Male, with 41 years old, healthy, claudicating on exertion since 60 days, no right femoral pulse. He is a marathons athlete. There is a dissection on RCI, thrombosis at origin of REI, and LEI with various aneurysms. My diagnosis is fibromuscular dysplasia with aneurysm and thrombosis. There are few cases in literature: Surg Today. 2003;33(8):639-41. Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm Caused by Fibromuscular Dysplasia: Report of a Case J Vasc Surg 2004;40:1032-6.) Spontaneous dissection and rupture of common iliac artery in a patient with fibromuscular dysplasia: A case report and review of the literature on iliac artery dissections secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia I think that is a challenge case, because his age, bilateral disease, sub-occlusion of RII, occlusion of REI and dissection on RCI ...
Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory vascular disease in which at least one of your arteries has an abnormal cluster of cells growing in the artery wall. This cluster causes the artery to narrow (stenosis), such as arteries in the kidneys (renal artery), arteries to the brain (carotid artery/vertebral artery) and less commonly the arties that supplies the abdomen (abdominal aorta), which can cause damage to the organs that, receive blood through the narrowed artery. FMD is so poorly understood by many healthcare providers, treatment is often not optimal, leading to impaired quality of life and potential serious number of complications, such as hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarction (heart attack), aneurysms (arterial swelling) and arterial dissection, if left untreated.A few thousand cases have been confirmed in the U.S., but some experts believe it affects up to 5% of the population. When presumably healthy kidney donors are screened with X-rays, FMD has ...
I am Deb B. I live in the foothills of Adelaide, South Australia. I have Fibromuscular Dysplasia. Up until my diagnosis and first treatment in 2007, I was really sick, unable to function basically. My once organised life was in shambles. The symptoms were many, and I was often hospitialized for my extremely high blood pressure. Medication wasnt working, my vision was poor, my headaches on going; I could barely walk at times and was dropping weight dramatically. I knew something was very wrong and so did every doctor who looked at me ...
If you have fibromuscular dysplasia and have any sudden changes in your vision, ability to speak, or new weakness in your arms or legs, seek medical attention immediately. If you have any of the other signs or symptoms listed and are concerned about your risk of fibromuscular dysplasia, see your doctor.. Because fibromuscular dysplasia can be hereditary, tell your doctor about your family history of the disease, even before you show any symptoms so that he or she can be alert to changes that might suggest you have fibromuscular dysplasia. Theres currently no genetic test for fibromuscular dysplasia.. ...
Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was first described in 1938 in the renal arteries as a cause of arterial hypertension in a patient with unilateral kidney disease who had "an intraluminal mass of smooth muscle" (Leadbetter and Burkland, 1938; Sandok, 1989; Slovut and Olin, 2004). More than two decades later, McCormack et al. (1958, 1966) described the renal artery pathology of FMD. For many years, fibromuscular disease was assumed to be limited to the renal arteries. Palubinskas and Ripley (1964) were the first to report the angiographic appearance of FMD in extrarenal arteries. Their patient had involvement of the celiac artery and an angiographic lesion in an internal carotid artery (ICA). A year later, Javid (1965) first furnished histological proof of FMD in a carotid artery (Sandok, 1983). Connett and Lansche (1965) were the first to describe the radiological appearance of carotid artery FMD in a patient in whom the disease was confirmed pathologically," according to Uncommon Causes of Stroke, ...
Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of the blood vessels that causes abnormal growth within the wall of an artery. FMD has been found in nearly every arterial bed in the body although the most common arteries affected are the renal and carotid arteries. There are various types of FMD, with multi-focal fibroplasia being the most common. Further, less common, forms of the disease include focal (previously known as intimal) and adventitial fibroplasia. FMD predominantly affects middle-aged women, but has been found in men and people of all ages. Pediatric cases of FMD are vastly different from that of the adult population, and poorly studied. The prevalence of FMD is not known and, although the disease was initially thought to be rare, recent studies have suggested that it may be underdiagnosed. The symptoms expressed by FMD patients is largely dependent on the vascular bed(s) affected by the disease. Patients may also be entirely asymptomatic and have ...
See related article, pp 652-658. Before 2004, fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was thought to predominately affect the renal arteries.1 In the early studies, the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries were involved in only 25% to 30% of patients with FMD.1 However, in a recent report, renal artery involvement occurred in 75.3% of 507 patients, extracranial carotid artery in 73.7% of 476 patients, and vertebral artery in 33.4% of 329 patients.2 There are now ,1600 patients enrolled in the US registry, and it seems that the phenotypic presentation is expanding to include not only stenosis (multifocal [string of beads] or focal [a discrete area of a single stenosis]) but also aneurysm, dissection, and arterial tortuosity. Although other studies have reported on the frequency of multivessel FMD,3,4 Plouin et al5 have conducted the first prospective study in which cross-sectional imaging (computed tomographic angiogram [CTA] or magnetic resonance angiogram [MRA]) was performed in every patient ...
Fibromuscular Dysplasia, commonly called FMD, is a disease that causes one or more arteries in the body to have abnormal cell development in the artery wall. Find more information on symptoms and treatment options at the number 1 heart center, Cleveland Clinic.
Fibromuscular Dysplasia is a vascular disease that causes one or more arteries in the body to have abnormal cell development in the artery wall.
A case of treatable hypertension: fibromuscular dysplasia of renal arteries. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
The case of a 25-year-old woman with coarctation of the thoracic aorta and combined bilateral fibromuscular dysplasia of the renal arteries is reported. Although marked hemodynamic changes induced by the coarctation were probably pre-existent, hypertension was revealed only during the last month of her first pregnancy and was spontaneously corrected 2 months post partum. Surgical treatment of the thoracic coarctation did not influence blood pressure which remained normal ...
Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was first observed in 1938 by Leadbetter and Burkland in a 5-year-old boy, and described as a disease of the renal arteries. Involvement of the craniocervical arteries was recognized in 1946 by Palubinskas and Ripley.
obesity (3) Cardiovascular disease (2) Diabetes (2) FMD (2) Free H1N1 ebook (2) H1N1 (2) Hypoglycemia Cure (2) LDL (2) Lipids (2) Serotonin (2) Swine Flu (2) Swine Flu Ebook (2) Treatment of Obesity (2) blood pressure (2) cholesterol (2) fibromuscular dysplasia (2) high blood pressure (2) insulin (2) kidney failure (2) stroke (2) 1. Resistance Training (1) ALTERNATE HIP BATH (1) Acne Causes (1) Acne Problems (1) Acne Skincare (1) Acne Symptoms (1) Acute Bronchitis (1) Adult Dyslexia (1) Allergies Causes (1) Allergies Symptoms (1) Allergy Cures (1) Allergy Remedies (1) Anaemia Symptoms (1) Anaemia Treatment (1) Appendicitis Treatment (1) Appendix Symptoms (1) Asthma Allergies (1) Asthma Bronchitis (1) Asthma Cause (1) Asthma Remedies (1) Asthma Symptoms (1) Asthma Therapy (1) Asthma Treatments (1) Atherosclerosis (1) Autism (1) Backache (1) Backache Causes (1) Backache Relief (1) Backache Symptoms (1) Backache Treatment (1) Bleeding Piles (1) Body Detox (1) Body Detoxification (1) Body Exercises ...
Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was first observed in 1938 by Leadbetter and Burkland in a 5-year-old boy, and described as a disease of the renal arteries. Involvement of the craniocervical arteries was recognized in 1946 by Palubinskas and Ripley.
Patient registry is demonstrating to be essential in cataloguing the clinical features, symptoms, severity, and outcomes of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), a non-inflammatory vascular disease.
Fibromuscular dysplasia answers are found in the Diagnosaurus powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Web.
Renal artery stenosis is a common finding in patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease (1). Among patients with renal artery stenosis, more than 90% are atherosclerotic in nature, which typically involves the ostium and the proximal portion of the main renal artery with plaque extending into the peri-renal aorta (1). The prevalence of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) increases with age, presence of diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Fibromuscular dysplasia, a distant second in the etiology of renal artery stenosis accounts for ,10% of cases and is typically seen in young and middle-aged women. As opposed to ARAS, fibromuscular dysplasia usually affects the distal two-thirds of the main renal artery with a characteristic beaded angiographic appearance. Based on epidemiological data, ARAS appears to be a relatively common clinical finding and is present in ∼6.8% of patients over the age of 65 years (2) and in ,50% of ...
The most common primary renal diseases of the renal arteries are atherosclerotic RAS and fibromuscular dysplasia. These lesions are associated with two common syndromes-namely, hypertension and ischaemic nephropathy. Fibromuscular dysplasia accounts for 10% of these stenoses, the rest being atherosclerotic. The prevalence of RAS in atherosclerotic patients increases with age, particularly in patients with diabetes, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease.9 The existing data on the prevalence of renovascular hypertension are based on necropsy findings and angiography carried out owing to renovascular hypertension. Renovascular hypertension accounts for about 5% of the American hypertensive population.2 Several studies have shown a correlation between increasing age and the presence of renal artery atherosclerosis.2,10 Bacha et al described an increased prevalence of renovascular disease (20%) in patients with diabetes and hypertension.11,12 The mean age ...
This accounts for 80% of renal cases and most carotid cases. Regions of thick, fibrodysplastic, collagenized tunica media alternate with regions of thinned media. The result is the classic string-of... more
Although FMD can be controlled successfully, there is no cure. For some patients, FMD may be a recurring condition that requires lifelong monitoring by your physician. Depending on your individual case, we may recommend follow-up visits at a frequent occurrence at first, and then ultimately once or twice a year. Because FMD can increase the risk of high blood pressure, impaired kidney function, aneurysm, stroke and other complications, we carefully watch patients for these possible complications. We collaborate with specialists who are knowledgeable about the implications of FMD on other aspects of your life. If needed, we can also refer you for:. ...
The increased incidence of FMD in women as compared with men suggests a possible hormonal or genetic influence. Some authors have proposed the sex difference to be related to immune system functioning... more
Research in the C. John Sperati Lab focuses on hypertension and kidney diseases. Topics of recent studies include novel treatments for these conditions, secondary hypertension and the genetic epidemiology of chronic kidney disease. Within the area of hypertension, we are particularly interested fibromuscular dysplasia, hyperaldosteronism, atherosclerotic renal arterial disease and genetic hypertensive syndromes.. Research Areas: kidney diseases, fibromuscular dysplasia, hypertension, hyperaldosteronism, atherosclerosis ...
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Question - Fibromuscular displasia in arteries leading to kidneys. Will a stent open blockage and reduce BP?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Renal artery stenosis, Ask a Cardiologist
Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic noninflammatory vascular disease that primarily affects women from age 20 to 60, but may also occur in ...
Disease affecting the arterial supply to the kidneys, leading to ischaemia and resultant stimulation of the renin-*angiotensin-aldosterone axis. In the major vessels, the most common cause is atheromatous plaque disease. Other causes are fibromuscular dysplasia and Takayasus disease. ...
Yet another related disorder causing hypertension is glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism, which is an autosomal dominant disorder in which the increase in aldosterone secretion produced by ACTH is no longer transient, causing of primary hyperaldosteronism, the Gene mutated will result in an aldosterone synthase that is ACTH-sensitive, which is normally not.[22][23][24][25][26] GRA appears to be the most common monogenic form of human hypertension.[27] Compare these effects to those seen in Conns disease, an adrenocortical tumor which causes excess release of aldosterone,[28] that leads to hypertension.[29][30][31] Another adrenal related cause is Cushings syndrome which is a disorder caused by high levels of cortisol. Cortisol is a hormone secreted by the cortex of the adrenal glands. Cushings syndrome can be caused by taking glucocorticoid drugs, or by tumors that produce cortisol or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).[32] More than 80% of patients with Cushings syndrome develop ...
Design: Blinded comparison of CTA and MRA with confirmatory DSA (Renal Artery Diagnostic Imaging Study in Hypertension [RADISH] study). Setting: 6 hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients: 356 hypertensive patients 18 to 75 years of age (mean age 52 y, 52% men) with diastolic blood pressure , 95 mm Hg were routinely screened for RAS, and had ≥ 1 predefined clinical clue indicating RAS. Exclusion criteria were known allergy to iodinated contrast agents; pregnancy; and contraindications to MRA, CTA, or DSA. Description of tests: CTA, MRA, and DSA were done within a 3-month period for each patient; no intervention was done before testing was complete. The degree of stenosis was determined by the diameter of the most severely affected part of a renal artery measured and related to the reference diameter (diameter of a representative nonaffected portion of the artery beyond the site of poststenotic dilatation [if present]). Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was diagnosed when multiple aneurysms separated ...
Expertise, Disease and Conditions: Atherosclerotic Renovascular Disease, Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), Electrolyte Disorders, Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD), Glomerulonephritis, Hyperaldosteronism, Hypertension, Nephrology, Renal Artery ...
Renal artery stenosis is a disease in which renal artery get narrow due to fibromuscular dysplasia or atherosclerosis. In this state renal artery can impede blood flow and leads to renal failure. Now we will talk about that what is renal- renal means anything related to kidney so renal arteries are those arteries, which carries Read more ...
Renal artery stenosis is a disease in which renal artery get narrow due to fibromuscular dysplasia or atherosclerosis. In this state renal artery can impede blood flow and leads to renal failure. Now we will talk about that what is renal- renal means anything related to kidney so renal arteries are those arteries, which carries Read more ...
The string of beads sign is the description typically given to the appearance of the renal artery in fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) but may also be used to describe the appearance of splanchnic arteries in segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM). It r...
The complex anatomy of the carotid space within a small confined area is unique to the head and neck and allows for a vast array of pathology. This paper will review the anatomy of the carotid space from the skull base to the thorax, defining its borders at multiple levels, as well as its contents. The paper will also describe the myriad of mass lesions and vascular pathologies that may occur within the carotid space. The discussion will include anatomic considerations in differential diagnoses, imaging features, and lesion characteristics across multiple imaging modalities including CT, MRI, ultrasound, and conventional angiography. Entities discussed include paragangliomas, nerve sheath tumors, meningioma, fibromuscular dysplasia, carotidynia, thrombus, dissection, pseudoaneurysm, and pathology of the deep cervical chain lymph nodes. Understanding the complex and unique anatomy of the carotid space, as well as the nuances of navigating a broad differential, will empower the reader to make an accurate
People usually arent born with aneurysms. Most develop after age 40. Aneurysms usually develop at branching points of arteries and are caused by constant pressure from blood flow. They often enlarge slowly and become weaker as they grow, just as a balloon becomes weaker as it stretches. Aneurysms may be associated with other types of blood vessel disorders, such as fibromuscular dysplasia, cerebral arteritis or arterial dissection, but these are very unusual. They may run in families, but people are rarely born with a predisposition for aneurysms. Some aneurysms are due to infections, drugs such as amphetamines and cocaine that damage the brains blood vessels, or direct brain trauma from an accident. ...
obesity (3) Cardiovascular disease (2) Diabetes (2) FMD (2) Free H1N1 ebook (2) H1N1 (2) Hypoglycemia Cure (2) LDL (2) Lipids (2) Serotonin (2) Swine Flu (2) Swine Flu Ebook (2) Treatment of Obesity (2) blood pressure (2) cholesterol (2) fibromuscular dysplasia (2) high blood pressure (2) insulin (2) kidney failure (2) stroke (2) 1. Resistance Training (1) ALTERNATE HIP BATH (1) Acne Causes (1) Acne Problems (1) Acne Skincare (1) Acne Symptoms (1) Acute Bronchitis (1) Adult Dyslexia (1) Allergies Causes (1) Allergies Symptoms (1) Allergy Cures (1) Allergy Remedies (1) Anaemia Symptoms (1) Anaemia Treatment (1) Appendicitis Treatment (1) Appendix Symptoms (1) Asthma Allergies (1) Asthma Bronchitis (1) Asthma Cause (1) Asthma Remedies (1) Asthma Symptoms (1) Asthma Therapy (1) Asthma Treatments (1) Atherosclerosis (1) Autism (1) Backache (1) Backache Causes (1) Backache Relief (1) Backache Symptoms (1) Backache Treatment (1) Bleeding Piles (1) Body Detox (1) Body Detoxification (1) Body Exercises ...
The authors reported an extremely rare case of bilateral spontaneous vertebro-vertebral arteriovenous fistulas (VVAVFs) associated with fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). A 53-year-old hypertensive woman has been placed on antiplatelet drug following diagnosis of supratentorial ischemic stroke for 2 years. Few months before hospitalization, she developed bilateral audible bruits and progressive spastic quadriparesis.
The status of the blood vessels at the time of ANY consultation, may be either healthy OR unhealthy. Unfortunately, without sophisticated equipment, there is no way of knowing whether vessels may be weak or suffering from underlying disease such as fibromuscular dysplasia or atherosclerosis (rare in the younger patient). This is one of the reasons that manipulation in particular, has been called into question. At best the science remains equivocal. A recent systematic review found no association and suggested that, "the relative risk of ICA dissection after cervical spine manipulation compared with other health care interventions for neck pain, back pain, or headache is unknown". However, critics argue that spinal manipulation to the neck may injure vessels, leading to stroke. ...
In the control arm, an initial Transonic measurement pre-treatment will be performed. The interventionalist will select the most significant lesion based on angiographic appearances and treat this lesion, which may require use of multiple balloons for the same lesion. At this point a Transonics measurement will be taken - Measurement A. The results will not be revealed to the interventionalist, who will proceed with the procedure as per their standard practice. A Transonics measurement will be taken after treatment of each of the significant lesions identified at the start of the exam. A post-procedural Transonics measurement (Measurement X) will also be taken, again the interventionalist will blinded as to this result. The appearances on completion angiography will be recorded as percentage stenosis remaining ...
Looking for online definition of fibromuscular hyperplasia in the Medical Dictionary? fibromuscular hyperplasia explanation free. What is fibromuscular hyperplasia? Meaning of fibromuscular hyperplasia medical term. What does fibromuscular hyperplasia mean?
Background: Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is an idiopathic, systemic, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory vascular disease leading to stenosis, aneurysms, dissections and occlusion of small and medium-sized arteries, with possible life-threatening complications. Recent data suggest that FMD is not so rare as previously thought, showing a prevalence up to 4%, but it is mostly undiagnosed. FMD mainly involves renal and internal carotid arteries, thus its clinical manifestations include hypertension and stroke. However, increasing evidence from large registries point out that FMD is a systemic disease, with a very high prevalence of multiple districts involvement.. Vascular Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (V-EDS) is a rare vascular disease (prevalence 1/150000), due to heterozygous mutations of COL3A1 gene, coding for collagen tipe III, with dominant autosomic transmission. V-EDS patients are predisposed to spontaneous ruptures in the vascular, intestinal districts and in many others.. In FMD, vascular ...
Clinical features of carotid artery dissection include ipsilateral local signs, contralateral ischemic stroke, or both. We observed two patients in whom these features were associated with renal infarcts.. A 57-year-old woman had painful Horners syndrome caused by a right internal carotid artery dissection. On days 3 and 4 she had acute abdominal pain, first on the right side and later on the left. The computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a left renal infarct. No aortic dissection or cardiac source of embolism was found. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a mild dystrophy of the ascending aorta and of the mitral valve. Cerebral angiography showed irregularities of the V3 segment of the left vertebral artery compatible with fibromuscular dysplasia. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 100 mm/h, and she complained of intense fatigue. She fully recovered within 3 months. A 53-year-old man had sudden severe abdominal pain followed by headache and difficulty in swallowing. He had 9th, 10th, ...
Suspicion of secondary hyperaldosteronism is raised by moderate to severe hypertension that is relatively unresponsive to therapy, combined with evidence of renovascular disorders or diagnoses that may be associated with renovascular disorders. Abdominal bruits serve as a clinical sign of vascular stenosis. Difference in kidney size or unexplained renal insufficiency also raises clinical suspicion. Most patients with hypertension have essential hypertension of unknown cause, but renovascular hypertension is one of the more common forms of secondary hypertension. In adults younger than 30 years of age, renal artery stenosis may result from fibromuscular dysplasia of renal vessels. In patients older than 50 years of age, atherosclerosis is the leading cause; less frequent causes are renal artery aneurysm, renal vascular thrombosis, and other processes, such as vasculitis affecting renal vessels. Occasionally, external masses may compress the renal artery. Rarely, renin is produced by renal tumors. ...
Acute renal infarction is rare, with a documented incidence of between 0.004% to 0.007% of hospital admissions; however, the true incidence is almost certainly higher, as the condition is easy to miss and misdiagnose. Most cases are encountered between the sixth or seventh decades of life, with men and women equally affected. In 2% to 20% of instances, bilateral infarcts are found. The primary pathology of renal infarction is occlusion of the renal artery and/or its branches, resulting in infarction and ischemic death of the affected parenchyma. This may occur via several mechanisms: thromboembolism, in-situ thrombosis, renal artery stenosis, and drugs. Atrial fibrillation is the most common cause of thromboembolism; other important etiolgoies include valvular heart disease, and infective endocarditis. In-situ thrombosis may occur in the case of an atherosclerotic renal artery, or in the presence of a hypercoagulable state. Renal arterial stenosis may result from fibromuscular dysplasia, renal ...
1. eligible patients aged between 30-80 years; intracranial arterial stenosis related to the following non-atherosclerotic factors will be not be considered: arterial dissection, moya-moya disease; vasculitic disease; herpes zoster, varicella zoster or other viral vasculopathy; neurosyphilis; any other intracranial infection; any intracranial stenosis associated with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis; radiation-induced vasculopathy; fibromuscular dysplasia; sickle cell disease; neurofibromatosis; benign angiopathy of central nervous system; postpartum angiopathy; suspected vasospastic process, and suspected recanalized embolus ...
Top 10 tissues for 204420_at (Homo sapiens, Affymetrix Probeset): pulmonary (lung) myofibroblast, pulmonary (lung) mucosa cell, uterine myometrium myocyte, breast (mammary gland) stroma cell, meniscal cell, urinary bladder stromal fibromuscular cell, chondrocyte, conjunctival epithelium cell (sp.), reconstructed epidermal model, urinary bladder urothelium (epithelium) cell
OBJECTIVES: To present a modified technique in artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) placement that is associated with low rates of erosion and infection in a high-risk population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: After Institutional Review Board approval, we identified patients who underwent primary AUS placement using the modified technique between January 2007 and November 2015. Our modification consists of preserving the dorsolateral fibromuscular tissue surrounding the bulbar urethra and horizontally transecting the ventral bulbospongiosus muscle during urethral cuff placement. Preoperative variables such as radiotherapy (RT) and bladder neck contractures were recorded. Effectiveness and complications including infections, erosions, and re-operations were recorded at follow-up. RESULTS: The new technique was used on 208 patients: 40% had a history of RT, including 15% who had had a salvage radical prostatectomy; 26% had had previous bladder neck contractures. No patients developed infection. Overall, erosion
Renal artery stenosis (RAS,renal artery narrowing) is the narrowing of the lining of the main artery that supplies the kidney. RAS is the most common cause of secondary hypertension (high blood pressure produced by another disorder) in patients with kidney disease. Secondary hypertension is called renal vascular hypertension (RVH). Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis (AS-RAS) is due to the build-up of cholesterol on the inner lining of the renal artery. Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD).
Background: Spontaneous cervicocephalic artery dissection (sCAD) of more than two cervical arteries is rare.. Patients and methods: Vascular and potential sCAD risk factors, triggering events, clinical and neuroimaging findings, and outcome of patients with multiple sCAD were studied. Patients were drawn from prospective hospital-based sCAD registries.. Results: Of 740 consecutive patients with sCAD, 11 (1.5%) had three, and one had four (0.1%) sCAD. Eight of these 12 patients were women. One patient had additional dissections of the celiac trunk and hepatic artery. Vascular risk factors included hypertension (n = 1), hypercholesterolaemia (n = 6), current smoking (n = 5) and migraine (n = 6). No patient had a family history of sCAD, fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) or connective tissue disease. SCAD was preceded by a minor trauma in five and infection in four patients. Clinical manifestations included ischaemic stroke (n = 8), transient ischaemic attack (n = 3), headache (n = 9), neck pain (n = ...
Splenic artery aneurysm (SAA) is defined as an abnormal dilatation of the splenic artery more than 1 cm in diameter. It was first described on cadavers in 1770 by Beaussier [7]. It accounts for approximately 60 % of all visceral arterial aneurysms [2]. It is the third most common intra-abdominal aneurysm, following aortic and iliac artery aneurysms [3]. SAA is rarely seen with a prevalence of 1 % [1]. It is four times more common in females compared to males [8-10]. Risk factors correlating to the development of SAA include fibromuscular dysplasia, collagen vascular diseases, female gender, history of multiple pregnancies, and portal hypertension, although the pathogenesis is not fully understood [11].. Splenic artery pseudoaneurysms are less prevalent than true SAA. They differ from true SAA in that the dilatation occurs following the disruption of one or more layers of the vessel wall. Splenic artery accounts for the majority of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms. Unlike true SAA, they have a slight ...