This thesis explores the relationship between health access risk factors and diabetes in an urban First Nations population living in Canada. The proportion of Aboriginal peoples in Canada living in urban areas is increasing. Despite this, health data on urban Aboriginal populations in Canada is sparse and often unreliable. The Our Health Counts (OHC) study collected data from a self-identified urban First Nations population living in Hamilton, ON through respondent driven sampling. As statistical techniques for this data are not yet fully developed, advanced logistic regression modeling strategies were used to assess the relationship between health access risk factors and diabetes. Feeling health services were not culturally appropriate was significantly associated with an increased odds for diabetes (12.07, 95% 2.52, 57.91). A strong potential effect between diabetes was also found for the following barriers: not being able to locate a doctor in the area; feeling health care services accessed ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Body composition and overweight prevalence in 1704 schoolchildren from 7 American Indian communities. AU - Caballero, Benjamin. AU - Himes, John H.. AU - Lohman, Timothy. AU - Davis, Sally M.. AU - Stevens, June. AU - Evans, Marguerite. AU - Going, Scott. AU - Pablo, Juanita. PY - 2003/8. Y1 - 2003/8. N2 - Background: Nationwide data on obesity prevalence in American Indian communities are limited. Objective: We describe the body composition and anthropometric characteristics of schoolchildren from 7 American Indian communities enrolled in the Pathways study, a randomized field trial evaluating a program for the primary prevention of obesity. Design: A total of 1704 children in 41 schools were enrolled in the study. Basic anthropometric measurements included weight, height, and triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses. Percentage body fat was estimated from bioelectrical impedance and anthropometric variables with the use of an equation developed and validated for this ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Association of cardiometabolic genes with arsenic metabolism biomarkers in American Indian communities. T2 - Environmental Health Perspectives. AU - Balakrishnan,Poojitha. AU - Vaidya,Dhananjay. AU - Franceschini,Nora. AU - Saroja Voruganti,V.. AU - Gribble,Matthew O.. AU - Haack,Karin. AU - Laston,Sandra. AU - Umans,Jason G.. AU - Francesconi,Kevin A.. AU - Goessler,Walter. AU - North,Kari E.. AU - Lee,Elisa. AU - Yracheta,Joseph. AU - Best,Lyle G.. AU - Maccluer,Jean W.. AU - Kent,Jack. AU - Cole,Shelley A.. AU - Navas-Acien,Ana. PY - 2017/1/1. Y1 - 2017/1/1. N2 - Background: Metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) is subject to inter-individual variability, which is explained partly by genetic determinants. oBjectives: We investigated the association of genetic variants with arsenic species and principal components of arsenic species in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). Methods: We examined variants previously associated with cardiometabolic traits (~ 200,000 from Illumina ...
Not necessarily. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, 41 percent of U.S. women of childbearing age (or their partners) had been surgically sterilized as of 1995-a surprisingly high number, Im sure youll agree. "Surgical sterilization has grown to be the most common method of contraception among women of reproductive age in the United States," the NCHS says. I mention these facts to put claims about Native American sterilization in perspective. They may be greatly exaggerated-come on, 40 percent sterilized against their will?-but theyre not completely insane. Allegations of forced sterilization of Native American women were controversial in the 70s and are only slightly less so today. Some activists at the time accused the U.S. government of genocide. Scholar Jane Lawrence rehashed the whole affair in "The Indian Health Service and the Sterilization of Native American Women," American Indian Quarterly, summer 2000, writing, "Various studies revealed that the Indian Health ...
Compared with the non-Hispanic white (NHW) population, the urban American Indian and Alaskan Native (AIAN) community was more likely to have lower survival rates following invasive prostate and breast cancer, according to a new study by Emerson et al in Cancer Research.. "Its been reported that the AIAN community has a higher cancer burden than other racial/ethnic groups," said lead author Marc A. Emerson, MPH, PhD candidate, of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who was an Intramural Research Training Award fellow in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute while conducting this work. "However, accurate, population-based information on the cancer experience for this population residing in an urban setting is severely lacking.". Previous AIAN data regarding cancer incidence and mortality are linked with the Indian Health Service (IHS); however, access to IHS facilities for the majority of AIANs is ...
This fact-filled book on long-ago games played by Native Americans describes ball games that stretched over several miles. With many sidebars on Native American
RATIONALE: Studying samples of tumor tissue in the laboratory from Native American women with breast cancer may help doctors identify and learn more about biomarkers related to breast cancer in these patients. It may also help doctors learn more about the prognosis of these patients.. PURPOSE: This laboratory study is looking at biomarkers in Native American women with breast cancer. ...
National Jewish Health has launched a new quitline program aimed at reducing commercial tobacco use among American Indians. The American Indian commercial tobacco program launched on August 1, 2015, and is serving American Indians in Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wyoming.. Nationally, American Indians are more likely to use commercial tobacco and have more difficulty quitting than those in other racial and ethnic groups. Culturally specific cessation resources are vital for tribal communities, which respect cultural traditions around tobacco, ways of communicating, and barriers to smoking cessation. Despite being relatively easy-to-access cessation resources, quitlines have been known for having low rates of use by American Indians and Alaska Natives. With strong oral traditions, tribal communities often value face-to-face communication over telephone communication. Add to that long histories of mis-treatment by and mis-trust of governmental agencies - ...
Diabetes-related kidney failure among Native American adults (American Indians/Alaskan Natives) decreased 54% between 1996 and 2013, following the implementation of population-based approaches to diabetes management and improvements in clinical care begun by the Indian Health Service (IHS) in the mid-1980s, according to a report in the CDCs Vital Signs.. Native Americans have a greater chance of developing diabetes than any other US racial/ethnic group. About 2 of 3 Native Americans with kidney failure have diabetes, according to the report. The rate of diabetes-related kidney failure in Native Americans has declined faster than any racial/ethnic group in the United States.. "The 54% decline in kidney failure from diabetes followed implementation of public health and population approaches to diabetes as well as improvements in clinical care by the IHS," Mary L. Smith, Indian Health Service principal deputy director said during a press conference hosted by the CDC. "We believe these strategies ...
Native American reservation inequality underlies a range of societal issues that affect the lives of Native American populations residing on reservations in the United States. About one third of the Native American population, about 700,000 persons, lives on an Indian Reservation in the United States. Reservation poverty and other discriminatory factors have led to persisting social inequality on Native American reservations. Disparities between many aspects of life at the national level and at the reservation level, such as quality of education, quality of healthcare, substance abuse, teenage pregnancy, violence, and suicide rates are significant in demonstrating the inequality of opportunities and situations between reservations and the rest of the country. Many contemporary disparities are rooted in the history of Indian reservations. The reservation system was created following the expansion of the United States into tribal lands throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, during United States ...
American Indians (AI) and Alaska Natives (AN) of the United States (US), and First Nations (FN) peoples of Canada, experience higher rates of many chronic diseases. While the burden of specific health issues differs by group, an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes exists. For Northern Plains AI tribes of the US, rates of type-2 diabetes have reached epidemic levels. Research is needed to understand and address complex chronic health concerns for these groups, including efforts to resolve the disparity between need for kidney donation and donation consent rates. This presentation will describe an essential approach to intervention studies that incorporates participatory research principles and builds trusted partnerships with AI/AN and FN communities. The presentation will focus on the process and the outcomes of behavioral intervention research designed to increase intent to serve as an organ or tissue donor for Northern Plains AI tribes. Related future research ...
American Indians (AI) and Alaska Natives (AN) of the United States (US), and First Nations (FN) peoples of Canada, experience higher rates of many chronic diseases. While the burden of specific health issues differs by group, an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes exists. For Northern Plains AI tribes of the US, rates of type-2 diabetes have reached epidemic levels. Research is needed to understand and address complex chronic health concerns for these groups, including efforts to resolve the disparity between need for kidney donation and donation consent rates. This presentation will describe an essential approach to intervention studies that incorporates participatory research principles and builds trusted partnerships with AI/AN and FN communities. The presentation will focus on the process and the outcomes of behavioral intervention research designed to increase intent to serve as an organ or tissue donor for Northern Plains AI tribes. Related future research ...
COVID-19 is the most recent example of the vulnerability of American Indian reservations to pandemic disease. The Navajo Nations COVID-19 infection rate is higher than that of any US state-even New York. This is especially puzzling when considering population density. The Navajo Nation encompasses over 27,000 square miles and has a population of about 150,000 people.
Aboriginal people living in industrialized countries experience disproportionately high rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (diabetes), diabetes complications, and associated risk factors when compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts [1-4]. In Canada, Aboriginal peoples are comprised of three distinct Indigenous groups, namely First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Rates of diabetes are 2.5 to 4 times higher among First Nations people than the general population, with higher rates among women than men and a younger age at diagnosis [5]. In addition, some First Nations people have higher rates of documented smoking, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia and have increasing rates of serious diabetes-related complications [6-8]. This epidemiological trend requires urgent clinical action: primary prevention of diabetes is necessary to protect future generations, but initiatives to improve the quality of care provided to First Nations people already living with diabetes are urgently needed to reduce ...
According to national data, meth use rates for American Indian/Alaska Native populations remain among the highest of any ethnicity - almost two times higher than other groups, according to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Specifically, American Indians or Alaska Natives almost are twice as likely to have used meth in the past year than whites (1.1% vs. 0.6%) or Hispanics (1.1% vs. 0.6%), and approximately five times more likely to have used meth than African Americans (1.1% vs. 0.2%).. "The data about methamphetamine abuse in the Native American community are troubling," Kerlikowske said. "This ad campaign will supplement the important work for prevention and treatment already being done by the Native American community, local prevention groups, law enforcement, and treatment providers.". The Native American Anti-Meth Campaign, in its third year coordinated by ONDCPs National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, is the only national anti-meth advertising campaign tailored to reach ...
The ties between people and their natural environment is the subject for several artists in the second, "relationship", portion of the show. Among the most striking items is a circular heap of broken bone china that is illuminated by a spotlight. On the wall beside it plays black-and-white footage of a hunt for buffaloes, a species that was driven to the verge of extinction. The buffalo were hunted in part for sport, in part for commercial ends-their bones used to make the china-and in part to destroy the livelihoods of Native Americans who could then more easily be forced to move by European settlers.. Power is the theme of the final portion of the show. This includes references to old and recent protests by Native Americans, such as against a proposed pipeline in South Dakota, and to the fact that Native American women helped to inspire the wider womens suffrage movement in America. The highlight of this section is a modern take on a wedding coat used by the Osage people. Such coats are ...
Earl Townsend Jr., who died in 2007, was a passionate collector and historian of Native American artifacts. His impressive collection of prehistoric stone artifacts remains one of the largest and best in existence. As an historian, he was widely recognized as the greatest authority of Native American birdstones. His landmark book, "Birdstones of the North American Indian," originally published in 1959, is considered the premier reference book for birdstone study among collectors.. An enthusiastic and determined group of bidders helped make the Dec. 3 auction of Native American artifacts the most successful auction in Antique Helper history. It was a record-breaking sale for Antique Helper and the artifact collecting community. Bringing an unprecedented hammer total of $1.2 million, this was reportedly the most successful auction of Native American artifacts to date. Ninety-eight percent of the lots sold on auction day. The majority sold at, double, triple or even quadruple high estimate.. [This ...
In an FTC action challenging allegedly illegal business practices by a payday loan operation affiliated with American Indian Tribes, a United States Magistrate Judge just issued a report and recommendation on the scope of the FTC Act.
TITLE: Gerontology and Geriatric Research to Benefit American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) Elders & Tribes. WHEREAS, we, the members of the National Congress of American Indians of the United States, invoking the divine blessing of the Creator upon our efforts and purposes, in order to preserve for ourselves and our descendants the inherent sovereign rights of our Indian nations, rights secured under Indian treaties and agreements with the United States, and all other rights and benefits to which we are entitled under the laws and Constitution of the United States, to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of the Indian people, to preserve Indian cultural values, and otherwise promote the health, safety and welfare of the Indian people, do hereby establish and submit the following resolution; and. WHEREAS, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) was established in 1944 and is the oldest and largest national organization of American Indian and Alaska Native tribal ...
Write a 2-3 page paper analyzing the lives of Native American women in the second half of the nineteenth century. Answer the following questions within the text of your essay: How did the cultural experiences of Native American.
Poor glucose control during pregnancy is a significant concern for Canadian women with diabetes. This problem is magnified in First Nations women, who have among the highest rates of gestational diabetes (GDM) in the world (up to 18% of First Nations women will develop GDM during pregnancy and 70% of these will go on to develop type 2 diabetes later). Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology has the potential to help women maintain tighter control during pregnancy, however, in the First Nations population, there are many unique barriers that may affect use of this technology. Such barriers include remoteness of the community, cultural apprehension, lack or difficulty of access to care, and language differences.. A total of 60 participants from three participating First Nations communities in Southern Ontario will participate in the study. Participants will self-select to either the CGM group (n=30) or the control group (n=30) after consenting to participate in the study. Participants in ...
Despite this setback, the Executive Order raised awareness about the need to protect the public and workers from secondhand smoke and it laid the groundwork for a fourth campaign. With President Shellys support, Team Navajo introduced the Navajo Nation Commercial Tobacco-Free and Smoke-free Act of 2011 (legislation number 0261). In response, the NNGE introduced a counter proposal, Navajo Nation Smoking Regulation Act of 2011 (legislation number 0241). NNGEs bill proposed prohibiting the use of cigarettes and secondhand smoke in all public spaces and workplaces, except for casino gaming floors, and would have exempted casinos from secondhand smoke regulation until all their construction debts were paid.34 NNGE conducted a campaign alleging the loss of tribal revenues if smoking were prohibited in casinos. Team Navajos comprehensive secondhand smoke protection bill (legislation number 0261), with its inclusion of casinos, was not able to overcome these allegations, despite Team Navajos ...
Conversion of g, gram amounts of CATTAIL,NARROW LEAF SHOOTS (NORTHERN PLAINS INDIANS) into portion 100 g, grams measuring units. Exchange amounts between 1 g, gram and 1 or multiples of portion 100 g, grams measure of CATTAIL,NARROW LEAF SHOOTS (NORTHERN PLAINS INDIANS) product.
Total fertility rate: United Nations Population Division. Regional aggregates calculated by UNFPA based on data from United Nations Population Division.. The designations employed and the presentation of material on the map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of UNFPA concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The dotted line represents approximately the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by India and Pakistan. The final status of Jammu and Kashmir has not yet been agreed upon by the parties.. ...
Total fertility rate: United Nations Population Division. Regional aggregates calculated by UNFPA based on data from United Nations Population Division.. The designations employed and the presentation of material on the map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of UNFPA concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The dotted line represents approximately the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by India and Pakistan. The final status of Jammu and Kashmir has not yet been agreed upon by the parties.. ...
Aboriginal: Aboriginal includes persons who reported being an Aboriginal person - that is, First Nations (North American Indian), Métis or Inuk (Inuit), and/or those who reported Registered or Treaty Indian status registered under the Indian Act of Canada, and/or those who reported membership in a First Nation or Indian band. Age-standardization: Age-standardized rate is a rate that would have existed if the population had the same age distribution as the selected reference population. The BC Community Health Profiles use estimates for a given year (1991 or 2011) as the reference population, and chronic disease incidence and prevalence rates have been age-standardized using the direct standardization method with five-year age groups. Alcohol-related deaths: Alcohol-related deaths include deaths where alcohol was a contributing factor (indirectly related) as well as those due to alcohol (directly related). Chronic disease: Chronic diseases, also known as non-communicable diseases, are diseases ...
Aboriginal: Aboriginal includes persons who reported being an Aboriginal person - that is, First Nations (North American Indian), Métis or Inuk (Inuit), and/or those who reported Registered or Treaty Indian status registered under the Indian Act of Canada, and/or those who reported membership in a First Nation or Indian band. Age-standardization: Age-standardized rate is a rate that would have existed if the population had the same age distribution as the selected reference population. The BC Community Health Profiles use estimates for a given year (1991 or 2011) as the reference population, and chronic disease incidence and prevalence rates have been age-standardized using the direct standardization method with five-year age groups. Alcohol-related deaths: Alcohol-related deaths include deaths where alcohol was a contributing factor (indirectly related) as well as those due to alcohol (directly related). Chronic disease: Chronic diseases, also known as non-communicable diseases, are diseases ...
George Catlin (1796-1872) Scalp Dance From The North American Indian Portfolio London, 1844 Lithographs with original hand-coloring Sheet size: approx. 16 1/2 x 23 George Catlin was the earliest great artist to travel extensively among the Plains Indians of North America and visually record their customs and artifacts
Lets start with the "window dressing" or as they say in politics, the "talking points". Patients First has very little to do with patients. It is a document about the structure of health care and how it is delivered. It is about how the health care bureaucracy or system is to be organized. It claims it is about equity, helping individuals and groups that have barriers to accessing health care services but the model it is proposing has nothing to do with equity. Rather, the model being proposed is about providing a model of health care that provides equal access to all. That is not equity, that is equality. That is not dissimilar from our current model which has left many individuals and groups on the outside of the system looking in.. There is a specific reference to our First Nations population suggesting that Patients First will somehow improve their access to health care. I think we would all agree that the health status of our First Nations people is a national disgrace. While it is ...
Adventures of the Ojibbeway and Ioway Indians in England, France, and Belgium: Being Notes of Eight Years Travels and Residence in Europe With His North American Indian ...
Ideas of cultural and physical difference frequently intertwined with ideas of descent and heredity in the 17th and 18th centuries. Nowhere, perhaps, is this clearer than in the puzzle of Indian origins, a pressing issue once it became clear that the Americas represented a "new world." Geography, customs, beliefs, bodies, and languages were all pressed into service to answer a question of ancestry and migration. Theories were innumerable: the Indians were the inhabitants of Atlantis, or Phoenicians, or Welsh. Perhaps the most prominent view-first published in 1594, but probably discussed long before, and reaching its fullest articulation in the southeastern trader James Adairs History of the North American Indians (1775)-was that the Indians descended from the ten Lost Tribes, Jews who continued to keep the covenant even after being deported to Assyria after the conquest of Israel centuries before Christ. Another theory, first introduced by José de Acosta and increasingly accepted in the 18th ...
Seminole definition, a member of any of several groupings of North American Indians comprising emigrants from the Creek Confederacy territories to Florida or their descendants in Florida and Oklahoma, especially the culturally conservative present-day Florida Indians. See more.
PERHAPS the most familiar application of the principle that like produces like is the attempt which has been made by many peoples in many ages to injure or destroy an enemy by injuring or destroying an image of him, in the belief that, just as the image suffers, so does the man, and that when it perishes he must die. A few instances out of many may be given to prove at once the wide diffusion of the practice over the world and its remarkable persistence through the ages. For thousands of years ago it was known to the sorcerers of ancient India, Babylon, and Egypt, as well as of Greece and Rome, and at this day it is still resorted to by cunning and malignant savages in Australia, Africa, and Scotland. Thus the North American Indians, we are told, believe that by drawing the figure of a person in sand, ashes, or clay, or by considering any object as his body, and then pricking it with a sharp stick or doing it any other injury, they inflict a corresponding injury on the person represented. For ...
Miami: Algonquian -speaking North American Indians who lived in the area of what is now Green Bay, Wis., U.S., when first encountered by French explorers in the 17th century. The Miami...
12.25 x 15.25 framed. Plate facing page 110, The North American Indian (1907-1930) v.15, Southern California Shoshoneans. The Diegueños. Plateau Shoshoneans. The Washo.
Although coronary heart disease CHD is currently the leading cause of death among American Indians, information on the prevalence of CHD and its association with known cardiovascular risk factors is limited. The Strong Heart Study was initiated in 1988 to quantify cardiovascular disease and its risk factors among three geographically diverse...
Native American news, videos and information from Indigenous communities, First Nations and Aboriginal people through out the world
Women of All Red Nations (WARN) was a Native American womens organization. It was established in 1974 by Lorelei DeCora Means, Madonna Thunderhawk, Phyllis Young, Janet McCloud, and others. WARN included more than 300 women from 30 different tribal communities. Many of its members had previously been active in the American Indian Movement and were participants in the 1973 Wounded Knee incident. The inaugural conference took place in Rapid City, South Dakota. WARN championed the health of Native American women, the restoration and securing of treaty rights, eliminating Indian mascots for sports teams, and combating the commercialization of Indian culture. They highlighted the high rates of health issues caused by nuclear mining and storage on Indian land, such as birth defects, miscarriages and deaths. They also expressed concerns about forced sterilization of Indian women and the adoption of Indian children by non-Indians. They published the article "The Theft of Life" in their annual ...
Low-income individuals are less likely than their wealthier counterparts to invest in long-term assets and educational attainment. To some extent this might simply reflect the preferences of this population. On the other hand, it may be indicative of significant obstacles that prevent poorer individuals and households from creating wealth for themselves and ultimately their communities. Borrowing and access to capital is an important means by which most individuals and households are able to buy homes, automobiles and send their children (and themselves) to school. While it is quite well documented that American Indians residing on reservations tend to be poorer than the average American citizen, we know very little about the use of credit and creditworthiness of this population.. Recent research by Dimitrova-Grajzl et al (2015) provides a useful examination of credit scores and the types of borrowing that occurs for residents of American Indian reservations. Their research uses confidential-use ...
Characteristics of the fall 1980 full-time, first-time freshmen enrolled in New Jersey colleges and universities are tabulated and trends in the past five years are summarized. Highlights include the following: There was a modest decline in entering freshmen over the previous year, consistent with projections in the statewide plan. The decline was not uniform across sectors, with a higher decline at Rutgers University than at state, independent, and community colleges. Women continued to comprise the majority of freshmen at 52 percent. The racial/ethnic distribution was six percent Hispanic, 12 percent black, and 82 percent other (including white, American Indian/Alaskan native, Asian/Pacific Islander, and non-resident aliens). The greatest percentage decline was among blacks. A two to three percent decline occurred in all age groups except 35 and over, in which it grew about one percent in the last year. The number of New Jersey residents declined by four percent in the
This community event aims to increase understanding of the cultural differences and similarities in the American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. The presenter will address the history and perceptions as well as the cancer disparities and outcomes these populations experience both locally and nationally. This event hopes to encourage dialogue in a safe atmosphere to better serve these unique populations. Presenter: Miquela Taffa (Laguna Pueblo) This event is free and open to the public. We welcome both community members and Washington University faculty, staff, and students who work with or are interested in these populations. Please feel free to bring lunch to this meeting. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, please contact Saffiyah Poole at [email protected] This event is co-hosted by the Program for the Elimination of Cancer Disparities (PECaD), part of Siteman Cancer Center, and the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies ...
American Indian Religious Freedom Act: Congress eventually passed the American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA; 1978). AIRFA was intended to ensure the protection of Native American religions and their practitioners, and it successfully stripped away many of the bureaucratic obstacles with which they had been confronted. Before 1978, for instance, the terms of the…
The Municipality of Sioux Lookout is a hub with a population of 5,500 that also serves as a health and service hub for 29 remote First Nations communities.
The government of the United States has established a land base for the American Indian Tribes of Florida. Historically, most of that land has been designated as reservations. ...
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
The Navajo Nation Leaking Storage Tank Soil and Water Cleanup Standards 2012 In the Navajo Way, the Earth is our Mother, the mountains part of her sacred body, the water courses her veins and arteries.
The FBI and Navajo Nation Division of Public Safety are investigating an apparent homicide that occurred in Sheep Springs, New Mexico on November 25.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Social Determinants of American Indian Nutritional Health. AU - Warne, Donald. AU - Wescott, Siobhan. PY - 2019/2/13. Y1 - 2019/2/13. N2 - The American Indian (AI) population suffers from significant health disparities, including nutrition-related chronic diseases (diabetes, cancer, and heart disease). Several risk factors for disease and social determinants of health have unique histories in the AI population, including historical trauma, boarding schools, adverse childhood experiences, poverty, federal food programs, and food deserts. To effectively address these disparities, a multipronged approach in collaboration with stakeholders is needed to address the upstream social determinants of health and to increase access to healthier foods. Promising practices and strategies can be considered in several focus areas, including 1) improving existing food programs, 2) promoting breastfeeding and early childhood nutrition, 3) promoting food sovereignty and access to traditional ...