Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved a range of mechanisms, including manipulation of the host cell epigenetic machinery and host cell gene expression rewiring, to parasitize and thrive inside host phagocytes. A new study in The EMBO Journal (Yaseen et al, 2018) reports that, conversely, host macrophages can use epigenetic modulators to modify the cell surface of invading pathogens and counteract infection. This study opens new avenues to better understand host-pathogen interactions and to develop novel, more effective antimicrobial strategies.. See also: I Yaseen et al (January 2018) ...
Bacterial pathogens represent a major health problem worldwide. In developing countries they are one of the major killers (notably M. tuberculosis) particularly for immuno-compromised patients (aging people, HIV-infected patients, grafted patients) or people suffering from specific diseases (e.g. cystic fibrosis patients). One aggravating factor is the rise of new strains of bacteria resistant to one or several antibiotics, and the very limited number of newly developed antibiotics. This has led to a renewed interest in understanding how pathogenic bacteria can cause diseases.. Bacteria are defined as virulent (or pathogenic) based on their ability to mount a harmful infection in a host. Virulent bacteria can infect a host, non-virulent bacteria cannot. A successful infection relies on a series of specific bacterial traits, such as the ability to secrete toxins, to escape the host immune system, to replicate within host cells or to inhibit phagocytic engulfment. For any given pathogenic ...
Using DNA Microarrays to Study Host-Microbe Interactions, info about Medicine: Medical Specialties: Microbiology: Using DNA Microarrays to Study Host-Microbe Interactions
Evolutionary genomics has recently entered a new era in the study of host-pathogen interactions. A variety of novel genomic techniques has transformed the identification, detection and classification of both hosts and pathogens, allowing a greater resolution that helps decipher their underlying dynamics and provides novel insights into their environmental context. Nevertheless, many challenges to a general understanding of host-pathogen interactions remain, in particular in the synthesis and integration of concepts and findings across a variety of systems and different spatiotemporal and ecological scales. In this perspective we aim to highlight some of the commonalities and complexities across diverse studies of host-pathogen interactions, with a focus on ecological, spatiotemporal variation, and the choice of genomic methods used. We performed a quantitative review of recent literature to investigate links, patterns and potential tradeoffs between the complexity of genomic, ecological and ...
Over the millennia, pathogens have coevolved with their hosts and acquired the ability to intercept, disrupt, mimic, and usurp numerous signaling pathways of those hosts. The study of host/pathogen interactions thus not only teaches us about the intricate biology of these parasitic invaders but also provides interesting insights into basic cellular processes both at the level of the individual cell and more globally throughout the organism. Host/pathogen relationships also provide insights into the evolutionary forces that shape biological diversity. Here we review a few recent examples of how viruses, bacteria, and parasites manipulate tyrosine kinase-mediated and Rho guanosine triphosphatase-mediated signaling pathways of their hosts to achieve efficient entry, replication, and exit during their infectious cycles.. ...
Deborah Hung Laboratory. We are facing an incredible challenge in the realm of infectious diseases that has been brought on by the convergence of three current phenomena - newly emerging infectious organisms, a global crisis in antibiotic resistance, and the threat of bioterrorism. A response to this challenge requires a renewed devotion to understanding the underlying mechanisms involved in infection and an increased commitment to the discovery of new antibiotics.. The goal of research in the Hung Lab is to understand in vivo mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis by studying pathogen-host interactions. By merging the fields of chemical genetics and bacterial genetics/genomics, we hope to provide insight into possible new paradigms for addressing infectious diseases.. Despite recent, largely genetic, technical advances in the field of in vivo pathogen-host interactions, many important questions related to the mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis remain unanswered, in part because of the inability ...
Our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis is dominated by the cell biology of the host-pathogen interaction. However, the majority of metabolites that are used in prokaryotic and eukaryotic physiology and signalling are chemically similar or identical. Therefore, the metabolic crosstalk between pathogens and host cells may be as important as the interactions between bacterial effector proteins and their host targets. In this Review we focus on host-pathogen interactions at the metabolic level: chemical signalling events that enable pathogens to sense anatomical location and the local physiology of the host; microbial metabolic pathways that are dedicated to circumvent host immune mechanisms; and a few metabolites as central points of competition between the host and bacterial pathogens.
Disease-causing microorganisms that find their way into feeds and foods or farms and homes can pose a threat to the health of the animal and human hosts. The Host - Pathogen Interface research cluster seeks to uncover both the common and unique ways that micro-organisms act to gain entry and produce disease in their hosts, and understand how protective barriers and defense mechanisms in animal tissues and cells work to combat bacterial, viral, and parasitic infectious agents. Through their discoveries, our investigators develop innovative approaches to prevent or ameliorate outbreaks of infectious diseases in humans, companion animals, and livestock. ...
We fund basic, clinical and translational research into pathogens implicated in human infectious diseases. This includes understanding of the pathogen at the molecular and cellular level through to host pathogen interactions and into epidemiology of infectious diseases. We are also keen to fund research to inform novel strategies for preventing and controlling infectious and immune disease control, including research on human behaviour and lifestyle.. ...
Casein Kinase 1 (CK1) family members are serine/threonine protein kinases ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotic organisms. They are involved in a wide range of important cellular processes, such as membrane trafficking, or vesicular transport in organisms from yeast to humans. Due to its broad spectrum of action, CK1 activity and expression is tightly regulated by a number of mechanisms, including subcellular sequestration. Defects in CK1 regulation, localisation or the introduction of mutations in the CK1 coding sequence are often associated with important diseases such as cancer. Increasing evidence suggest that the manipulation of host cell CK1 signalling pathways by intracellular pathogens, either by exploiting the host CK1 or by exporting the CK1 of the pathogen into the host cell may play an important role in infectious diseases. Leishmania CK1.2 is essential for parasite survival and released into the host cell, playing an important role in host pathogen interactions. Although Leishmania CK1.2 has
Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, super-resolution microscopy. The extraordinary temporal and spatial precision of human infectious processes relies on the exact and specific interactions of host and pathogen. Research into these processes requires sophisticated analytical methods. The small size of most infectious agents (bacteria, viruses) and the subcellular compartments in the host requires imaging with a spatial resolution close to electron microscopy to obtain insights into the molecular structure and organization of host pathogen interactions. The project of Markus Sauer aims to develop refined localization microscopy methods (dSTORM and PALM) capable of providing quantitative information on the distributions and densities of molecules with unmatched spatial resolution. For example, the sub-cellular localization of bacterial proteins secreted by Chlamydia (Thomas Rudel), Salmonella (Jörg Vogel) and Campylobacter (Cynthia Sharma) and their interacting host proteins ...
In this study, comprehensive analyses of murine 65-kDa GBPs in host defense were performed. In addition to the five known mGBPs, five novel murine 65-kDa GTPases were identified by microarray and in silico analyses. Interestingly, all 10 mGBPs were up-regulated in vitro by IFN-γ, selected proinflammatory stimuli, and TLR agonists as well as in vivo upon infection with L. monocytogenes or T. gondii. Importantly, a set of mGBPs were found to enclose intracellular T. gondii parasites, defining them as key effector molecules at the interface of host pathogen interaction. Strikingly, virulent T. gondii interfered with the accumulation of mGBPs around the PV.. GBPs are characterized by their distinct GTP-binding motives G1-G4. The known 65-kDa mGBPs have canonical G1 and G3 GTP binding sites, but possess an RD in G4 instead of the N/T KXD motif found in other GTPases, such as Rab, Ras, and 47-kDa GTPases (12, 15). Mutational analysis of hGBP1 revealed that in the G4-binding motif of GBPs the amino ...
The editors of Pathogens and Disease aim to publish outstanding primary Research Articles, Short Communications, and MiniReviews reporting on hypothesis- or discovery-driven studies relating to pathogens, the host pathogen interaction, the host response to infection, and their molecular and cellular correlates.
GCEID will focus on three distinct programs within the One Health approach: Improved understanding of the EID threat through studies in pathogenesis and pathobiology Host pathogen interactions and comparative immunology Underlying pathogen and host factors that influence emergence and host switching Factors governing virulence and host specificity Research to mitigate the risks of EID entry…
[email protected] Research Focus: Host pathogen interaction, trafficking of AAV and VACV in multiple cell lines with emphasis on cytokines/ chemokines mediated inhibition of viruses, viral morphogenesis, signaling cascade and cell fate ...
Im an evolutionary biologist who studies bacteriophage life history stochasticity and the population dynamics of host/pathogen interactions Im currently affiliated with Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center. I can be reached at john.dennehyATqc.cuny. ...
Im an evolutionary biologist who studies bacteriophage life history stochasticity and the population dynamics of host/pathogen interactions Im currently affiliated with Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center. I can be reached at john.dennehyATqc.cuny. ...
Colette Cywes-Bentley, Ph.D., is a Scientist in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Brigham & Womens Hospital (BWH) and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Dr. Cywes-Bentleys research focuses on understanding host pathogen interactions, specifically ...
Professor Niels Jørgen Olesen, DVM, Ph.D Head of section. Research area: Fish diseases with focus on their surveillance and control, on prophylaxis, and on development of diagnostic methods. The activities include studies on host-pathogen interactions, on serological response, vaccine development and genetic resistance, development of immunochemical methods such as immunoflourescence, ELISA, immunohistochemistry for pathogen detection. Disease pathogenesis studies. Molecular and immunological pathogen characterisation, epidemiology and health management in aquaculture and risk analysis. ...
The Jason Harris, MD, MPH and Regina LaRocque, MD, MPH Laboratory is focused on host-pathogen interactions and the innate and adaptive immune response to Vibrio cholerae, cholera vaccines, and in the area of susceptibility to cholera.
Tuberculosis kills between 2 million and 3 million people each year and continues to be a major global health concern. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent responsible, is an obligate human pathogen that has infected mankind since the dawn of time. The emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of the disease threatens to completely undermine disease-control efforts and even may be shifting the fundamental pathobiology of the host-pathogen relationship. The community of scientists engaged in studying this deadly disease has made dramatic advances in understanding the biology and biochemistry of this deadly pathogen, but many important details are only now starting to be appreciated. These three symposia in the tuberculosis theme will bring together diverse speakers struggling to understand the molecular details of the host-pathogen relationship and how the bacterium may be adapting to human attempts to bring the disease under control. The subjects were chosen so that the three symposia ...
The Merck Research Laboratories (MRL) Exploratory Science Center (ESC) Cambridge, a wholly owned subsidiary of Merck and Co., is focused on driving early discovery research.
The tight association of the human body with trillions of colonizing microbes that we observe today is the result of a long evolutionary history. Only very recently have we started to understand how this symbiosis also affects brain function and behavior. In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose how host-microbe associations potentially influenced mammalian brain evolution and development. In particular, we explore the integration of human brain development with evolution, symbiosis, and RNA biology, which together represent a
The Schultz group will add chemical expertise and tool development to the consortium. The tools provided will help understanding pathogen-host interactions as well as pathogen lifecycles. Specifically, we will prepare artificial amino acids and photostable membrane-permeant dyes for non-disruptive labeling of proteins in intact pathogens and host cells. We will apply new methods to cross-link interacting proteins inside cells. We will provide photoactivatable lipids to manipulate host membranes. Finally, we will provide fluorescent reporters for monitoring relevant enzyme activities. All tools will be applied in close collaboration with other groups from the consortium including Brügger, Müller, Ruggieri, Kräusslich, Lemke, Briggs, Fackler, Urban. Specifically, we will help to visualize rare molecules such as viral particles or dsRNA by helping other consortium members tagging them with dyes suitable for single molecule microscopy (Lemke, Kräusslich) or correlative electron microscopy ...
Dept. of Infectious Diseases - Virology. Malaria remains one of the most devastating infectious diseases in humans, for two reasons. One is that Plasmodium(the causative malaria agent) has evolved efficient means to exploit cellular host mechanisms in order to proliferate. The second are the persisting gaps in our understanding of these pathogen-host interactions, especially in the clinically silent liver stage. Our two labs have recently performed a collaborative project with the aim to dissect this particular step, using a physiologically relevant in vivo mouse model of Plasmodium infection. We specifically focused on the identification of mi(cro)RNAs (small regulatory RNAs that control gene expression in many species) that are dysregulated in livers of infected mice. Interestingly, we found that Plasmodium infection triggers a significant, up to ten-fold increase of a particular miRNAknown to be a key player in innate and adaptive immunity in mammals, miR-155 (Hammerschmidt-Kamper et al., ...
Multidisciplinary has become the watchword of modern biology. The integration of several disciplines has created a rapidly growing multidisciplinary field of research, the so-called Mathematical Immunology . In simple terms, mathematical immunology attempts to uncover the biological mechanisms underlying the dynamics of pathogen-host interactions by employing mathematical, statistical, and computational models. In recent years, the field of mathematical immunology has blossomed with the availability of large and rich datasets due to the genomics revolution and increased sensitivity of laboratory and clinical tools; the development of mathematical tools capable of encapsulating complex nonlinear systems; and the advancement in computing power for large-scale calculations, simulation, and visualization. Interest in the computer simulation of biological processes to reduce complications incurred in human and animal research (such as ethical and practical considerations, costs, and risks) has also ...
The Hultquist lab specializes in the development and adaptation of high-throughput, quantitative, systems-based approaches for use in primary models of disease to better understand the host-pathogen relationship. Leveraging diverse expertise in primary cell models, proteomic profiling, and functional genomics, we work at the intersection of systems biology and infectious disease, defining host-pathogen interactions and their consequences for replication and pathogenesis. Through these efforts, we ultimately hope to strengthen the bridge from big data to targeted discovery to clinical application for the development of personalized, host-driven therapies and the advancement of human health. ...
During the course of a viral infection, viral proteins interact with an array of host proteins and pathways. Here, we present a systematic strategy to elucidate the dynamic interactions between H1N1 influenza and its human host. A combination of yeast two-hybrid analysis and genome-wide expression profiling implicated hundreds of human factors in mediating viral-host interactions. These factors were then examined functionally through depletion analyses in primary lung cells. The resulting data point to potential roles for some unanticipated host and viral proteins in viral infection and the host response, including a network of RNA-binding proteins, components of WNT signaling, and viral polymerase subunits. This multilayered approach provides a comprehensive and unbiased physical and regulatory model of influenza-host interactions and demonstrates a general strategy for uncovering complex host-pathogen relationships ...
MICROBE and HOST LIPIDS. From infections to microbiota and imaging. Microbes are found in almost every habitat present in nature and are vital to humans. For instance, the human microbiota has an influence on host physiology. In contrast, some pathogenic microbes can cause infectious diseases, which altogether claim 17 million deaths per year worldwide. Better understanding man and microbes interaction is thus a major public health issue. Indeed, a deeper knowledge of microbiota functions as well as the pathogenic mechanisms developed by microbes will pave the way for the development of new preventive or therapeutic strategies.. Lipids, via their different functions, play a key role in host-microbe interactions. They are essential components of the cell membranes. Some of them are able to modulate host cell functions, and might be used as virulence factors by pathogenic microbes. Manipulation of host lipid metabolism is among the invading strategies evolved by infectious agents, but regulation ...
Why is a wholesome person protected from attacks while people with cystic fibrosis or damaged epithelium are particularly vunerable to this opportunistic pathogen? To be able to address this issue it is vital to completely understand the powerful interplay between your web host microenvironment and host-pathogen connections within a physiologically relevant way. pathogenesis can help progress fundamental knowledge of pathogenic systems and raise the translational potential of analysis results from bench towards the patients bedside. Launch As a respected reason behind life-threatening nosocomial attacks has been thoroughly studied within the last 35 years. Zero available or super model tiffany livingston program can mimic the condition phenotype completely. Accordingly the intricacy of the web host pathogen and host-pathogen connections provides necessitated a mixed usage of different model systems to progress our knowledge of infectious disease. is certainly most commonly BRL 52537 ...
in Journal of virology (2016), 90(4), 2039-51. Carbohydrates play major roles in host-virus interactions. It is therefore not surprising that, during coevolution with their hosts, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to hijack for their ... [more ▼]. Carbohydrates play major roles in host-virus interactions. It is therefore not surprising that, during coevolution with their hosts, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to hijack for their profit different pathways of glycan synthesis. Thus, the Bo17 gene of Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) encodes a homologue of the cellular core 2 protein beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-mucin type (C2GnT-M), which is a key player for the synthesis of complex O-glycans. Surprisingly, we show in this study that, as opposed to what is observed for the cellular enzyme, two different mRNAs are encoded by the Bo17 gene of all available BoHV-4 strains. While the first one corresponds to the entire coding sequence of the Bo17 gene, the ...
Nguyen Quang N, Goudey S, Ségéral E, Mohammad A, Lemoine S, Blugeon C, Versapuech M, Paillart JC, Berlioz-Torrent C, Emiliani S, Gallois-Montbrun S. Dynamic nanopore long-read sequencing analysis of HIV-1 splicing events during the early steps of infection. Retrovirology. 2020 Aug 17;17(1):25.. Leymarie O, Lepont L, Versapuech M, Abelanet S, Judith D, Janvier K and Berlioz-Torrent C. Contribution of the cytoplasmic determinants of Vpu to the expansion of virus containing compartments in HIV-1 infected macrophages. J Virol. 2019 May 15;93(11).. Bonnard D, Le Rouzic E, Eiler S, Amadori C, Orlov I, Bruneau JM, Brias J, Barbion J, Chevreuil F, Spehner D, Chasset S, Ledoussal B, Moreau F, Saïb A, Klaholz BP, Emiliani S, Ruff M, Zamborlini A, Benarous R. Structure-function analyses unravel distinct effects of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase on viral maturation and integration. J Biol Chem. 2018 Apr 20;293(16):6172-6186.. Dejarnac O, Hafirassou ML, Chazal M, Versapuech M, Gaillard J, ...
Accepting PhD Students. PhD projects. Prof Bengoechea is keen to PhD applications from candidates with a basic or clinical background. My laboratory focus is to understand the host-pathogen interface, with major focus on multidrug reistant pathogens, to develop new therapeutics. We employ in vitro and in vivo models of disease, and exploit a multidisciplinary approach bridging Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Biology. Previous research experience is desirable although not essential. ...
TopThis module aims at providing an in-depth knowledge in the field of host-pathogen interactions, i.e how the immune system deals with pathogens, and how the pathogens deal with the hosts immune system. An introductory lecture series covers the basics in microbiology (bacteriology, virology, parasitology), immunology, vaccinology, and general principles of host-pathogen interactions. Selected diseases illustrate host-pathogens interactions along with the consequences for vaccine and drug design. The following set of lectures covered by clinicians and professionals focus on patient management, field study, as well as safety aspects when working with pathogens in a research lab. Tutorials are broken into journal club, article write-up exercise and problem-based study and are directly related to the topics developed during the lectures ...
Infectious diseases continue to pose significant risks to human, animal and plant health. A better understanding of these threats - and the mechanisms that host cells mount to fend off the infections - is key to the diagnosing, treating and preventing the spread of disease.
Thermus and Pyrococcus Argonautes have been characterised as novel defence systems, revealing their unique property to use DNA guides for DNA interference.
Characterize at the biochemical level the molecules involved in these processes, define the way they interact and study their tridimensional structure by X-ray crystallography.
Interactions between pathogens and host immune cells are complex, dynamic, and play a critical role in disease pathogenesis. The outcome of such interactions is a reflection of the properties of the microbial agent and the ability of the host to respond to infection. This outcome may range from disease, persistent infection within the host, or even microbe elimination. Pathogenic organisms and/or their virulence factors often exploit the host immune machinery and subsequently modulate cell function, signaling, migration, and cytoskeleton rearrangement. An emerging theme in microbe-host interaction is that evolutionarily distant pathogens exploit a number of common cellular pathways. Understanding the common cellular targets and immune dysfunction elicited by various microbes may offer critical intervention to deregulate functional immunity by disseminating the impact of invading microbes and leading to novel therapeutic strategies.. Our research focuses on studying host-pathogen interactions ...
Structural biology of microbial virulence factors and their complexes with host components. Keywords: Host-pathogen interactions. Subject area(s): Microbiology, Virology & Pathogens , Proteins & Biochemistry , Structural Biology & Biophysics. ...
A new report appearing in the March 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal helps shed light on what drives the evolution of pathogens, as well as how our bodies adapt to ward them off. Specifically, the report shows that our bodies ...
Bacterial-encoded covalent adhesion is a new molecular principle in host-microbe interactions and may play a key role in host colonization by a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria.
CELL BIOLOGY. Breaking down miRNAs. Elbarbary et al. identify an endonuclease that initiates decay of microRNAs that regulate the cell cycle.. PROTEOMICS. Mapping the proteome. Thul et al. generated the Cell Atlas, an image-based collection of 12,003 proteins and 13 organelles that reveals proteins that exhibit multiple localizations and single-cell variation (see also Horwitz and Johnson).. HOST-MICROBE INTERACTIONS. Taking a look at plant-microbe relationships. Martin et al. review the evolution of plant-symbiont interactions that modulate plant signaling pathways, development, and immunity. ...
PhD Research Project: Using live-cell imaging of the immune response to investigate host-pathogen i in £30,000 - £39,999, Academic (e.g. Lecturer), Science with Global Academy Jobs. Apply Today.
Host-pathogen interactions have critical implications for the establishment of disease and for determining adaptive immune responses of the host. This study has conducted global Aspergillus fumigatus transcriptional analyses throughout the initiation of murine infection using a wild-type and an attenuated ΔlaeA isolate. A novel data analysis protocol was applied from which three time-series datasets were generated between 4, 8 and 14 hours post infection. This approach identified distinct temporal gene expression profiles during disease initiation whereby numerous secreted enzymes, including proteases and antigens, were upregulated between 4 and 8 hours, while a striking upregulation of genes in secondary metabolism clusters and subtelomeric loci was observed between 8 and 14 hours. In order to test the role of several upregulated secondary metabolite genes on host-pathogen interactions and virulence, two isolates mutated in non-ribosomal peptide synthetase encoding genes (ΔftmA, Δpes3), and ...
Pectin lyases (PNLs) are important enzymes that are involved in plant cell wall degradation during the infection process. Colletotrichum is a diverse genus of fungi, which allows the study of the evolution of PNLs and their possible role in pathogen-host interactions and lifestyle adaptations. The phylogenetic reconstruction of PNLs from Colletotrichum and analysis of selection pressures showed the formation of protein lineages by groups of species with different selection pressures and specific patterns. The analysis of positive selection at individual sites using different methods allowed for the identification of three codons with evidence of positive selection in the oligosaccharide-binding region and two codons on the antiparallel sheet, which may influence the interaction with the substrate ...
Modeling of disease pathogenesis and immunity often is carried out in large animals that are natural targets for pathogens of human or economic relevance. Although murine mAbs are a valuable tool in identifying certain host/pathogen interactions, progress in comparative immunology would be enhanced by the use of mAbs isolated from the host species. Such antibodies would reflect an authentic host immune response to infection or vaccination, and as they are host derived, would allow the application of in vivo experiments that previously have been unrealizable in large animals because of induction of an antispecies immune response. The advent of antibody phage display technology provides a way of producing host-derived mAbs in animals where the molecular genetics of Ig formation are known. Exploiting recent advances in the molecular immunology of cattle, we report here the design of an optimized phage display vector, pComBov, for the construction of combinatorial libraries of bovine Ig ...
Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described
Subject: Lambda Lunch update To: [email protected] Lambda Lunch update, 1/29/08: 1/29/08, Noon, Building 32TII Conference Room: Emily Troemel (Fred Ausubel lab, MGH) Host/pathogen interactions in C. elegans 1/29/08, 2:15 PM, 37/2041: Heather W. Pinkett, (Caltech) Structural Studies of an ABC Transporter from Haemophilus influenzae, HIF 1/31/08*: Bob Schleif (Hopkins) Pursuing a Proteins Innermost Secrets: AraC (Sankar Adhya) 2/7/08*: Christophe Penno (Cashel lab) Control of the virulence of Shigella flexneri by transcriptional slippage 2/8/08, Noon, Building 32TII Conference Room: Jennifer Philips (Perrimon + Rubin labs, Harvard Med) Genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila identifies host factors that modulate Mycobacterial infection 2/8/08, 9 AM - 12 PM, Natcher (Building 45) Room E1/E2: Imaging Bacterial Structures: A Symposium in Honor of Martin Kessel. Register at http://www.csmicro.org/html/CSM_Winter08_Symposium.htm 3/7/08: 12:00 PM, 32TII/Conf. room: Petra Levin (Wash ...
Researchers at the Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene aim to elucidate host pathogen interactions to provide a basis for the development of new strategies to fight infectious diseases. Current research at the Institute has evolved over decades: the nineteen-sixties through nineteen-eighties, under the leadership of P. Klein, heralded an era of pioneering studies on complement, interleukins and T-cells, with bacterial virulence factors and molecular biology of viruses emerging as additional themes in the nineteen-eighties. From 1990 until early 2012 the Institute was led by S. Bhakdi, whose research focused on bacterial pore forming toxins and complement. During these two periods, the Institute also served as an important coordinator of Collaborative Research Centers in the field of Immunology. Between September 2013 and October 2016, A. Diefenbach held the position as director of the Institute; and a new class of lymphoid cells became the main area of investigation. Thus, for more ...
We at The National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, George Mason University, eagerly look forward to welcoming you to our annual Host Pathogen Interactions in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases conference on the 12th of February, 2015.. We have had successful meetings in the past two years that have fostered many meaningful collaborations and have advertised novel research to the research community in the area. The focus of the meetings has been and will continue to be on interactions between pathogens and hosts following exposure to bacterial and viral agents and the applicability of the knowledge gained to design of novel diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines.. We look forward to an enriching, interesting and beneficial meeting in 2015.. View all conference details on the NCBID calendar.. ...
Bishun Deo Prasad, PhD, is an Assistant Professor and Scientist in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering at Bihar Agricultural University in Sabour, India. He has published 12 research papers in reputed peer-reviewed international journals which have been cited more than 100 times. He has also contributed to one authored book, has written several book chapters, and has submitted 10 sequences of different isolates to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). He is reviewer of International Journal of Agriculture Sciences and the Journal of Environmental Biology. Dr. Prasad has been associated with biotechnological aspects of rice, Brassica napus, Arabidopsis, linseed, lentil, vegetable (bitter guard and pointed guard), and horticultural (mango, litchi and banana) crops. He is also associated with host pathogen interaction studies in rice, B. napus and Arabidopsis as well as mutational breeding aspect in rice for abiotic stress tolerance. He is dynamically ...
The co-founders partners, all international leaders in the field of research into host pathogen interactions, provide complementary expertise with outstanding core facilities for monitoring diseases, treatments and prevention in relevant animal models of human infections. Tools already developed by the partners are extended with state-of-the-art equipments and standardized assays.. The center is also fostering research programs for the development of new models of human infection and for refinement of the use of animals and reductions of the number of animals required for experimental medicine. There are already and will be new programs on assays standardization and harmonization, non invasive methods (telemetry, in vivo imaging), animal training and in silico modeling. A Biological Resource Center has been created in partnership with our industrial partner with Bertin Pharma.. The major objective of this consortium is to provide the national and international scientific community with a highly ...
ST258-K. pneumoniae (ST258-KP) strains, the most widespread multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired pathogens, belong to at least two clades differing in a 215 Kb genomic region that includes the cluster of capsule genes. To investigate the effects of the different capsular phenotype on host-pathogen interactions, we studied representatives of ST258-KP clades, KKBO-1 and KK207-1, for their ability to activate monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells from human immune competent hosts. The two ST258-KP strains strongly induced the production of inflammatory cytokines. Significant differences between the strains were found in their ability to induce the production of IL-1β: KK207-1/clade I was much less effective than KKBO-1/clade II in inducing IL-1β production by monocytes and dendritic cells. The activation of NLRP3 inflammasome pathway by live cells and/or purified capsular polysaccharides was studied in monocytes and dendritic cells. We found that glibenclamide, a NLRP3 inhibitor, inhibits more ...
The host-pathogen interaction is defined as how microbes or viruses sustain themselves within host organisms on a molecular, cellular, organismal or population level. This term is most commonly used to refer to disease-causing microorganisms although they may not cause illness in all hosts. Because of this, the definition has been expanded to how known pathogens survive within their host, whether they cause disease or not. On the molecular and cellular level, microbes can infect the host and divide rapidly, causing disease by being there and causing a homeostatic imbalance in the body, or by secreting toxins which cause symptoms to appear. Viruses can also infect the host with virulent DNA, which can affect normal cell processes (transcription, translation, etc.), protein folding, or evading the immune response. One of the first pathogens observed by scientists was Vibrio cholera, described in detail by Filippo Pacini in 1854. His initial findings were just drawings of the bacteria, but up until ...
The pathogens on the currency notes can lead to several skin diseases, fungal infections, respiratory disorders and even tuberculosis.
Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are highly contagious pathogens infecting human and numerous animals. The viruses cause millions of infection cases and thousands of deaths every year, thus making IAVs a continual threat to global health. Upon IAV infection, host innate immune system is triggered and activated to restrict virus replication and clear pathogens. Subsequently, host adaptive immunity is involved in specific virus clearance. On the other hand, to achieve a successful infection, IAVs also apply multiple strategies to avoid be detected and eliminated by the host immunity. In the current review, we present a general description on recent work regarding different host cells and molecules facilitating antiviral defenses against IAV infection and how IAVs antagonize host immune responses.
Craig Roy received his B.S. from Michigan State University in 1985 and earned his Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University in 1991 in the laboratory of Dr. Stanley Falkow. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Ralph Isberg in the Department of Molecular Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine in 1996, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Stony Brook University. Dr. Roy became a founding member of the Department of Microbial Pathogenesis at Yale University in 1998 and serves as Vice-Chair. He currently holds the title of Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunobiology. Research in the Roy laboratory focuses on the host-pathogen interface. Using multi-disciplinary approaches his laboratory has discovered many novel mechanisms that intracellular pathogens use to modulate host membrane transport pathways, which allow these pathogens to evade cell autonomous ...
In the context of pulmonary infection, both hosts and pathogens have evolved a multitude of mechanisms to regulate the process of host cell death. The host aims to rapidly induce an inflammatory response at the site of infection, promote pathogen clearance, quickly resolve inflammation, and return to tissue homeostasis. The appropriate modulation of cell death in respiratory epithelial cells and pulmonary immune cells is central in the execution of all these processes. Cell death can be either inflammatory or anti-inflammatory depending on regulated cell death (RCD) modality triggered and the infection context. In addition, diverse bacterial pathogens have evolved many means to manipulate host cell death to increase bacterial survival and spread. The multitude of ways that hosts and bacteria engage in a molecular tug of war to modulate cell death dynamics during infection emphasizes its relevance in host responses and pathogen virulence at the host pathogen interface. This narrative review outlines
Mycobacterial diseases, including tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy (or Hansens disease), have profoundly altered the course of human history. Yet our knowledge of the temporal evolutionary dynamics for these pathogens is remarkably limited, despite their importance for identifying links between the pathogens and signatures of adaptation in the human genome as well as for predicting future trends in the pathogen-host interaction. Here I examine the evolutionary history of tuberculosis and leprosy, focusing on the distribution of strain diversity in humans (past and present) and non-human primates in order to elucidate phylogenetic relationships, examine signals of adaptation to humans, identify the impact of human demography on their spread, and assess patterns of pathogen exchange through time. Specifically, we use new methods of DNA extraction, library construction, and targeted enrichment to obtain genetic data from prehistoric samples with characteristic lesions of mycobacterial disease. To ...
The mammalian intestinal tract harbors a diverse community of trillions of microorganisms, which have co-evolved with the host immune system for millions of years. Many of these microorganisms perform functions critical for host physiology, but the host must remain vigilant to control the microbial community so that the symbiotic nature of the relationship is maintained. To facilitate homeostasis, the immune system ensures that the diverse microbial load is tolerated and anatomically contained, while remaining responsive to microbial breaches and invasion. Although the microbiota is required for intestinal immune development, immune responses also regulate the structure and composition of the intestinal microbiota. Here we discuss recent advances in our understanding of these complex interactions and their implications for human health and disease.
Journal of Pathogens is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies related to all aspects of pathogens and pathogen-host interactions. The journal covers all pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, parasites, and protozoa that infect humans or animals. Articles detailing diagnosis, management, or treatment for pathogen-related diseases, as well as environmental and public health implications, will also be considered.
Journal of Pathogens is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies related to all aspects of pathogens and pathogen-host interactions. The journal covers all pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, parasites, and protozoa that infect humans or animals. Articles detailing diagnosis, management, or treatment for pathogen-related diseases, as well as environmental and public health implications, will also be considered.
MicroRNA (miRNA) is small non-coding RNA with approximate 22 nt in length. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs play significant roles in pathogen-host interactions. Brucella organisms are...
A biological process represents a specific objective that the organism is genetically programmed to achieve. Biological processes are often described by their outcome or ending state, e.g., the biological process of cell division results in the creation of two daughter cells (a divided cell) from a single parent cell. A biological process is accomplished by a particular set of molecular functions carried out by specific gene products (or macromolecular complexes), often in a highly regulated manner and in a particular temporal sequence. Note that, in addition to forming the root of the biological process ontology, this term is recommended for use for the annotation of gene products whose biological process is unknown. When this term is used for annotation, it indicates that no information was available about the biological process of the gene product annotated as of the date the annotation was made; the evidence code no data (ND), is used to indicate this.. ...
There are currently three main axes of research in the HMI lab: Deciphering the activity and functioning of the Type Three Secretion Apparatus We previously reported the development of transcriptional reporter of the Type Three Secretion Apparatus (T3SA) in Shigella flexneri (See Figure 1) based on the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as shown in the…
Meet Global Microbiologists and Physiologists from USA (America), Europe, Middle East and Asia pacific at Microbial Physiology Conferences, Microbiology Conferences, and Genomics Conferences happening from July 16-18, 2018 London, UK
Find great deals for The Microbe-Host Interface in Respiratory Tract Infections by Taylor & Francis Inc (Hardback, 2004). Shop with confidence on eBay!
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) - PathoGenetix and Applied Maths today announced a deal to integrate each others technologies into a solution for rapid pathogen strain typing.
Host-pathogen interactions are like an arms race, in which the outcome of the encounter is determined by the dynamic interplay between the bodys (the host) responses, which aim to eliminate the pathogen, and the countermeasures that pathogens employ to avoid eradication. Thus, to understand host-pathogen interactions, both sides of this war should be studied simultaneously. In the laboratory we study both the bacterial and the host adaptation strategies engaged during the course of infection, focusing on: 1) How the host spies on bacterial communication systems and what are the sensors and mechanisms involved, with a major focus is on an important host receptor recently discovered to be able to sense bacterial infection, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). 2) How the bacteria reacts and adapts to host derived responses. ...
Background The rapid growth of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data has led to the emergence of PPI network analysis. from POINT http://point.bioinformatics.tw/ and POINeT http://poinet.bioinformatics.tw/. Further development of methods to forecast host-pathogen relationships should incorporate multiple methods in order to improve level of sensitivity, and should facilitate the recognition of focuses on for drug finding and … Continue reading Background The rapid growth of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data has led. ...
So they propose that differences in the populations that are coming down with the disease is due only to density-dependent host-pathogen dynamics not that some populations are resistant. They go on to provide a detailed model of persistence if the host and pathogen, chance of reinfection, and survival of the host which is derived from the long-term study data. There are many more interesting findings and models proposed in the paper. It also further reinforces (for me) the need to know more about the molecular basis of the host-pathogen interactions and more about how the fungus persists without a host, lifestyle of how it overwinters, and the details of the microbe-host interactions, and the infection dynamic when zoospores disperse from infected frogs.. The Vrendenburg et al paper adresses the dynamics of population decline in the mountain yellow-legged frogs over a periods of 1-5 and 9-13 year study in 3 different study sites at different sampling intervals. The authors were able to catalog ...
Tzfira, Tzvi and Citovsky, Vitaly, From Host Recognition to T-Dna Integration: the Function of Bacterial and Plant Genes in the Agrobacterium-Plant Cell Interaction (2000). ...
All PhD positions offered are coordinated by the Center for Infection Biology (ZIB). It was founded in September 2002 as a joint co-operation between well renowned research institu-tions: Hannover Medical School, the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, the University of Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig. Students enrolled in the programme will work in one of these institutions. The programmes objective is to investigate the complex interactions between host and pathogen as well as basic research with the combined tools of immunology, cell biology and molecular biology.. 20 students from around the world are accepted each year after a rigorous selection procedure. Students enrolled in the PhD programme work on a three-year research project and attend seminars, conventions and lab courses. They are encouraged and supported by a network of supervisors and support teams and finish the programme after the PhD examination at the end of ...
[email protected] Research Interests: Research Interests: Host-pathogen interactions, vaccine development, virology, bacteriology. I grew up near Jacksonville Florida, and did my undergrad at Berry College. There I majored in both Biochemistry and Biology, and performed research in Dr. Christopher Halls Immunology and Parasitology lab. My research focus in this lab was to profile the cytokine expression of a choriocarcinoma cell line, upon infection with T. cruzi, to better understand both host-pathogen interactions and vertical transmission. During this time I also performed research at the CDC, working in the Rickettsial Zoonosis Branch of the Division of Vector Borne Disease. Here I utilized IFA to examine the prevalence of wildlife from Berry Colleges campus that was seropositive for rickettsial pathogens.. Duke was my number one choice because of how well the faculty members research matched my own interests. I also really enjoyed the sense of community I felt not only with the ...
We evaluated the fraction of variation in HIV-1 set point viral load attributable to viral or human genetic factors by using joint host/pathogen genetic data from 541 HIV infected individuals. We show that viral genetic diversity explains 29% of the variation in viral load while host factors explain 8.4%. Using a joint model including both host and viral effects, we estimate a total of 30% heritability, indicating that most of the host effects are reflected in viral sequence variation.. ...
Dr. Feng Shaos laboratory is interested in studying molecular mechanisms of bacterial infection and host innate immunity defense. Bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems such as type III/IV secretion system to inject effector proteins into host cells, serving as a key and universal virulence mechanism. The effectors usually harbor a unique and potent activity that modulates the function of key signaling molecules in the host, and this plays a critical role in bacterial survival and systemic infections. Using pathogens such as Shigella, Salmonella, Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Legionella and Burkholderia as the model, we are working to discover and reveal some novel and common biochemical mechanisms utilized by bacterial effectors in modulating host signal transduction pathways. Our recent work has led to several interesting discoveries. 1) The OspF family of type III effectors, conserved in Shigella, Salmonella and the plant pathogen P. syringae, harbors a novel ...
Read A hypothesis explaining why so many pathogen virulence proteins are moonlighting proteins, Pathogens and Disease on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Manipulation of cell death pathways has been identified as a common feature of host-microbe interactions. We examine two examples: influenza A as a
Professor and Chair of Microbiology and Cell Science, IFAS, University of Florida - Cited by 21,597 - molecular microbial ecology - host-microbe interactions - genomics
Video created by 콜로라도 대학교 볼더 캠퍼스, 캘리포니아 샌디에고 대학교 for the course Gut Check: Exploring Your Microbiome. Youre more than halfway through the course! We hope youve been learning lots of new, exciting things about the human gut microbiota! In this ...
Author: Arthur C. Croft, PhD(c), DC, MSc, MPH, FACO. Title: Study Confirms Flaws in Standard MVC Defense Strategy. Summary: A new study provides further evidence that delta V is actually not a valid gauge of injury risk.
We are proud members of the G.W. Hooper Foundation, located on the 15th floor of the HSW building (HSW 1521 and 1517), Parnassus Campus, UCSF.. We started our lab in Jan 2014. We work at the cross roads of mammalian cell biology and bacterial pathogenesis. Our lab is interested in understanding how bacterial proteins subvert various cellular processes and manipulate them to their own advantage. Understanding the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions serves two main purposes. First, it provides an understanding of the mechanism of disease and thus leads to the development of better therapeutic approaches. Second, because bacteria disrupt host processes in multiple ways and often target key host proteins, studying these interactions often lead to a deeper understanding of basic mammalian cell-biological processes. Based on our recent discovery, a major focus of our lab is to understand how the host unfolded protein response pathway is manipulated in response to pathogen infection. Currently, we ...
Host genetics refers to the genetics of a person, in the context of how the host genetics may effect pathogenicity of a disease or virus. It has been argu
© Cambridge University Press 2007 and Cambridge University Press, 2009. Introduction The study of the host genetic component of infectious disease is potentially one of the most difficult areas of complex human genetic disease analysis for one major reason: the absolute requirement for a host-pathogen interaction to cause disease. Since the pathogen has its own genome, with all of its attendant potential for variability, there has been an ongoing
Cell Death and Immunity symposium will provide a unique opportunity to bring together researchers in the cell death and immunology communities, as well as scientists studying host-pathogen interactions, who are focused on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that link cell death and the immune response.. Visit the website to know more.
Cell Death and Immunity symposium will provide a unique opportunity to bring together researchers in the cell death and immunology communities, as well as scientists studying host-pathogen interactions, who are focused on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that link cell death and the immune response.. Visit the website to know more.