Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever , Read about Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment. Also read Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever articles about how to live with Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever , and more.
From what place did the Ebola virus get its name? Ebola virus got its name from the river where the first outbreak emerged - the Ebola River. Find out more with this look at the Ebola virus, Ebola symptoms and how the microbe causes Ebola hemorrhagic fever. This article also includes an Ebola virus picture.
... On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms or a full patient history. A similarity measure between symptoms and diseases is provided.
Get information on the Ebola hemorrhagic fever vaccine, symptoms, treatment, causes, and history. Learn how Ebola virus disease is spread, and read about infection prevention efforts.
Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF) is infamous for its high case-fatality proportion (CFP) and the ease with which it spreads among contacts of the diseased. We describe the course of the EHF outbreak in Masindi, Uganda, in the year 2000, and report on response activities. We analysed surveillance records, hospital statistics, and our own observations during response activities. We used Fishers exact tests for differences in proportions, t-tests for differences in means, and logistic regression for multivariable analysis. The response to the outbreak consisted of surveillance, case management, logistics and public mobilisation. Twenty-six EHF cases (24 laboratory confirmed, two probable) occurred between October 21st and December 22nd, 2000. CFP was 69% (18/26). Nosocomial transmission to the index case occurred in Lacor hospital in Gulu, outside the Ebola ward. After returning home to Masindi district the index case became the origin of a transmission chain within her own extended family (18 further cases
Ebola hemorrhagic fever is caused by Marburg virus and Ebola virus. Marburg and Ebola viruses are filoviruses. Serology test is considered in detecting the virus specific IgG or IgM and polymerase chain reaction and immunoassay able to detect the DNA of
TY - JOUR. T1 - Therapeutics of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. T2 - Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of successful disease mitigation. AU - Yen, Judy Y.. AU - Garamszegi, Sara. AU - Geisbert, Joan B.. AU - Rubins, Kathleen H.. AU - Geisbert, Thomas. AU - Honko, Anna. AU - Xia, Yu. AU - Connor, John H.. AU - Hensley, Lisa E.. PY - 2011/11/1. Y1 - 2011/11/1. N2 - The mechanisms of Ebola (EBOV) pathogenesis are only partially understood, but the dysregulation of normal host immune responses (including destruction of lymphocytes, increases in circulating cytokine levels, and development of coagulation abnormalities) is thought to play a major role. Accumulating evidence suggests that much of the observed pathology is not the direct result of virus-induced structural damage but rather is due to the release of soluble immune mediators from EBOV-infected cells. It is therefore essential to understand how the candidate therapeutic may be interrupting the disease process and/or targeting the infectious ...
From August 2000 through January 2001, a large epidemic of Ebola hemorrhagic fever occurred in Uganda, with 425 cases and 224 deaths. Starting from three laboratory-confirmed cases, we traced the chains of transmission for three generations, until we reached the primary case-patients (i.e., persons with an unidentified source of infection). We then prospectively identified the other contacts in whom the disease had developed. To identify the risk factors associated with transmission, we interviewed both healthy and ill contacts (or their proxies) who had been reported by the case-patients (or their proxies) and who met the criteria set for contact tracing during surveillance. The patterns of exposure of 24 case-patients and 65 healthy contacts were defined, and crude and adjusted prevalence proportion ratios (PPR) were estimated for different types of exposure. Contact with the patients body fluids (PPR = 4.61%, 95% confidence interval 1.73 to 12.29) was the strongest risk factor, although transmission
During August 2007-February 2008, the novel Bundibugyo ebolavirus species was identified during an outbreak of Ebola viral hemorrhagic fever in Bundibugyo district, western Uganda. To characterize the outbreak as a requisite for determining response, we instituted a caseseries investigation. We identified 192 suspected cases, of which 42 (22%) were laboratory positive for the novel species; 74 (38%) were probable, and 77 (40%) were negative. Laboratory confirmation lagged behind outbreak verification by 3 months. Bundibugyo ebolavirus was less fatal (casefatality rate 34%) than Ebola viruses that had caused previous outbreaks in the region, and most transmission was associated with handling of dead persons without appropriate protection (adjusted odds ratio 3.83, 95% confidence interval 1.78-8.23). Our study highlights the need for maintaining a high index of suspicion for viral hemorrhagic fevers among healthcare workers, building local capacity for laboratory confi rmation of viral hemorrhagic ...
Photo Credit - CDC/ NIAID. Produced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), under a very-high magnification, this digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicts filamentous Ebola virus particles budding from the surface of a VERO cell of the African green monkey kidney epithelial cell line. Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) is one of numerous Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. It is a severe, often fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (such as monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees). Ebola HF is caused by infection with a virus of the family Filoviridae, genus Ebolavirus. When infection occurs, symptoms usually begin abruptly. The first Ebolavirus species was discovered in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo near the Ebola River. Since then, outbreaks have appeared sporadically. See the Flickr link below for additional SEM NIAID Ebola virus imagery.
Image Credit - CDC/ NIAID. Produced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), under a very-high magnification, this digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicts a single filamentous Ebola virus particle that had budded from the surface of a VERO cell of the African green monkey kidney epithelial cell line. Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) is one of numerous Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. It is a severe, often fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (such as monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees). Ebola HF is caused by infection with a virus of the family Filoviridae, genus Ebolavirus. When infection occurs, symptoms usually begin abruptly. The first Ebolavirus species was discovered in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo near the Ebola River. Since then, outbreaks have appeared sporadically. See the Flickr link below for additional SEM NIAID Ebola virus imagery.
Daniel G. Bausch, A.G. Sprecher, Benjamin Jeffs, Paul Boumandouki Antiviral Research 2008;78:150-161. (doi: 10.1016/j.antiviral.2008.01.152) Read more
In the early, or fulminating form, hemorrhaging appears on the second or third day as sub-conjunctival bleeding turns the whites of the eyes deep red. Hemorrhagic smallpox also produces a dusky erythema, petechiae, and hemorrhages in the spleen, kidney, serosa, muscle, and, rarely, the epicardium, liver, testes, ovaries and bladder. Death often occurs suddenly between the fifth and seventh days of illness, when only a few insignificant skin lesions are present. A later form of the disease occurs in patients who survive for 8-10 days. The hemorrhages appear in the early eruptive period, and the rash is flat and does not progress beyond the vesicular stage. Patients in the early stage of disease show a decrease in coagulation factors (e.g. platelets, prothrombin, and globulin) and an increase in circulating antithrombin. Patients in the late stage have significant thrombocytopenia; however, deficiency of coagulation factors is less severe. Some in the late stage also show increased antithrombin. ...
Acting as a guide and protector means you are proactive about identifying breaches of protocol and possible points of contamination. As examples, when you and your colleague begin the donning process you may notice that they are still wearing jewelry, or ID badges. Be sure those are removed prior to donning any equipment as they can cause rips or tears to the PPE.. Draw items like cell phones and ID badges to your colleagues attention well before they don any PPE. These are items which can be easily forgotten about as we have them on our person every day. A good time to do a final check may be when they first change into their fresh surgical scrubs.. Other examples of proactive risk monitoring during doffing might include identifying issues with equipment, identifying placement and fit issues with PPE and maintaining control of the pace of the donning process. These are only a few examples. Your role is to protect by using common sense. Dont simply depend on what is on the checklist, ...
You, your Trained Observer, and the assistant are a team throughout the doffing process. The Trained Observer will read each step aloud, giving you the time to take the required action. The assistant will help you when necessary. Remember, dont rush through the doffing process. Take your time and be careful. ...
Build: Wed Jun 21 18:33:50 EDT 2017 (commit: 4a3b2dc). National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda MD 20892-4874 • 301-435-0888. ...
Simply uttering the word Ebola is enough to cause a person to cringe, shudder, twitch, or perhaps even recoil in horror. Rightly so. Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF), the result of an infection with one of the four identified sub-types of Ebola viruses known to affect humans, is gruesome. Ebola infection can result in a mortality rate as high as 90 percent of all infected individuals, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).. The real horror, though, comes when you know that no one is sure where Ebola can be found (until theres an outbreak, of course); there are no vaccines and no treatments; and were still uncertain about how people are infected in the first place.. Ebola hit the international stage without warning and with dumbfounding devastation. In 1976, outbreaks in Zaire and Sudan resulted in 318 and 284 cases, with 280 and 151 deaths, respectively. Since 1976, sporadic outbreaks have occurred, ranging from a single case to a massive 425 cases in Uganda in 2000. Since 1976, ...
What is Ebola?. Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a fatal disease contracted by humans and nonhuman primates like chimpanzees monkeys and gorillas. Virus Ebolavirus is responsible for causing this disease.. The first cases of Ebola were found in 1976 in Nzara (Sudan) and in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The original host of the disease is unknown but researchers consider animals, mainly bats, as its source.. Symptoms of Ebola. Experts say, the symptoms of Ebola start appearing between 2 and 21 days after initial contact. The common symptoms include fever, weakness, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea rash poor kidney and liver function. In rare cases, patient can also experience internal and external bleeding.. There is no known cure or vaccine for Ebola. Currently treatments and vaccines are under development but most have not been tested in humans. Patients suffering from this disease usually suffer dehydration. Hence, they are given oral or intravenous fluid ...
Get information on the Ebola hemorrhagic fever vaccine, symptoms, treatment, causes, and history. Learn how Ebola virus disease is spread, and read about infection prevention efforts.
Three outbreaks of Ebola hemorrhagic fever have recently occurred in Gabon. Virus has been isolated from clinical materials from all three outbreaks, and nucleotide sequence analysis of the glycoprotein gene of the isolates and virus present in clinical samples has been carried out. These data indicate that each of the three outbreaks should be considered an independent emergence of a different Ebola virus of the Zaire subtype. As in earlier Ebola virus outbreaks, no genetic variability was detected between virus samples taken during an individual outbreak.
Ebola outbreak is nearing possible end in Nigeria. Strong emergency operations center, polio eradication experience keys to success. The Ebola outbreak in Nigeria appears to be nearing a possible end thanks to a rapid response coordinated by Nigerias Emergency Operations Center with assistance from international partners, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The official end to an Ebola outbreak comes when two of the 21-day incubation periods for Ebola virus have elapsed without any new cases.. During the outbreak there were 19 laboratory-confirmed and one probable Ebola cases in two Nigerian states. Nearly 900 patient contacts were identified and followed; all but three have completed 21 days of follow-up without Ebola symptoms. There have been no new cases since August 31 and the last three patient contacts will exit their 21-day follow-up on October 2 - strongly suggesting the outbreak in Nigeria has been contained. A report on Nigerias response to the ...
What is Ebola virus? Ebola virus is a Deadly and serious virus it transmitted from animal and human.Ebola virus is known as Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever(EHF). Generally, ebola is a virus Hemorrhagic fever of humans caused by ebola virus.At the first time, it (Read more)…. ...
What is Ebola virus? Ebola virus is a Deadly and serious virus it transmitted from animal and human.Ebola virus is known as Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever(EHF). Generally, ebola is a virus Hemorrhagic fever of humans caused by ebola virus.At the first time, it (Read more)…. ...
Ebola virus disease (EVD), Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), or simply Ebola is a disease of humans and other primates caused by an ebolavirus. Symptoms start two days to three weeks after contracting the virus, with a fever, sore throat, muscle pain and headaches. Typically, vomiting, diarrhea and rash follow, along with decreased functioning of the…
Via Guinéenews.org: Advice Julie Damond, responsible communication Doctors Without Borders Ebola outbreak in Guinea. Excerpt from a Google translation: Ebola hemorrhagic fever is raging in Guinea for more than three months with a disastrous record of 112 infected 72 dead....
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (7th grade report) Ebola is a severe and often fatal disease in humans, and non-human primates, such as monkeys, gorillas, and
Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by one of five different Ebola viruses. Four of the strains can cause severe illness in humans and animals. The fifth, Reston virus, has caused illness i...
Due to the lack of Ebola outbreak early warning alert, preparedness, surveillance and response systems, the most deadly, complex and largest ever seen Ebola war has been devastating West African communities. The unparalleled Ebola tsunami has prompted interrogations into, and uncertainties about, the effectiveness and efficiency of national, regional and international communitys illed- responses using conventional humanitarian control and containment approaches and methods. The late humanitarian and local non-government organisations emergency responses and challenges to curb transmission dynamics and stop the ongoing spread in the Ebola outbreak in West Africa have led to an unprecedented toll of 14,413 reported Ebola cases in eight countries since the outbreak began, with 5,177 reported deaths including 571 health-care workers and 325 died as 14 November 2014. These indications the need of further evaluation of monitoring as substantial proportion of infections outside the context of Ebola epicentres
A neonate born to an Ebola virus-positive woman was diagnosed with Ebola virus infection on her first day of life. The patient was treated with monoclonal antibodies (ZMapp), a buffy coat transfusion from an Ebola survivor, and the broad-spectrum antiviral GS-5734. On day 20, a venous blood specimen tested negative for Ebola virus by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The patient was discharged in good health on day 33 of life. Further follow-up consultations showed age-appropriate weight gain and neurodevelopment at the age of 12 months. This patient is the first neonate documented to have survived congenital infection with Ebola virus ...
WHAT IS EBOLA?. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Ebola, previously known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a rare and deadly disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus strains.. SYMPTOMS OF EBOLA. As mentioned on the CDC webpage, early symptoms of Ebola, can only be spread to others after symptoms begin. […]. ...
Kartik Chandran, Ph.D."We knew from our previous research that Ebola virus infects host cells by attaching its surface glycoprotein to a host cell receptor called NPC1," said study co-leader Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., associate professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology at Einstein. "Here, we show how bats have evolved to resist Ebola infection and how, in turn, the virus could have evolved to overcome that resistance." The other study co-leaders are Sara Sawyer, Ph.D., an associate professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology at CU-Boulder, and John Dye, Ph.D., Viral Immunology Branch Chief at USAMRIID.. Outbreaks of Ebola virus disease among humans are thought to begin when a person comes into contact with a wild animal carrying Ebola virus (a member of the family of filoviruses). "Unlike HIV or influenza virus, Ebola virus stays hidden in an unknown natural reservoir between outbreaks," said Dr. Dye. Prior research points to ...
Natural News) In 2014, the Ebola outbreak occurred in West Africa where 11,000 people died. Although it was contained for a few years, it has re-emerged in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever with up to a 90 percent death rate. An infected person will show symptoms within two to 21 days.. Its symptoms start out like the flu, with cough, sore throat, fever, aches and pains, diarrhea, malaise, nausea, and vomiting. As the virus advances, the victim starts to get bruising, rashes, bloody diarrhea and vomiting, bleeding from the eyes, nose, mouth, and multiple organ failure leading to death.. A person can contract the virus by being exposed to infected bodily fluids such as blood, saliva, vomit, perspiration, or stools. In many African countries, the practice of preparing their deceased loved ones for burial is often the cause of exposure. It can also spread via sexual contact because the virus can stay in sperm for months, even as the victim recovers. ...
I have already done a partial retrospective on having been reporting on Ebola haemorrhagic fever viruses for just over 20 years - but I totally forgot to commemorate that I have been producing Web pages for just over 21! So Im going to go on a nostalgic ramble through the past, mainly using Ebola as…
Ebolaviruses cause a severe and often fatal haemorrhagic fever in humans, with some species such as Ebola virus having case fatality rates approaching 90%. Currently, the worst Ebola virus outbreak since the disease was discovered is occurring in West Africa. Although thought to be a zoonotic infection, a concern is that with increasing numbers of humans being infected, Ebola virus variants could be selected which are better adapted for human-to-human transmission. To investigate whether genetic changes in Ebola virus become established in response to adaptation in a different host, a guinea pig model of infection was used. In this experimental system, guinea pigs were infected with Ebola virus (EBOV), which initially did not cause disease. To simulate transmission to uninfected individuals, the virus was serially passaged five times in naïve animals. As the virus was passaged, virulence increased and clinical effects were observed in the guinea pig. An RNAseq and consensus mapping approach was then
Ebola (E-bo-la) fever is a serious disease caused by the Ebola virus, which is named for the Ebola River in the Congo (formerly Zaire). Ebola Fever causes high fever, rash, and bleeding throughout the body. People with Ebola fever often die very quickly. Although scientists know that the disease results from a viral infection, they still have not solved the mystery of its origin and mode of transmission to humans. The Ebola virus belongs to the group of viruses called filoviruses, as do the Marburg and Reston viruses. Scientists first identified the Marburg virus in 1967, when it caused a small outbreak among sick monkeys brought from Africa to a medical laboratory in Marburg, Germany. In 1976, a filovirus named for the Ebola River in Zaire (now the Congo) caused an epidemic in central Africa that killed hundreds of people. Smaller outbreaks have occurred in Africa since then. In 1989 and 1990, many monkeys shipped from Asia to a research laboratory in Reston, Virginia, died from a disease that ...
Both WHO and some national public health agencies such as the CDC monitor and prepare for emerging infectious diseases. An emerging infectious disease is either new to the human population or has shown an increase in prevalence in the previous twenty years. Whether the disease is new or conditions have changed to cause an increase in frequency, its status as emerging implies the need to apply resources to understand and control its growing impact.. Emerging diseases may change their frequency gradually over time, or they may experience sudden epidemic growth. The importance of vigilance was made clear during the Ebola hemorrhagic fever epidemic in western Africa through 2014-2015. Although health experts had been aware of the Ebola virus since the 1970s, an outbreak on such a large scale had never happened before (Figure 12.14). Previous human epidemics had been small, isolated, and contained. Indeed, the gorilla and chimpanzee populations of western Africa had suffered far worse from Ebola than ...
Research published by Army scientists indicates that a minor reduction in levels of one particular gene, known as CD45, can provide protection against two divergent microbes: the virus that causes Ebola hemorrhagic fever and the bacterium that causes anthrax. Taken together, the results suggest a common host restriction factor and a promising approach to drug development for treating two completely different infections.
Drug Discovery and Molecular Biology of Pathogenic RNA viruses: Influenza, Dengue and Ebola Influenza, dengue fever, and Ebola hemorrhagic fever are diseases caused by highly pathogenic RNA viruses which have proven difficult to target for drug discovery. For influenza, the yearly "seasonal" vaccine does not keep up with the constant genetic drift of the virus, or with new pandemic strains. For dengue virus, there are no vaccines or drugs available despite approximately 100 million cases per year worldwide. Ebola virus remains unchallenged by pharmaceuticals. We are developing new approaches to identifying chemical inhibitors for these three viruses. One approach is "chemical-genetic", and it employs the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a test tube. We genetically modify yeast to express specific viral proteins such as the NS1 protein from influenza virus. This expression system is then used to screen for new chemical compounds that can inhibit the function of the viral protein in the ...
This 1b study investigated the immunogenicity and tolerability of an Ebola DNA Plasmid Vaccine, VRC-EBODNA023-00-VP, and a Marburg DNA Plasmid Vaccine,
But there are few things that [Preston] led people to understand about Ebola that are even more horrific than reality, the notion that people bleed out, as though their bodies were simply being drained off blood-theyre bleeding from their eyes, theyre melting inside, their internal organs are dissolving. And when I talk to the Ebola experts, people like Carl Johnson and Pierre Rola at the CDC and others, they said, No, no, it doesnt do that. It is a horrible disease, but it is not horrible in that way. It kills a lot of people, but its usually, its not necessarily even a particularly bloody disease; they dont call it Ebola hemorrhagic fever anymore, as they did, because theyve realized that sometimes its kind of bloody; its not as bloody as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. It is a horrific disease that kills people, but it doesnt cause people to melt down ...
Geneva, Switzerland. On 7 October 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) will convene an informal consultation on how science can inform our response to Ebola virus disease. A group of scientists with expertise in Ebola control will work with WHO to review the current science and information emerging from the countries experiencing epidemics of Ebola virus disease. This expert advice will be used to inform WHO directions and actions in this current response and any future Ebola outbreaks.. Objectives of the consultation. The objective of the consultation is to obtain perspectives from the review of the available science in relation to diagnostic and virological findings, clinical features, epidemiology and the impact of Ebola disease control measures on the evolution of the outbreak. These observations may be used by WHO to:. ...
Ebola haemorrhagic fever kills many people in Central Africa each year. It can cause runaway internal and external bleeding in humans and also apes. What remains unidentified is the jungle-based organism serving as the virus’s host. To assist search efforts, from next year detailed vegetation maps of Congo and Gabon will be created with satellite images as part of a new ESA Data User Element project called Epidemio, developing Earth Observation (EO) services for epidemiologists. The Gabon-based International Centre for Medical Research (CIRMF) will combine EO data with field results within a geographical information system (GIS). They hope to spot particular environmental characteristics associated with infected sites where either dead animals are found or local people have acquired Ebola antibodies. “By comparison with known infected sites, remote sensing will help determine other suspect sites,†said Ghislain Moussavou of CIRMF. “It is not possible to test the blood of ...
The music is not in the notes, but the silence in between." - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. If one were to describe the history of Ebola outbreaks, one method would be to construct a timeline, with a point on the line for each outbreak. You could create this timeline with a varying number of points, depending on your methodology, but regardless of how you built your timeline, there would be spaces between these points. This is due to the nature of Ebola; it appears, it disappears, and it appears again. To the Ebola virus, these gaps are periods of convalescence. To us, they are periods of absence and mystery, and one of these gaps stands out as the most mysterious.. The CDC lists five Ebola outbreaks in the late 1970s. The "first" Ebola outbreak took place in 1976, though we now recognize the event as two simultaneous and separate outbreaks. Between June and November 1976, 284 cases (151 deaths) of Ebola Sudan occurred near what is now Nzara, South Sudan[i]; between September and October 1976, 318 ...
CIDRAP News) - An outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever has grown to 20 cases in western Uganda, and 10 people in two of Ugandas central districts have contracted Ebola hemorrhagic fever, the World Health Organization (WHO) said recently. ...
The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has already killed 600 people. The outbreak occurred this spring, but a new study shows that the virus may have been affecting people in the region for years before the outbreak.. According to the study, there was a mysterious illness affecting people in West Africa years before the outbreak. The illness was likely the Ebola virus. Although blood samples were taken from most of the people treated for the illness, none of them were tested for Ebola.. Researchers are now testing the blood samples to see if the patients were indeed suffering from the Ebola virus. The test samples were over seven years old, but still potentially dangerous. Researchers had to heat treat them to help make them safe before they could be tested.. "It had been circulating there for a long time," said Randal Schoepp of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. "It just hadnt gotten out of control or the right conditions werent there.". ...
The National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) was established in 2010, with a mission and scientific activities that trace back to the earliest days of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This document is a strategic roadmap for the work necessary during the next 5 years to realize the Center"s vision--prevent infection, protect people, and save lives. NCEZID is responsible for the prevention and control of a wide range of infectious diseases, including rare but deadly diseases like anthrax and Ebola hemorrhagic fever, and more common illnesses like foodborne diseases and healthcare-associated infections. The Center"s expert staff manages a broad portfolio of science-based programs that also promote water safety, the health of migrating populations, and the identification and control of diseases transmitted by animals and insects (e.g., rabies, Lyme disease). NCEZID works closely with the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, ...
This series provides a detailed overview of the most important historic and emerging zoonotic diseases, such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, foot-and-mouth disease, influenza, giardiasis, Japanese encephalitis, shigellosis, and spongiform encephalopathies, with information ranging from their first appearance and most important outbreaks to the latest scientific knowledge of the diseases and their causative agents. PAHO Publications Catalog
This series provides a detailed overview of the most important historic and emerging zoonotic diseases, such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, foot-and-mouth disease, influenza, giardiasis, Japanese encephalitis, shigellosis, and spongiform encephalopathies, with information ranging from their first appearance and most important outbreaks to the latest scientific knowledge of the diseases and their causative agents. PAHO Publications Catalog
Its odd to see otherwise pretty rational folks getting nervous about the news that the American Ebola patients are being flown back to the United States for treatment. "What if Ebola gets out?" "What if it infects the doctors/pilots/nurses taking care of them?" "I dont want Ebola in the US!". Friends, I have news for you: Ebola is *already* in the US.. Ebola is a virus with no vaccine or cure. As such, any scientist who wants to work with the live virus needs to have biosafety level 4 facilities (the highest, most secure labs in existence-abbreviated BSL4) available to them. We have a number of those here in the United States, and people are working with many of the Ebola types here. Have you heard of any Ebola outbreaks occurring here in the US? Nope. These scientists are highly trained and very careful, just like people treating these Ebola patients and working out all the logistics of their arrival and transport will be.. Second, you might not know that weve already experienced patients ...
Table of Contents. Table of Contents 2. List of Tables 6. List of Figures 7. Introduction 8. Global Markets Direct Report Coverage 8. Ebola Viral Infections Overview 9. Therapeutics Development 10. Pipeline Products for Ebola Viral Infections-Overview 10. Pipeline Products for Ebola Viral Infections-Comparative Analysis 11. Ebola Viral Infections-Therapeutics under Development by Companies 12. Ebola Viral Infections-Therapeutics under Investigation by Universities/Institutes 17. Ebola Viral Infections-Pipeline Products Glance 19. Late Stage Products 19. Clinical Stage Products 20. Early Stage Products 21. Unknown Stage Products 22. Ebola Viral Infections-Products under Development by Companies 23. Ebola Viral Infections-Products under Investigation by Universities/Institutes 28. Ebola Viral Infections-Companies Involved in Therapeutics Development 29. Abivax S.A. 29. AmVac AG 30. AnGes MG, Inc. 31. Arno Therapeutics, Inc. 32. Canopus BioPharma Incorporated 33. Crucell N.V. 34. Emergent ...