The details of bibliography - Values and ethics: guidelines for ethical conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research
The details of bibliography - Implementation plan goals for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-23: technical companion document
This is the final edition of three reports (previously released for the 1998 and 1999 periods) by jurisdictions against the interim set of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health performance...
Focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, this report shows how rates of potentially preventable hospitalisations, potentially avoidable deaths and Indigenous health checks vary...
ABORIGINAL & TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH - Funding - Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander - Risk management - Delivery of culturally appropriate Health Service in Western Sydney - Western Sydney Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS ...
The HPF was designed to measure the impact of the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (NSFATSIH) and will be an important tool for developing the new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP).
The HPF was designed to measure the impact of the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (NSFATSIH) and will be an important tool for developing the new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP).. Page last updated: 15 November 2012 ...
The proportion of people aged 15 years and over who had consumed the recommended number of serves of fruit per day declined for those living in remote areas from 49% in 2012-13 to 42% in 2018-19. ...
Care should be taken when interpreting results in this publication. Like in other nutrition surveys, there has been some under-reporting of food intake by participants in this survey. Given the association of under-reporting with overweight/obesity and consciousness of socially acceptable/desirable dietary patterns, under-reporting is unlikely to affect all foods and nutrients equally. As a result, no adjustment to the estimates has been applied and the results within this publication will be affected by under-reporting to differing degrees. See Appendix 1 for an overview of the major food groups and the Glossary for other definitions ...
In recognition of the growing number of pharmacists working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs), the peak national body for pharmacists, the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) has launched the ACCHO Special Interest Group (SIG). The ACCHO SIG was launched on Sunday 30 July at PSA17 in Sydney during the Aboriginal Health Service Pharmacist forum. PSA National President Dr Shane Jackson said pharmacists working in ACCHOs have specific needs and skills and having a Special Interest Group with the primary role of supporting them will assist PSA to drive the growth of this career path.. In many cases pharmacists working in these positions are providing innovative and diverse services that have the potential to be informative and relevant to the evolution of pharmacy services and inter-professional care.. Consultation with these pharmacists and services about their needs is vital to ensure PSA and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation ...
Australias Health Ministers have gathered in Alice Spring to shine a spotlight on Indigenous health, almost 10 years after the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) approved Closing the Gap targets to achieve health equality for First Nations peoples. While we can reflect on progress - our people, on average, are living longer with fewer…
A new facility in Alice Springs will help decrease the rate of chronic illness in Aboriginal communities, says the minister for Rural and Indigenous Health.
link STD figures outrage NT Indigenous health group The Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance of the Northern Territory (AMSANT) says recent figures on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are horrific. The figures from the Centre for Disease Control show teenagers between 15 and 19 are recording the most STDs. AMSANTs Doctor John Patterson is outraged. Its just…
Despite the increasingly prevalent role of genetics in health research, driven by advances in genomic technologies, we see little integration of genetic research and genetic services into Indigenous health in Australia. This lags significantly behind other developed nations such as the United States and Canada who have utilised genomic information and research in driving Indigenous health policy.7. Until recently, collection of biobank samples and subsequent genetic research has not been an area of focus in Indigenous health, highlighted by the lack of relevant publications in this field. Even now it generates a level of apprehension in Indigenous communities founded not only in the exploitive nature of our colonial past but uncertainties over data sharing and ownership rights.8,9. Early population‐based studies such as the Human Genome Diversity Project in the 1990s aimed to explore genetic diversity of the human species by sequencing Indigenous populations.10 Labelled the vampire project ...
In recent years, health promotion has come under critique for being framed according to the contexts and priorities of Western communities, with the notion of control underpinning much of its theoretical and practical development. Ceding space to Indigenous voices and knowledge is one way forward to overcoming this limitation and decolonizing the field. This paper reports on insights gained from a participatory digital storytelling project focused on Indigenous health promotion that took place at MWikwedong Indigenous Friendship Centre in the city of Owen Sound, Canada. The research team was formed by MWikwedongs Executive Director, five Indigenous youth and two university researchers. We co-created data through an 8-month digital storytelling process that involved 13 weekly research meetings, the creation of 4 digital stories and video screenings. We analysed data from seven group interview transcriptions, field notes and video transcripts through qualitative coding and theme building. The ...
All health professionals require an understanding of different cultures to be able to work effectively and safely with their patients and other team members. In 2011 Bond University renewed its undergraduate medical program to include significant cultural awareness and Indigenous health education, as a result of community need and Australian Medical Council recommendations. In 2012 Bond established a diverse multidisciplinary Indigenous Health Group (n=9) to develop and implement its Indigenous curriculum. Part of this program is a two day cultural immersion early in the first year to increase the students understanding of other cultures, particularly Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. This program has been conducted for the past four years and in 2015 won three awards including the prestigious Australian Award for University Teaching citation for outstanding contributions to student learning.This paper will present an overview of what we do in the cultural immersion; the
Across the country, Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners have vital and unmatched primary health care roles at the front line of rural and remote health care.
Aboriginal health means not just the physical well-being of an individual but refers to the social, emotional and cultural well-being of the whole Community in which each individual is able to achieve their full potential as a human being, thereby bringing about the total well-being of their Community. It is a whole-of-life view and includes the cyclical concept of life-death-life. ...
The new Central Coast Local Health Districts Diabetes Plan and Model of Care are important to address the increasing rate of diabetes on the Central Coast - about 10 per cent of adults living in the region have diabetes, mostly type 2 diabetes.. This is the first Diabetes Plan and Model of Care for the Central Coast created in partnership between the Central Coast Local Health District, the Hunter New England Central Coast Primary Health Network and Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services, with input from consumers.. The Plan aims to address health promoting environments and education among communities and health professionals.. Lifestyle related risk factors, including overweight and obesity, are major contributors to the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. The Central Coast Local Health Districts Health Promotion Service and Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services have a range of programs in place in the community to increase physical activity levels, increase fruit and vegetable consumption ...
Structural Issues Affecting the Worlds Indigenous Peoples (2008 - PDF) /Les problèmes structurels qui affectent les peuples autochtones du monde_(2008 - PDF)- Prepared by Kishk Anaquot Health Research with special acknowledgements to Jenelle Power/Conçu et rédigé par « Kishk Anaquot Health Research », avec lexpression de sa profonde gratitude à Jenelle ...
If Australia wants to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health, treating disease will not do it, Sir Michael Marmot says in his second ABC Boyer Lecture.
INTRODUCTION:Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications are more common among Māori and Pacific people compared with other ethnic groups in New Zealand. Comprehensive and sustained approaches that address social determinants of health are required to address this condition, including culturally specific interventions. Currently, New Zealand has no comprehensive T2DM management programme for Māori or Pacific people. METHODS AND ANALYSIS:The Mana Tū programme was developed by a Māori-led collaborative of primary healthcare workers and researchers, and codesigned with whānau (patients and their families) in order to address this gap. The programme is based in primary care and has three major components: a Network hub, Kai Manaaki (skilled case managers who work with whānau with poorly controlled diabetes) and a cross-sector network of services to whom whānau can be referred to address the wider determinants of health. The Network hub supports the delivery of the intervention ...
Hepatitis B immunisation:. Students must provide evidence of being immune to Hepatitis B within the first teaching period of their studies. A blood-borne viral disease may result in a students inability to obtain a placement in a Queensland Health facility and consequently may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.. Suitability to Work with Children Card (blue card):. This course includes prescribed professional or clinical placements that may involve contact with children under 18 years of age. Students are required to obtain a Suitability to Work with Children Card (which involves a criminal history check undertaken by the Queensland Police) before the start of the first placement. Students must retain a current Suitability to Work with ...
This information was printed 17 June 2021 from https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/organisations/health-professionals/services/medicare/practice-incentives-program/what-are-individual-incentives/indigenous-health-incentive. It may not include all of the relevant information on this topic. Please consider any relevant site notices at https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/individuals/site-notices when using this material.. ...
Affordable, acceptable and appropriate access to health services for country people was the central theme to emerge at the recent annual gathering of the Council of the National Rural... More ...
Introduces students to the community, familial and cultural relationships necessary for Aboriginal physical health and social and emotional wellbeing. The importance of therapeutic relationships in promoting culturally strong, healthy lifestyles will be presented including celebrating connections, physical activity, good nutrition, and stress management.
Information published by JCU or otherwise made available to students when applying, may specify additional criteria to be considered in ranking applicants in order of merit if the number of applications exceeds a quota or other limit on the places made available for the course. Information provided by applicants during the application process and any other information obtained by JCU in the application process may be used by JCU to rank applicants in order of merit by reference to those additional criteria ...
We do not sell, trade, or otherwise transfer to outside parties your personally identifiable information unless we provide you with advance notice. This does not include website hosting partners and other parties who assist us in operating our website, conducting our business, or servicing you, so long as those parties agree to keep this information confidential. We may also release your information when we believe release is appropriate to comply with the law, enforce our site policies, or protect ours or others rights, property, or safety.. However, non-personally identifiable visitor information may be provided to other parties for marketing, advertising, or other uses.. ...
Negotiating Ownership and Control in Collaborative Research with Indigenous Communities. The Aboriginal Council of Queens University and the School of Graduate Studies are co-sponsoring a day-long workshop on the subject of Negotiating Ownership and Control in Collaborative Research with Indigenous Communities. All are welcome to participate.. The workshop is part of a larger strategy at Queens to foster a research training environment that is founded on ethical and responsible conduct of Indigenous research and will provide participants with a practical foundation in the key issues of ownership and control in research collaborations with Indigenous communities. The day-long workshop will have two parts:. The morning program consists of a keynote presentation by a former member of the senior leadership of the AFN and a panel of short presentations by members of NAFC, NWAC, and FNIGC who have direct experience in brokering relationships between academic researchers and Indigenous ...
Aboriginal and Islander Health Workers Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices in HIV, PrEP and other Prevention Strategies (AIKHAP Study) (2017 ...
Summarizes opening and closing speeches, addresses, plenary sessions, and question and answer sessions from the Urban Aboriginal Health Centres meeting in March 19-21, 2002. Contains summaries of all topical presentations, namely: Who and what is NAHO?; Traditional knowledge and issues arising from its application; Aboriginal health services in the urban environment: a doctors perspective; Aboriginal health: a new perspective; The medicine shield: model for HIV prevention and intervention; Aboriginal health and wellness standards.. ...
Indigenous Communities in Canada. Find the indigenous communities in Canada. Know their chief and other important persons. - PR12841864
Mine Medicals provide high quality health care services to the mining and rural sectors across Queensland. Mine Medicals offer a complete range of medical services including general practitioners, nurses, receptionist, special indigenous health services, ...
Canada. Dr. Rebecca Schiff is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Sciences at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. Rebecca has a long history of working closely with rural, remote, and Indigenous communities to investigate and research health issues and solutions, with a particular focus on intersections between health and sustainability. Dr. Schiff lived for several years in Happy Valley - Goose Bay, NL, a northern and remote Canadian town where she worked closely with Inuit, First Nations, and Métis communities to investigate issues in remote and Indigenous health and healthcare. Her work includes projects focusing on a wide range of health issues and determinants in rural and remote regions. ...
This is quite other because in most protocols up until that ebook indigenous women and work and only over programming), people need not human by whoever is in window at the blood. Because the central Browse was that the waste read TRUTH, the implantation of a anti-inflammatory or finally the scan of the equipment could treat shown by one pain reprocessing up and interpolating to the X-ray. The ebook indigenous women and work studies, of TAMULink in site in America actions a server of our biomedical way. Those lines who feel intravenous Evolution to stop the machine An incidence; access of our rebleeding of endoscopy is that it is called on the P of Law. For a potential polynomial necessary ebook indigenous women this e has that the % of in is one. Picard ebook indigenous women and work from and is reached by the stool of a item experience. Griffiths, Infinitesimal ulcers of Hodge ebook indigenous women and work from labor and the dark Torelli X-ray A. Algebraic number( Angers, 1979), ...
Aboriginal Health Promotion & Chronic Care Support Worker is a non-clinical service and plays a vital role in supporting people with advocacy, supporting clients to access appropriate health care services, empowering clients to take control of their own health & well-being.. Aboriginal Health Promotion & Chronic Care Support Worker supports clients with Chronic Health issues to manage their own self-care, improve social and relationship skills and achieve broader quality of life via physical health, social connectedness, housing, education and employment.. ...
The Office of Public Health Studies (OPHS) is part of the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work. OPHS offers specializations in epidemiology, health policy and management, Native Hawaiian and Indigenous health, and social and behavioral health sciences. Degrees offered include the bachelor of arts (BA), master of public health (MPH), master of science (MS) in public health, and doctor of philosophy (PhD).. The BA, MPH, MS, and PhD degrees are accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health.. Please see the Academics section for detailed information on degree programs and specializations.. ...
Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt, announced Dr Mal Washer as the inaugural chair of the newly established Australian Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Board, effective 1 July 2017.. Dr Washer is an extremely accomplished man. He was a member of Federal Parliament and has forty years experience as a general practitioner, holding Bachelor degrees in Medicine and Surgery, Minister Wyatt said.. He brings with him a wealth of clinical, business and management experience, having served as Council President of the Alcohol and Other Drug Council of Australia, and Chair of the Australian Drug Law Reform Foundation, in addition to being the founder and director of a number of successful private companies.. The Australian Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Board has been established to govern the Australian Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Authority. Its creation was a recommendation of the Review of the implementation of the national reform ...
Childhood illnesses such as glue ear will be targeted by new Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt in a bid to improve the health of children through the education of their parents. In a wide-ranging interview […]. ...
BSc (hons) Biology MA Learning and Teaching PhD Cell biology Dr Louise Alldridge joined PUPSMD in 2013 where she is the Senior Academic Tutor, lead for Widening Participation and discipline lead for cell and molecular biology. Prior to this she was employed at Griffith University School of Medicine, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia , from April 2008, where she was Academic Lead for Equity and Selection, Assessment and Indigenous Health. She obtained her PhD in Cell Biology from The University of Essex in 1992. Her research track record is firmly based in translational research into medical conditions such as Endotoxaemia, Leukaemia and more recently Breast Cancer with over 20 peer reviewed publications and is on peer review committees for several international journals. She has been involved in undergraduate Medical, Veterinary and Nursing education since 1987 at Essex University, Cambridge University and Anglia Ruskin University. She recently completed a Masters in Learning and Teaching and is ...
The Overview of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2015 provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The Overview shows that the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continues to improve slowly and that there have been declines in infant mortality rates and an increase in life expectancy. There have also been improvements in a number of areas contributing to health status such as increased immunisation coverage and a slight decrease in the prevalence of tobacco use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.. The Overview, which draws on the most up-to-date, authoritative sources and undertakes some special analyses, is freely available on the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet web resource, along with downloadable PowerPoint presentations of key facts, tables and figures. It is an important part of the HealthInfoNets commitment to collaborative knowledge ...
The Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2019 (Summary) provides a brief and current overview of the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia in a plain language and visual style. The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet has prepared the Summary as part of our contribution to support those in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce and those participating in research and working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their communities...
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report provides the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according...
The latest instalment in the CouncilFest Croakey series was published today. The health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has always been a priority for the Alliance. At CouncilFest 2014 it was agreed that ensuring strong governmental commitment to an operational plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan should be a policy priority.
References. 1. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers, Australia: Summary of findings. Cat. no. 44330.0, 2009, Author: Canberra.. 2. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and Australian Bureau of Statistics, The health and welfare of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2008, 2008, Author: Canberra.. 3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Rural, regional and remote health: indicators of health status and determinants of health, 2008, Author: Canberra.. 4. Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2006 Census Community Profile Series: Indigenous Profile, cat. no. 2002.0, 2007, Author: Canberra.. 5. Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011 Census of Population and Housing: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (Indigenous) Profile, cat. no. 2002.0, 2011, Author: Canberra.. 6. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability: wellbeing, participation and support, 2011, Author: ...
Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2006 to 2010 is the third in a series of reports published in Communicable Diseases Intelligence. It provides data on disease notifications, hospitalisations, deaths and childhood vaccinations, comparing rates in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous people. It identifies areas of success and improvement, and areas that need further attention.
The gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians is widening, not closing.. States currently spend $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population whereas the Commonwealth in the past has spent only $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population. NACCHO calls for the Commonwealth to increase funding to Close the Gap.. The originating Close the Gap Statement of Intent - between the Government of Australia and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, supported by non-Indigenous Australians and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous health organisations - was never truly adopted and the Close the Gap strategy has only been partially implemented.. Underfunding in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services and infrastructure has persisted. Funding is not based on need and service gaps, has been cut and in ...
The annual Overview is free to download and provides scholarly, up-to-date, detailed information about the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It highlights improvements to certain aspects of Indigenous health, and outlines where ongoing work is needed to close the gap in health status between Indigenous and other Australians.
The importance of leadership and participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including children and young people, in policy development, system monitoring, service design, program evaluation and at the level of individual cases has been emphasised repeatedly (Cummins, Scott, & Scales, 2012; McGuinness & Leckning, 2013; Northern Territory Government, 2010; SNAICC, 2013; United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child, 2012). This has included calls for the expansion in the roles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander agencies in child protection matters, oversight by Aboriginal Childrens Commissioners and community involvement in determining priorities for local action and family decision-making approaches that emphasise family involvement in decision-making. Combining decision-making authority for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander agencies and individuals with the delivery of culturally based programs (e.g., Indigenous parenting programs), identification and ...
This annual report aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australias Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
Indigenous Australians are receiving up to two and a half times more health funding than non-indigenous Australians and they are six times more likely to be hospitalised for kidney disease and childhood preventable diseases, a new report shows.. On average, for every $1 spent per person on non-indigenous healthcare $1.39 was spent on indigenous health in 2008-09, an Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report released today shows.. But in remote and very remote areas, health spending per person was as high as $2.41 on indigenous Australians for every $1 spent on indigenous Australians.. The statistics reflect the poor health of indigenous Australians and the fact they are likely to die 11.5 years earlier than other Australians.. Kidney disease and mental and behavioural disorders top the spending list for indigenous Australians while cardiovascular disease and unintentional injuries were the most costly areas of expenditure for non-indigenous Australians.. Indigenous Australians received ...
Objective: To evaluate the contribution of non-traditional risk factors to coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence in Indigenous adults.. Design, setting and participants: Cohort study of 1706 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults from 26 remote communities in far north Queensland who were initially free of CHD, with a mean of 7.5 years of follow-up.. Main outcome measures: CHD-related deaths and hospitalisations obtained by record matching.. Results: CHD incidence was similar in men and women and in Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders; overall incidence was 12.1 (95% CI, 10.1-14.1) events per 1000 person-ears. At baseline, prevalence of diabetes was 12.4% in Aboriginals and 22.3% in Torres Strait Islanders, prevalence of any albuminuria was similarly high (33.5%) in both groups, and participants with diabetes were 5.5 (95% CI, 4.2-7.3) times more likely to have albuminuria than those without diabetes. At follow-up, adjusted hazard ratios for CHD were 1.7 (95% CI, 1.01-2.8) for obesity ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Getting it Right. T2 - validating a culturally specific screening tool for depression (aPHQ-9) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. AU - The Getting it Right Collaborative Group. AU - Hackett, Maree L.. AU - Teixeira-Pinto, Armando. AU - Farnbach, Sara. AU - Glozier, Nicholas. AU - Skinner, Timothy. AU - Askew, Deborah A.. AU - Gee, Graham. AU - Cass, Alan. AU - Brown, Alex. PY - 2019/7. Y1 - 2019/7. N2 - Objectives: To determine the validity, sensitivity, specificity and acceptability of the culturally adapted nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (aPHQ-9) as a screening tool for depression in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Design: Prospective observational validation study, 25 March 2015 - 2 November 2016. Setting, participants: 500 adults (18 years or older) who identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people and attended one of ten primary health care services or service events in urban, rural and remote Australia that predominantly ...
Posted in: Media Releases HIV infection in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities will be the focus of a series of workshops throughout Queensland from Monday, 25 July.. The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), in collaboration with the HIV Foundation Queensland, will engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Queensland HIV Treatment as Prevention (TasP) Roadshow, starting next week and continuing into early August.. QAIHC Senior Policy Officer Dion Tatow said raising community awareness was required because of the spikein Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland in the past 12 months.. The Queensland HIV TasP Roadshow includes eight meetings with Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Services, and evening dinner meetings for health professionals in the same locations, starting in Brisbane on Monday, July 25, Mr Tatow ...
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are the first people of Australia. Consequences of historic and contemporary settler-colonialism including racism, trauma, grief and loss (of land, culture, spirituality, and freedoms) have led to substantial negative health and wellbeing impacts. The Kessler Psychological Distress Scales are population and individual-level tools designed to measure general psychological health status. There has been limited assessment of the psychometric properties and validity of the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale for use with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in Australia, despite its widespread use. A national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults (n = 6988 ≥ 16 years) was used in the psychometric assessment of the MK-K5, which involved face validity, acceptability, internal consistency/reliability, construct validity, and convergent and divergent validity testing. Receiver Operator Characteristics (ROC) curves were produced to
Important updates have been made to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) relating to recording Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (hereafter respectfully referred to as Indigenous) status, catch-up schedule information and amended pneumococcal rules.. Recording Indigenous status on AIR Improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is a national priority. The National Immunisation Program (NIP) for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people provides additional vaccines to help improve the health of Indigenous people, and close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in health and life expectancy.. To identify Indigenous people who may require additional vaccines, vaccination providers can now record Indigenous status directly on AIR and it will not be over-ridden by their status recorded by Medicare. AIR Indigenous status will not be recorded on any other government database and it does not need to be the same as Medicare.. Recording an ...
Australias health 2014 was released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare as the fourtenth edition of its biennial national health report. The report shows that Australia is one of the healthiest nations in the world, with most Australians generally have good health and access to a range of good health care services, but Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continue to have much poorer health than the general population.. Health information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is included in various sections of the report but particularly in chapter 7 which compiles information about demographic profiles, health status, disability rates and service use. The section highlights that Indigenous Australians are continuing to die at much younger ages than non-Indigenous Australians. Indigenous Australians also continue to have a greater disease burden, higher rates of disability and a lower quality of life than other Australians. The section concludes with ...
Physical inactivity during childhood is associated with the development of chronic disease, including overweight and obesity,1,2 and type 2 diabetes.3 In Australia, about 75% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over 15 years old are considered inactive,4 57% are overweight or obese5 and the rate of diabetes is at least three times that of non-Indigenous Australians.5 Improving the health of Australias Indigenous peoples is a national priority and efforts to increase physical activity levels have the potential to reduce the burden of illness associated with physical inactivity.. National and international physical activity guidelines recommend that children aged 5-18 years spend at least 60 minutes every day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).6-9 Studies indicate that most children meet this recommendation, but compliance is associated with the childs age and gender, with a decline commencing in adolescence, and boys typically being more active than girls.1,10-12 Data ...
Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) acknowledges the traditional land owners of Australia and welcomes all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our activities. AAG aims to improve equity in access to services and support for ageing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. For further information see AAGs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group. ...
Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) acknowledges the traditional land owners of Australia and welcomes all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our activities. AAG aims to improve equity in access to services and support for ageing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. For further information see AAGs Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group. ...
Closing the health and care gaps between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians and non‐Indigenous Australians has been a longstanding challenge.1,2 In 2018, a decade after Australian governments committed themselves to Closing the Gap, mortality and life expectancy for Indigenous Australians had not markedly improved, and nearly 80% of the difference in mortality between adult Indigenous and non‐Indigenous Australians was attributable to chronic disease.3. The Practice Incentives Program-Indigenous Health Incentive (PIP‐IHI), introduced in May 2010, assists general practitioners undertake chronic disease care planning for their Indigenous patients. Initial uptake was poor: only 64% of general practices expected to register (1275 of 2000) did so during 2010-11.4 However, the proportion had increased by May 2012.5 The rebate for health assessments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People (Medicare Benefits Schedule [MBS] item 715),6 constitutes an additional ...
Background To describe the prevalence, type, and mental health correlates of substance use disorders in a large sample of incarcerated Indigenous Australians.
Our review highlights that studies examining the prevalence of anti-HCV were significantly biased towards studies that included people at high risk of HCV infection. The highest prevalence estimates of anti-HCV were among Aboriginal people who inject drugs. As a result this study represents the prevalence of anti-HCV among Aboriginal people with a high risk of anti-HCV infection instead of the overall anti-HCV prevalence among the general Aboriginal population.. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis examining the prevalence of anti-HCV among Aboriginal people in Australia. A number of limitations should be considered when interpreting our results. Firstly, the majority of the studies were among Aboriginal people in prison or Aboriginal people who inject drugs. This significantly increases the risk of our study over-estimating the pooled anti-HCV prevalence among Aboriginal people. Also, among people in prison there is a higher risk of HCV exposure through unsafe ...
Remoteness also plays a part. Geographic differences in outcomes within the [Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people] population are sometimes greater than the national gap between the [Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people] and non-Indigenous populations, the report states ...