charged molecules move through this tiny hole. When a molecule passes through the nanopore it creates a dip in current, called current blockage, because it partially blocks the ions from going through and so it increases the nanopore resistance. This phenomenon is observed using a refined ammeter that detects changes in current in the range of pA. At the Laboratory of Nanoscale Biology (LBEN), we are interested in very small biological units, and this thesis is focused on the RNA polymerase, the enzyme that catalyzes the transcription reaction. Transcription is the first step in gene expression where DNA is copied into RNA. It is extensively studied at the
Atomic layer deposition of alumina enhanced the molecule sensing characteristics of fabricated nanopores by fine-tuning their surface properties, reducing 1/f noise, neutralizing surface charge to favor capture of DNA and other negative polyelectrolytes, and controlling the diameter and aspect ratio of the pores with near single Ångstrom precision. The control over the chemical and physical nature of the pore surface provided by atomic layer deposition produced a higher yield of functional nanopore detectors ...
Liu, J. and Wang, B. and Hartono, S. and Liu, T. and Kantharidis, P. and Middelberg, A. and Lu, G. et al. 2012. Magnetic silica spheres with large nanopores for nucleic acid adsorption and cellular uptake. Biomaterials. 33 (3): pp. 970-978 ...
Dr Ulrich Keyser of the Universitys Cavendish Laboratory, along with PhD student Nick Bell and other colleagues, has developed a system which combines a solid-state nanopore with a technique known as DNA origami, for use in DNA sequencing, protein sensing and other applications. The technology has been licensed for development and commercialisation to UK-based company Oxford Nanopore, which is developing portable, low-cost DNA analysis sequencing devices.
Location: Candiotty Auditorium. When: Lecture 9:30 - 11:00 , /br, Flow cell loading demonstration 11:10- 11:30. Oxford Nanopore Technologies aims to disrupt the paradigm of biological analysis. Our technology and commercial model has already opened up DNA analysis to researchers who previously had no direct access to sequencing technologies, freeing them up to perform analyses in their own labs or in the field, and in real time. We continually improve the technology performance, make it easier to use and expand the ways in which users can access nanopore sequencing. This technology pathway is designed to enable the analysis of any living thing, by any person, in any environment.. This seminar will introduce the worlds first and only nanopore DNA sequencer, the MinION which is able to sequence DNA and RNA directly, without the need for PCR. It will include examples of the MinIONs portability, the opportunities that come from real-time analysis and how long reads meet some of the challenges that ...
The science of nanopores is complex and challenging. We are very proud to have gathered a world-class panel of experts, from leading institutions in this field," said Dr. Gordon Sanghera, CEO of Oxford Nanopore Technologies. "Our relationships with the Advisory Board members extend beyond pure technical advice; our support of research in the laboratories will further the science of nanopores. Oxford Nanopore now has the worlds best advisors and an excellent in-house development team of scientists and engineers. We are in a unique position to develop an early-to-market sequencing technology and improved versions in the future. A label-free approach to DNA sequencing would facilitate a transformation in genomics that could be likened to the broadband revolution ...
Sports medicine doctor, fitness guru and long-time radio host Gabe Mirkin, M.D., brings you news and tips for your healthful lifestyle. A practicing physician for more than 50 years and a radio talk show host for 25 years, Dr. Mirkin is a graduate of Harvard University and Baylor University College of Medicine. He is board-certified in four specialties: Sports Medicine, Allergy and Immunology, Pediatrics and Pediatric Immunology. The Dr. Mirkin Show, his call-in show on fitness and health, was syndicated in more than 120 cities. Read More ...
5. Nguyen D, Helms V, Lee PH: PRIMSIPLR: Prediction of inner-membrane situated pore-lining residues for alpha-helical transmembrane proteins. Proteins 2014: (in press).. 4. Zhukovsky MA, Lee PH, Ott A, Helms V: Putative cholesterol-binding sites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5. Proteins 2013, 81(4):555-567.. 3. Lee PH, Helms V, Geyer T: Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations of protein translocation through nanopores. J Chem Phys 2012, 137(14).. 2. Lee PH, Helms V: Identifying continuous pores in protein structures with PROPORES by computational repositioning of gating residues. Proteins 2012, 80(2):421-432.. 1. Lee PH, Kuo KL, Chu PY, Liu EM, Lin JH: SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters. Nucleic Acids Res 2009, 37:W559-W564.. ...
DALLAS, January 27, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- New analysis from MarketsandMarkets Genomics Market by Products - , Services (Sequencing & Microarray Services, and Software) - Global Forecast to 2018, finds that the Global Genomics Market earned revenues of $11.11 billion in 2013 and estimates this market to reach over $19.0 billion by 2018. The report segments the Global Genomics Market by products (instrument, consumables, and services), by technology (Nucleic acid extraction & purification, PCR, DNA sequencing, and DNA microarray), by application (diagnostics, personalized medicine, academic research, agriculture & animal health, and academic research), and by geography (North America, Europe, APAC, and RoW). Technological advancements (Nanopore sequencing, customized microarray, and d-PCR), increasing capital investment by public and private capitalists in genetic researches, as well as innovations in bioinformatics tools for advanced application in drug discovery and academic research are considered the
DESCRIPTION: This intense 5 day workshop will focus on a myriad of different techniques used in the molecular manipulation of DNA (general cloning, transformation, silica kits, pI kits, PCR, qPCR), RNA (isolation, reverse transcription) and protein (SDS-PAGE, 2D gels), as well as lectures that will describe some high throughput technologies such as SNP analysis, and next generation sequencing. Primarily aimed at researchers who are new to the area, familiar but require a quick updating, or theoretically familiar but lacking in practical bench training. Note: That this session will also include hands-on and theoretical content around Next Gen Sequencing (specifically around the use of the Ion Torrent and MinION nanopore sequencing systems).. PHILOSOPHY: Whilst molecular techniques have evolved at a blindingly fast rate over the last few decades, the underlying biochemical principles behind the vast majority of them have actually changed little. This workshop therefore combines opportunities to ...
In January 2013 I joined UEA where my research focusses on the molecular diagnosis of pathogens in complex clinical syndromes such as sepsis, respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections. A particular focus is on the application of next generation sequencing in clinical diagnostics. Currently, NGS is being used in centralised national reference laboratories to type referred bacteria but is not yet used for routine diagnostic laboratories. Third generation NGS technology (eg real-time nanopore sequencing) will radically change this landscape, reducing cost and turnaround time and removing the need for expert operators and analysts. This will facilitate the use of NGS for the rapid, routine profiling of pathogens in clinical samples, possibly at the point-of-care. The main challenge to implementation remaining is sample preparation. Nucleic acid extraction is not optimised for the sequencing based detection of tiny amounts of pathogen nucleic acid in a vast excess of human nucleic ...
George McDonald Church studied DNA from living and from extinct species in the US during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Church helped to develop and refine techniques with which to describe the complete sequence of all the DNA nucleotides in an organisms genome, techniques such as multiplex sequencing, polony sequencing, and nanopore sequencing. Church also contributed to the Human Genome Project, and in 2005 he helped start a company, the Personal Genome Project. Church proposed to use DNA from extinct species to clone and breed new organisms from those species.. Format: Articles Subject: People ...
George McDonald Church studied DNA from living and from extinct species in the US during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Church helped to develop and refine techniques with which to describe the complete sequence of all the DNA nucleotides in an organisms genome, techniques such as multiplex sequencing, polony sequencing, and nanopore sequencing. Church also contributed to the Human Genome Project, and in 2005 he helped start a company, the Personal Genome Project. Church proposed to use DNA from extinct species to clone and breed new organisms from those species.. Format: Articles Subject: People ...
Schatz, M. C. (2017) Nanopore sequencing meets epigenetics. Nat Methods, 14 (4). pp. 347-348. ISSN 1548-7091 Scholes, D. R., Dalrymple, J., Mesa, J. M., Banta, J. A., Paige, K. N. (2017) An assessment of the molecular mechanisms contributing to tolerance to apical damage in natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant Ecology, 218 (3). pp. 265-276. ISSN 1385-0237 Schorn, A. J., Gutbrod, M. J., LeBlanc, C., Martienssen, R. (2017) LTR-Retrotransposon Control by tRNA-Derived Small RNAs. Cell, 170 (1). 61-71.e11. ISSN 0092-8674 Sekiya, Michiko, Maruko-Otake, Akiko, Hearn, Stephen, Sakakibara, Yasufumi, Fujisaki, Naoki, Suzuki, Emiko, Ando, Kanae, Iijima, Koichi M. (2017) EDEM Function in ERAD Protects against Chronic ER Proteinopathy and Age-Related Physiological Decline in Drosophila. Developmental Cell, 41 (6). 652-664.e5. ISSN 1534-5807 Senturk, S., Shirole, N. H., Nowak, D. G., Corbo, V., Pal, D., Vaughan, A., Tuveson, D. A., Trotman, L. C., Kinney, J. B., Sordella, R. (2017) Rapid and ...
Nanoscale Volcanoes: Accretion of Matter at Ion-Sculpted Nanopores Understanding the diffusive properties of matter on a substrate surface as a result of an electric field driving force is helpful in creating arrays of nanosized pores which are useful in the application of DNA sequencing. Mitsui et al demonstrated that an ion beam generated electric field causes atoms on the surface of a substrate to be drawn toward nanopores that are behaving as "traps" for the matter. The diffused atoms close the nanopores and form volcanic ridges along the periphery. These atoms can diffuse longer distances than previously recorded in literature. ...
Ultrarapid DNA sequencing would allow physicians to acquire full on-the-spot genomic information and would therefore advance clinical practice to provide a level of care that would have been unbelievable just a few years ago. We are working to advance several critical limitations associated with ultrarapid DNA sequencing. Our approach involves nanopore strand sequencing, in which a single strand of DNA moves through a narrow pore, the alpha-hemolysin (aHL) protein nanopore, and the bases are identified as they pass a reading head.. We are investigating methods to control and monitor the translocation of single stranded DNA through a nanopore with single-nucleotide resolution. We have recently made a breakthrough in this field by designing the first supramolecular nanopore device capable of detecting up to nine consecutive DNA polymerase-catalyzed single nucleotide primer extensions with high sensitivity and spatial resolution (2.4 Å). In this setup, the polymerase acts as a molecular motor to ...
Selected publications; for a complete list and reprints, please vitit http://www.icp.uni-stuttgart.de/~mfyta/publ.html] B. Adhikari and M. Fyta, Towards double-functionalized small diamondoids: selective electronic band-gap tuning, Nanotechnology 26, 035701 (2015). M. Fyta, Stable boron nitride diamondoids as nanoscale materials", Nanotechnology 25, 365601 (2014). G. Sivaraman and M. Fyta, Derivatives of small diamondoids as biosensors for DNA nucleobases, Nanoscale 6, 4225 (2014). C.W. Hsu, M. Fyta, G. Lakatos, S. Melchionna, and E. Kaxiras, Ab initio determination of coarse-grained interactions in double-stranded DNA, J. Chem. Phys. 137(10), 105102 (2012). M. Fyta and R.R. Netz, Ionic force field optimization based on single-ion and ion-pair solvation properties: going beyond standard mixing rules, J. Chem. Phys. 136(12), 124103 (2012). M.Fyta, S. Melchionna, and S. Succi,Translocation of biomolecules through solid-state nanopores: theory meets experiments, J. Polym. Sci. B, 49, 985 (2011). A. ...
Selected publications; for a complete list and reprints, please vitit http://www.icp.uni-stuttgart.de/~mfyta/publ.html] B. Adhikari and M. Fyta, Towards double-functionalized small diamondoids: selective electronic band-gap tuning, Nanotechnology 26, 035701 (2015). M. Fyta, Stable boron nitride diamondoids as nanoscale materials", Nanotechnology 25, 365601 (2014). G. Sivaraman and M. Fyta, Derivatives of small diamondoids as biosensors for DNA nucleobases, Nanoscale 6, 4225 (2014). C.W. Hsu, M. Fyta, G. Lakatos, S. Melchionna, and E. Kaxiras, Ab initio determination of coarse-grained interactions in double-stranded DNA, J. Chem. Phys. 137(10), 105102 (2012). M. Fyta and R.R. Netz, Ionic force field optimization based on single-ion and ion-pair solvation properties: going beyond standard mixing rules, J. Chem. Phys. 136(12), 124103 (2012). M.Fyta, S. Melchionna, and S. Succi,Translocation of biomolecules through solid-state nanopores: theory meets experiments, J. Polym. Sci. B, 49, 985 (2011). A. ...
Companies in this industry take advantage of a particular element called a nanopore, a tiny channel through which an electrical current can flow and be measured by an electrode in a microchip, to read single strands of DNA. When a biomolecule enters the nanopore, it alters the current flow in a pattern that is characteristic of that molecule. Genia proposes using large arrays of nanopores to create DNA sequencing chips that allow the ability to pinpoint DNA bases during a specific biochemical reaction. The analysis of the data received reveals the sequence of the DNA strand. The difference in what Genia does, in comparison to other companies, is that Genias nanopore is a genetically engineered protein.. There is a lot of potential in nanopore-based sequencing and that can be seen by the NIHs recent award of a total of $17 million in funding to its "$1,000 Genome" grant program. The largest grant of $5.25 million went to the inventors of the technology used in Genias instruments. Current ...
There is much interest in replicating the exquisite ion selectivity of biological channels in synthetic pores, both for technological applications and as a means of comprehending the physical mechanisms at play in biology. For example, we still dont fully understand how proteins can distinguish between ions as similar as sodium and potassium. In our recent work we used the structure of two biological pores as inspiration for designing graphene nanopores that are selective for either K+ or Na+. While obtaining K+ selectivity was relatively easy, a number of strict criteria had to be followed to make a Na+ selective pore. Most interestingly, one of our pores displays voltage dependent selectivity: it prefers the passage of Na+ under low electric fields, but favours K+ when the strength of the field is increased. This novel phenomenon may have interesting technological applications as an electric field driven selectivity switch. While these graphene pores are difficult to make, studying such ...
For most biotechs, DNA analysis will need to be extended beyond simply visualizing the amplified samples. DNA sequencing centers have offered increasingly more affordable services over the past ten years, but if a small startup anticipates that sequencing will need to be performed often, it may make the most sense to invest in a dedicated piece of sequencing equipment.. Traditional DNA sequencing machines cost between $50,000 and $10 million, making them unattainable to any biotech startup lacking a sufficient capital grant. These devices take up significant physical space - with the smallest units being around the size of a desktop photocopier - and traditional workflows involve lengthy and complicated sample preparation.. In comparison, the MinION by Oxford Nanopore Technologies, takes a completely different approach to DNA and RNA sequencing. The system is made up of a portable device, which works with small reusable cartridges - flow cells - which contain protein nanopores, much like those ...
Oxford Nanopore Technologies develops nanopore-based electronic systems for analyzing single molecules, including DNA, RNA and proteins.
Single-molecule array-based approaches to genome sequencing have the potential to deliver a dramatic reduction in sequencing costs over bulk methods by reducing...
Biophysics and Soft Matter Physics: DNA elasticity and topology, DNA-protein interactions, DNA monolayers, protein nanopores, nuclear pore complex, chromatin structure and dynamics.. ...
A carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite nanopowder was consolidated by spark plasma sintering at the temperatures ranging from 650 to 1100 degrees C. It was found that the water released by dehydroxylation was trapped inside the nanopores in the densified HAp bodies over 900 degrees C. Based on the analysis by the X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry and scanning electron microscope, the water-nanopore system was evaluated and its effect on the grain growth was also investigated. It was revealed that the water existed inside the closed nanopores most probably resulted in the formation of local micro-hydrothermal environments inside bulk HAp ceramics during SPS. Therefore, the grain growth was enhanced by the local micro-hydrothermal reactions activated above 900 degrees C. In addition, abnormal grain growth was also observed when a higher temperature or higher heating rate was employed, which may be attributed to the local highly active hydrothermal reactions.. ...
Guest lecture by Mirkó Palla, PhD Abstract: Driven by the maturation of next-generation sequencing technologies, DNA sequencing has been dramatical...
Accurate blood glucose monitoring is critical for diabetes patients to tightly control their diseases. For decades, blood glucose monitoring technology has relied on the use of reagents, including enzymes, mediators, and buffers. This monitoring technology not only is prone to interference and instability of the reagent. The daily use of multiple glucose test strips or implantable glucose sensors has been a great burden to the country. We have developed a biomimetic sensor utilizing nanopore structures that does not use any reagent and is free from interference commonly encountered in the conventional blood glucose monitoring devices (E. Chen, Novel Nanopore Structured Electrochemical Biosensor US Patent 11785,660, October 2, 2008). This report is to present current progress in the study of interference, which is an important step towards prototyping. D (+) xylose, D(+) galactose, ascorbic acid and uric acid were studied using the FDA approved protocols and were shown to exhibit negligible interferences
Dr. Mirkin s article reflects the current sentiment of Medical Doctors. The body can convert most any food into the proper pH. Dr. Mirkin does not address the fact that many cancer patients have reduced saliva and urine pH. Dr. Mirkin does not cite any studies refuting the connection between lowered Saliva pH and lowered immune system performance. Dr. Mirkin does not cite any studies showing that a lowered immune system is often concurrent with the onset of Cancer. I feel the Medical community is doing the public a disservice by not testing more routinely for pH and advising nutir ...
The quality of the Oxford Nanopores long DNA sequence reads has been, to date, lower than other technologies, causing great interest to develop new algorit