Lewy body diseases, like Parkinsons disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, are characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies (deposits of a misfolded but naturally-occurring protein called alpha-synuclein), and a depletion of the neurotransmitter (chemical messenger) dopamine. The majority of dopamine-producing cells die before motor symptoms of Parkinsons disease emerge. But until now, research has not demonstrated whether the presence of Lewy bodies is linked to the cascade of symptoms in Parkinsons.. The first hints of cell-to-cell transmission of Lewy body pathology came in 2008. Researchers transplanted fetal nerve tissue into the brains of individuals with Parkinsons disease and years later discovered the transplanted cells developed the same pathology. Subsequent research demonstrated that this cell to cell transmission led to cell death. But questions remained as to how Lewy body pathology caused the progressive devastation of Parkinsons disease.. Researchers at the University of ...
Lewy body dementia may not be as well-known as Alzheimers disease, but is the second-most progressive form of dementia after Alzheimers disease.. It causes a progressive decline in mental and physical abilities.. What is Lewy body dementia and what are its symptoms?. Mayo Clinic neuropathologist Dr. Dennis Dickson says, "Lewy body dementia is a prototypical mixed dementia, with features of both Parkinsons disease and Alzheimers disease. This combination of disease processes makes medical management difficult.The four cardinal features are cognitive impairment, visual hallucinations, fluctuations in level of consciousness, and Parkinsonism. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is another very characteristic feature of many patients.". Mayo Clinic neurologist Dr. Rodolfo Savica says those with Lewy body dementia often show traits of both Alzheimers disease and Parkinsons disease, leading to the concept that it falls between the two disorders. Like Parkinsons disease, Lewy ...
The prevalence of a disease identifies how many people are affected by a condition and with Lewy body dementias the prevalence is estimated to be 1.3 million Americans. Incidence, however, measures how many new cases of a disease are identified during a specific period of time. Only limited information is available about the incidence of Lewy body dementias, but it is widely accepted to be highly underdiagnosed and is the most frequently misdiagnosed form of dementia. A new study examines for the first time in North America the incidence of Lewy body dementias and its distribution by age and sex in the general population.. Researchers at Mayo Clinic reviewed the medical records of the population of Olmsted County, MN from January 1991 to December 2005, taking advantage of the unique resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project. Dr. Rodolfo Savica and colleagues identified individuals who had documented two core symptoms of LBD (parkinsonism and dementia) and studied their medical records to ...
OBJECTIVE--To further elucidate the relation between diffuse Lewy body disease and Parkinsons disease. METHODS AND RESULTS--The clinical features of nine cases of pure diffuse Lewy body disease without pathological evidence of coexisting Alzheimers neuritic pathology were reported. All patients were aged less than 70 years at onset (mean 62 years). Five patients presented with clinical features, which included assymetric resting tremor had levodopa responsiveness, which were initially indistinguishable from idiopathic Parkinsons disease. All five patients later became demented (mean of three years after presentation). Two further patients presented with parkinsonism and dementia and two patients presented with dementia and developed parkinsonism at a later stage. Hallucinations appeared 2.5-9 years after the onset of symptoms in six patients and were a presenting feature in one patient. All patients met the pathological criteria of idiopathic Parkinsons disease, with respect to the midbrain ...
Clumps of α-synuclein in neurons define Lewy body diseases, but tau tangles may add their own stamp to these disorders. Results from an imaging study, published September 19 in JAMA Neurology, suggest that tau pathology packs a cognitive wallop in people with dementia with Lewy bodies as well as those with Parkinsons disease dementia. The researchers, led by Stephen Gomperts of Massachusetts General Hospital in Charlestown, also reported that in a few cases, tau pathology occurred in the absence of pathological accumulation of Aβ. The findings, some of which were presented at the International Dementia with Lewy Bodies Conference last year, support the idea that aggregated tau plays a role in the cognitive impairment that occurs in Lewy body diseases.. "This finding underscores the importance of tau accumulation in these disorders," said Kejal Kantarci of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. She added that the small size of the study makes replication crucial. Tanis Ferman of the Mayo ...
(title:Lewy body dementia AND body:Lewy body dementia) OR title:Lewy body dementia, lewy bodies, what is Lewy body Dementia, lewy body symptoms, lewy body stages, dementia with lewy bodies
(title:Lewy body dementia AND body:Lewy body dementia) OR title:Lewy body dementia, lewy bodies, what is Lewy body Dementia, lewy body symptoms, lewy body stages, dementia with lewy bodies
Dementia with Lewy bodies describes several common disorders causing dementia. The name for the disease comes from the presence inside nerve cells of Lewy bodies. The disease has been given a variety of names - Diffuse Lewy body Disease - Cortical Lewy body Disease - Lewy Body Dementia - Senile Dementia Of Lewy Type - Lewy Body Variant of Alzheimers Disease The main features of the condition include - development of dementia with features similar with those of Alzheimers - development of some features of Parkinsons disease - fluctuation in condition on a day-to-day basis - early development of hallucinations
article{cd36c084-6c7e-45dc-b2f8-f7648cb9c97c, abstract = {,p,Background: Concomitant Alzheimers disease (AD) pathology is observed in Lewy body diseases (LBD), but the clinical impact is unknown. Only a few biomarker studies in LBD exist and have included small cohorts from single centers. Objective: We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarkers across the spectrum of LBD in a large multicenter cohort and to assess whether an AD biomarker profile was associated with demographic and clinical differences in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Methods:We included 375 DLB patients, 164 Parkinsons disease (PD) patients without dementia, and 55 PD patients with dementia (PDD) from 10 centers. CSF amyloid-beta42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) values were dichotomized as abnormal or normal according to locally available cut-off values. A CSF AD profile was defined as abnormal Aβ42 combined with abnormal t-tau and/or p-tau. Results: A ...
Lewy body diseases (LBDs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that consists of Parkinsons disease, Parkinsons disease with dementia (PD), and dementia with Lewy bodies. LBDs are characterized by the aggregation of �-synuclein in specific brain regions, which leads to the formation of Lewy bodies and Lewy neuritis, usually accompanied by neurodegeneration. Identification of early stages in LBDs is crucial since the neurodegeneration may be possibly stopped or treated before the pathological cascades start. This study aims to identify people at high risk of developing LBDs i.e. in prodromal stages of these diseases, based on an acoustic analysis of speech and voice. Eighteen acoustic features were evaluated from 36 Czech native, clinically diagnosed PD patients, 29 healthy controls (HC) and 37 subjects at risk of developing LBDs. Statistical analysis of acoustic features and multiple modelling techniques were explored in order to find the best discriminative model, including multivariate ...
For carers, and for anyone with Lewy Body Dementia, walking improves mood, independence, health, cognition and sleep patterns. You CAN live beyond Lewy.
Fontana California physician directory -Read about Lewy body dementia (LBD) symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, heredity, life expectancy, stages, and prognosis. Lewy body dementia is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimers disease. Common symptoms of LBD include changes in thinking ability, significant movement problems, sleep disorders, dizziness, fainting, urinary incontinence, and constipation.
Germantown Maryland physician directory -Read about Lewy body dementia (LBD) symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, heredity, life expectancy, stages, and prognosis. Lewy body dementia is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimers disease. Common symptoms of LBD include changes in thinking ability, significant movement problems, sleep disorders, dizziness, fainting, urinary incontinence, and constipation.
Today I managed to confirm the dates for going back to giving "Living with Lewy Body Dementia" presentations to Graduate Nurses at Northumbria University I have not been able to do this for a year or so because of the problems with the diagnosis, and my recurring chest infections.. But as my diagnosis is all sorted out, and my medication for chest problems is being sorted out so I am now able to start again.. Its been a difficult time, but over the last two new months I have been able to get some control over my life again which is good. I do now, have the new diagnosis of "Emphysema" and "Bronchiectasis" along with the Lewy Body Dementia, but I am sure that this will sort itself out very soon once I get started on the new medication and physiotherapy or Pulmonary rehabilitation as its called.. I do feel that its very important talking to nurses like this, because they are able to get information from someone with the illness, and thats more up to date than many text books these days.. These ...
Lewy Body Dementia Lewy Body Dementia, also known as LBD, is a topic that hits home for me. My grandfather passed away a year ago and was originally
Objective: To compare cognitive impairments in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinsons disease dementia (PDD), to discriminate between the two entities.. Methods: 10 DLB and 12 PDD consecutive patients performed a neuropsychological battery designed to assess several cognitive domains: verbal and visual memory (Delayed Matching to Sample (DMS)-48), language, gnosia, praxia and executive functions.. Results: DLB patients had poorer performances in orientation (p,0.05), Trail Making Test A (p,0.05) and reading of names of colours in the Stroop Test (p,0.05). Their scores were also lower in the visual object recognition memory test (DMS-48), in both immediate (p,0.05) and delayed recognition (p,0.05). No differences were observed in the other tests.. Conclusion: Despite global similarities in cognitive performances between DLB and PDD patients, we observed important differences: in particular, DMS-48, a test of visual object recognition memory and visual storage capacity, was poorer in DLB ...
References:. Ballard CG, Chalmers KA, Todd C, McKeith IG, OBrien JT, Wilcock G, et al. Cholinesterase inhibitors reduce cortical Abeta in dementia with Lewy bodies. Neurology . 2007;68:1726-1729. Bouchard RW. Diagnostic criteria of dementia [review]. Can J Neurol Sci . 2007;34:(Suppl 1)S11-18. Camicioli R, Gauthier S. Clinical trials in Parkinsons disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies [review]. Can J Neurol Sci . 2007;34:(Suppl 1)S109-117. Carson-DeWitt R. Dementia. EBSCO Health Library website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/thisTopic.php?marketID=15topicID=81 . Updated November 2008. Accessed February 6, 2009. Chaudry, A, Khan, F. Dementia with Lewy bodies. In: Gilman S, ed. MedLink Neurology. San Diego, CA: MedLink Corporation. Available at: http://www.medlink.com . Accessed August 10, 2007. Chou KL, Borek LL, Friedman JH. The management of psychosis in movement disorder patients [review]. Expert Opin Pharmacother . 2007;8:935-943. Dementia with Lewy bodies information ...
BACKGROUND: Previous Cochrane reviews have considered the use of cholinesterase inhibitors in both Parkinsons disease with dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). The clinical features of DLB and PDD have much in common and are distinguished primarily on the basis of whether or not parkinsonism precedes dementia by more than a year. Patients with both conditions have particularly severe deficits in cortical levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Therefore, blocking its breakdown using cholinesterase inhibitors may lead to clinical improvement. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of cholinesterase inhibitors in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinsons disease with dementia (PDD), and cognitive impairment in Parkinsons disease falling short of dementia (CIND-PD) (considered as separate phenomena and also grouped together as Lewy body disease). SEARCH METHODS: The trials were identified from a search of ALOIS, the Specialised Register of the Cochrane
There were 23 patients with LBD (16 with DLB and 7 with PDD). The mean age at presentation was 76 ± 7 years and the mean MMSE score at presentation was 19 ± 7 with a total duration of follow-up of 72 patient-years (mean follow-up, 1138 ± 698 days). The baseline demographics of the patients are summarised in Table 2. There was no statistically significant difference in baseline demographics between DLB and PDD patients. The time to diagnosis appeared to be longer but not statistically significant for PDD patients, possibly due to very small numbers in the two groups. The overall accuracy of diagnosis was 52%. Six (38%) of the 16 DLB patients were initially misdiagnosed as AD. The frequency of defining clinical characteristics of LBD among DLB and PDD patients is summarised in Table 3. There were no statistically significant differences (results not shown). Of note, 69% of DLB patients presented with parkinsonism and 74% of LBD patients had vivid visual hallucinations. Information about the ...
Dementia with Lewy bodies is characterized by the accumulation of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in the CNS, both of which are composed mainly of aggregated α-synuclein phosphorylated at Ser129. Although phosphorylated α-synuclein is believed to exert toxic effects at the synapse in dementia with Lewy bodies and other α-synucleinopathies, direct evidence for the precise synaptic localization has been difficult to achieve due to the lack of adequate optical microscopic resolution to study human synapses. In the present study we applied array tomography, a microscopy technique that combines ultrathin sectioning of tissue with immunofluorescence allowing precise identification of small structures, to quantitatively investigate the synaptic phosphorylated α-synuclein pathology in dementia with Lewy bodies ...
Lewy body dementia, also known as dementia with Lewy bodies, is a cortical type of dementia. Its the third most common type of progressive dementia
Mayo Clinic study provides answers for patients with Parkinsons disease, Lewy body dementia, multiple system atrophy with parkinsonism and Parkinsons disease dementia
This blog is about Lewy Body Dementia from the perspective of two fellows that have it. Think: Beavis and Butthead on dementia. Serving up the snarky side of dementia since 2018 ...
Since I remember things when I remember them, I wanted to bring up something that is relevant to my condition. My Neurologist is a tenacious professional who, once she bites into a case, she will not spit it out! She has treated me with dogged determination to extend my coherent life as long as is physically possible. Once she reached the 80% solution on my diagnosis of Dementia, she immediately placed me on the two newest Alzheimers drugs. She then sent me to UVA to get a second opinion. No professional insecurity here! The UVA folks determined it was Lewy Body Dementia as I have discussed before. The UVA Doctors told my wife and I that my Neurologist was the reason I was doing as well as I am ...
Lewy body dementia is the third most common type of dementia. Its devastating for both for the patient and their family. Read more about it here!
The following information has been shared with me from other caregivers within the LBD community so I thought I would put this out there for others. The link below holds information about a program run by Jim and Helen Whitworth of Arizona. Jim is a co-founder of the LBDA and a former caregiver. Helen, his…
LBDA invites you to submit a personal Lewy body dementia story or photograph for possible inclusion in our Web site, e-news or other publications.. Personal stories can be submitted to LBDA via the Internet, e-mail or mail, and can be up to 1,000 words in length. Photographs can be submitted in electronic or hard copy form. No hard copy pictures will be returned. The submission must include full contact information of the author, including name, address, phone number and e-mail if available. Please also let us know if you would like to be acknowledged publicly as the author of your story or picture, or if you wish it to be published anonymously.. By submitting a story or photograph, authors give LBDA the permission to use their story or photograph in print or online, and to reproduce it in part, completely, or summarized by LBDA at our discretion. Unfortunately, we cannot guarantee that all stories or photographs submitted will be published. Depending on the story or photograph and the authors ...
I was diagnosed as having Early Onset Lewy Body Dementia, and I am now learning to live a new life doing things to help others with the illness ...
Watch Mayo Clinic neurologist Dennis W. Dickson, M.D., and psychologist Tanis J. Ferman, Ph.D., discuss signs and symptoms of Lewy body dementia.
To maintain a radiant look of your skin for a long time, you must adhere to certain rules of daily Lewy Body Dementia Treatment. Our website will help you with that. Read product descriptions and order the one you need in just a few clicks.
This review summarises the findings and applications from neuroimaging studies in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), highlighting key differences between DLB and other subtypes of dementia. We also discuss the increasingly important role of imaging biomarkers in differential diagnosis and outline promising areas for future research in DLB. DLB shares common clinical, neuropsychological and pathological features with Parkinsons disease dementia and other dementia subtypes, such as Alzheimers disease. Despite the development of consensus diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis of DLB in clinical practice remains low and many DLB patients will be misdiagnosed. The importance of developing accurate imaging markers in dementia is highlighted by the potential for treatments targeting specific molecular abnormalities as well as the responsiveness to cholinesterase inhibitors and marked neuroleptic sensitivity of DLB. We review various brain imaging techniques that have been applied to
Parkinsons disease, like Alzheimers disease, is caused at least in part by tangled proteins that steadily build up on neurons.. In Parkinsons disease these clumps are called Lewy bodies. They primarily target dopaminergic neurons in a part of the midbrain called the substantial nigra, the area that controls movement.. The illness is characterized by tremors, instability/loss of balance, poor coordination and stiffness, and generally affects people in their 50s, 60s and beyond, although early-onset cases have been recorded.. These are the well-known symptoms were all familiar with. But cognitive decline and Parkinsons disease dementia may also accompany these symptoms. Researchers have recently discovered biomarkers of cognitive decline in Parkinsons disease, which can help people receive treatment earlier. Heres how to know if someone is coming down with this type of dementia.. As theres still no cure for Parkinsons disease, early intervention and prevention are key. According to the ...
FederalGrants.com opportunity listing for the Progression Markers for Cognitive Impairment in Parkinsons Disease Dementia (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) federal grant. Includes information on eligibility, deadlines, requirements, and guidelines.
BACKGROUND:. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is underrecognised in clinical settings.. AIMS:. To investigate whether performing a (123)I-ioflupane injection ((123)I-FP-CIT also called DaTSCAN™) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan in patients with possible DLB would lead to a more certain diagnosis (probable DLB or non-DLB dementia).. METHOD:. We randomised 187 patients with possible DLB 2:1 to have a scan or not (control group). The outcome measure was a change in diagnosis to probable DLB or non-DLB.. RESULTS:. There were 56 controls and 114 scanned patients, of whom 43% had an abnormal scan. More patients in the imaging group had a change in diagnosis compared with controls at 8 and 24 weeks (61% (n = 70) v. 4% (n = 2) and 71% (n = 77) v. 16% (n = 9); both P,0.0001). Clinicians were more likely to change the diagnosis if the scan was abnormal (82%) than if it was normal (46%).. CONCLUSIONS:. Imaging significantly contributed to a more certain diagnosis, proving to be a ...
Fluctuating cognition (FC) is a common and important symptom in dementia, particularly dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), although it has not been empirically quantified or characterised. Forty subjects (15 DLB, 15 AD, 10 elderly controls) were evaluated using a clinical FC severity scale, as well as receiving measures of variability in attentional performance and slow EEG rhythms across 90 s, 1 h and 1 week. DLB patients had significantly more severe FC and more severe variability in attentional and slow electrocortical measures than either AD patients or normal controls in all time frames. Attentional and EEG variability also correlated significantly with independent clinical ratings of FC. Clinical quantification and measures of attention and EEG variability can therefore make an important and standardised contribution to the assessment of FC in dementia, facilitating future treatment studies with important implications for the potential causative mechanisms and differential diagnosis. ...
The disease is not genetically linked therefore cases may arise spontaneously even though the patient has no known family history of the condition. The core cause of the disease is the build up of proteins called alpha-synuclein. In healthy individuals alpha-synuclein is involved in regulating the release of some neurotransmitters between neurones. When deposited in the brain they form aggregates named Lewy Bodies inside neurons, causing reduced levels of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and acetylcholine. As a result the brains cognitive processes are affected, leading to symptoms associated with dementia. ...
Alpha-synuclein (SNCA) genetic variability has been implicated in many susceptibility studies of idiopathic Parkinson s disease (PD), Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, typically described as Diffuse Lewy body Disease (DLBD) post-mortem) and to a lesser extent multiple system atrophy (MSA). However, which precise variant within the region contributes to the clinical (movement and cognitive) or pathologic phenotypes is unclear. In this study we proposed to sequence the entire SNCA genomic locus (and171 other genes implicated in dopamine metabolism, parkinsonism, dementia and neurodegeneration) to identify specific SNCA biomarkers. Towards this end complete resequencing and/or genotyping has been accomplished for: a) de novo PD (the entire Parkinson s Progressive Markers Initiative series); b) four PD-MCI cohorts (patients with ,5 progression with detailed longitudinal evaluation beyond another 3-8 years and data on PD‐MCI and PDD to MCI (level II) criteria), and; c) autopsy-confirmed Lewy body ...
A phase II randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled study will be performed to evaluate the impact of Nilotinib (Tasigna®, AMN107, Novartis, Switzerland) on safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical outcomes in patients with Dementia with Lewy Bodies. Sixty ( 60) participants will be recruited and randomly assigned 1:1 to placebo (arm 1) or 200 mg Nilotinib (arm 2).This study will be conducted in DLB patients with 2.5≥Hoehn & Yahr≤3 and UPDRS I-III ≤50 and 15≥UPDRS III (motor) ≥40 (Unified Parkinsons Disease Rating Score)and MoCA≥18(Montreal Cognitive Assessment). Eligible participants must be stable on MAO-B inhibitors (Rasageline or Selegeline) for 4 weeks and must not be on ≥800mg Levodopa daily. Participants must be stable on acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and other medications for at least 6 weeks. Participants will be treated for 6 months and monitored every month ( 4 weeks) in a total of 9 visits that include screening , baseline, 1, 2, ...
(Above: This is a paired photo set made by Mount Allison fine arts student Nancy Conly Pinkerton at the time Dad and I were at the university together . She
The study population will consist of male or female outpatients at least 50 years of age with mild to moderate disease severity (MMSE 12 to 24 inclusive) according to UKPDS and DSM IV TR criteria (for PDD patients) and the third report of the DLB consortium (for DLB patients) and who have a knowledgeable and reliable caregiver to accompany the patient to all clinic visits during the course of the study ...
This dataset contains 3,984 medical sentences extracted from PubMed abstracts and relationships between discrete medical terms were annotated. This dataset focuses primarily on "treat" and "cause" relationships, with 1,043 sentences containing treatment relations and 1,787 containing causal ones.. Human-in-the-loop annotators were given two different terms (such as "Lewy Body Dementia" and "Well-formed Visual Hallucinations") and were asked to mark the relationship between those terms (in this case "Lewy Body Dementia causes Well-Formed Visual Hallucinations).. This corpus has been referenced in the following papers:. ...
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
slowed movements, stiff/rigid muscles & posture, possibly resting tremor). But with early dementia, often with associated psychosis (visual hallucinations, delusional thoughts), excessive sleepiness, depression/anxiety/apathy, & rbd. Rbd = rem behavior d/o, causing acting-out of dreams in rem sleep. Would you like to video or text chat with me? ...
Clinical diagnostic concepts and methods for the dementias associated with Lewy body disease have evolved over the last three decades to incorporate previously used terminologies including diffuse LB
When most people think of dementia they probably think of Alzheimers disease. Since Alzheimers is the most common form of dementia, and one of the biggest risk factors for developing AD is age, new
I am a recent graduate of the School of Care Giving for a patient with Lewy Body Dementia. I survived my mom... I did it! This blog is about my adventures with my demented mom in the world between dream and reality. I hope my blog posts that document my experiences as a care giver for a parent with Lewy Body Dementia will help encourage you and know that what you are doing is worth every minute. It may be hard right now but one day, after your loved one passes, you will feel peace and able to sleep better than you have slept in years ...
International Journal of Alzheimers Disease is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of Alzheimers disease.
I am a recent graduate of the School of Care Giving for a patient with Lewy Body Dementia. I survived my mom... I did it! This blog is about my adventures with my demented mom in the world between dream and reality. I hope my blog posts that document my experiences as a care giver for a parent with Lewy Body Dementia will help encourage you and know that what you are doing is worth every minute. It may be hard right now but one day, after your loved one passes, you will feel peace and able to sleep better than you have slept in years ...
Now, as much as I would like that environment, it would not be good for my wife. She is still very independent, active, and adventurous. The thought of everything being taken care of by someone else is frightening to her. I understand that. So, for the time being, we will maintain the status quo. But, we do feel we need to look at facilities for future planning. And, while I am on the waiting list for the Armed Forces Retirement Home, that facility only takes care of me and makes no accommodations for her. I need to find a facility where we can continue to live together and still meet my needs as they progress ...
Dads other VA prescription arrived in the mail Thursday. Wow, the VA actually came through for us, woo hoo! Were still waiting to hear about the full work up at the main clinic... hopefully soon.