Background: Physical inactivity is a leading risk factor for mortality. Adults with intellectual disability are extremely inactive, but less is known about physical activity levels in children and youth with intellectual disability. This paper examines the participation by adolescents and young adults with and without mild to moderate intellectual disability in sport/exercise. Methods: Secondary analysis was undertaken of Next Steps, an annual panel study that followed a cohort from early adolescence into adulthood. Participants with mild to moderate intellectual disability were identified through data linkage with educational records. Results: Sport/exercise participation rates were consistently lower for adolescents and young people with mild to moderate intellectual disability than for their peers without intellectual disability. Matching participants on between-group differences in exposure to extraneous risk factors did not impact on these between-group differences in participation in ...
The participants with moderate and severe behaviour problems showed significantly more symptoms of psychiatric disorders than those without such problems, and the majority of the participants with behaviour problems had symptoms of the main psychiatric disorders. The participants with mild and moderate intellectual disability showed more symptoms of psychosis and depression than the participants with severe and profound intellectual disability. There were no direct associations between individual behaviour problems and psychiatric disorders, but the group with mild/moderate intellectual disability showed a somewhat different pattern of associations than the group with severe/profound intellectual disability. Depression was associated with screaming and aggression in the participants with severe and profound intellectual disability, and with self-injury in the participants with mild and moderate intellectual disability ...
A mental disorder characterized by arrested or incomplete mental development, with onset before age 18, leading to significantly below-average intellectual functioning (specifically, IQ below 70), accompanied by deficits in adaptive functioning in such areas as interpersonal communication, self-care, home living, social skills, use of public amenities, self-direction, scholastic or academic performance, work, leisure, health, or safety. According to the World Health Organization, an IQ between 50 and 70 is approximately indicative of mild mental retardation, 35-50 moderate mental retardation, 20-35 severe mental retardation, and below 20 profound mental retardation. See cerebral gigantism, cerebral palsy, cretinism, cri du chat, Downs syndrome, foetal alcohol syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Hurlers syndrome, idiot savant, Klinefelters syndrome, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, macrocephaly, microcephaly, mild mental retardation, moderate mental retardation, phenylketonuria, profound mental retardation, ...
Knapp, M., Comas-Herrera, A., Astin, J., Beecham, J., & Pendaries, C. (2005). "Intellectual disability, challenging behavior and cost in care accommodation: What are the links?" Health & Social Care in the Community, 13(4): 297-306.. The paper examines the links between degree of intellectual disability, challenging behaviour, service utilisation and cost for a group of people with intellectual disabilities living in care accommodation in England. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of people with intellectual disabilities, identified via provider organisations, with supplementary collection of costs data. Multivariate analyses of cost variations were carried out for 930 adults with intellectual disabilities. There were strong, nonlinear, interdependent links between degree of intellectual disability, behaviour, service use and costs. Higher costs were associated with more severe intellectual disabilities and more challenging behaviour. Sector and scale of residence also influenced cost in ...
|p||span class=hi-italic|“A useful resource for all educational teams who plan for students with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities. Downing
Intellectual disabilities affect peoples intellectual capacity and their capacity to learn new or complex information. They become apparent in childhood and affect development.. The cause of many intellectual disabilities is not known and in many cases there are no visible signs of the impairment. The most commonly recognised form of intellectual disability is Downs Syndrome.. 1% or almost 29,000 New Zealanders have an intellectual disability. Health Indicators for New Zealanders with Intellectual Disability.. Intellectual disabilities are different from learning difficulties or disabilities, such as dyslexia, which affect the way in which people learn rather than their capacity to learn. Intellectual disabilities are also not a form of mental health problem such as depression or schizophrenia, which can present at any time and affect perception rather than intellectual capacity.. ...
The London 2012 Paralympics have the potential to change public attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities, according to research presented in a symposium at the British Psychology Society Annual Conference held in London last week.. Joanna Ferrara and her colleagues from Canterbury Christ Church University asked 120 student volunteers to complete a questionnaire about their attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities - also known as learning difficulties and previously known as mental handicap. The same students were then asked to read about and watch footage of elite athletes with intellectual disabilities performing at a Paralympic level of sport and complete the questionnaires again.. The researchers found that the students attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities were more positive regarding beliefs about empowerment. Attitudes were influenced by the amount of prior contact respondents had had with people with intellectual disabilities. This adds to ...
The term "mental retardation" is an often-misunderstood term and since it is seen as derogatory in the general public we use the term "intellectual disability." In general people believe that retardation is only diagnosed on the basis of below-normal intelligence (IQ), and that those with intellectual disabilities are unable to learn or to care for themselves. This is actually not true. In order to be diagnosed as a person with intellectual disabilities, the individual has to have both a significantly low IQ and considerable problems in everyday functioning. Most of those with intellectual disabilities can learn a great deal, and in adulthood can lead at least partially independent lives. The reason for this is like anything else there are degrees of impairment and most individuals with intellectual disabilities have only a mild level of impairment. However, those with intellectual disabilities may also have several different physical and emotional complications. For instance, they may have ...
Complicating our efforts to answer Kennedys question of what we should do with the people who have intellectual disability is the fact that the current term, intellectual disability, describes a broad and diverse group of individuals. Intellectual disability, while being inclusive of only about half a percentage point of the general population, includes individuals capable of attaining a high school degree and individuals who have been unable to develop basic personal care skills. The range included within the category is as wide as the range between mild intellectual disability and genius. The net impact of this diversity is the growing recognition that one size does not fit all. No program or regulation is going to work well across the entire spectrum of intellectual disability. Services, supports, and regulatory protections must be individualized and models must be developed whether in the healthcare or human services sector to better serve those individual needs. We face a considerable ...
Members of the Knights of Columbus do a great deal to assist people with intellectual disabilities. As your council works to improve the quality of life for people with intellectual disabilities, please remember that your everyday speech, council bulletins, committee reports, posters, and flyers should be accurate and considerate when referring to people with disabilities.. DO talk or write about people with intellectual disabilities (do NOT use other terms to describe them).. DO treat adults with intellectual disabilities as adults (NOT as children).. Use positive language. MOST IMPORTANTLY, speak or write about these individuals with the respect all human beings deserve. Keep in mind that how you refer to people can have a great impact on the way others perceive them.. (click here to donate to the Campaign for People with Intellectual Disabilities Fund). One of the most popular and successful programs conducted by our councils for the benefit of people with intellectual disabilities is when ...
Objectives: There is now a body of research into the attributions that carers make of the challenging behavior of people with intellectual disabilities; however the attributions that people with intellectual disabilities make have not been studied. This paper describes the attributions that people with intellectual disabilities make of challenging behavior and compares them to those of their carers. Methods: Twenty-three day-service staff and 34 adults with intellectual disabilities completed measures of attribution, optimism, emotion and need for help and gave open-ended responses to questions about the causes of and potential interventions for challenging behaviors. Results: The overall pattern of attribution, emotion, optimism and intention to help is similar for people with intellectual disabilities and staff. However, compared to staff, people with intellectual disabilities were less optimistic and less happy about challenging behavior. Conclusions: This area of research will help identify ...
INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY 1. Introductionto Intellectual Disability. Intellectual disability refers to a disability, which occurs beforethe age of 18. Individuals with disability experience limitations intwo major areas: Intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior. Boththe limitations are often expressed in conceptual, practical, andsocial life of an individuals everyday skills. A number ofindividuals that experience intellectual disability are affectedmildly and thus making their disability more difficult to see withoutvisual cues (Rapley, 2004). It is diagnosed with the use ofintellectual standardized tests and adaptive behavior. It is observedthat individuals with appropriate support over a sustained of time,generally experience outcome in life. The paper therefore, examinesintellectual disability by focusing on a special educatorsinterview of students with intellectual disability, and then focus onissues relating to students ID. The special andregular educators interview ...
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Intellectual Disability LHO Dublin North. A comprehensive adult service is provided across the whole spectrum of intellectual disability, this includes people with an intellectual disability who are homeless, parents, non-nationals, travellers and young person/adults with challenging behaviour or duel diagnosis.. Intellectual Disability Services for LHO Dublin North are provided by St Josephs Intellectual Services and by a number of voluntary services through a range of comminity and residential service models. Contact Details Tel 01 8403401. St Josephs Intellectual Disability Services has four functional areas namely. Acute Services, Residential Services, Day Services, Community Services.. Referral System. There is an open referral system for clients and their families which is responded to within a specified period. Each client then has an entire assessment of needs completed by a Clinical Nurse Specialist and when required other assessments are carried out by Psychologists, Speech & Language ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Women with intellectual disabilities. T2 - A study of sexuality, sexual abuse and protection skills. AU - Eastgate, Gillian. AU - van Driel, Mieke L.. AU - Lennox, Nicholas. AU - Scheermeyer, Elly. PY - 2011/4. Y1 - 2011/4. N2 - Background: Sexual abuse and abusive relationships are known to be especially common in people with intellectual disability. This study explored how women with intellectual disability understand sex, relationships and sexual abuse, the effects of sexual abuse on their lives, and how successfully they protect themselves from abuse. Method: Semistructured narrative interviews with nine women with mild intellectual disability in Queensland, Australia. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed qualitatively. Results: Major themes that emerged were: sexual knowledge and sources of knowledge; negotiating sexual relationships; declining unwanted sexual contact; self protection strategies; sexual abuse experiences; and sequelae of sexual ...
The Divisions clinical service platform is based at two regional Psychiatric Hospitals, Alexandra Hospital in Maitland and Lentegeur Psychiatric Hospital in Mitchells Plain. The Groote Schuur UCT Department accommodates the Vera Grover Chair, non-patient related research activities and access to general Departmental administrative support. Alexandra Hospital provides for people with intellectual disability and the Lentegeur Intellectual Disability Service functions within the general Lentegeur Psychiatric Hospital. The establishments have approximately 300 and 250 Intellectual Disability Service (IDS) beds respectively; Alexandra Hospital has 34 acute beds and Lentegeur Hospital IDS has 15 child and adolescent beds. Both provide outpatient services and medium- and long-term care for over 400 patients in a number of wards. Although nearly 500 adults with intellectual disability were de-institutionalised from both hospitals in 2008-2009, many with severe and profound intellectual disability ...
This article systematically reviews the literature on the effects of adverse life events or trauma on people with intellectual disabilities. It is important to systematically examine empirical evidence of the effects of trauma in people with intellectual disabilities as to date the number of studies in this area is not substantial, and the effects of trauma seen in the predominately general population literature are not necessarily transferable to the intellectual disability population. Identification of the effects of trauma on people with intellectual disabilities facilitates case recognition and appropriate treatment. Fifteen articles were selected for the review, and the results suggest that studies to date have been hampered by the lack of a consistent definition of trauma and the lack of a reliable and valid means of measuring the effects of trauma in people with intellectual disabilities. The review also indicates a lack of studies establishing causal links between life events and ...
An Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF-IID) is a facility that serves four (4) or more persons with intellectual disability or persons with related conditions and provides health or rehabilitative services on a regular basis to individuals whose mental and physical conditions require services including room, board, and active treatment for their intellectual disability or related conditions. For purposes of this regulation, the definitions of "Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities" and "Habilitation Center for Persons with Intellectual Disability or Persons with Related Conditions" are the same and both terms are utilized interchangeably.. ...
immune Uncategorized CD22, TBC-11251 Background People with intellectual disabilities have poor access to health care, which may be further compromised by a lack of accessible health information. there, and what they remembered a week later. Methods The study drew on qualitative data. We used a participatory research approach that involved working alongside people with intellectual disabilities and their supporters in a community setting. Cognitive function was assessed, using the Matrix Analogies Test and the British Picture Vocabulary Scale, to describe the sample. Participants, supported by facilitators, were video recorded accessing and engaging with the virtual environment. We assessed recall 1 week later, using a specialized interview technique. Data were downloaded into NVivo 8 and analyzed using the framework analysis technique. Results Study participants were 20 people aged between 20 and 80 years with mild to severe intellectual disabilities. All participants were able to access the ...
The present study aimed to analyze the stability of the memory of a stressful event (medical examination within a hospital setting) over time in young people (age range 12 to 21, Mage = 15.11 years old, SD = 3.047) with mild or moderate intellectual disability (IQ = 54.32, SD = 13.47). The results show a stability of the memory of what happened an hour and a week after the event in relation to the people involved, the apparatus used, and the parts of the body explored. No interaction effects were found between the stability of memory over time and the level of intellectual disability. The level of disability (mild or moderate) only affected the description of the doctor who performed the exploration and the explored parts of the body, showing better results for people with mild disability. In addition, the results highlight the relationship between memory and IQ, especially verbal IQ.
The genetic defect has widespread consequences in the body, and people with even the trait or carrier status may have a variety of physical, emotional, intellectual and behavioral problems or they may be normal. Early menopause is a common problem for women who are carriers. Also, older carriers can develop tremor and balance problems as they age. All of these problems can vary widely in severity among individuals.. Although many children with fragile X syndrome clearly desire socialization, they are often overwhelmed by stimuli, leading to behaviors typical of autism.. About 80 percent of boys with fragile X syndrome demonstrate intellectual disability, compared to about one third of females. Intellectual abilities range from a normal IQ with subtle learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability. Female carriers who are intellectually normal are often found to share characteristic disturbances, such as difficulty in learning math, and emotional problems such as extreme shyness, ...
BACKGROUND: Civil and political participation lies at the core of citizenship. Increasingly, people with intellectual disability are members of disability advisory bodies. This study investigated the political orientations of advisory body members with intellectual disability, their participatory experiences, and the types of support they received. METHOD: The 9 people with intellectual disability who in 2005 were members of disability advisory bodies at a state, national, and Victorian local government level were interviewed, together with 12 other members or secretariat staff of these bodies. Observations were also conducted of advisory body meetings. RESULTS: The political perspective of members with intellectual disability varied, but all had a background in self-advocacy. They found the work hard but rewarding and encountered both practical and intangible obstacles to participation. Members received varying types of practical support, but a supportive collegial milieu was characteristic ...
The prevalence of obese, overweight, and healthy weight adults with intellectual disability in the community was estimated using data from the National Health Interview Survey from 1985 to 2000. Using the Body Mass Index (BMI) as a measure, the percentage of adults with intellectual disability in the obese category was higher than that for the general population and increased over the 16-year period. There was no similar detectable trend for adults with intellectual disability who were in the overweight category. Compared to their counterparts in the general population, a smaller proportion of women and young adults with intellectual disability maintained their weights in the healthy range. Implications regarding potential health risks and future research were discussed. ...
Background: Families with parental intellectual disabilities are likely to need support in achieving a decent family life. In order to accurately plan for such support services, society needs data regarding the occurrence of those parents and their children. The aim of this study was to investigate the five-year incidence of children born to women with intellectual disabilities in a county in Sweden. Methods: Women born between 1975 and 1989 were identified from school registers for children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities in the county of Blekinge. The womens personal identification numbers were, in 2010, linked and matched with the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results: In total, 98 women with intellectual disabilities were identified. Nine of these had given birth to children; one woman to two children and eight women to one child each. The ten children were born between 2004 and 2008. Conclusion: The incidence rate calculated as a result of the present study indicates that ...
Part 1 is a literature review investigating South Asian parents perceptions of their childs intellectual disability, its effects on family life and views on service use. Search strategies used to identify relevant literature are specified and the results are presented in three parts. Firstly, experiences of parents regarding the process of diagnosis and provision of support are discussed. Secondly, their perceptions of the causes, symptoms and prognosis of their childs intellectual disability are presented. Lastly, the effects of having a child with an intellectual disability on parenting and family life are outlined. The findings are then summarised and implications considered. Part 2 is a qualitative study designed to address gaps identified in the literature review, focusing on the attitudes and beliefs of the Pakistani community in the UK regarding intellectual disabilities. The results highlight the importance of taking the views of this community in account in implementing current UK ...
by Dr Giacomo Vivanti. Many individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have Intellectual Disability (that is, below average I.Q. and poor adaptive functioning). What is the nature of this association? Data published from a recent study at the Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre (OTARC), Intellectual development in autism spectrum disorders, provide new insight into this complex issue.. The scientific community has given little attention to this question for decades. Indeed, the prevalent view in the field is that Intellectual Disability in ASD is an additional, unrelated condition that happens to be present in some individuals with ASD, and is not seen as providing valuable information on the nature of autism.. Following this line of thought, most research in ASD conducted over the past decades, including research on treatment, has excluded individuals with ASD who have an Intellectual Disability, on the ground that their Intellectual Disability would confound the interpretation of ...
An intellectual disability (also commonly referred to as a developmental disability among other terms) is, simply stated, a disability that significantly affects ones ability to learn and use information. It is a disability that is present during childhood and continues throughout ones life. A person who has an intellectual disability is capable of participating effectively in all aspects of daily life, but sometimes requires more assistance than others in learning a task, adapting to changes in tasks and routines, and addressing the many barriers to participation that result from the complexity of our society. Examples of an intellectual disability might include someone who has Down Syndrome, Autism, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, or another label, however, there are people with an intellectual disability may not have a medical diagnosis.. ...
McCracken, Forness, & Ackerland, 1994). Existing di- Autism and autism spectrum disorders make up agnostic classificatory systems (DSM-IV, American one of the largest diagnostic subgroups within the en- Psychiatric Association, 1994; ICD-10-CDDG, World tire population of individuals with intellectual disabil- Health Organization, 1992) rely heavily on descriptions ity (Nordin & Gillberg, 1996; Stromme & Diseth, of the subjective experiences of the individuals who are 2000). Autism is a behaviorally defined syndrome that being diagnosed. Applying these diagnostic approaches is characterized by abnormalities or impairments in the to persons who are unable to share their subjective ex- areas of communication and play, socialization, and periences because of cognitive and communication im- range of interests and activities, all with an onset before pairments and disabilities is problematic, and some 3 years of age (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Asso- would argue that an alternative conceptualization ...
David Hessl. All such tests have a "floor" - a point beyond which the test is not able to measure cognitive functioning below a given level, usually an IQ of around 40 points.. But many people with intellectual disability, such as those with Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), have scores that may be lower than the floor. Establishing a floor for intelligence levels, or "flattens," the profile of test scores among people with intellectual disability, which may eliminate the opportunity to fully appreciate their actual strengths and weaknesses.. That is the finding of research by the UC Davis MIND Institute, which seeks to offer a different, validated approach to the assessment of intelligence in individuals with intellectual disabilities. The study, "Improving IQ measurement in intellectual disabilities using true deviation from population norms," appears in the Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders.. "The results of the present study provide evidence of the ...
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Molecular anomalies in MED13L, leading to haploinsufficiency, have been reported in patients with moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID) and distinct facial features, with or without congenital heart defects. Phenotype of the patients was referred to MED13L haploinsufficiency syndrome. Missense variants in MED13L were already previously described to cause the MED13L-related syndrome, but only in a limited number of patients. Here we report 36 patients with MED13L molecular anomaly, recruited through an international collaboration between centers of expertise for developmental anomalies. All patients presented with intellectual disability and severe language impairment. Hypotonia, ataxia, and recognizable facial gestalt were frequent findings, but not congenital heart defects. We identified seven de novo missense variations, in addition to protein-truncating variants and intragenic deletions. Missense variants clustered in two mutation hot-spots, i.e., exons 15-17 and 25-31. We found that
There is currently no cure for intellectual disability. Those affected can learn to cope and do many things, if they get enough support and are taught well. There are many places around the world for someone with intellectual disability to get help. These places can take care of people with intellectual disabilities, as well as help them find jobs, find a house of their own, or help them take care of their children. There are some different ways for people with intellectual disability and those around them to learn how to help the person with the disability.[5] One kind is psychosocial treatment. This is meant for very young children. Psychosocial treatment helps them learn basic skills and increase learning over their lifetime. Another kind is behavioral treatment. This is meant to help young people, but can be used for adults as well. Behavior treatment helps teach language skills as well as social skills like sharing or following instructions. A third kind of help is cognitive-behavioral ...
This research aimed to identify current national provision by health services in Scotland in relation to proactive screening and reactive assessment for people with an intellectual disability in Scotland who have, or are at risk of developing, dementia. Staff from 12 intellectual disability services, representing the 11 health board areas in Scotland, completed an online questionnaire which asked about proactive screening and reactive assessment for people with intellectual disability who had, or were at risk of developing, dementia as well as suggested areas for improvement. All of the areas provided services for people with intellectual disability who have, or are at risk of developing, dementia, but differed as to whether this was reactive, proactive or both. Nine services offered intervention following diagnosis. The most common elements used across both proactive screening and reactive assessment were conducting a health check, using a general dementia questionnaire designed for people with ...
New research studies conducted by Special Olympics found disturbing evidence that individuals with intellectual disabilities face widespread health problems, while physicians, dentists and other health professionals are not receiving adequate training in order to treat them. The research reinforces previous studies that found that despite the widespread belief that individuals with intellectual disabilities receive better health care than the rest of the population, people with intellectual disabilities actually have poorer health, more specialized ealth care needs and greater difficulty accessing health care services and doctors compared to the general public. Research Methodology: Special Olympics recently commissioned two research studies related to the health and health care of individuals with intellectual disabilities.
INTRODUCTION. Intellectual disability and its effects on society. Millions of people around the world live with an intellectual disability, where the estimated prevalence in higher-income countries is between 1 and 3%.1-4 In Mexico alone, according to INDESOL (National Social Development Institute), some 2 925 000 people live with some type of intellectual disability.5 These conditions have an important social and economic impact, particularly because they can be accompanied by family-level psychological problems, discrimination, catastrophic costs that are not covered by the State due to the lack of universal access to health care and perhaps, most especially, lack of appropriate social services, principally educational programs focusing on social and vocational integration. In addition, people with intellectual disabilities have a greater risk of experiencing physical and mental health problems6-8 and are vulnerable to chronic disease at an earlier age, among other factors, due to a high ...
Since 1951 the government and people of Israel have looked to AKIM to provide care, advocacy, support and education to children and adults with intellectual disabilities and their families. AKIM works in all corners of Israel and is the largest provider of programs and services for people with an intellectual disability and their families.. Since 1962, Canadian Friends of AKIM - Promoting the Inclusion of Israeli Children and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities has operated projects in Israel for the benefit of more than 35,000 people with intellectual disabilities and their families.. ...
This legislative session, an important bill that will help individuals with intellectual disabilities is being considered. Ive co-sponsored SB 294, An Act Concerning Services for Individuals With Intellectual Disability, to ensure that people with intellectual disabilities who have requested services from the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) are properly informed and updated on the status of their request.. It can sometimes be confusing and frustrating for families to navigate requests for social services for individuals with intellectual disabilities, especially those on waiting lists for services. This bill aims to make sure that individuals and their families receive the information they need in a timely manner. The bill requires DDS to:. ...
Healthy Start have a great range of resources and information available online regarding supporting parents who have an intellectual disability. Please take the time to explore their website.. www.healthystart.net.au.. BOLD Network: WWILD supports the BOLD Network (Better Outcomes for Parents with Intellectual Disabilities), a group of professionals and organisations seeking social change for parents with intellectual disabilities in Queensland, to keep their families together where possible. For more information about the BOLD Network, call WWILD.. Man, N., Llewellyn, G., & Wade, C. (July 2014). Estimated Prevalence and Living Circumstances of Parents with Intellectual Disability in Australia from Selected National Surveys: Technical Report 1. Lidcombe, NSW: University of Sydney, available at http://www.healthystart.net.au/images/resources/04-Exploring-Research-Evidence/PrevalenceStudy_TechnicalReport_1_Aug2014.pdf ...
adult intellectual disability - Health Guidelines for Adults with an Intellectual Disability | Intellectual Disability and Health
New research by The Open University, Kings College London, the University of Cambridge and Birkbeck College suggests that the causes of autism and intellectual disability are mostly distinct.. The researchers found that behavioural and personality characteristics related to autism (also called autistic traits) are strongly genetic. Most importantly, they found that the genetic influences on autistic traits were largely distinct from the genetic influences on intellectual difficulties. This fits with the finding that although autism runs in families, relatives of children with autism do not tend to have intellectual disability.. "Autism and intellectual disability often occur together, and this has made many researchers think that the conditions must share the same genetic causes. Our research challenges this assumption," says Dr Rosa Hoekstra, Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University, who led the study.. Autism can be diagnosed in people with all types of intellectual ability: some have ...
The 1.5m people in the UK with an intellectual disability experience significant health inequality. Research shows that they are more likely to develop health problems than the general population, they are more likely to have reduced access to healthcare, and they are more likely to receive poorer care.. A 2018 report from the Learning Disability Mortality Review Programme found that people with intellectual disabilities also die a lot younger. On average, men die 23 years earlier and women die 27 years earlier compared with the general population. Our latest study adds to the evidence of these health inequalities. It shows that many people with intellectual disability, who can make decisions about their everyday life, arent given clear information about their medication. As a result, they often dont understand the drugs prescribed for them or their potential side effects. Legal consequences. The Accessible Information Standard states that all organisations providing NHS care and publicly ...
Abstract: The study examined the effects of the types of communication breakdowns of the communication partners on the repair strategies of students with severe intellectual disability during interaction within the natural school environment. Forty-eight staff members, divided into two groups based on daily vs. weekly contact with the student, and 12 students, ages 9-16, were videotaped during various activities. Results demonstrate that students used several types of repair strategies when faced with communication breakdowns adjusting some of them to breakdown types. Some of the students demonstrated attempts to shift partners as a systematic method when confronted with communication breakdowns, thus implying an alternative repair strategy. There were no significant differences among staff members based on their level of contact with the students except for more request for clarification and more substitution in the daily basis group.
In all studies, clinical outcomes were collected from medical records at 12 months post-intervention. In studies 2 and 3, data were extracted using the same variable definitions. Where these were compatible to those used in study 1, data were pooled. A disease diagnosis was defined as new if it had not been noted previously in the GPs records or specialists letters. In studies 2 and 3, data extractors were masked; in study 1 they were not.. The pooled analysis provided data on 407 adults assigned to receive health screening and 388 who received usual care. Fifty-eight per cent of participants were male, 69% had mild or moderate intellectual disability, and the median age was 37 years (range 19-79 years). Overall, a greater proportion of males than females received health screening (55% versus 47%); there was no difference in age or level of disability.. The intervention group generally received far more sensory testing and provision of health-promotion or disease-prevention activities (Table ...
Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex mode of inheritance. It is one of the most highly heritable of the complex disorders, although the underlying genetic factors remain largely unknown. Here, we report mutations in the X-chromosome PTCHD1 (patched-related) gene in seven families with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in three families with intellectual disability. A 167-kilobase microdeletion spanning exon 1 was found in two brothers, one with ASD and the other with a learning disability and ASD features; a 90-kilobase microdeletion spanning the entire gene was found in three males with intellectual disability in a second family. In 900 probands with ASD and 208 male probands with intellectual disability, we identified seven different missense changes (in eight male probands) that were inherited from unaffected mothers and not found in controls. Two of the ASD individuals with missense changes also carried a de novo deletion at another ASD susceptibility locus (DPYD ...
Executive Order 12994 By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to change the name of the "Presidents Committee on Mental Retardation" to the "Presidents Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities" (the "Committee") and expand the membership of the Committee, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. The Presidents Committee on Mental Retardation is hereby renamed the Presidents Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities. Sec. 2. Executive Order 12994 of March 21, 1996, is hereby amended by deleting the words "mental retardation" and inserting the words "intellectual disabilities" in lieu thereof throughout the text of that order, except in the title, the first line of the preamble, and section 1 of that order. Sec. 3. Section 1 of Executive Order 12994 is amended by deleting the words "(the "Committee")" and adding after "responsibilities," the words "and renamed the Presidents Committee for ...
Intellectual Disability Services The services that Tays provides for individuals with intellectual disabilities are intended to complement municipal basic services. We provide outpatient services and support centre services for persons in need of special support and their families. The services of the Outpatient Intellectual Disabilities Clin
Like everyone else, people with an intellectual disability enjoy activities and meeting new people. Most people with an intellectual disability are very able and value any opportunity for new experiences. Within these experiences the core values of offering choice and independence in relation to all elements of participation is of extreme importance.. Each person with an intellectual disability is an individual. Therefore it is important in getting to know each individual - to spend time with them and/or ensure that an overview of any specific needs the person may have is received firstly from themselves and then the persons family/support worker. There are some particular points to be aware of.. These include the following ...
Umeå University. Abstract:. People with intellectual disabilities are commonly seen as "non-adult others" and as persons of limited credibility, and this view has implications in a number of areas. In this paper, the empirical findings from an interview study focused on lived experience are analyzed in relation to the intersections of intellectual disability and gender. In light of Frickers (2007) work on epistemic injustice, and in recognition of Andersons (2012) emphasis on the importance of transactional and structural injustice, a novel aspect of epistemic injustice is provided: as a consequence of conditioned lived space. The social identity of intellectual disability position persons thus identified to belong to a segregated and marginalized group. Although guided by the ambition to care for and protect this vulnerable group, structural transactions provided by the welfare system run the risk of simultaneously depriving individuals of both the experiences and the hermeneutical resources ...
Introduction: Prescribing drugs is the most common intervention in healthcare. People with intellectual disabilities are likely to be prescribed more drugs than other individuals as they experience greater levels of ill‐health. Most available evidence focuses on psychotropic drug prescribing, with an absence of population‐level research on complete prescribing occurrences and potential drug-drug interactions in persons with intellectual disabilities. Methods: A total population sampling approach identified all individuals with intellectual disabilities known to services in Jersey ‐ 217 individuals participated. Prescribed drug data were categorised according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system and potential drug-drug interactions were graded according to severity using Stockleys Drug Interaction Checker. Results: As our analysis is ongoing, we cannot outline firm conclusions at this stage. Nevertheless, our results will; (1) outline the pattern and ...