Treatment of Hypothermia is abnormally low body temperature. It is a dangerous condition caused when your body loses more heat than it can produce. It requires immediate medical attention, Hyperthermia, Hypothermia Symptoms, Hypothermia Causes, Hypothermia Definition, Hypothermia Treatment, Hypothermia Diagnosis, Hypothermia Risk Factors, Hypothermia Syndrome, Hypothermia Prevention, Hypothermia Signs, Hypothermia Therapy, Acute Hypothermia, Chronic Hypothermia, Effects Of Hypothermia, Hypothermia Emedicine, Hypothermia Surgery
The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of the time interval from collapse to return of spontaneous circulation (CPA-ROSC) in cardiac arrest patients and the types of patients who will benefit from therapeutic hypothermia. Four hundred witnessed adult comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of cardiac etiology were enrolled in the study. The favorable neurological outcome was defined as category 1 or 2 on the five-point Pittsburgh cerebral performance scale at the time of hospital discharge. A matching process based on the propensity score was performed to equalize potential prognostic factors in the hypothermia and normothermia groups, and to formulate a balanced 1:1 matched cohort study. The rate of favorable neurological outcome was higher (P | 0.05) in the hypothermia group (n = 110) than in the normothermia group in patients with CPA-ROSC of 15 to 20 minutes (64% vs. 17%), 20 to 25 minutes (70% vs. 8%), 25 to 30 minutes (50% vs. 7%), 35 to 40 minutes (27% vs. 0%) and
BACKGROUND: Mild hypothermia treatment (32-34°C) in survivors after cardiac arrest (CA) is clearly recommended by the current guidelines. The effects of cooling procedure towards QT interval have not been evaluated so far outside of case series. In
This is a pilot study which will test the safety and feasibility of hypothermia treatment as adjunct therapy to conventional treatment of hyperammonemic encephalopathy (HAE) in neonates versus conventional treatment (dialysis, nutritional therapy, and ammonia scavenging drugs) only. The endpoint of the pilot study will be reached when either 24 patients have been enrolled and no serious adverse events were observed, when no patient has been enrolled in 5 years, or when serious adverse events occur which are clearly linked to the use of hypothermia. These would be serious complications not seen in patients on conventional therapy (dialysis , nutritional therapy, ammonia scavenging drugs) for HAE ...
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Fig. 9. Histograms showing the proinflammatory cytokine expression in the ipsilateral cuneate nucleus (CN) on day 7 after chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats treated with regional or whole-body hypothermia. A significant decrease in levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (A ) and interleukin (IL)-1β (B ) was observed after applying regional hypothermia (P , 0.05, by two-way ANOVA). In rats pretreated with mild or deep regional hypothermia, there was a significant decrease in TNF-α (A ) and IL-1β (B ) levels compared with those pretreated with regional normothermia (*P , 0.05, by Tukey test). Similarly, in the 5 h postinjury group, TNF-α (A ) and IL-1β (B ) levels in the CN were significantly decreased in CCI rats that received mild or deep regional hypothermia compared with those that received regional normothermia (*P , 0.05, by Tukey test). In addition, deep regional hypothermia administered preinjury and 5 h postinjury more effectively suppressed TNF-α (A ) and IL-1β (B ) ...
Patients often regain consciousness 3 days or more after arrest. Physicians may be making premature predictions about which patients are not likely to survive following cardiac arrest - and even withdrawing care -- before the window in which comatose patients who have received therapeutic hypothermia are most likely to wake up, according to two new studies from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The research helps to better define the proper timeframe and manner in which doctors may be able to predict which patients will regain consciousness after the use of therapeutic hypothermia, which preserves brain and other organ function following cardiac arrest.. Patients treated with hypothermia often dont regain consciousness until three or more days after their cardiac arrest, according Penn research that will present today at the American Heart Associations annual Scientific Sessions (Abstract #10778. But in a separate Penn study published online this week in ...
Enteral Feeding during therapeutic hypothermia, 978-3-659-61988-5, The basic provision of nutrition in the critical care population has been associated with reduced length of stay and improved outcome. Often catabolic, these patients are at risk of malnutrition. Government bodies advise and expect those requiring mechanical ventilation during critical illness to be enterally fed wherever possible. Cardiac arrest victims treated with neuroprotective therapeutic hypothermia often encounter the postponement of enteral feed until normothermia is restored. This is due to a lack of research evidence surrounding the ability for a hypothermic patient to absorb feed formulas. This is the first known study that sought to identify what percentage of feed could be tolerated by cooled victims of cardiac arrest during three distinct phases of therapeutic hypothermia. This included 24 hours at target temperature (32-34°C), 24 hours rewarming to 36.5°C and 24 hours maintained at a core temperature below 37.5°C. A
TY - JOUR. T1 - Asphyxiated neonates who received active therapeutic hypothermia during transport had higher rates of hypocapnia than controls. AU - Szakmar, Eniko. AU - Kovacs, Kata. AU - Meder, Unoke. AU - Bokodi, Geza. AU - Szell, Andras. AU - Somogyvari, Zsolt. AU - Szabo, Attila J.. AU - Szabó, M.. AU - Jermendy, Agnes. PY - 2018/1/1. Y1 - 2018/1/1. N2 - Aim: We investigated the association between active hypothermia and hypocapnia in neonates with moderate-to-severe hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) transported after birth. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of neonates with HIE born between 2007 and 2011 and transported to Semmelweis University, Hungary, for hypothermia treatment before and after we introduced active cooling during transport in 2009. Of these, 71 received intensive care plus controlled active hypothermia during transport, while the 46 controls just received standard intensive care. Incident hypocapnia was defined as a partial pressure of carbon-dioxide ...
BACKGROUND: Induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH; temperature 32-34°C) has become standard of care in many hospitals for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Pyrexia, or fever, is known to be detrimental in patients with neurologic injuries such as stroke or trauma. The incidence of pyrexia in the postrewarming phase of TH is unknown. We attempted to determine the incidence of fever after TH and hypothesized that those patients who were febrile after rewarming would have worse clinical outcomes than those who maintained normothermia in the postrewarming period.. METHODS: Retrospective data analysis of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) over a period of 29 months (December 2007 to April 2010).. INCLUSION CRITERIA: OHCA, age ,18, return of spontaneous circulation, and treatment with TH.. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: traumatic arrest and pregnancy. Data collected included age, sex, neurologic outcome, mortality, and whether the patient developed fever (temperature , 100.4°F, ...
We showed in a previous experimental study that moderate hypothermia during CPB increases IL10 blood concentrations and blunts TNFα production (2). We demonstrate here that systemic moderate hypothermia leads to increased gene expression and synthesis of IL10 in the myocardium after CPB and that this is related to myocardial protection. Despite the short observational period of 6 h, which did not allow us to extrapolate the outcome of the animals investigated, a substantial clinical benefit could be noticed, wherein the need for inotropic support to maintain stable hemodynamics was less in animals that were in moderate hypothermia during surgery. This cardioprotective effect of moderate hypothermia related to anti-inflammatory cytokine balance shown here could justify its use in clinical practice, especially in patients with severe preoperative heart failure in whom pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis in the myocardium is thought to contribute to myocardial dysfunction (4).. The mechanisms by ...
Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops beating and blood flow to the body is halted. It can occur while people are in the hospital because of a medical condition or while people are out of the hospital as a result of an accident or other cause. Cardiac arrest is a serious event that is associated with high rates of death and long-term disability. When a person experiences cardiac arrest,insufficient amount of blood flow and oxygen can result in brain injury.. Therapeutic hypothermia is a therapy that involves a controlled lowering of the body temperature and then maintenance of this lower temperature for a period of time. Therapeutic hypothermia has been successfully used in adults who experience cardiac arrest to improve survival rates and health outcomes, and it has also been studied in newborn infants who have suffered from perinatal asphyxia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia at improving survival rates and reducing brain injury in ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Absent SEP during therapeutic hypothermia did not reappear after re-warming in comatose patients following cardiac arrest. AU - Grippo, A.. AU - Carrai, R.. AU - Fossi, S.. AU - Cossu, C.. AU - Mazzeschi, E.. AU - Peris, A.. AU - Bonizzoli, M.. AU - Ciapetti, M.. AU - Gensini, G. F.. AU - Pinto, F.. AU - Amantini, A.. PY - 2013/4. Y1 - 2013/4. N2 - Background. Early prediction of neurological outcome for patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest (CA) is a challenging task. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve neurological outcome after CA. Two recent studies indicated that somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) recorded during TH retains high prediction value for poor neurological outcome. It remains unclear whether TH can influence the recovery of bilaterally absent (BA) N20 after re-warming. The primary endpoint of the present study was to evaluate if patients with BA SEPs during TH can recover cortical responses after re-warming. The secondary endpoint was to ...
1Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, 2Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. Introduction: In reconstructive surgery, skeletal muscle may endure protracted ischemia before reperfusion which may lead to significant ischemia/reperfusion injury. Other investigators reported that low local hypothermia (local cooling at 4-10°C) significantly reduced ischemia/reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle of different species of laboratory animals. However, this range of severe low local hypothermia is known to induce capillary damage. More recently, other investigators reported that low local mild hypothermia at 32-34°C significantly reduced ischemia/reperfusion injury in rabbit rectus femoris muscle in vivo. However, this infarct protective effect of low local hypothermia has not been tested in human skeletal muscle. The objective of this study was to use our established ex vivo human skeletal muscle culture model to study the efficacy of low local mild hypothermia (30-32°C) in ...
Purpose: The aim of our study was to assess the effect of hypothermia on histological damage in 19 brain regions after prolonged cardiac arrest in pigs.. Methods: Pigs were anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated. After stabilisation of pulmonary artery temperature (Tpa) at 38.5±0.2 °C, ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced and 10 min of untreated VF were followed by 8 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (mechanical chest compressions, two doses of vasopressin 0.4 IE/kg). At 8 min of CPR, up to 3 countershocks were delivered. Pigs that had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were randomized to one of 2 groups (control, hypothermia). Pigs in the hypothermia group were cooled to Tpa 33.0±1.0 °C with a surface cooling device (LRS Thermosuit™) circulating ice water over most of the skin surface. Pigs in the control group were kept at 38.5±1.0 °C throughout the experiment. After 14 hours of hypothermia, pigs were rewarmed, weaned and brought to the stable. At day 9 of the ...
Background: Therapeutic hypothermia has been known to reduce post-resuscitation neurological deficit and protect the cardiomyocyte from ischemia/reperfusion injury.. Hypothesis: Rapid brain cooling during CPR followed by systemic cooling reduces the severity of post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction after prolonged ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods: VF was induced in 16 domestic pigs and untreated for 10 minutes. CPR was then initiated for 5 minutes before defibrillation attempts. Coincident with starting CPR, the hypothermia group (n=8) was cooled by a Rhinochill device, which cooled the brain, followed by systemic hypothermia. The cooling was continued to achieve a target core temperature of 34°C.The body temperature of the control group was not intervened after VF was induced. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed before VF, hourly after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for 4 hours, and at 96 hours.. Results: Both myocardial systolic (LVEF) and diastolic (isovolumic ...
Stone heart resulting from ischemic contracture of the myocardium, precludes successful resuscitation from ventricular fibrillation (VF). We hypothesized that mild hypothermia might slow the progression to stone heart. Fourteen swine (27 ± 1 kg) were randomized to normothermia (group I; n = 6) or hypothermia groups (group II; n = 8). Mild hypothermia (34 ± 2°C) was induced with ice packs prior to VF induction. The LV and right ventricular (RV) cross-sectional areas were followed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance until the development of stone heart. A commercial 1.5T GE Signa NV-CV/i scanner was used. Complete anatomic coverage of the heart was acquired using a steady-state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence gated at baseline prior to VF onset. Un-gated SSFP images were obtained serially after VF induction. The ventricular endocardium was manually traced and LV and RV volumes were calculated at each time point. In group I, the LV was dilated compared to baseline at 5 minutes after VF and this
Encephalopathy in the late preterm and term infant is an important clinical condition because it can be associated with death or poor neurodevelopment in early childhood. Stages of encephalopathy (mild, moderate, and severe) soon after birth have value in predicting outcome during early infancy and even at early school-age. Prompt recognition after birth of the subset of infants in whom encephalopathy is associated with hypoxia-ischemia (hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy [HIE]) is critical because the outcome is potentially modifiable with therapeutic hypothermia. A series of large randomized clinical trials have provided better estimates of the outcomes of moderate and severe HIE compared with the era before the hypothermia trials. Therapeutic hypothermia reduces the composite outcome of death or a major disability at 18 months to 2 years of age among term infants who have moderate or severe encephalopathy. School-age follow-up of a limited number of infants from these trials indicates that death ...
The prevention of ischemic injury to preserve both end-organ function and improve neurological recovery by the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia has been well established in the literature. However, not only the means by which body temperature is cooled but also the rate by which target temperature is attained remains an area of continued interest and research. The induction of therapeutic hypothermia to begin the process of body temperature lowering through the infusion of a cold solution intravenously into the body may be one variable that influences not only rapidity of cooling but also subsequent clinical outcome. In a recent issue of Critical Care, Skulec and colleagues compared the induction of therapeutic hypothermia by cold normal saline versus cold colloid solution containing hydroxyethyl starch in a porcine animal model of cardiac arrest, assessing both the rate of temperature change and target temperature achieved, in addition to changes in intracranial pressure.
Neuronal injury is one of the key factors in determining outcome after cardiac arrest. Cerebral resuscitation starts with rapid restoration of spontaneous circulation by immediate CPR and defibrillation and continues in the postresuscitation period. Basic measures consist of good critical care practice, such as maintaining normotension, normoglycemia, and normocapnia. In addition, several more specific postresuscitation treatment options have been explored in recent years. All therapies for cerebral resuscitation must face the challenge presented by the complex pathophysiological network, which is activated by global ischemia. An effective therapy should act on multiple pathways simultaneously. This is what therapeutic hypothermia does. Two large randomized clinical trials have proven that mild therapeutic hypothermia is effective in improving both survival and neurological outcome of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Mild therapeutic hypothermia of 32°C-34°C for 12-24 h is, ...
During therapeutic hypothermia, doctors reduce a patients body temperature to prevent cellular damage. See how therapeutic hypothermia saves lives.
Background and Purpose. Studies have shown that inter-ischemia hypothermia is able to reduce the size of myocardial infarctions and improve their clinical outcomes. The present study determined whether inter-ischemia hypothermia induced by pharmacological approach induced stronger neuroprotection in ischemic brains. Methods. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied in 4 groups: (1) sham; (2) stroke; (3) stroke treated with pharmacological hypothermia before reperfusion (inter-ischemia hypothermia); and (4) stroke treated with pharmacological hypothermia after reperfusion is initiated (inter-reperfusion hypothermia). The combination of chlorpromazine and promethazine with dihydrocapsaicin was used to induce hypothermia. To compare the neuroprotective effects of drug-induced hypothermia between the groups, brain damage was evaluated using infarct volume and neurological deficits. In addition, mRNA expressions of NADPH oxidase subunits and glucose transporter subtypes were determined by real-time PCR.
Abstract: : Purpose: The present study was designed to examine the changes in the electroretinogram (ERGs) during postischemic reperfusion in young (4 months old) and aged (over 18 months old) Wistar rats under normothermic and hypothermic conditions. Methods: The ERG responses to single white light flashes were recorded by Ag/AgCl electrodes placed on the cornea. Ocular ischemia was induced by the elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) from 15 mmHg to 80 mmHg for 2 hours. In the hypothermia groups, the rectal temperature was decreased from 38.5 °C to 31.5 °C by using a domestic cooling pad throughout the experiments. Results: Exposure to 80 mmHg of IOP decreased the choroidal blood flow to 40 - 60% of the baseline value. In the young rats, the normalized amplitude of b-wave decreased during ischemia to 60.6±3.0% of the baseline value under normothermic condition and to 70.8±5.3% under hypothermic condition. During reperfusion, the amplitude of the b-wave recovered to the baseline level by ...
The effects of small variations in brain temperature have been tested in a number of stroke and brain injury models. For example, intraischemic hypothermia after transient global ischemia protected the CA1 hippocampus and dorsolateral striatum from neuronal necrosis (142) and attenuated cognitive and sensory motor deficits (143). In dogs, mild hypothermia at 34°C also resulted in significant improvement in neurologic function after cardiac arrest (144). Mild temperature reductions dramatically reduced infarct volume after transient focal ischemia (145, 146), whereas profound temperature reductions (24°C) or extended periods of mild hypothermia were required to reduce infarct volume after permanent focal ischemia (147, 148).. One of the limitations of postischemic hypothermia appears to be the therapeutic window. Although dramatic protection is observed if hypothermia is induced during or immediately after the ischemic insult, lesser degrees of protection are observed as a delay in the ...
Dr. Shankaran is continuing to study the hypothermia therapy. In a study submitted for publication that involves the same two groups of babies, MRIs tend to be more favorable for the hypothermia group, she said. Her team is also looking at variations on how best to use hypothermia. For instance, they are studying whether more time - 120 hours instead of 72 - and a lower temperature - 32 degrees instead of 33.5 - might deliver better results.. Donna Ferriero, MD, the W.H. and Marie Wattis Distinguished Professor and chair of the department of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, said it is not fully understood why hypothermia therapy helps prevent brain injury in babies.. "We still dont know the true mechanism at work," she told Neurology Today. "We think we are slowing the metabolism and thus ultimately preventing cell death.". Dr. Ferriero was part of a research team that investigated the use of Cool-Cap, a brain-cooling cap that works on the same principle as whole-body ...
In recent years, mild or moderate hypothermia has been proposed for clinical use as an adjunct for achieving protection from cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury. Clinically feasible brain cooling methods include a head hood or helmet with chemical cooling, head immersion in ice water, nasophyaryngeal cooling after tracheal intubations, etc. Under normal conditions it has been shown that temperature along the common and internal carotid arteries does not change significantly due to relatively small heat exchange surface of the blood vessels and high flow velocity of the blood. However, when the neck and brain surfaces are cold due to wearing external cooling garments, heat loss from the common and internal carotid arteries may result in arterial blood cooling before the blood enters the Circle of Willis [Zhu 2000]. ...
10 patients received hypothermia, while 9 were normothermic controls. It took an average of 3.5 hours to reach the target temperature of 32º C. In 9 out of 10 patients, the target was overshot, and the entire cooling and rewarming process lasted an average of 47.4 hours. There was a measurable, but non-statistically significant trend (P = 0.14) towards better clinical outcome in the hypothermic group: 50% of the hypothermic patients and 90% of the normothermic patients had bad outcomes. There was also a trend towards reduced infarct volume in the hypothermic cohort. Sinus bradycardia was the only complication to occur with a significantly higher frequency in the hypothermia group than in the control group. Researchers conclude that induced moderate hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke is both feasible and safe. A larger study of poststroke cooling is underway.. ...
Postischemic hypothermia protects against loss of agrin and SPARC from the vascular basement membrane in global cerebral ischemia
A new study shows how high-dose erythropoietin (EPO) can work together with hypothermia therapy to help babies with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).
OBJECTIVE: Mild hypothermia has a protective effect on ischemic stroke, but the mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we investigated microRNA (miRNA) profiles and the specific role of miRNAs in ischemic stroke treated with mild hypothermia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male adult Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to focal transient cerebral ischemia. Mild hypothermia was induced by applying ice packs around the neck and head of the animals. miRNAs expression profiles were detected in ischemic stroke treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia through miRNA chips. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to verify the change of miRNA array. Western blot and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay kits were used to detect the changes of protein expression and ATP levels, respectively. miR-15b mimic and its control were injected into the right lateral ventricle 60 min before the induction of ischemia. RESULTS: The results showed that mild hypothermia affected miRNAs profiles expression. We ...
Sou SN, Lee K, Nayyar K, Polizzi KM, Sellick C, Kontoravdi Cet al., 2017, Exploring cellular behavior under transient gene expression and its impact on mAb productivity and Fc-glycosylation., Biotechnol Bioeng Transient gene expression (TGE) is a methodology employed in bioprocessing for the fast provision of recombinant protein material. Mild hypothermia is often introduced to overcome the low yield typically achieved with TGE and improve specific protein productivity. It is therefore of interest to examine the impact of mild hypothermic temperatures on both the yield and quality of transiently expressed proteins and the relationship to changes in cellular processes and metabolism. In this study, we focus on the ability of a Chinese hamster ovary cell line to galactosylate a recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) product. Through experimentation and flux balance analysis, our results show that TGE in mild hypothermic conditions led to a 76% increase in qP compared to TGE at 36.5°C in our ...
hypothermia - MedHelps hypothermia Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for hypothermia. Find hypothermia information, treatments for hypothermia and hypothermia symptoms.
Just off the press: Cochrane Collaboration Review of the use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Evidence of moderate quality suggests that conventional cooling methods provided to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia improve neurological outcome after cardiac arrest, specifically with better outcomes than occur with no temperature management The updated Cochrane review goes a long way…
Stroke remains a disease with a serious impact on quality of life but few effective treatments exist. There is an urgent need to develop and/or improve neuroprotective strategies to combat this. Many drugs proven to be neuroprotective in experimental models fail to improve patient outcome in a clinical setting. An emerging treatment, therapeutic hypothermia (TH), is a promising neuroprotective therapy in stroke management. Several studies with TH in experimental models and small clinical trials have shown beneficial effects. Despite this, implementation into the clinical setting is still lacking due to methodological considerations as well as hypothermia-related complications. This paper discusses the possible opportunities and limitations of the use of TH in animal models and the translation into the clinic.
Hunter BR, Kirschner JM. In coma after cardiac arrest with nonshockable rhythm, therapeutic hypothermia improved 90-d neurologic outcome. Ann Intern Med. 2020;172:JC17. doi: https://doi.org/10.7326/ACPJ202002180-017. Download citation file:. ...
AIM: This study is to compare the effect of the δ-opioid receptor agonist, d-Ala(2)-d-Leu(5) enkephalin (DADLE) with normothermic control and therapeutic hypothermia on post resuscitation myocardial function and 72-h survival in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. METHODS: Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced in 15 male Sprague-Dawley rats ...
Today, even though therapeutic hypothermia is the only therapy proven to decrease mortality and improve neurological outcomes in comatose patients after cardiac arrest, an analysis of data on 26,519 patients in the United States suggests that it is used in only 0.35% of cases.
For adults, but not children, with traumatic brain injuries, therapeutic hypothermia is beneficial, according to a meta-analysis published online December 9 in Critical Care Medicine.
Evidence-based recommendations on therapeutic hypothermia with intracorporeal temperature monitoring for treating hypoxic perinatal brain injury
Evidence-based recommendations on therapeutic hypothermia with intracorporeal temperature monitoring for treating hypoxic perinatal brain injury
Press releases - Provides a strong multidisciplinary forum to ensure research advances are well disseminated and therapeutic hypothermia is used effectively to enhance patient outcomes from traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest, and more.
Editorial board - Provides a strong multidisciplinary forum to ensure research advances are well disseminated and therapeutic hypothermia is used effectively to enhance patient outcomes from traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest, and more.
The present invention provides a method and apparatus for controlling a patients body temperature and in particular for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Various embodiments of the system are described. The system includes: a source of breathing gas, which may be in the form of a compressed breathing gas mixture; a heat exchanger or other heating and/or cooling device; and a breathing interface, such as a breathing mask or tracheal tube. Optionally, the system may include additional features, such as a mechanical respirator, a nebulizer for introducing medication into the breathing gas, a body temperature probe and a feedback controller. The system can use air or a specialized breathing gas mixture, such as He/O2 or SF/O2 to increase the heat transfer rate. In addition, the system may include an ice particle generator for introducing fine ice particles into the flow of breathing gas to further increase the heat transfer rate.
Research has found that therapeutic hypothermia is no more effective than normal temperature control for children after cardiac arrest.
Learn how physicians and staff at Scripps are using therapeutic hypothermia pads to prevent people whove had a cardiac arrest from suffering brain damage.
This paper heralds a future research study into investigating whether therapeutic hypothermia initiated by infusion of cold () normal saline (2L) will be
Kim and coauthors report on the effect of prehospital induction of mild hypothermia on survival and neurological status among adults with cardiac arrest. In an
Disturbed homeostasis as a result of tissue stress can provoke leukocyte responses enabling recovery. Since mild hypothermia displays specific clinically relevant tissue-protective properties and interleukin (IL)-22 promotes healing at host/environment interfaces, effects of lowered ambient temperature on IL-22 were studied. We demonstrate that a 5h exposure of endotoxemic mice to 4°C reduces body temperature by 5.0 degrees and enhances splenic and colonic il22 gene expression. In contrast, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a and IL-17A were not increased. In vivo data on IL-22 were corroborated using murine splenocytes and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured upon 33°C and polyclonal T cell activation. Upregulation by mild hypothermia of largely T-cell-derived IL-22 in PBMC required monocytes and associated with enhanced nuclear T-cell NFATc2. Notably, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) antagonism by cyclosporine A or FK506 impaired IL-22 upregulation at normothermia and
The American Heart Association issued recommendations and guidelines for inducing mild hypothermia in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Today, about 500 out of 5,000 hospitals are performing the treatment.. When the body suffers a cardiac arrest and the heart stops, blood flow ceases and the person technically dies, says Benjamin Abella, clinical research director at the Center for Resuscitation Science in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Cooling the body to between 89.6 and 93.2 degrees F, about 5-8 degrees below normal body temperature, slows brain-cell death and other organ demise that could lead to permanent neurological damage.. The cooling should be done within 30 to 60 minutes of the arrest, and the patients remain that way for 12 to 24 hours before the body is slowly rewarmed to a normal temperature.. "Therapeutic hypothermia is the only post-resuscitation therapy shown to improve both survival and reduce disability after cardiac arrest," says ...