The Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, Georgia, is one of seven national primate research centers funded by the National Institutes of Health. It is known for its biomedical and behavioral studies with nonhuman primates. Its 25-acre (10 ha) Main Station contains most of the centers biomedical research laboratories. The center also includes the 117-acre (47 ha) Yerkes Field Station near Lawrenceville, Georgia. The center was established in 1930 by Robert Yerkes, in Orange Park, Florida, associated then with Yale University. Yerkes was a pioneering primatologist who specialized in comparative psychology. In 1965, it relocated to its present location on the campus of Emory University. The Field Station houses 3,400 animals, specializes in behavioral studies of primate social groups, and is located 30 miles (48 km) northeast of Atlanta, on 117 acres (47 ha) of wooded land. The Living Links Center is a part of the Yerkes National Primate Research Center run by primatologist Frans De ...
Exciting opportunity in Davis, CA for University of California Davis as a Clinical Laboratory Scientist - California National Primate Research Center
Affiliations: Yerkes National Primate Research Center, New England National Primate Research Center Mission: The Laboratory for Cognitive Neurobiology is focused on understanding the neurological basis in health and disease of higher cognitive functions including learning, memory and executive system functions.. Principal Research Programs: The main program is centered on the effects of aging in the central nervous system of the rhesus monkey, "Macaca mulatta". Monkeys are initially behaviorally tested to assess their memory and cognitive functions, after which the brains are examined to determine the structural, neurochemical and functional changes that may account for age-related cognitive impairments. Other investigations are examing the interaction of aging with untreated hypertension and with recovery from cortical stroke. Another study using behavioral, anatomical and fMRI methods examines the interaction of the prefrontal cortex and medial temporal limbic system in memory and executive ...
With the help of many colleagues and collaborators, the current study shows how well a ZIKV DNA vaccine called VRC5283 protects rhesus macaque offspring from viral infection. Although often unnoticed in adults, the virus can be particularly dangerous for fetuses. Infected mothers can be completely absent of symptoms but transmitting the virus to their fetus exposes them to potential health issues including: fetal death, microcephaly (abnormally small brain), and other abnormal developments. A combination of these symptoms is referred to as Congenital Zika Syndrome (CZS) and is most likely to develop when women become infected with Zika virus between the first and second trimester of pregnancy. Given the likelihood that women may not be aware of a pregnancy until many weeks post conception, researchers are working hard to develop a vaccine to protect all adolescent girls and women of child-bearing age ...
Chantek (December 17, 1977 - August 7, 2017), born at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, was a male hybrid Sumatran/Bornean orangutan who mastered the use of a number of intellectual skills, including American Sign Language (ASL), taught by American anthropologists Lyn Miles and Ann Southcombe. In Malay and Indonesian, cantik (pronounced chanteek) means "lovely" or "beautiful". Born at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Chantek was transferred to the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) when he was nine months old. Miles was the director of a research project to study apes, and she and a few student volunteers cared for him the first several months after his arrival. Dr. Miles taught him his first signs, "food-eat" and "drink". Soon after this her teaching schedule made it necessary to hire an assistant, Ann Southcombe. Ann had experience raising seven baby gorillas at the Cincinnati Zoo and was the first "mother" and "teacher" for Michael, ...
The Confocal Microscopy and Molecular Pathology Core is housed within the Division of Comparative Pathology. The Confocal Microscopy and Molecular Pathology Core (CMMPC) provides research support and training with molecular pathology skills, confocal microscopy, image analysis, and multicolor immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization techniques for internal and affiliate scientists.. Services include assistance with experimental design, antibody selection, molecular probe selection, fixation and staining protocols, operating fluorescent and confocal microscopes, acquiring and storing imaging data, interpretation of results, and generation of publication quality images.. Image analysis services include assistance with capturing images for evaluation and with use of various image analysis software. In addition, core personnel perform these services to investigators, as well as provide training and support to core and affiliate scientists and graduate students.. ...
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Animal activist alleges another incident at primate center - Media Coverage - Stop Animal Exploitation NOW! - Exposing the truth to wipe out animal experimentation
USDA cites primate center - Media Coverage - Stop Animal Exploitation NOW! - Exposing the truth to wipe out animal experimentation
Jeffrey T. Jensen is the Leon Speroff Professor and vice chair for research in the Department of Ob/Gyn and a professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at OHSU. He is also the director of the Womens Health Research Unit at OHSU and a senior scientist at the Oregon National Primate Research Center.. Jensen is currently the principal investigator at OHSU of the federally funded Contraception Clinical Trials Network. At the primate research center, he is co-principal investigator of the federally funded U-54 Contraception Development Research Center, and the director of the Oregon Permanent Contraception Research Center. His lab investigates novel contraceptive strategies using the nonhuman primate model. Research collaborations include his work as a consulting scientist and member of the International Committee for Contraception Research of the Population Council.. Jensen is also the editor of Ob/Gyn Clinical Alert and as deputy editor for the journal Contraception.. ...
First author of the study is Sunayana Banerjee, who conducted the research while she was a post-doctoral fellow at Emory. Co-senior author is Kerry Ressler - a psychiatrist focused on PTSD who was formerly with the Yerkes National Primate Research Center and Emory University and is now at Mclean Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Co-authors include research specialist Hadj Aoued and Emory undergraduates Vanessa Gutzeit, Justin Baman and Nandini Doshi. The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health grants R21MH102191 and R01DC008343 and the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs Primate Centers P51OD11132 ...
Changes in a female monkeys social status lead to changes in her immune system, and researchers writing in this weeks edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) Early Edition suggest that the findings may be applicable to humans as well.. The research, which was led by Jenny Tung, currently a visiting assistant professor in Duke Universitys evolutionary anthropology department and a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Chicago at the time of the study, is said to be the first to utilize an experimental approach to analyze how gene expression patters across a range of genes correlates with the social dominance of an animal, the Durham, North Carolina-based school said in a press release on Monday.. Emory University, home of the Yerkes National Primate Research Center (where the research was conducted), said that Tung and her colleagues studied 49 female rhesus macaques and could determine the social rank of each macaque, without looking at the animal itself, ...
Washington National Primate Research Center The WaNPRC is one of a number of very large primate research facilities in the United States. Other facilities with very large populations (generally 2000 or more) include the other seven NPRCs: Yerkes, New England, Oregon, Tulane, Wisconsin, California, and Southwest. Other large facilities include New Iberia, Manheimer, Wake Forest,…
Studies show that the life expectancy can vastly differ between people of high and low wealth, attributed to access to medical care, differences in habits, exercise and diet, but the stress of living with a lower social status could potentially affect your immune system.. A study of monkeys was undertaken after previous studies suggest that social status could affect the way genes switch on and off within immune cells. The new study, which was undertaken at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University in Georgia, looked at female rhesus monkeys.. The scientists put 45 unrelated monkeys that had never met into new social groups, and watched how the monkeys treated each other to see who did the bullying and who cowered.. The monkeys in the newly created groups formed a pecking order of seniority, with those who were introduced to the groups earlier usually ranking higher than those who came later.. The immune cells were then taken from the monkeys and measured the activity of ...
Inherited retinal degenerations are a common cause of untreatable blindness worldwide, with retinitis pigmentosa and cone dystrophy affecting approximately 1 in 3500 and 1 in 10,000 individuals, respectively. A major limitation to the development of effective therapies is the lack of availability of animal models that fully replicate the human condition. Particularly for cone disorders, rodent, canine, and feline models with no true macula have substantive limitations. By contrast, the cone-rich macula of a nonhuman primate (NHP) closely mirrors that of the human retina. Consequently, well-defined NHP models of heritable retinal diseases, particularly cone disorders that are predictive of human conditions, are necessary to more efficiently advance new therapies for patients. We have identified 4 related NHPs at the California National Primate Research Center with visual impairment and findings from clinical ophthalmic examination, advanced retinal imaging, and electrophysiology consistent with ...
...Key differences in immune system signaling and the production of speci...Following the identification of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) as ...Surprisingly the natural hosts for the AIDS viruses such as the mang...A team of scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center and ...,Why,some,primates,,but,not,humans,,can,live,with,immunodeficiency,viruses,and,not,progress,to,AIDS,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
Staff at the Jacobsen Library are pleased to announce the launch of The Nash Collection of Primates in Art and Illustration, a searchable and browsable collection of historical images that illustrate how nonhuman primates have been depicted over time. The collection is a collaboration between Stephen Nash, Scientific Illustrator and Adjunct Associate Professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and staff of the Lawrence Jacobsen Library at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin, and is hosted by the University of Wisconsins Digital Collections Center.. ...
Cytomegalovirus, or CMV, is a common virus found in almost every person on the planet. For most of them, it causes no harm and leads to no symptoms. But for newborn babies and people with compromised immune systems, it can lead to birth defects, serious illness and even death.. Now, researchers associated with the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) at the University of California, Davis have discovered that low levels of CMV changed microbe and immune cell populations and response to the flu vaccine in rhesus macaques. CMV infection generally increased immune activity but also diminished antibodies responding to influenza vaccination. The study also found that low levels of CMV make the body susceptible to changes in environmental conditions that could accentuate their impact.. "Subclinical CMV infection alters the immune system and the gut microbiota in the host and that impacts how we respond to vaccines, environmental stimuli and pathogens," said Satya Dandekar, who chairs ...
Inherited retinal degenerations are a common cause of untreatable blindness worldwide, with retinitis pigmentosa and cone dystrophy affecting approximately 1 in 3500 and 1 in 10,000 individuals, respectively. A major limitation to the development of effective therapies is the lack of availability of animal models that fully replicate the human condition. Particularly for cone disorders, rodent, canine, and feline models with no true macula have substantive limitations. By contrast, the cone-rich macula of a nonhuman primate (NHP) closely mirrors that of the human retina. Consequently, well-defined NHP models of heritable retinal diseases, particularly cone disorders that are predictive of human conditions, are necessary to more efficiently advance new therapies for patients. We have identified 4 related NHPs at the California National Primate Research Center with visual impairment and findings from clinical ophthalmic examination, advanced retinal imaging, and electrophysiology consistent with ...
Associate Professor, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics Contact information [email protected] Other positions Core Scientist, Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison, WI Education B.A., Northwestern University, 1978 Ph.D., Anthropology, Yale University, 1989 Research interests My research is focused on the genetics and genomics of nonhuman primates. These
Residents are invited to attend an informational meeting Tuesday night in Mandeville to discuss an ongoing investigation at the Tulane National Primate Research Center.
The National Institutes of Health has awarded an Emory-led research consortium $15 million over five years for renewal of a grant aimed at better understanding and improving human immune responses to vaccination. The grant builds on the pioneering accomplishments of the research team over the past several years in developing "systems biology" methods to accurately predict the efficacy of vaccination in humans, and providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms that drive effective immunity to vaccination.. The grants principal investigator is Bali Pulendran, PhD, whose laboratory is widely credited with launching the field of "systems vaccinology." Pulendran is Charles Howard Candler Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, the Emory Vaccine Center and Yerkes National Primate Research Center. Systems vaccinology combines immunology, genomics and bioinformatics to predict the effectiveness of a vaccine without exposing individuals to infection, and offers a means ...
Tis the season to eat, drink and be merry! And perhaps a few of those seasonal sips will be of the adult variety. So maybe its not a huge surprise that a study published in December 2013 by OHSU researchers got a bit more coverage in recent weeks. The study, whose senior author was Kathy Grant of the OHSU Brain Institute and OHSUs Oregon National Primate Research Center, found that moderate drinking may help boost … Read More. ...
Programs of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center are supported by the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP) of the National Institutes of Health through Award Number P51OD011106 ...
Abhijit Chaudhari (UC Davis, USA) Abhijit J. Chaudhari, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Radiology at the University of California Davis. He also serves at the Director of the UC Davis Center for Molecular and Genomic Imaging (CMGI) and is a Core Scientist with the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) and Co-Leader of the…
If the same pattern is found in people infected with HIV, the finding could lead to a treatment strategy that slows the production of this restraining type of T cell. This would let the immune soldiers go after the virus more aggressively.. The scientists dont know if the simian virus is directly causing the build-up of the inhibitory T cells, called regulatory T cells, but in any case, reducing regulatory T-cell production could boost the bodys resistance to the evasive virus.. The research was a collaboration among scientists at the Cincinnati Childrens Hospital, UC Davis School of Medicine, and the California National Primate Center.. Regulatory T cells, or Tregs, normally tamp down immune-system attacks, presumably to prevent an over-active assault that can cause harmful inflammation or auto-immune disease. The scientists suspect that the high number of Treg cells in the infected primates might prevent their immune systems from mounting a full-on attack against the virus.. The researchers ...
A scientist jumps at the chance to study the blood of four Ebola survivors to better understand how the immune system responds to the deadly virus. 1 Comment. ...
Mustached tamarins, being callitrichines, have distinguishing features that set them apart from other New World monkeys. These include their diminutive body size and the presence of claw-like nails on all digits except the hallux. Mustached tamarins have also lost both their upper and lower 3rd molars and the hypocones on their upper molars. The dental formula is 2.1.3.2 / 2.1.3.2. Tamarins have spatulate incisors that are shorter than their canines, unlike marmosets which have incisors and canines of more similar size. The labial and lingual sides of their incisors are also thickened with enamel. Mustached tamarins have jet black pelage on their body and tail and a characteristic white stripe on their upper lip, which gives the appearance of a "white mustache." Mustached tamarins do not have prehensile tails. Mustached tamarins do not exhibit sexual dimorphism and there are only minor differences in body and canine size between males and females. On average, adult male mustached tamarins weigh ...
ABSCN-5 Includes: SRV, SIV, STLV, Herpes B Surrogate Marker, Measles. ABSCN-8 Includes: SRV, SIV, STLV, Herpes B Surrogate Marker, Measles, RhCMV, SFV, RRV. ABSCN-Custom Includes: ABSCN-8 and addtional agents by request (SV40, LCV, custom).. The Antibody Screen panels utilize Multiplex Microbead ImmunoAssays to detect the hosts humoral immune response to various infectious agents. The panels simultaneously detect virus-specific antibodies in serum, plasma or other body fluids. The antibody screen assays are run on a Luminex platform using panels of microbeads coated with purified antigens. Each antigen bead has uniquely identifiable spectral signature. Microbeads are incubated with diluted serum samples so that any specific antibodies present will bind to the matching antigen coated beads. The beads are washed, and reacted with phycoerythrin-conjugated detection reagents. After additional washing, independent gated events for each bead are counted and analyzed in a Luminex cytometer. The median ...
Aug 1, 2013--Press release from the California National Primate Research Center. Collaborative efforts add critical information to understanding effects of BPA. BPA (bisphenol A), is used in the manufacturing of various plastics and food packaging, consumer products, some paper receipts, and medical devices. It is controversial because it exerts weak, but detectable, hormone-like properties which can mimic estrogen and may lead to far-ranging negative health effects including increased cardiovascular disease and diabetes in adults, increased cancer rates, including breast cancer, neurological difficulties, and hormonal and reproductive issues in both sexes and at all stages of life.. Recent results from research at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) have shown that fetal BPA?exposure during a critical window of susceptibility in the third trimester, at levels similar to those measured in human blood, caused an increase in mucin genes and mucous cell maturation in the lungs ...
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http://www.davisenterprise.com/local-news/group-says-primate-center-usda-covered-up-negligence/ Group says Primate Center, USDA covered up negligence By Cory Golden (Davis Enterprise) April 19, 2001 Group says Primate Center, USDA covered up negligence An animal-rights group on Tuesday accused the California National Primate Research Center and U.S. Department of Agriculture of covering up negligence in the death of research monkeys. Michael Budkie, executive director of the Ohio-based group Stop Animal Exploitation Now!, said UC Davis and USDA did not respond to an anonymous whistleblower complaint about deaths in the center�s outdoor enclosures. As a result, he said, at least 36 more animals died under similar circumstances. "Obviously, there are issues within UC Davis with regard to how they�re taking care of the animals," Budkie said at a news conference in Davis, "but in this situation the more serious question is: How is it that the USDA could go in and do an investigation, see that ...
Primate research animal. Head of an adult rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). This monkey may be used to study primate behaviour & biology, the development & transmission of human diseases, or to test novel drugs. Photographed at the New England Regional Primate Research Centre, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, USA. - Stock Image G352/0185
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Primate research animal. Baby marmoset monkey (Callithrix sp.) held in the gloved hands of a researcher, which was bred in captivity. This monkey may be used to study primate behaviour & biology, the development & transmission of human diseases, or to test novel drugs. Photographed at the New England Regional Primate Research Centre, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, USA. - Stock Image G352/0189
Not much going on out here in the Sacto Valley, location of UC Davis Primate Research Center and School of Comparative Medicine (located @ intersection County Road 98 & Hutchinson). Apparently the enlightened scientists at UCD Primate Research still believe that they are able to discover medical treatments by subjecting rhesus macaques and other primates and/or monkeys to bizarre and cruel animal experimentation claimed to benefit humans. Though humans are also primates, we are not identical in physiology and therefore primate testing will not always produce accurate results. This discrepency often comes out after the novel pharma product is released to the consumer market. Meanwhile the primates obtained for research are often hijacked from their native rainforest homes by economically disadvantaged gangs of poachers ...
... - MADISON, Wis. - University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers studying monkeys have shown that one infection with Zika virus protects against future infection, though pregnancy may drastically prolong the time the virus stays in the body.. The researchers, led by UW-Madison pathology Professor David OConnor, published a study today (June 28, 2016) in the journal Nature Communications describing their work establishing rhesus macaque monkeys at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center as a model for studying the way Zika virus infections may progress in people.. The team of UW and Duke University scientists - which includes specialists in emergent and insect-borne diseases, genetics and immunology, pediatrics and pregnancy - have been working with infected monkeys for months.. "What weve shown in the monkey model matches a lot of what people have observed in epidemiological studies of humans," says Emma Mohr, a pediatric infectious disease fellow at UW-Madison and first author on ...
When a single monkey at the California National Primate Research Center in Davis fell ill with pneumonia, it would have been hard to predict that within just a few weeks 19 monkeys would be dead, and three humans sick. But, that is precisely what happened in May 2009 during the Davis outbreak. Researchers have finally learned where the virus originated, which shows that this is the first ever recorded case of an adenovirus jumping from monkeys to humans. An adenovirus is a large DNA-based virus, while most other viruses are RNA-based. Adenoviruses are responsible for colds and respiratory infections in humans, in addition to many different illnesses in animals like dogs, horses, pigs, and cattle. But it didnt seem that this type of virus could jump between species. That is, until that single monkey, an adult male titi monkey, started to cough. Within 2 months 23 or the 65 titi monkeys were sick (19 would die) and researchers were left puzzled by what they identified as a completely new ...
Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included Ezetimibe karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death end-stage heart failure and stroke is usually low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus ...
Genetically modified organisms have come to be synonymous with corn and soy (and the brands behind the recent proliferation of GMOS such as Monsanto). But the practice of altering DNA and cellular structures doesnt stop at plant seeds; researchers at the Oregon National Primate Research Centre at Oregon Health and Science University have successfully genetically modified monkeys.
Cloaking immune cells with antibodies that block T cell trafficking to the gut can substantially reduce the risk of viral transmission in a non-human primate model of HIV infection, scientists report.. The findings suggest that drugs that are already in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel diseases might be effective in the treatment or prevention of HIV infection.. The results were published Monday in Nature Medicine.. "We were surprised by the effects that we observed," says senior author Aftab Ansari, PhD, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and Yerkes National Primate Research Center.. "Our goal was to demonstrate that blocking CD4+ T cell trafficking to gut tissues could decrease the level of virus in the gut and help mount an effective immune response, but we found that administration of the antibody could actually prevent transmission. The results of this study suggest that this form of therapy could counteract pathologies that lead to ...
Yerkes National Primate Research Center researchers are the first to show that an irradiation plus transplantation combination approach in nonhuman primates can be used to treat or even possibly cure HIV/AIDS, and this new model is providing some answers about the Berlin patient, the only human thought cured of AIDS.
Many animals, ranging from the rat to the puffer fish, have had their genome sequenced, and now humankinds closest living relative, the chimpanzee, has joined the group. The publication of a draft sequence of this primates genome today in the journal Nature provides the most detailed look yet at the similarities, and differences, between humans and chimps. Previous studies comparing DNA between the two analyzed randomly selected regions of the genetic codes that comprised around 500 base pairs each. The Chimpanzee Sequencing and Analysis Consortium, made up of 67 scientists from around the world, set out to catalogue the chimps entire genome, which contains some three billion base pairs. The researchers studied the DNA of Clint, a male chimp that lived at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, Ga., until he passed away at the age of 24. Using the shotgun sequencing approach, they mapped 94 percent of the genome with a high degree of certainty, covering some parts of the ...
The U.S. National Institutes of Healths (NIH) plan to transfer an estimated 186 chimpanzees from the Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF) in New Mexico to the Southwest National Primate Research Center in Texas, moving them from a holding facility to a lab where they will be more readily available for invasive research.. Before living at APF, these individuals endured years of research or use as "breeders" to make babies to be sent into research. New Mexico citizens and supporters nationwide; animal protection groups; actor Gene Hackman, who has a home in New Mexico; and New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson have all joined in urging the NIH to halt their transfer plans.. Recently, Governor Richardson met with officials at the NIH to urge them to keep the chimpanzees in New Mexico and to convert APF into a sanctuary. In his press release following this meeting, Governor Richardson stated, "While it appears they are holding steadfast to their position, I am holding steadfast to mine. I will continue ...
Grieder will oversee the divisions grantmaking which exceeded $176 million in FY 2004 to support the 8 national primate research centers and their field stations, primate breeding and resource-related projects, development of mammalian and nonmammalian animal model resources, pre- and post-doctoral training and a variety of research projects. Since 1993, Grieder has been on the faculty and has conducted research at the medical school of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Her areas of expertise include viral-induced neuroimmunology and neurodegeneration, emerging viral threats and the molecular genetics of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus, which is on the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions list of biowarfare agents ...
Welcome to the graduate program in Immunology and Molecular Pathogenesis (IMP) at Emory University.. The IMP program is part of the broader Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences at Emory that offers research intensive training programs leading the to the PhD degree. The IMP program offers interdisciplinary training in molecular and cellular immunology and the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of infectious disease. Faculty members are affiliated with basic science and clinical departments in the School of Medicine, the Emory Vaccine Center, the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, as well as the adjacent U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Explore this site to meet our faculty and learn about their research, meet our students, and get an idea of what the IMP graduate experience is all about.. ...
Alice Tarantal, Ph.D.: Department of Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, University of California, Davis Satya Dandekar, Ph.D.: Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology, University of California, Davis Peter Barry, Ph.D.: Department of Medical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California, Davis. Ellen Sparger, D.V.M., Ph.D.: Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of California, Davis. Sungjin Kim, Ph.D.: Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California, Davis. Chin-Shang Li, Ph.D: Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis. Laurel Beckett, Ph.D.: Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis Koen Van Rompay, D.V.M., Ph.D.: California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis. Valerie Flaherman, M.D.: Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco. Susan Lynch, Ph.D: ...
Clinton D. Kilts Professor and Vice Chair for Research of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Affiliate Scientist of Yerkes National Primate Research Center ...