Introduction: Silent cerebral microbleeds (CMB) are common in Moyamoya Disease (MMD) and Moyamoya syndrome (MMS) in Asia. The incidence was reported to be 30-40%. The presence of CMB was found to be a predictor for subsequent cerebral hemorrhage in MMD. The significance of CMB in MMD/MMS in non-Asian population has not been reported. We try to investigate the prevalence of CMB in MMD/MMS in United States and its predictive value for subsequent cerebral hemorrhage.. Methods: Moyamoya Database was established in our institution after reviewing patients with ICD9 code of Moyamoya Disease or Moyamoya Syndrome or cerebrovascular occlusive disease from 2007 to 2015. Patients in the database were reviewed retrospectively and included in the study if there were MR images (including GRE, SWI or T2* sequences) at diagnosis or during follow up and available for review. Patients with poor image quality were excluded. Patients were noted to have microbleeds if it was found on initial or follow up MRI. ...
We performed linkage analysis to map the locus of familial moyamoya disease on chromosome 17. Despite the small pedigree and the limited number of microsatellite markers on chromosome 17, we successfully identified the disease locus in the telomeric region of the long arm of chromosome 17. With the APM method, we confirmed the linkage at a significantly low P value. During the initial period of this study, we expected moyamoya disease to be related to the NF1 gene located on chromosome 17q11.2. The NF1 protein is a GTPase-activating protein that regulates cellular growth through control of the Ras oncogene. We hypothesized that aberration of this regulation might give rise to the proliferation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells in the internal carotid arteries and their branches. The present data, however, did not support the direct participation of the NF1 gene in the occurrence of moyamoya disease and instead indicated the importance of a distinct gene located closer to the telomere of ...
Wang MY, Steinberg GK. Rapid and near-complete resolution of moyamoya vessels in a patient with moyamoya disease treated with superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass. Pediatr Neurosurg. 1996;24(3):145-150.. Bowen M, Marks MP, Steinberg GK. Neuropsychological recovery from childhood moyamoya disease. Brain Dev.1998;20(2):119-123.. Golby AJ, Marks MP, Thompson RC, Steinberg GK. Direct and combined revascularization in pediatric moyamoya disease. Neurosurgery. 1999;45(1):50-58; discussion 58-60.. Woolfenden AR, Albers GW, Steinberg GK, Hahn JS, Johnston DC, Farrell K. Moyamoya syndrome in children with Alagille syndrome: additional evidence of a vasculopathy. Pediatrics. 1999;103(2):505-508.. Fleetwood I, Steinberg GK. Moyamoya disease. Can J Neurol Sci. 2000;27(4):325-327.. Lim M, Cheshier S, Steinberg GK. New vessel formation in the central nervous system during tumor growth, vascular malformations, and Moyamoya. Curr Neurovasc Res. 2006;3(3):237-245.. Kelly ME, Bell-Stephens ...
Moyamoya syndrome is a rare condition in which blood vessels at the base of the skull progressively narrow, limiting the flow of oxygenated blood to the brain. Surgical treatment options for Moyamoya syndrome include direct revascularization procedures such as an EC-IC bypass as well as indirect revascularization procedures like encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) and pial synangiosis. Here at Columbia University Medical Center/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, our neurosurgeons have particular expertise using these and other surgeries to treat patients with Moyamoya syndrome.. "Moyamoya" means "puff of smoke" in Japanese, and the condition is so named because the body grows a secondary network of small vessels in an effort to compensate for the restricted blood flow. On an arteriogram, the network of new vessels resembles a cloud-or puff of smoke. Moyamoya is more common in Japan than in the U.S., but it is unusual everywhere.. The blood vessel network that gives Moyamoya its name may lead to ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Understanding and treating moyamoya disease in children. AU - Jodi, L. Smith. PY - 2009/10/13. Y1 - 2009/10/13. N2 - Moyamoya disease, a known cause of pediatric stroke, is an unremitting cerebrovascular occlusive disorder of unknown etiology that can lead to devastating, permanent neurological disability if left untreated. It is characterized by progressive stenosis of the intracranial internal carotid arteries and their distal branches and the nearly simultaneous appearance of basal arterial collateral vessels that vascularize hypoperfused brain distal to the occluded vessels. Moyamoya disease may be idiopathic or may occur in association with other syndromes. Most children with moyamoya disease present with recurrent transient ischemic attacks or strokes. Although there is no definitive medical treatment, numerous direct and indirect revascularization procedures have been used to improve the compromised cerebral circulation, with outcomes varying according to procedure type. ...
Moyamoya disease: Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on moyamoya disease at PatientsLikeMe. 24 patients with moyamoya disease experience fatigue, depressed mood, pain, anxious mood, and insomnia and use Aspirin and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to treat their moyamoya disease and its symptoms.
The balance between heat production (metabolism) and heat removal (blood flow) helps in keeping the temperature of the brain constant. In patients with moyamoya disease, this balance may be disturbed. The purpose of this study was to assess the thermal pathophysiology of the brain in patients with moyamoya disease. The study included 12 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease and 10 controls. Temperature was measured by image postprocessing of diffusion-weighted images. Our noninvasive thermometry showed that the ventricular temperature of moyamoya disease patients was higher than that of normal controls. The mean temperature difference of 1.1 degrees C between the two groups was significant. Patients with moyamoya disease tend to have elevated ventricular temperatures, which may represent a mismatch between cerebral metabolism and perfusion.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Surgical Treatment for Patients with Moyamoya Syndrome and Type 1 Neurofibromatosis. AU - Porras,Jose L.. AU - Yang,Wuyang. AU - Garzon-Muvdi,Tomas. AU - Xu,Risheng. AU - Blakeley,Jaishri. AU - Belzberg,Allan. AU - Caplan,Justin M.. AU - Khalid,Syed. AU - Colby,Geoffrey P.. AU - Coon,Alexander L.. AU - Tamargo,Rafael J.. AU - Ahn,Edward S.. AU - Huang,Judy. PY - 2017/3/1. Y1 - 2017/3/1. N2 - Introduction The current study describes the impact of surgery in preventing follow-up ipsilateral transient ischemic attacks (TIAs)/strokes in an East Coast North American cohort of patients with both moyamoya syndrome (MMS) and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) (MMS-NF1). Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of patients with MMS and NF1 at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions from 1990-2014. Baseline characteristics and follow-up results including subsequent ipsilateral strokes were collected and compared between a revascularization group (group 1) and a conservatively managed group ...
Symptoms, treatment, risks, and surgery | Dr. Newell has 25+ years of experience helping with Moyamoya Disease. Moyamoya disease is a progressive disorder of the cerebral vessel.
Moyamoya syndrome (sometimes referred as Moyamoya disease also) is predominantly a problem observed in kids. It is a rare medical complexity when the walls of carotid arteries
MACHADO, Sheila Braga; MENDES, Florentino Fernandes and ANGELINI, Adriana de Campos. Moyamoya disease and sevoflurane anesthesia outside the surgery center: case report. Rev. Bras. Anestesiol. [online]. 2002, vol.52, n.3, pp.344-347. ISSN 0034-7094. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0034-70942002000300010.. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Moyamoya disease is a progressive cerebrovascular disorder implying anesthetic challenges due to patients poor brain perfusion, in addition to being a major cause for stroke in young people. This report aimed at describing a case of Moyamoya s disease in a patient submitted to general anesthesia with sevoflurane for a diagnostic procedure outside the surgery center. CASE REPORT: Male child, 13 years old, physical status ASA IV, with Moyamoya disease and neurological sequelae after three previous strokes, chronic renal failure and systemic hypertension admitted for high digestive endoscopy. In the supine position and after monitoring, inhalational induction was attained ...
Objective: The etiology of Moyamoya disease is still widely unknown. Several publications on Moyamoya describe differences of cytokine and growth factor concentrations in different specimen. We analyzed the DNA of patients with Moyamoya disease for single nucleotide polymorphisms in and upstream of the genes for previously described associated cytokines and growth factors.. Methods: 13 SNPs were genotyped in or upstream to 4 genes (bFGF, CRABP1, PDGFRB, TGFB1) comparing 40 DNA samples of Moyamoya disease patients to 68 healthy controls from central Europe. Genotyping was performed by sequencing the SNP containing genetic regions with custom made primers.. Results: We found association of two SNPs: rs382861 [A/C] (p=0.0373, OR=1.81, 95% CI=1.03-3.17) in the promoter region of PDGFR and rs1800471[C/G] (p=0.0345, OR=7.65, 95% CI=0.97-59.95), located in the first exon of TGFB1.. Conclusions: Our results indicate possible genetic risk factors for the genesis of Moyamoya disease. TGFB1 and PDGF(R) are ...
UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot : 73 Moyamoya disease 2: A progressive cerebral angiopathy characterized by bilateral intracranial carotid artery stenosis and telangiectatic vessels in the region of the basal ganglia. The abnormal vessels resemble a puff of smoke (moyamoya) on cerebral angiogram. Affected individuals can develop transient ischemic attacks and/or cerebral infarction, and rupture of the collateral vessels can cause intracranial hemorrhage. Hemiplegia of sudden onset and epileptic seizures constitute the prevailing presentation in childhood, while subarachnoid bleeding occurs more frequently in adults ...
Dr. Rudrajit Kanjilal, Neuro-surgeon at CMRI. Moyamoya disease is a well recognized phenomenon since 1940s, though it is a relatively uncommon cerebrovascular disorder which at times occur due to familial reason or genetic mutation. Originally, it was thought that the disease was region specific, specially Japan and other Asian countries, since it was first discovered in Japan. However, now we have seen that all races are equally prone to developing this disease. Arguably, its occurance is higher in Asian countries than in Europe or North America. The name of the disorder "Moyamoya" has been derived from Japanese language which means "puff of smoke". This exactly describes the appearance of the bunch of tangled tiny vessels formed at the base of the brain. In Japan it is a genetic, familial disease, while in India, it is sporadic, we dont see a familial trend in Indian subcontinent. It is idiopathic and mostly happen due to genetic mutation, but the incidence is not very rare. Causes and ...
A 45-year-old male patient with moyamoya disease is scheduled for a superficial temporal to middle cerebral artery bypass. He has a past medical history of hypertension and stroke with residual left...
The described features are those of Moyamoya disease with occluded distal ICAs as well as left MCA causing extensive acute left cerebral infarction. The Ivy sign refers to the leptomeningeal hyper intense FLAIR signal or brighnt sulci due to sl...
Case A 44-year-old man from Bangladesh presented with acute psychotic episodes of visual, auditory and tactile hallucinations, paranoia, somatoform disorders and non-epileptic attacks. He had a 3-year history of mental health disorders and was later admitted to the hospital with a headache and hemiparesis secondary to an intraventricular haemorrhage. The neuroimaging showed characteristic appearances of Moyamoya disease. Neurosurgical multidisciplinary meeting discussion opted for conservative management and stroke rehabilitation. Despite the improvement of his neurological deficits, he continued to show apathy, depression, psychogenic attacks with features of executive dysfunction. Due to family history of juvenile death in the family, the patient had genetic testing and was found to have the mutation in the gene Ring finger protein 213 (RNF213). ...
Dr. Peter Nakaji in Phoenix, AZ, treats Moyamoya Disease, a rare cerebrovascular disease caused by blocked arteries at the base of the brain.
Moyamoya disease diagnostics (costs for program #260949) ✔ Academic Hospital Bogenhausen ✔ Department of Neurology, Neurophysiology, Neuropsychology and Stroke Unit ✔ BookingHealth.com
Moyamoya disease diagnostics (costs for program #260853) ✔ University Hospital Münster ✔ Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, General Pediatrics ✔ BookingHealth.com
Moyamoya Disease (MMD) is characterized by the uni- or bi-lateral occlusion of primarily the internal carotid artery, with subsequent development of fragile, abnormal collateral vessels. Diagnosis is difficult and usually occurs following clinical presentation of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke, seizures, migraines or developmental issues.. With access to samples from a uniquely large cohort of patients at Stanford, along with cutting edge techniques, we are able to comprehensively study several aspects of MMD pathology, including genetics, gene expression, proteomics, tissue ultrastructure and autoantibody expression. Together, these technologies may identify a specific set of molecules that identify MMD in patients earlier for more effective interventions. Our high throughput genetic and epigenetic studies aim to screen for genetic changes that underlie the Moyamoya disease, which will help identify novel candidates for diagnosis of moyamoya disease.. In one of the most ambitious efforts in MMD ...
Moyamoya is a disease in which certain arteries in the brain are constricted and blood flow in the brain is blocked by the constriction.
Moyamoya disease (MMD) is an occlusive cerebrovascular disease characterized by stenosis of the terminal aspect of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal network of basal vessels.1 The etiology of MMD is unknown, but both congenital and acquired processes may play a role in its development. The incidence of disease is 4.6 times higher in Asian Americans as compared to their Caucasian counterparts and shows a predominance for females.1 Catheter angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis, but due to its invasive nature MRA has gained in popularity. On MRA, the classic "puff of smoke" may be visualized due to collateral vessel formation after arterial stenosis. Patients who are conservatively managed experience stroke at a rate of 3.2%-15.0% annually.2 In those who underwent postoperative direct revascularization, the annual stroke rate decreased to 0.0%-1.6%, while those who had undergone postoperative indirect revascularization presented an annual stroke rate of 0%-14.3% ...
The exact function of RNF213 is unknown. Recent in vivo experiments using genetically engineered RNF213 mice addressed the mechanism underlying the RNF213 SNPs in the development of MMD pathology. The target disruption of RNF213 did not induce MMD in the RNF213-defcient mice under normal conditions [33]. Kanoke and colleagues alternatively generated RNF213-knock-in mice that expressed a missense mutation in the mouse RNF213, p.R4828K, on Exon 61, which corresponds to the human RNF213, p.R4859K, on Exon 60 in MMD patients; however, these mice did not develop MMD under normal conditions [34]. These negative results could be consistent with the low penetrance rate of the RNF213 polymorphisms in patients with MMD, and may indicate the importance of environmental factors in addition to the genetic factors [35]. They subjected the RNF213-deficient mice to an ischemic insult, and found that the post-ischemic angiogenesis was significantly enhanced in the mice lacking RNF213 after a chronic hindlimb ...
The image displayed here is an internal carotid angiogram taken from a different patient with a more typical Moyamoya disease angiogram. The black arrow points to the "puff of smoke" which represents neovascularization providing collateral blood flow. There is stenosis of the internal carotid artery proximal to this puff of smoke. The white arrow points to a dilated ophthalmic artery which is providing collateral circulation as well. Moyamoya disease is a disease of the large cerebral vessels that results in a network of small collateral vessels that form a pattern on angiography resembling a "puff" or "hazy cloud" of smoke (the English translation of the Japanese term, moyamoya). Diseased vessels may narrow and occlude resulting in transient ischemic attacks and/or cerebral infarcts, or they may rupture resulting in spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage. Patients may also present with headaches. This condition presents largely in childhood and is uncommon (Despite this, three likely cases have ...
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Results A total of 91 infarct patterns were observed from 66 patients. The gyral, atypical territorial, and honeycomb patterns, which are not usually seen in conventional stroke patients, were common in MMD (68.1%). Among all patterns, a gyral pattern was most common (40/91, 44.0%). Borderzone and deep lacunar patterns were infrequent. Gyral and borderzone patterns were more frequently seen in the C-MMD group, whereas a honeycomb pattern was not seen in young patients. Honeycomb pattern was more common at advanced vascular stages. Infarctions confined to the cortex were more common in the C-MMD group (26/32, 75.0%) than in A-MMD patients (14/34, 41.2%). ...
The Stanford Moyamoya Center offers a highly experienced group of professionals who see several new moyamoya patients each week, making Stanford the largest moyamoya referral center in the world ...
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Authors Mark S. Gerber, MD Robert F. Spetzler, MD Division of Neurological Surgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Josephs Hospital and Medical
Principal Investigator:MIYATAKE Satoko, Project Period (FY):2014-04-01 - 2017-03-31, Research Category:Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C), Section:一般, Research Field:Pediatrics
Moyamoya Disease is a progressive disease that affects the blood vessels in the brain (cerebrovascular). It is characterized by narrowing and/or closing of the main artery to the brain (carotid).
Hi i was just looking for forums on Neurofibromatosis and on MoyaMoya and couldnt find any so i thought i would try here. I have a family history of neurofibromatsis and my 16 y old daughter has moyamoya and its getting worse. trying to find where to post so i can post more info on things. :)
Preoperative symptoms included headache in 3 patients, transient ischemic attack in 10, cerebral infarction in 3, and intracranial hemorrhage in 4 patients. Intervals between the initial bypass surgery and repeat bypass surgery were 0.3-30 years (median 3 years). In group A, superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis and indirect bypass were performed on 7 hemispheres. Only indirect bypass was performed on 3 hemispheres because of the lack of suitable donor or recipient arteries. In group B, occipital artery (OA) to PCA anastomosis and indirect bypass were conducted on 4 hemispheres, and OA-MCA anastomosis and indirect bypass on 1 hemisphere. Only indirect bypass was conducted on 7 hemispheres because of the lack of suitable recipient arteries. All 22 repeat bypass surgeries were successfully conducted. During follow-up periods (median 4 years), none of the patients suffered repeat stroke except 1 patient who died of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage 3 years after ...
The course of MMD spans from clinical silence for several years to rapid progression.5,7 Its severity can be classified into six stages based on Suzukis classification, which highlights the angiographic evolution of the disease (Table 1).8,9 A management plan is decided accordingly.. There is no curative treatment for arterial occlusion regression or Moyamoya vessel prevention. Due to the more progressive nature of the disease in the pediatric population, treatment is geared toward preventing irreversible brain damage.8,12 Treatment is strongly recommended for symptomatic adults since the stroke rate is estimated at 10% to 15% per year compared with 3% in asymptomatic patients.7,9,11,12. The mainstay of treatment in symptomatic patients with ischemic MMD is surgical revascularization.9,12 The goal is to improve cerebral blood flow and prevent infarction. Direct or indirect bypass has been shown to improve blood flow and decrease ischemic events postoperatively.12 Post-op complications may ...
Moyamoya.com - Online Store Online Store Search page. Worldwide support group for sufferers of MoyaMoya Disease and their families. Help stread the word by getting your Moyamoya.com merchandise here!
Expertise, Disease and Conditions: Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (ASH), Arteriovenous Malformations (AVM), Brain Cancer, Brain Hemorrhage, Brain Tumors, Carotid Artery Stenosis, Cavernous Malformations, Cerebellar Ataxia, Cerebral Aneurysms, Cerebral Revascularization, Cerebrovascular Diseases, Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease, Chiari Malformations, Complex Skull Reconstruction, Cranioplasty, Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas, Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Moyamoya Disease, Neurosurgery, Spinal Vascular ...
TY - GEN. T1 - LARTERIOGRAFIA NELLA DIAGNOSI DI MALATTIA DI MOYAMOYA IN PAZIENTI CON SINDROME DI DOWN. AU - Vicari, S.. AU - Albertini, G.. PY - 1990. Y1 - 1990. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025589297&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025589297&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Contributo a conferenza. AN - SCOPUS:0025589297. VL - 36. SP - 977. EP - 981. BT - Rivista di Neurobiologia. ER - ...
BACKGROUND:Moyamoya disease (MMD) is an idiopathic disease caused by progressive steno-occlusion of the distal internal carotid artery. Ideal surgical treatment for adult patients with ischemic-type MMD has not been achieved. The aim of this study wa...
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen children and young adults (8 female patients; age, 9.7 ± 7.1 years; range, 1-23 years) with Moyamoya disease underwent cerebral perfusion imaging with H2[15O]-PET (Discovery STE PET/CT, 3D Fourier rebinning filtered back-projection, 128 × 128 × 47 matrix, 2.34 × 2.34 × 3.27 mm3 voxel spacing) and arterial spin-labeling (3T scanner, 3D pulsed continuous arterial spin-labeling sequence, 32 axial sections, TR = 5.5 seconds, TE = 25 ms, FOV = 24 cm, 128 × 128 matrix, 1.875 × 1.875 × 5 mm3 voxel spacing) within less than 2 weeks of each other. Perfusion of left and right anterior cerebral artery, MCA, and posterior cerebral artery territories was qualitatively assessed for arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[15O]-PET by 2 independent readers by use of a 3-point-Likert scale. Quantitative correlation of relative CBF with cerebellar normalization between arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[15O]-PET was evaluated in a volume-based approach for each ...
Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular syndrome characterized by progressive stenosis and occlusion of the internal carotid arteries and other cir..
There will be without any doubt a place for quality articles in the area of neurosurgery showing ways and techniques that could assist in the treatment of occlusive cerebrovascular diseases, spinal cord and encephalic arteriovenous malformations cerebral aneurysms, cavernomas, dural fistulas, cerebral and cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebellar moyamoya disease and techniques to perform cerebral arterial encephalic bypass ...
Vascular neurosurgery is a major focus of the group, both clinically and in the laboratory. We have extensive experience in the management of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), aneurysms, and occlusive diseases such as carotid artery stenosis and moyamoya disease. Many complex brain vascular disorders and some brain tumours are best managed with bypass grafts and our group is recognised nationally and internationally for our expertise with these techniques. We work closely with the interventional neuroradiologists at Macquarie University Hospital in the management of neurovascular cases. Our patient centric, multidisciplinary approach ensures risks and alternatives have been considered when establishing a care plan ...
Dr. E. Sander Connolly Jr. serves as the Surgical Director of the Neuro-Intensive Care Unit, caring for patients suffering from the acute effects of both hemorrhagic as well as ischemic stroke. Working as part of an extremely experienced and world-renowned team of critical care and stroke neurologists, as well as interventional radiologists, endovascular neurosurgeons, neuroanesthesiologists, and specialized nurse practitioners, he provides highly personalized, state-of-the-art care for patients with brain aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and spontaneous hemorrhages, as well as for those patients with carotid stenosis, Moyamoya disease, and cerebral ischemia due to atherosclerosis and other vasculopathies. In addition, he serves as Director of the Cerebrovascular Research Laboratory, which continues to be at the forefront of biomedical science, bringing the latest discoveries to the operating room and the patient bedside to not only treat but also prevent stroke.. Dr. Connollys special ...
The RNF213 gene encodes a cytosolic protein consisting of a RING finger domain and two AAA+ ATPase domains. The protein possesses E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and ATPase activity and it specifically targets FLNA and NFATC2 downstream of RSPO3 for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. This leads to the inhibition of the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway involved in vascular development. The protein thus plays a key role in angiogenesis, particularly in sprouting angiogenesis.. Genome wide association studies have helped identify a link between RNF213 mutations and susceptibility to Moyamoya Disease 2, a disorder characterized by intracranial carotid artery occlusion, basal ganglia telangiectases and inflammatory arteriopathy. Animal studies have helped reinforce the role of the protein in vascular growth; knockdown of the RNF213 ortholog in zebrafish has been found to result in abnormal vascular development, notably causing deficient sprouting vessels in the head. ...
Moyamoya disease is a rare, progressive cerebrovascular disorder caused by blocked arteries at the base of the brain in an area called the basal ganglia. The name
Dr Tollesson offers treatments for brain conditions which include brain tumours, epilepsy, moyamoya disease and hydrocephalus, in Spring Hill and Rockhampton, QLD.
Three weeks ago she had a cerebral angiogram done. That is a artery study of her brain. The purpose is to look at the brain and see if there is any other problems with the arteries and does she have good blood flow and also does she have the brain disease MoyaMoya which is what they think she has. The procedure was about and hour and half. She did great while she was under but in recovery she had to lay still for 4 hours to make sure the artery in her leg/groin area clotted and there was no bleeding. For a 2 year old to lay still is impossible, so she was heavily sedated and slept really well. She would try to roll and we (Dan or I) would put a hand on her leg to stop her. A week later Dan and I meet with her neuro-surgeon for the results. Her brain looks really good and the arteries look great and so does the blood flow. Of course there is a but to the story and that is there are some abnormalities on the brain. There are new tiny new arteries that are forming and the Doctor does not know why. ...
Hi im not even sure what to write here.. so i will post this IN DEC. 2010 MY DAUGHTER ELIZABETH 15 Y OLD AT THE TIME HAD A MASSIVE STROKE.. DURING THIS PERIOD OF TIME SHE WAS DIGANOSED WITH A DISORDERED CALLED MOYAMOYA.... THIS IS DISORDER WHERE THE CAROTID ARTERY CLOSES OFF AND NOTHING CAN BE DONE. IN APRIL 2011 AND MAY 2011 THEY DID BRAIN BYPASS OPERATIONS TO TRY TO GET HER BRAIN THE O2 AND BLOOD SUPLLY IT NEEDS. THEY DID NOT TAKE. THEY HAVE TOLD ME THAT SHE WILL CONTINUE TO HAVE
METHODS We performed echo-planar perfusion studies in 19 patients with a 1.5-T unit, using a free-induction-decay echo-planar sequence for 14 examinations and a turbo-gradient-spin-echo echo-planar sequence for five examinations. After a bolus injection of contrast material, 30 consecutive scans were done in 10 sections every 2 seconds. The data were analyzed to yield time-intensity curves for a region of interest set in the territory of the bilateral middle and/or anterior cerebral arteries in all examinations and to produce semiquantitative flow maps of each section, representing the signal decrease due to passage of contrast material in 17 examinations. The semiquantitative flow maps were compared with single-photon emission CT (SPECT) findings in 11 cases. ...