Ingenol was identified as a constituent in Euphorbia ingens in 1968 (9). Subsequently, a wide range of macrocyclic diterpenoids have been isolated from Euphorbia exhibiting a high diversity in backbone structures, oxygenation levels, stereoisomerism, and esterification patterns (1). According to different stages of cyclization of their C20 backbones, macrocyclic diterpenoids can be classified into two groups: simple bicyclic casbene type and further cyclized types. The latter includes jatrophanes, lathyranes, tiglianes, daphnanes, and ingenanes ranked according to their increased structural complexity (Fig. 1). Although jatrophanes are widespread in Euphorbia, only very few Euphorbia species have been reported to accumulate ingenanes (1). Currently the commercially most interesting species is Euphorbia lathyris L., a plant native to the Mediterranean area. E. lathyris L. contains both esterified lathyrane and ingenane derivatives (known as Euphorbia factors or L-factors) in the seed oil (10). A ...
In indigenous or folk medicine, Euphorbia hirta is a very popular herb and used as a palliative to treat various ailments including intestinal parasites, diarrhoea, vomiting, amoebic dysentery, asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, coughs, kidney stones, menstrual problems etc. The objective of this study is to evaluate the anxiolytic and sedative-like effects of the methanol extract from the leaves of Euphorbia hirta (Euphorbiaceae). Methanolic extract of Euphorbia hirta was evaluated for its CNS depression effect using mice behavioral models such as, elevated plus maze and hole board test for its anxiolytic potential where hole cross and pentobarbital-induced sleeping time tests were performed for its sedative properties, respectively. The test group received three different doses of the MEHL (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) orally. The positive control group received diazepam (1 mg/kg) orally where the negative control group received distilled water (10 ml/kg) orally. In elevated plus maze test, the
Six multinucleate and two binucleate strains of Rhizoctonia spp. pathogenic to the weed leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) were compared in aggressiveness. Pathogenicity was tested by inoculating stems of leafy spurge or planting roots or seeds in soil infested with Rhizoctonia strains (8 cfu/g). Two multinucleate strains were significantly more virulent on roots of leafy spurge than the other strains. Eleven cultivated plant species were found to be susceptible to at least one of the eight Rhizoctonia strains, having mean disease ratings significantly different (P = 0.05) from those of control plants. Two or more strains caused significantly different mean disease ratings in eight of these host species, indicating that there was variation among strains. Four strains had equally broad host ranges of six plant species, but their respective host ranges were not identical. The two binucleate strains, which ranked lowest in overall aggressiveness to leafy spurge, also had relatively narrow host ranges ...
Euphorbia Helioscopia specifications & features from suppliers/manufacturer The efficacy of euphorbia helioscopia is diuretic and lose weight, dispel fever,kill insects and prevent itch. For ascites, edema, tuberculosis, cervical lymphnodes, ringworm sores.Package: cardboard drums, with double aseptic food poly bags inside.
Euphorbia tithymaloides is a perennial succulent spurge. An erect shrub, the plant is also known by the scientific name Pedilanthus tithymaloides. However, the genus Pedilanthus has been submerged into the genus Euphorbia, and is more correctly known by its new name (Euphorbia tithymaloides). Euphorbia tithymaloides has a large number of household names used by gardeners and the public. Among them are redbird flower, devils-backbone, buck-thorn, cimora misha, christmas candle, fiddle flower, ipecacuahana, Jacobs ladder, Japanese poinsettia, Jews slipper, Jewbush, milk-hedge, myrtle-leaved spurge, Padus-leaved clipper plant, red slipper spurge, redbird cactus, slipper flower, slipper plant, slipper spurge, timora misha, and zig-zag plant. In other parts of the world, it is known as gin-ryu (Japan); pokok lipan and penawar lipan (Indonesia); airi, baire, and agia (India); aperejo (Yoruba); sapatinho do diabo (Brazil); itamo real (Puerto Rico); pantoufle (France); and zapatilla del diablo ...
Euphorbia Linnaeus, 1753 (Euphorbiaceae) is one of the most diverse and complex genera among the angiosperms, showing a huge diversity in morphologic traits and ecologic patterns. In order to improve the knowledge of the karyotype organization of Euphorbia hirta (2n = 18) and E. hyssopifolia (2n = 12), cytogenetic studies were performed by means of conventional staining with Giemsa, genome size estimations with flow cytometry, heterochromatin differentiation with chromomycin A3 (CMA) and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and Giemsa C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 45S and 5S rDNA probes, and impregnation with silver nitrate (AgNO3). Our results revealed small metacentric chromosomes, CMA+/DAPI0 heterochromatin in the pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes and CMA+/DAPI− in the distal part of chromosome arms carriers of nucleolar organizing regions (NORs). The DNA content measurements revealed small genomes for both species: E. hirta with 2C = 0.77 pg and E. hyssopifolia
Background: Euphorbia plants are traditionally used in folk medicine for infections, inflammation, and cancer. Objectives: To investigate the effects of the butanolic extracts of Euphorbia micorociadia and Euphorbia osyridea on specific transcription factors and cytokines expression of T cell subsets. Methods: Activated mouse splenocytes were cultured in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts. Cells were evaluated for the gene expressions of T cell transcription factors and cytokines of T helper (Th)1 [T-bet and interferon gamma (IFNγ)], Th17 [retinoic acid receptor related orphan receptor (RORγt) and interleukin (IL)-17], and T regulatory (Treg) cells [forkhead box P3(Foxp3), IL-10, and Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β] using real-time PCR. The cytokine secretions were evaluated by ELISA and Foxp3 protein expression by flow cytometry. Results: Both E. osyridea and E. microciadia extracts at 0.1 μg/ml increased T-bet expression [|1.73 relative fold change (RFC), p|0.05] and
... Manufacturer Exporter & Supplier in Tamil Nadu India- YR Success E & I is a best Manufacturer Exporter & Supplier of Euphorbia Pilurifera in Tamil Nadu, Euphorbia Pilurifera Supplier Tamil Nadu, Euphorbia Pilurifera Manufacturing Company in India.
Dichloromethane-methanol (1:1 ratio) extract and petroleumether extract of Euphorbia tirucalli L latex was investigated for anthelmintic activity. The..
Euphorbia helioscopia (sun spurge) is a species of flowering plant in the spurge family Euphorbiaceae. It is a herbaceous annual plant, native to most of Europe, northern Africa, and eastward through most of Asia. Other old folk names include wart spurge, umbrella milkweed and "madwomans milk". It is an annual plant growing in arable land and disturbed ground. It grows to 10-50 cm tall, with a single, erect, hairless stem, branching toward the top. The leaves are oval, broadest near the tip, 1.5-3 cm long, with a finely toothed margin. The flowers are small, yellow-green, with two to five basal bracts similar to the leaves but yellower; flowering lasts from mid spring to late summer. It is highly poisonous. Active ingredients are extracted from it for use in pharmaceutical industry. It is also a plant used in Chinese traditional medicine. Its extract has been found to be an inhibitor in vivo of hepatocellular carcinoma in mice and in vitro in humans. E. helioscopia contains the jatrophone-type ...
Gatas-gatas, tawa-tawa, Euphorbia hirta: Philippine herbal medicine - An illustrated compilation of Philippine medicinal plants by Dr Godfofredo Stuart, with botanical information, properties, folkloric use and medicinal research studies
APG IV Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • (unranked): Archaeplastida • Regnum: Plantae • Cladus: angiosperms • Cladus: eudicots • Cladus: core eudicots • Cladus: superrosids • Cladus: rosids • Cladus: eurosids I • Cladus: COM • Ordo: Malpighiales • Familia: Euphorbiaceae • Subfamilia: Euphorbioideae • Tribus: Euphorbieae • Genus: Euphorbia • Species: Euphorbia caput-medusae Linné ...
APG IV Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • (unranked): Archaeplastida • Regnum: Plantae • Cladus: angiosperms • Cladus: eudicots • Cladus: core eudicots • Cladus: superrosids • Cladus: rosids • Cladus: eurosids I • Cladus: COM • Ordo: Malpighiales • Familia: Euphorbiaceae • Subfamilia: Euphorbioideae • Tribus: Euphorbieae • Genus: Euphorbia • Species: Euphorbia capsaintemariensis Rchb., 1832 ...
APG IV Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • (unranked): Archaeplastida • Regnum: Plantae • Cladus: angiosperms • Cladus: eudicots • Cladus: core eudicots • Cladus: superrosids • Cladus: rosids • Cladus: eurosids I • Cladus: COM • Ordo: Malpighiales • Familia: Euphorbiaceae • Subfamilia: Euphorbioideae • Tribus: Euphorbieae • Genus: Euphorbia • Species: Euphorbia damarana L.C.Leach , 1975 ...
APG IV Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • (unranked): Archaeplastida • Regnum: Plantae • Cladus: angiosperms • Cladus: eudicots • Cladus: core eudicots • Cladus: superrosids • Cladus: rosids • Cladus: eurosids I • Cladus: COM • Ordo: Malpighiales • Familia: Euphorbiaceae • Subfamilia: Euphorbioideae • Tribus: Euphorbieae • Genus: Euphorbia • Species: Euphorbia pentagona Haw. 1828 ...
Mutualisms, or mutually beneficial species interactions (+/+), play a key role in ecological community functioning, influencing community stability and biological diversity. Despite their importance in ecological processes, the study of mutualism has limitations. First, seemingly positive interactions are often considered mutualisms without proper evaluation of the interaction consequences to both partners involved. Second, studies on mutualism often focus on a single life history stage, yet organisms often engage in multiple forms of mutualism during their lifetime (e.g., many plants rely on pollinators and seed dispersers). My research addressed these limitations in mutualism research by investigating (1) the outcomes of interaction between an invasive plant (Euphorbia esula L., Euphorbiaceae) and the native ant community during both the seed and flowering plant stages, and (2) how both the ant and plant benefit from myrmecochory (ant-mediated seed dispersal). My research had three main ...
USDA, ARS, Germplasm Resources Information Network. Euphorbia esula in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Accessed on 08-Apr-12 ...
Euphorbia marginata (2012 season) ハツユキソウ(初雪草)の花 英名:Snow-on-the-mountain トウダイグサ科 Euphorbiaceae トウダイグサ属 Euphorbia 白い総苞の中に五つの蜜線と複数の雄蕊の花と一つの雌蕊の花、 トウダイグサ科特有の花の構成ですが、この写真の花には 雌蕊が見当たらず、雄蕊だけの不稔花のよう。(結実率は悪くない) 毎年、前年に採取した種を春に蒔き、発芽率も悪くないのですが、 双葉を食害されて消えてしまうことも多く、 また、育ちもあまり良くないので、来年はある程度大きくなるまで 苗床で育ててみようかと思います。 tags: flowers 花
62. Euphorbia pekinensis Ruprecht in Maximowicz, Prim. Fl. Amur. 239. 1859. 大戟 da ji Euphorbia barbellata Hurusawa; E. cavaleriei H. Léveillé & Vaniot; E. hurusawae Oudejans; E. hurusawae var. imaii (Hurusawa) Oudejans; E. imaii Hurusawa; E. jesonii Oudejans; E. kitagawae (Hurusawa) Kitagawa; E. labbei H. Léveillé; E. lanceolata T. N. Liou; E. lasiocaula Boissier; E. lasiocaula var. pseudolucorum Hurusawa; E. sinensis Jesson; E. sampsonii Hance; E. tchen-ngoi (Soják) Radcliffe-Smith; E. virgata Waldstein & Kitaibel var. kitagawae Hurusawa; Tithymalus tchen-ngoi Soják.. Herbs, perennial, 40-80(-90) cm tall. Rootstock vertical, cylindric, 20-30 cm × 6-14 mm thick, sometimes branched. Stems single or clustered, 3-6(-7) mm thick, upper parts 4- or 5-branched, pilose or glabrous. Leaves alternate; stipules absent; petiole absent or nearly so; leaf blade very variable, usually elliptic, occasionally lanceolate, narrowly oblong or oblanceolate, rarely linear, 3-7(-9.5) × 0.7-1.7(-2.4) cm, ...
Synonyms for Aplarina in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Aplarina. 63 words related to spurge: Euphorbia, genus Euphorbia, caper spurge, Euphorbia lathyris, myrtle spurge, mole plant, Euphorbia helioscopia, sun spurge, wartweed. What are synonyms for Aplarina?
Citation: Horvath, D.P., Kudrna, D., Talag, J., Anderson, J.V., Chao, W.S., Wing, R., Foley, M.E., Dogramaci, M. 2013. BAC library development, and clone characterization for dormancy-responsive DREB4A, DAM, and FT from leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) identifies differential splicing and conserved promoter motifs. Weed Science. 61(2):303-309. Interpretive Summary: We have developed a new tool for examining the genome of the invasive perennial weed leafy spurge. Specifically, we have developed a collection of DNA fragments from the leafy spurge genome that each spans about 143,000 bases with enough fragments to cover the leafy spurge genome 5 times over. Each fragment has been cloned into bacteria for easy retrieval and also has been spotted out on a membrane to allow one to clone any gene of interest. We have used these membranes to identify and sequence fragments that contained one of several genes that are likely to play some role in controlling dormancy of buds in leafy spurge. We have ...
The Atlas of Florida Plants provides a source of information for the distribution of plants within the state and taxonomic information. The website also provides access to a database and images of herbarium specimens found at the University of South Florida and other herbaria.
Euphorbia Blue Haze (Blue Haze Spurge) is a fantastic evergreen with cool-blue foliage and bright chartreuse-yellow flowers in late spring; thrives in poor soil
Plantes (hors orchidées),Euphorbiaceae,Euphorbia flavicoma DC. subsp. flavicoma,Euphorbe, Observatoire du Patrimoine Naturel du Gard, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
Euphorbia myrsinites is identified as a noxious weed and/or invasive species in some regions. Its cultivation is illegal in the U.S. state of Colorado, where it is classified as a Class A noxious weed, and landowners are legally required to eradicate it.[10]. Myrtle spurge is also classified as a noxious weed in the U.S. state of Oregon, subject to quarantine.[11]. It was listed as a noxious weed in Salt Lake County, Utah in 2007, and since has been illegal for sale within the county.[12] Salt Lake County landowners and land managers are legally responsible to contain, control, or eradicate the species on their property. The Utah Native Plant Society has also formally recommended it be listed as a Utah state noxious weed. ...
Euphorbia aff. Viridis (Klotzsch & Garcke) boiss, a plant species belonging to the Euphorbiaceae family, is one of the most diverse of the American continent, and is used in multiple treatments in ancestral medicine in the Ecuadorian Andes. In the present study organic compounds extracted from the leaves of the plant were analyzed. The description and taxonomic classification of the plant was established. For the phytochemical study, phenols, tannins, saponins, coumarins, lactones and flavonoids were analyzed, and positive results were observed for each chemical compound, with the exception of alkaloid compounds. The chemical characterization by Gas Chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry GS-MS, showed 36.66% lanosterol, 12.25% β-sitosterol, 5.11% 3-β-cholest-4-en-3-ol, 4.73% Hexadecanoic acid as major elements. The microbiological assay of ethanolic extracts showed a 44% inhibition percentage on Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC70693) and 43% on Escherichia coli (ATCC10536) with an MIC of 30μl ...
The ethyl acetate partition of dried methanolic extract of aerial parts of Euphorbia microsciadia (Euphorbiaceae) afforded three pentacyclic triterpenes, betulinic acid (1) from lupane type, oleanolic acid (2) from oleane type and ursolic acid (3) from ursane type triterpenes that are reported for the first time in this plant. These three compounds were structurally compared through their mass fragmentation pattern, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data and their biologic immunomodulatory effects. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by 13C- and 1H-NMR as well as 2D-NMR, IR and by the aid of mass fragmentation pattern and comparing with the literature. After running T-Cell proliferation assay, oleanolic acid stimulated proliferation of T-Cells at lower concentration 0.5 µg/mL, while betulinic acid and ursolic acid showed inhibitory activity against T-Cell proliferation with IC50- value | 50 µg/mL and 3.01 ± 0.47 µg/mL, respectively.
Description: Euphorbia flanaganii is a low, spineless, many-branched, succulent to 5 cm tall and 30 cm wide. It is commonly known as Medusa plant, because its prostrate, snake like arms resemble locks of hairs. The central stem merges into roots forming an tuberous body (often called a caudex) with branches radiating from it. If you look down into a large specimen youll see what looks like a sun flower; its another example of a Fibonacci spiral. A properly grown plant is a joy, especially when it is in flower, for then each snaky finger is covered with fragrant yellow flowers and the cluster is exquisite. The whole plant produce a caustic milky sap that can cause skin rash, itching and general discomfort ...
The Euphorbia herb has been used in traditional medicines around the world for thousands of years. Research is now proving the validity of this medicinal use.
Antibacterial activity of aqueous and solvent extracts of Euphorbia cotinifolia leaves was tested against some human pathogenic bacteria, viz. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Enterobacter aerogenes and Staphylococcus aureus by agar cup diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Antioxidant properties were evaluated for different solvent extracts by di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide methods and IC50 values were calculated and compared with the standard ascorbic acid and butylated hydroxyanisole. Among the aqueous and organic solvent extracts, methanol and ethyl acetate showed significant activity against B. subtilis and E. aerogenes, which recorded a maximum inhibition zone of 17.25 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of methanol and ethyl acetate extracts for different bacteria ranged from 0.3-1.25 mg/mL. In DPPH method, IC50 values of chloroform, petroleum ether, ethyl ...
Euphorbia neohumbertii is an erect succulent plant, up to 3 feet (90 cm) tall with 4 sided stem and large green leaves. The leaves grow...
Canine mammary gland tumors (cMGTs) are the most common neoplasms in intact female canines and viewed as a suitable model for studying human breast cancers. Euphorbia royleana has been reported to have a variety of antitumor efficacies. We have prepared the crude extracts of E. royleana in ethanol and hexane solvents to evaluate the anti-tumor effects for cMGT in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that E. royleana could inhibit cell proliferation and colony formation in cMGT cells. The suppression of tumor cell growth resulted from necrosis and cell cycle arrest. Moreover, autophagy appears to play a critical role in E. royleana-mediated cell death by triggering cell apoptosis. The in vivo results also revealed that E. royleana treatment could reduce the size of solid tumors while exhibiting low toxicity in cMGT-bearing nude mice. The anti-tumor mechanisms of E. royleana were firstly verified to show it would cause autophagic cell death, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in canine mammary tumor cells.
This study was carried out to determine acute oral toxicity and histopathological effects associated with consumption of Euphorbia heterophylla ethanolic extract using 9 to 10 weeks old Albino mice randomized in six groups. The five groups were orally administered with single graded doses of plant extract at 1500, 2000, 2500, 3500 and 4000 mg/kg body weight while the sixth group was administered 1 ml of physiological saline and the animals were observed for toxicity signs and death. Viscera organs were obtained after cervical dislocation for histopathological assessment. The graded extracts induced dose-dependent toxicity signs with major clinical manifestation prior to death including: polyurea, circling, paralysis, thirst, loss of appetite and gait, tachypnea, dehydration and stupor. The major dose- dependent histopathological lesions included: Hemorrhages, congestion, peri-vascular degeneration and necrosis in viscera organs in the groups that received 2000 to 4000 mg/kg body weight. The 24 h
The current study was focused to investigate the phytochemical analysis, antibacterial and antifungal activity of plant extract of Euphorbia nallamalayana against different pathogens. Four solvent extracts
Read Some of the Major Health Benefits of Euphorbia that is Sure to Create Impact in the Lives of Many People Suffering from Various Health Conditions.
USDA, ARS, Germplasm Resources Information Network. Euphorbia attastoma in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Accessed on 08-Apr-12 ...
THE ANALYSIS OF STEVIA AND SUGAR ON THE SHELF LIFE AND THEIR POTENTIAL FOR DIABETICS IN NON-CARBONATED DRINK ABSTRACT The objective of this experiment i
With UK supermarket shelves currently full of poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), it can only mean one thing - Christmastime is upon us, and the traditional ornamental plant returns to our lives once more.. Cuttings, first planted in July, have been carefully nurtured to the point of perfection by expert horticulturalists, striving to bring poinsettia to their festive peak. Its distinctively-coloured bracts (not leaves) range from the usual red, to white, orange, or even marbled peach. The variety of colours is determined by levels of pigments known as anthocyanins. Predominant in tea, wine, and berries, anthocyanins are members of the flavonoid group of phytochemicals which have diverse roles in UV protection, metal ion regulation, and responses to nutrient deficiency1,2. Poinsettia bracts are often mistaken for petals because of their colour and arrangement near the tiny, pale yellow flowers (a cluster of cyathia). In fact, poinsettia bracts are actually modified leaves aggregated at the ...
Pathogenicity Groups of Bean Common Mosaic Virus Isolates in Kenya. Michael E. Omunyin. Pages: 985-989. VIEW ABSTRACT , VIEW ARTICLE. Vegetative Compatibility, Pathogenicity, and Virulence Diversity of Fusarium oxysporum Recovered from Spinach. M. B. Fiely. Pages: 990-993. VIEW ABSTRACT , VIEW ARTICLE. Host Range Determination of Myrothecium verrucaria Isolated from Leafy Spurge. Shawming Yang. Pages: 994-997. VIEW ABSTRACT , VIEW ARTICLE. Factors Influencing Pathogenicity of Myrothecium verrucaria Isolated from Euphorbia esula on Species of Euphorbia. Shawming Yang. Pages: 998-1002. VIEW ABSTRACT , VIEW ARTICLE. Purification of Barley Yellow Streak Mosaic Virus and Detection by DAS-ELISA and ISEM Using Polyclonal Antibodies. Jihad S. Skaf. Pages: 1003-1007. VIEW ABSTRACT , VIEW ARTICLE. Response of Root-Knot Resistant Tobacco to Concomitant Populations of Meloidogyne Species. Tenson B. S. Ngambi. Pages: 1008-1013. VIEW ABSTRACT , VIEW ARTICLE. Occurrence of Puccinia graminis subsp, graminicola ...
ABSTRACT Powdery mildew disease on poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima) growing in commercial greenhouses was first observed in the United States in 1990 and has become an economically significant problem for poinsettia growers in the Midwest and northern United States since 1992. The temporal development of infection structures produced by conidial germ tubes of the pathogen (Oidium sp.) and the effect of high temperature on their development were investigated using poinsettia leaf disks placed in humidity chambers. Observations were made using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. At 20 degrees C (85% relative humidity), conidia germinated and formed an appressorium within 6 h of inoculation. Germination over time followed a monomolecular curve (r(2) = 0.77, P |/= 0.0001). Within 24 h postinoculation, germinated conidia had formed secondary germ tubes and a haustorium. The percentage of germinated conidia with appressoria and one or more secondary germ tubes increased linearly with time (r
Order: Malpighiales. Synonyms: Euphorbia officinarum. Poisonous Gum-Thistle. Dergmuse. Darkmous. Euphorbium Bush. Gun Euphorbium.. Habitat: Euphorbia resinifera grows in the slopes of the Great Atlas range in Morocco.. Description: Euphorbia resinifera is a leafless perennel shrub growing about 4 feet in height, resembling a cactus in appearance forming multi-stemmed cushion-shaped clumps up . It has many branches. The stems are erect, succulent, four-angled, with short but sharp pairs of 6 mm spines on the angles, spaced about 1 cm apart up the stem..CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES. The flowers are small, simple, and bright yellow, and the fruit a small capsule with one seed in each cell. Specimens sent to Kew in 1870 have never flowered, but others have done so in Paris. Both Pliny and Dioscorides knew the drug, and its name is classical.. The milky juice is collected from incisions made in the fleshy branches, and is so acrid that it burns the fingers. It flows down the stems and encrusts them as it ...
COMMON NAMES: Pill-bearing spurge, Snake-weed, Cats-hair, Queensland asthma-weed, Flowery-headed spurge.. Botanical Source.-A prostrate or ascending (erect, Coulter), pubescent, herbaceous annual, having a stem which forks at the base, bearing oblique, oblong-ovate, leaves, opposite, serrate, and acute at both ends. The flower-heads, which are cymose, minute, numerous, and crowded, are borne on a stalk which proceeds from only one leaf-axil. The involucres are minute and arranged in dense, short-stalked clusters, which are terminal. The gland-appendages are narrow or obsolete. The fruit is an acute-angled, hairy pod, inclosing the reddish 4-angled, transversely rugulose seeds.. History and Chemical Composition.-This plant is found in most tropical and subtropical regions. In the United States it grows throughout the gulf states to Texas and New Mexico (Coulter). This plant reaches a height of 10 to 15 inches, and has a red, fibrous root. The stalk, which is reddish, is covered with peculiar ...
These are the plants that may appear in our catalogue & is not the complete list. The complete list includes all the Family Myrtaceae. It was hoped this would be a short term measure…..but the authorities are in no rush to take action that would lead to lift the restriction.. There are other plants that are not permitted into WA for various reasons. We get all our plants approved by the State Dept of Agricultures when sending.. Here are a few more for your information.. Euphorbia species, Citrus species, Microcitrus species, Hibiscus species, Azalea species, Feijoa species, Vaccinium species Blueberry, Rhododendron, Vireya.. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. Save. ...
Habit: Annual to shrub [tree; fleshy, +- cactus-like], glabrous or hairy; sap milky; generally monoecious. Stem: prostrate to erect, generally < 1 m; branches arrayed around main stem(s) in 3-dimensions or 2-ranked, resulting in 2-faced stems with adaxial leaf faces all displayed to top side and abaxial leaf faces to bottom side. Leaf: proximal cauline, alternate or opposite, +- sessile to petioled; distal-most cauline in some species whorled, subtending umbel-like cluster of inflorescence branches, leafy bracts distal to whorled leaves generally opposite (whorled); stipules 0, gland-like, thread-like, or scale-like, free or fused, entire to divided; blade entire or toothed (pinnately lobed), base symmetric or asymmetric. Inflorescence: 1° inflorescence a cyathium, resembling a flower; cyathia 1--many, stalked or sessile, terminal (axillary), in generally leafy-bracted cyme-like arrays; cyathium a compact unit comprising an involucre of 5 fused bracts enclosing 1--many reduced staminate flowers ...
Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is an invasive perennial weed infesting range and recreational lands of North America. Previous research and omics projects with E. esula have helped develop it as a model for studying many aspects of perennial plant development and response to abiotic stress. However, the lack of an assembled genome for E. esula has limited the power of previous transcriptomics studies to identify functional promoter elements and transcription factor binding sites. An assembled genome for E. esula would enhance our understanding of signaling processes controlling plant development and responses to environmental stress and provide a better understanding of genetic factors impacting weediness traits, evolution, and herbicide resistance. A comprehensive transcriptome database would also assist in analyzing future RNA-seq studies and is needed to annotate and assess genomic sequence assemblies. Here, we assembled and annotated 56,234 unigenes from an assembly of 589,235 ...
Cactaceous columnar shrub up to 1,5 m. Erect quadrangular stems with coupled brown thorns, which contain a latex, denominated euphorbium, named after the Greek Physician Euforbus, that is extremely irritating in contact with the skin. Apart from using it as poison for the arrows, is has previously been used as purgative and vomitive, as well for as the treatment of abscesses or fistulas, but, given its toxicity, its use it home -made products has been left although it enters in the composition of products in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry and it continues being used in some places, as Egypt, in external use to combat the apoplexy. It blooms in spring and summer. Native from Morocco.. ...
Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Wen-Tsong Hsieh, Hui-Yi Lin, Jou-Hsuan Chen, Wen-Chung Lin, Yueh-Hsiung Kuo, W Gibson Wood, Hsu-Feng Lu, Jing-Gung Chung].
Most of the biomass in these plants is underground. Graham Williamson in his beautiful book "Richtersveld; the enchanted wilderness" has the following to say: "E. celata is a curious Namaqualand endemic which makes up for its lacklustre appearance by its botanical uniqueness. It grows almost secretly in hidden cracks in orange sandstone and is very difficult to detect ...
The Atlas of Florida Plants provides a source of information for the distribution of plants within the state and taxonomic information. The website also provides access to a database and images of herbarium specimens found at the University of South Florida and other herbaria.
The Atlas of Florida Plants provides a source of information for the distribution of plants within the state and taxonomic information. The website also provides access to a database and images of herbarium specimens found at the University of South Florida and other herbaria.