TY - JOUR. T1 - Amygdala response and functional connectivity during cognitive emotion regulation of aversive image sequences. AU - Sarkheil, Pegah. AU - Klasen, Martin. AU - Schneider, Frank. AU - Goebel, Rainer. AU - Mathiak, Klaus. PY - 2019/10. Y1 - 2019/10. N2 - Emotion regulation (ER) is crucial in terms of mental health and social functioning. Attention deployment (AD) and cognitive reappraisal (CR) are both efficient cognitive ER strategies, which are based on partially dissociated neural effects. Our understanding of the neural underpinnings of ER is based on laboratory paradigms that study changes of the brain activation related to isolated emotional stimuli. To track the neural response to ER in the changing and dynamic environment of daily life, we extended the common existing paradigms by applying a sequence of emotionally provocative stimuli involving three aversive images. Eighteen participants completed an ER paradigm, in which they had to either shift their attention away from ...
A model linking cognitions to emotional competence is presented and tested. The model is based on the four domains of Emotional Intelligence (Goleman, 2002) and on the theoretical framework of Rational-Emotive-Behavior Therapy (Ellis, 1962, 1994). In this respect, we expect irrational beliefs to be negatively associated with both emotional competence and job satisfaction. Furthermore, we expect emotional competence to be positively associated with job satisfaction. Additionally, it is proposed that irrational beliefs mediate emotional competences influence on job satisfaction. We test our hypotheses using data from two different studies. Study 1 collected data from 113 respondents that answered an experimental questionnaire study using organizational scenarios. Study 2 collected data through a questionnaire using the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI 2.0) as direct measure of emotional intelligence and competencies and an irrationality scale (Försterling & Bühner, 2003) as a measure for ...
The ventromedial prefrontal cortex has been implicated in a variety of emotion processes. However, findings regarding the role of this region specifically in emotion recognition have been mixed. We used a sensitive facial emotion recognition task to compare the emotion recognition performance of 7 subjects with lesions confined to ventromedial prefrontal regions, 8 subjects with lesions elsewhere in prefrontal cortex, and 16 healthy control subjects. We found that emotion recognition was impaired following ventromedial, but not dorsal or lateral, prefrontal damage. This impairment appeared to be quite general, with lower overall ratings or more confusion between all six emotions examined. We also explored the relationship between emotion recognition performance and the ability of the same patients to experience transient happiness and sadness during a laboratory mood induction. We found some support for a relationship between sadness recognition and experience. Taken together, our results ...
What role do emotions play with regards to employee engagement?. Experiencing positive emotions can raise well being, encourage creativity and broaden thinking. Experiencing negative emotions can lead to anti social behaviour, narrower thinking and negativity.. All emotions are part of day to day life but the balance and the context in which we experience them are critical. The data say that when considering positive emotions, more is better. The data also say that when considering negative emotions, less is better, down to a point. Negativity can either promote healthy functioning or kill it, depending on its contextual appropriateness and dosage relative to positive emotions. Barbara Fredrickson, 2013. This raises a number of questions: what are organisations today doing to increase positive emotions and limit negative emotions? Are leaders aware of these concepts? And, if so, do they pay them any credence? How does how people feel, emotionally, impact employee engagement in an ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Trauma-Related Cognitions and Cognitive Emotion Regulation as Mediators of PTSD Change Among Treatment-Seeking Active-Duty Military Personnel With PTSD. AU - For the STRONG STAR Consortium. AU - McLean, Carmen P.. AU - Zang, Yinyin. AU - Gallagher, Thea. AU - Suzuki, Noah. AU - Yarvis, Jeffrey S.. AU - Litz, Brett T.. AU - Mintz, Jim. AU - Young-McCaughan, Stacey. AU - Peterson, Alan L.. AU - Foa, Edna B.. N1 - Funding Information: Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Defense through the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Research Program awards W81XWH-08-02-109 (Alan L. Peterson), W81XWH-08-02-0111 (Edna B. Foa), and W81XWH-08-02-0114 (Brett T. Litz). Role of the funding source: The grant sponsor played no role in study design; the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; the writing of this paper; or the decision to submit ...
The social brain undergoes developmental change during adolescence, and pubertal hormones are hypothesized to contribute to this development. We used fMRI to explore how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to brain activity during a social emotion task. Forty-two females aged 11.1 to 13.7 years underwent fMRI scanning while reading scenarios pertaining either to social emotions, which require the representation of another persons mental states, or to basic emotions, which do not. Pubertal stage and menarcheal status were used to assign girls to early or late puberty groups. Across the entire sample, the contrast between social versus basic emotion resulted in activity within the social brain network, including dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC), the posterior superior temporal sulcus, and the anterior temporal cortex (ATC) in both hemispheres. Increased hormone levels (independent of age) were associated with
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Human Emotions: A Reader brings together a collection of articles which give an approach to the fast-growing field of empirical and theoretical research on emotions. The volume includes classic writings from Darwin, James and Freud chosen to show their current significance, together with articles from contemporary research literature. The articles give a broad coverage of the subject and include selections from cross-cultural, biological, social, developmental and clinical areas of study.Human Emotions: A Reader begins with an overall introduction to both the volume and subject area by the Editors. Each of the six sections of the book, and each article are introduced, contextualizing and relating these articles to comparable research.The volume is organized to correspond with the structure and coverage of Understanding Emotions written by Keith Oatley and Jennifer M. Jenkins (also published by Blackwell). It can also be used independently allowing instructors to teach courses on emotions with their own
Downloadable! A field study performed at the end of multiday hospital stays investigated trend effects on retrospective global judgments of emotions. Subjects (43 women and 50 men) reported instances of their positive and negative emotions, retrospective global judgments of these emotions, and satisfaction with hospital services. Retrospective global judgments of positive and negative emotions were a positive function of the increase or decrease of the instances of emotions over time. Consistent with predictions based on the literature on gender differences in information processing, mens retrospective judgments of positive emotions were highly sensitive to trend effects but no trend effect was found for negative emotions. In contrast, women demonstrated trend effects primarily in judgments of negative emotions. Trends in positive and negative emotions, however, did not significantly contribute to satisfaction judgements for men and women. Theoretical and managerial implications of the results are
TY - JOUR. T1 - Emotions on the move. T2 - Mobile emotions among train commuters in the South East of Denmark. AU - Jensen, Hanne Louise. PY - 2012. Y1 - 2012. N2 - The overall aim of this paper is to discuss how including, and stressing, emotions in research enables us to understand the experience of commuting as an everyday practice that has more meaning than a journey from A to B. The paper shows how emotions are practiced and produced while commuting, and how these emotions are crucial for the production of social space onboard trains. In doing so it draws on ethnographical research conducted while following various commuting communities and individual commuters. The paper concludes that the emotional practice of commuting produces an ever changing space where the practices of commuting with all their variations fill and add to lives on board and outside of the train.. AB - The overall aim of this paper is to discuss how including, and stressing, emotions in research enables us to understand ...
Abstract: Developmental research on emotion regulation is increasingly advancing toward a systems view that integrates behavioral and biological constituents of emotional self-control. However, this view poses fundamental challenges to prevailing conceptualizations of emotion regulation. In portraying emotion regulation as a network of multilevel processes characterized by feedback and interaction between higher and lower systems, it becomes increasingly apparent that emotion regulation is a component of (rather than a response to) emotional activation, that it derives from the mutual influence of multiple emotion-related systems (rather than the maturation of higher control processes alone), and that it sometimes contributes to maladaptive behavioral outcomes, especially in conditions of environmental adversity. The implications of this perspective for the developmental study of emotion regulation are discussed.. Reassessing emotion regulation. ...
First of all, we can cultivate positive emotions by remembering a time when we experience them, all right?So, I was just telling you when we were going through the emotions,times when I felt gratitude, for example, or times that I felt joy.And when we allow ourselves to go back to that time and really re-live it then we can re-experience those positive emotions as well.A second way we can cultivate positive emotions is by acting like we do when we feel them.So, William James says, that the sovereign path to cheerfulness is to act cheerfully.If you want to raise your mood, then act like you are feeling cheerful.And often times that actually does make us feel cheerful.Its important to remember the importance of our body in feeling these emotions.So, if I just say, well, Im going to try too be cheerful now.That doesnt really work.Well, how do act when Im feeling cheerful as I move my body around zenith has this emotional effect as well.A third way of cultivating positive emotions is by putting ...
Rapid assessment of emotions is important for detecting and prioritizing salient input. Emotions are conveyed in spoken words via verbal and non-verbal channels that are mutually informative and unveil in parallel over time, but the neural dynamics and interactions of these processes are not well understood. In this paper, we review the literature on emotion perception in faces, written words, and voices, as a basis for understanding the functional organization of emotion perception in spoken words. The characteristics of visual and auditory routes to the amygdala - a subcortical center for emotion perception - are compared across these stimulus classes in terms of neural dynamics, hemispheric lateralization, and functionality. Converging results from neuroimaging, electrophysiological, and lesion studies suggest the existence of an afferent route to the amygdala and primary visual cortex for fast and subliminal processing of coarse emotional face cues. We suggest that a fast route to the amygdala may
As you teach your adult students about emotions, you may want to consider the activities in this lesson. The ability to recognize emotions can be hard for some people. Small facial expressions and muscles movements can tell a story, though for some people, this story can remain a mystery. Pinning down the word that perfectly describes a feeling can be difficult, even for adults. Developing emotional intelligence requires experience and introspection, but a basic vocabulary comes first. We created the Emotion Faces printout to help children match a word (and a face) with their feelings. This printable Emotions Card Game is another tool that makes a perfect addition to your big emotions toolkit! (You can see all of our resources for helping children learn to manage big emotions here).The game gets kids identifying and talking about a range of emotions - 40 different emotions in fact!Emotions cards- These would be great for writing internal story. by Midya .. A great chart to utilize for students ...
This volume offers a much needed shift of focus in the study of emotion in the history of philosophy. Discussion has tended to focus on the moral relevance of emotions, and (except in ancient philosophy) the role of emotions in cognitive life has received little attention. Thirteen new essays investigate the continuities between medieval and early modern thinking about the emotions, and open up a contemporary debate on the relationship between emotions, cognition, and reason, and the way emotions figure in our own cognitive lives. A team of leading philosophers of the medieval, renaissance, and early modern periods explore these ideas from the point of view of four key themes: the situation of emotions within the human mind; the intentionality of emotions and their role in cognition; emotions and action; the role of emotion in self-understanding and the social situation of individuals.
Our findings document the broad range of emotions that ED providers reported experiencing during their own recent patient encounters, including those that elicited positive emotions, negative emotions, and involved patients with mental health conditions. The emotion profiles demonstrate that providers experience a mix of discrete emotions-a finding that parallels those in the emotion literature.59 60 Notably, providers emotion profiles in angry and mental health encounters are strikingly similar, reflecting high levels of negative emotion.. Providers also reported significantly lower engagement in their recent encounters with patients who elicited anger or had a mental health condition compared with encounters with patients who elicited positive emotions. Further, a large majority of providers reported that their emotions influenced their clinical decision-making and behaviour in at least one encounter. Encounters that elicited anger resulted in the lowest reported quality of care. This ...
Previous studies in patients with amygdala lesions suggested that deficits in emotion recognition might be mediated by impaired scanning patterns of faces. Here we investigated whether scanning patterns also contribute to the selective impairment in recognition of disgust in Huntington disease (HD). To achieve this goal, we recorded eye movements during a two-alternative forced choice emotion recognition task. HD patients in presymptomatic (n=16) and symptomatic (n=9) disease stages were tested and their performance was compared to a control group (n=22). In our emotion recognition task, participants had to indicate whether a face reflected one of six basic emotions. In addition, and in order to define whether emotion recognition was altered when the participants were forced to look at a specific component of the face, we used a second task where only limited facial information was provided (eyes/mouth in partially masked faces). Behavioural results showed no differences in the ability to recognize
logical experiments have demonstrated the human amygdalas role in recognition of certain emotions signaled by sensory stimuli, notably, fear and anger in facial expressions. We examined recognition of two emotional dimensions, arousal and valence, in a rare subject with complete, bilateral damage restricted to the amygdala. Recognition of emotional arousal was impaired for facial expressions, words, and sentences that depicted unpleasant emotions, especially in regard to fear and anger. However, recognition of emotional valence was nor-mal. The findings suggest that the amygdala plays a critical role in knowledge concerning the arousal of negative emotions, a function that may explain the impaired recognition of fear and anger in patients with bilateral amygdala damage, and one that is consistent with the amygdalas role in processing stimuli related to threat and danger. Studies in humans provide strong evidence for neural systems that are specialized for the recognition of certain emotions. ...
This paper reviews and synthesizes functional imaging research that over the past decade has begun to offer new insights into the brain mechanisms underlying emotion regulation. Toward that end, the first section of the paper outlines a model of the processes and neural systems involved in emotion generation and regulation. The second section surveys recent research supporting and elaborating the model, focusing primarily on studies of the most commonly investigated strategy, which is known as reappraisal. At its core, the model specifies how prefrontal and cingulate control systems modulate activity in perceptual, semantic, and affect systems as a function of ones regulatory goals, tactics, and the nature of the stimuli and emotions being regulated. This section also shows how the model can be generalized to understand the brain mechanisms underlying other emotion regulation strategies as well as a range of other allied phenomena. The third and last section considers directions for future ...
Thus, these researchers set out to further expand our understanding of the differential effects of emotion regulation strategies on the human brain.. Goldin and colleagues chose to compare two specific regulation strategies - cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression - in the context of negative emotions. Dr. Philippe R. Goldin describes these approaches: Reappraisal is a cognitive strategy that alters the meaning of a potentially upsetting situation [and has] been associated with decreased levels of negative emotion and increased well-being, whereas suppression is a behavioral strategy that involves inhibiting ongoing emotion-expressive behavior [and has] been associated with increased physiological responding and decreased well-being. This suggests that cognitive regulation, such as reappraisal, may be more effective because it impacts the emotion-generative process earlier than a behavioral strategy, like suppression.. To examine the differences in these processes, the researchers ...
Psychology Question Bank - 440 MCQs on Motivation and Emotions - Part 1 1. Self-Quiz on Motivation and Emotion. 81. Research on gender and emotional intelligence suggests that women are more skilled than men at: A. avoiding the experience of emotional ambivalence B. preventing emotions from distorting reasoning C. interpreting others facial expressions of emotion D. delaying emotional gratification in pursuit of long-term goals Answer: C (b) Psychosexual behaviour. (a) The science of behaviour and mental processes (b) The science of human behaviour and mental processes (c) The science of mind (d) The study of motivation, emotion, personality, adjustment and abnorma-lity. A researcher wants to study math achievement in sixth graders. c) emotions. Based on the relative age effect, Molly will MOST likely ____. The ability to understand emotions, emotional language, and the signals conveyed by emotions. Psychology , Multiple Choice , Questions, And Answer , Test Bank , Exam. C Behavior, mental ...
An emotion recognition apparatus performs accurate and stable speech-based emotion recognition, irrespective of individual, regional, and language differences of prosodic information. The emotion recognition apparatus includes: a speech recognition unit which recognizes types of phonemes included in the input speech; a characteristic tone detection unit which detects a characteristic tone that relates to a specific emotion, in the input speech; a characteristic tone occurrence indicator computation unit which computes a characteristic tone occurrence indicator for each of the phonemes, based on the types of the phonemes recognized by the speech recognition unit, the characteristic tone occurrence indicator relating to an occurrence frequency of the characteristic tone; and an emotion judgment unit which judges an emotion of the speaker in a phoneme at which the characteristic tone occurs in the input speech, based on the characteristic tone occurrence indicator computed by the characteristic tone
This study investigated the associations between emotion recognition ability and autistic traits in a sample of non-clinical young adults. Two hundred and forty nine individuals took part in an emotion recognition test, which assessed recognition of 12 emotions portrayed by actors. Emotion portrayals were presented as short video clips, both with and without sound, and as sound only. Autistic traits were assessed using the Autism Spectrum Quotient (ASQ) questionnaire. Results showed that men had higher ASQ scores than women, and some sex differences in emotion recognition were also observed. The main finding was that autistic traits were correlated with several measures of emotion recognition. More specifically, ASQ-scores were negatively correlated with recognition of fear and with recognition of ambiguous stimuli.. ...
Emotional Competence (EC), which refers to individual differences in the identification, understanding, expression, regulation and use of ones own emotions and those of others, has been found to be an important predictor of individuals adaptation to their environment. Higher EC is associated with greater happiness, better mental and physical health, more satisfying social and marital relationships and greater occupational success. While it is well-known that EC (as a whole) predicts a number of important outcomes, it is unclear so far which specific competency(ies) participate(s) in a given outcome. This is because no measure of EC distinctly measures each of the five core emotional competences, separately for ones own and others emotions. This lack of information is problematic both theoretically (we do not understand the processes at stake) and practically (we cannot develop customized interventions). This paper aims to address this issue. We developed and validated in four steps a ...
The aim of this study is to explore the role of language skills, communication and emotion regulation in relation to the degree of externalizing behavior. Studying children with an additional X chromosome, who are known to have language deficits, can reveal insights into the underlying mechanisms of the development of externalizing behavior problems. A total of 85 normal developing children (34 boys and 51 girls) and 33 children with an additional X chromosome (16 girls and 17 boys) participated in the study. All children were tested on language skills (vocabulary, word associations, formulating sentences and concealed meaning) and emotion regulation (Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire- kids). Parents completed questionnaires to assess social communication (Autism Questionnaire-children and Pragmatics Profile) and externalizing behavior (Social Skills Rating System and Child Behavioral Checklist).Our results indicate poorer language and social communication skills, more externalizing ...
Behaviorally, regulation success was similar between subjects with MDD and healthy controls. However, subjective ratings might be unreliable as they could be due to social desirability effects. Neurally, amygdala reactivity upon negative stimulation did not differ between groups and-crucially-both groups showed a significant downregulation effect in the amygdala. We regard this neural effect as a proxy for regulation success, although it cannot be directly equated with emotion regulation (Fig. 1). Empirical evidence suggests that depressive patients exhibit increased and relatively unmodulated amygdala activity during emotional stimulation without being asked to regulate at all (Drevets, 1999; Sheline et al., 2001; Siegle et al., 2002, 2007) and that this effect decreases with antidepressant medication (Brody et al., 1999; Sheline et al., 2001; Fu et al., 2004). That we did not observe increased amygdala activation upon negative stimulation in patients may thus be a consequence of medication. To ...
This course offers an in-depth exploration of research and theory on emotions that stretches across traditional psychological subdisciplines. Emotions are complex, multiply-determined phenomena - they influence our biochemistry, our thinking, our actions, our relationships, as well as our mental and physical health. The character of emotions changes over the life-course and reflects individual differences. This complexity and significance makes the study of emotions an especially exciting and challenging task for researchers. A number of recurring themes will emerge in our discussions over the course of the academic term. Among them are (1) the functions of emotions, in both present day and ancestral circumstances; (2) the ways people respond to and regulate their own emotion experiences; and (3) the extent to which cultural and gender-related differences in emotions exist. The format of this course is centered on in-class discussions of common readings and the issues these readings raise. ...
Viewing of single words produces a cognitively complex mental state in which anticipation, emotional responses, visual perceptual analysis, and activation of orthographic representations are all occurring. Previous PET studies have produced conflicting results, perhaps due to the conflation of these separate processes or the presence of subtle differences in stimulus material and methodology. A PET study of 10 normal individuals was carried out using the bolus H215O intravenous injection technique to examine components of processing of passively viewed words. Subjects viewed blocks of random-letter strings or abstract, concrete, or emotional words (words with positive or negative emotional salience). Baseline conditions were either passive viewing of plus signs or an anticipatory state (viewing plus signs after being warned to expect words or random letters to appear imminently). All words (and to a lesser extent the random letters) produced robust activation of cerebral blood flow in the left ...
Emotions can be distinguished on three dimensions: pleasant versus unpleasant, activated versus quiescent, and feeling dominant versus feeling vulnerable.. In the plane formed by pleasantness and activation, emotions lie approximately on a circle. Unpleasant emotions are further distinguishable in terms of domination versus vulnerability. Interestingly, no pleasant emotion with a name is associated with a sense of vulnerability.. The orderliness of emotions on the three dimensions inspired the idea of using an emotion-spiral to measure emotions. Studies by Heise and Calhan (1995) and by Heise and Weir (1999) used such an instrument for data collection.. The following shows an emotion-spiral measuring instrument for use on the World Wide Web. This example doesnt actually collect data; the Done button has no effect.. ...
Emotion Regulation Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders provides step-by-step, detailed procedures for assessing and treating emotion regulation difficulties in individuals diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder (AUD). The Emotion Regulation Treatment…
typology. The idea that morality is based on sentiment was also characteristic of the Scottish school, including Adam Smith and Hume. On the other hand, because emotions are not acts of will or deliberation, they are traditionally regarded as irrational, and Kant thought that moral action based on principle (his phlegmatic character) was only truly moral and praiseworthy. This, however, is only partially true. An irrational person will have irrational emotions; but a rational person, as long as they are not psychicly conflicted, will have rational emotions. Indeed, an apparently rational person with irrational emotions is displaying evidence of unresolved inner conflict. Self-deception in thought is easy. Self-deception in emotion requires the suppression of the emotion, which may be difficult and result in various unpleasant and unexpected symptoms. The emotions have a way of breaking through or of producing seemingly unrelated manifestations. Their ability to do this is an indication of the ...
Emotions and Attraction By Torin Hester and Rachel Ball Emotions • • An emotion is.. A mental and physiological state associated with a wide variety of feelings, thoughts, and behavior • Any strong feeling But where do emotions come from? How are they made? How do we experience them? Where They Come From Although many theories as to how emotions come to be exist, we know that they take place in the limbic system. This system deals with other elements concerning regulation of memories, fight or flight reactions and motivations, but most importantly it concerns emotions. The parts of the limbic system that contribute to this are the Amygdala (a small almond shaped structure) and the Hippocampus (a tiny seahorse-shaped structure). The amygdala connects with the hippocampus, as well as the Thalamus. This connection between these three parts of the brain allow it to control and regulate emotions, such as anger, love and affection. It also helps to maintain major things such as friendships and ...
Mind objects are everything that goes on in your mind, not just thoughts.. They are emotions and feelings as well.. A mind object has a life on its own.. In your neuronet, it represents a very specific set of connections with the whole stream of biochemical reactions associated with it.. This life of thought forms, emotions and feelings is REAL!. Every time you experience an emotion, this emotion is translated into a very specific boost of certain chemicals in your brain and body.. You have the chemicals of happiness, fear, joy, pleasure, etc.. Here is the key element to understand: you get addicted to the chemicals associated with the specific emotional reactions you are used to.. Why addiction?. Because the moment you stop having that specific emotion you are used to, our body misses it!. The part of our body that fed itself from that specific chemical no longer gets its food.. So, you will often recreate that emotion simply to have a new boost in the specific biochemical associated with ...
If emotional nakedness got as much attention as physical nakedness, wed be much happier.. Of course, its not about baring your soul and putting your emotions behind a loudspeaker, its about being in-tune with your emotions - being as familiar and aware of your emotional self as you are with your physical self.. But its not as easy because theyre not as obvious. Emotions can arise mysteriously and be misleading, often going against your better judgment. You get angry over whats fickle, upset with whats spoken in jest, and fall in love with the wrong people.. Happiness comes in being congruent with your emotions, to be aligned with them. Oscar Wilde said, I dont want to be at the mercy of my emotions. I want to use them, and to enjoy them.. Emotions can be broken down into 3 major components:. ...
What produces emotions? Why do we have emotions? How do we have emotions? Why do emotional states feel like something? This book seeks explanations of emotion by considering these questions. Emotion continues to be a topic of enormous scientific interest. Emotion Explained describes the nature, functions, and brain mechanisms that underlie both emotion and motivation.
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For many people, there are good emotions and bad emotions. Good emotions make us feel better, bad emotions make us feel worse. (make only because we identify with them as mine). As weve been discussing recently, people have the habit sometimes of dwelling in their bad emotions. Staying in a place of discomfort, mainly because its familiar. Or it may distract us from how we really feel. I know people who maintain a constant state of fatigue, requiring coffee to function, for similar reasons. If we stay inside our little box, well be safe from how we really feel. Like our true feelings were a bogey man.. If we allow ourselves to experience our emotions more openly, well find some have a more constricting quality. Feelings of fear and shame for example, make us feel small. Feelings of joy and love make us feel more expanded. This is a deeper aspect of why we judge some emotions as bad - they make us feel more constrained, lesser.. Whats notable here though is that its not the ...
In the last decade, the history of emotions has developed into an increasing productive and intellectually stimulating area of historical research. Although there are precursors of the history of emotions - especially Febvres Histoire des Sensibilités[1] or Gays Psychohistory[2] - the field converges methodologically with newer historiographical approaches such as conceptual history, historical constructivism and the history of the body.[3] Similar to the sociology of emotions or anthropology of emotions, the history of emotions is based on the assumption that not only the expression of feelings, but also the feelings themselves are learned. Culture and history are changing and so are feelings as well as their expression. The social relevance and potency of emotions is historically and culturally variable. In the view of many historians, emotion is, therefore, just as fundamental a category of history, as class, race or gender. ...
The objects of our reality are fields of vibrational energy that our attention decodes in the form that we can perceive with our senses. We transform these fields of energy into solid objects with our attention, information, beliefs and emotion. STRATEGY 3: creative EMOTIONS emotions have a power that is 5,000 times greater than the of thoughts, with them we create our reality allowing us focus and validate what we believe. The emotions also generate a vibration frequency in coherence with the brain that scientists call the heart coherence. When you think and feel something nice generated frequency waves that can be read by sophisticated equipment, demonstrating that emotions have the power to modify the structure of the own DNA, in such a way that thinking and feeling is to practice corporal impact brain chemistry; It is proof of the power that have emotions to create power structures and information that generate health. Accompanied by an emotion thinking generates measurable changes within ...
11] In order to define the image that they want their organizations to portray, leaders use a core component of emotional intelligence to recognize emotions.. Cynics feel contempt, distress, shame, and even disgust when they reflect upon their organizations (Abraham, 1999). Toxicity in the workplace is a regular occurrence and an occupational hazard. A manager or co-worker who displays positive emotions consistently is more likely to motivate those around him/her and have more opportunities within the company. (2012). Negative emotions are caused by a range of workplace issues, including aggression, verbal abuse, sexual harassment, computer flaming, blogging, assertivenesstraining, grapevin… Retrieved from PsychInfo database. Critical Thinking & Managing Your Emotions in the Workplace. An additional hope is that cultures of trust, and individual skill-building, will allow employees to feel and express more positive emotions in the workplace. Cynicism is a negative effective reaction to ...
Recognizing your emotions and learning to manage them is one of the most important skills you can acquire. Helping children find their voice and being able to have a conversation about how theyre feeling with a safe adult means that they will feel happier, safer, and more confident.. Children should be taught the language necessary to label and identify the different emotions they may experience. We need to let children know that feeling different emotions is normal and that emotions are individual to us, we all share the same emotions but we experience them differently.. Children who are able to identify, understand, express, and manage a wide range of emotions experience long term benefits to their mental health, wellbeing and it leads to positive attitudes and behaviours later in life. This will give them the strategies and life skills to navigate their way through tough situations, manage difficulties and setbacks, and handle them in a more calm, purposeful way.. By giving them the ...
Abstract: In this study, we examined the hypothesis that preschoolers performance on emotion and cognitive tasks is organized into discrete processes of control and understanding within the domains of emotion and cognition. Additionally, we examined the relations among component processes using mother report, behavioral observation, and physiological measures of emotion control. Participants were 263 children (42 percent non-White) and their mothers. Results indicated that the three approaches of measuring emotion control were unrelated. Regardless of the measurement method, a four-factor solution differentiating emotion control and understanding and cognitive control and understanding fits the data better than did either of two two-factor models, one based on domains of emotion and cognition across processes, and one based on processes of control and understanding across domains. Results of this research replicate those of Leerkes et al. in describing a differentiated underlying structure of ...
Emotion regulation alters the trajectories of emotional responses and, when effective, transforms the emotional responses to help individuals adapt to their environment. Previous research has mainly focused on the efficiency of regulation strategies performed individually at a given time. Yet, in daily life, it is likely that several strategies are often combined. Thus, we question in this study the combinatorial efficiency of two emotion regulation strategies, Situation selection and Emotional suppression. In a within-subject design, sixty-five participants were asked to implement either no strategy, Situation selection only, Emotional suppression only, or both strategies together (four conditions) while looking at various emotionally charged images. Experience, expressivity, and physiological arousal were recorded throughout the viewing. Repeated-measures ANOVAs and corrected post-hoc tests were used for analyzing the data. The results of the combined strategies showed that Emotional suppression
Do animals feel human emotions? Joseph LeDoux, a researcher at New York University, says no, at least, they dont have emotions and feelings the way humans do. Animals studies are still useful though, if we concentrate on the "survival circuitry" thats u
Researchers also conducted a second experiment to gauge the effect of awareness on emotions and sight. Participants were asked to guess whether they thought the additional suppressed image being shown through continuous flash suppression was smiling, scowling, or neutral. If a participant was able to guess the suppressed image at a better than chance level, they were not included in the analysis. Still, the results were consistent: participants who were subconsciously shown a smiling face were more likely to view the neutral face as smiling.. These results are particularly interesting given previous research about how negative emotions can shape what we see. One recent study on depression and memory found people with major depressive disorder (MDD) tend to have a stronger emotional response when asked to recall painful memories, more so than those without MDD. Studies often show negative stimuli as having greater influence on behavior and decision making, states the website Psychological ...
A crucial aspect of how emotions help individuals adaptively navigate the world is tied to their interpersonal functions, or how they influence social interactions and relationships. Emotional expressions, such as a smile or a frown, are relatively involuntary, so they can provide a fairly reliable source of information about a persons emotions, beliefs, and intentions to those around them.[3] The communication of such information is crucial for structuring social relationships, and for negotiation and cooperation within groups, because it conveys not only how people are thinking and feeling, but also how they are likely to behave.[20] This information can in turn guide how other people think, feel, and behave towards those expressing their emotions. For example, emotional expressions can evoke complementary emotional responses, such as Fear in response to Anger,[3] or guilt in response to Disappointment.[21] They can also evoke reciprocal emotions, such as Empathy or Love.[22] Thus, emotions ...
Emotion, Attention and Perception. So, imagine that the guy with the gun is back again. Now the revolver is so close to your face that you can see the bullets loaded into the individual chambers. But its dark and youre emotional so how can you see that? Phelps (2006) explains that there is some evidence that fear can actually enhance perception. One study carried out by Phelps herself found an increased sensitivity to contrast when subjects were primed with fearful faces (Phelps, Ling & Carrasco, 2006). It seems, then, that emotional situations can send your visual cortex into overdrive.. In the same way, there is also evidence that emotional situations can enhance your attention. Some research has suggested that normal cognitive processes like the attentional blink can be reduced when emotions are running high. Again, patients with certain types of damage to their amygdala do not show this enhancement, lending further weight to the amygdalas claim to emotional fame.. Emotions and Social ...
Individuals face competitive environments daily, and it is important to understand how emotions affect behavior in these environments and resulting economic consequences. Using a two-stage laboratory experiment, I analyze the role of reported emotions in tournament performance and assess how the behavioral response differs across genders. The first stage serves to induce emotions, while the second stage presents the subject with a one-on-one winner-take-all tournament with the individual who generated the feeling, using a real-effort task. Ultimately, I show that women respond to the negative feelings more strongly than men. I find that women increase performance when experiencing negative emotions, while male performance remains unaffected. Remarkably, there is no gender gap in tournament performance when there are negative emotions.
(2009) van der Meer et al. Psychiatry Research. Schizophrenia patients might experience difficulties in applying two widely used emotion regulation strategies, reappraisal and suppression. We investigated the relationships among emotion regulati...
TY - CHAP. T1 - Neural network approach for classification of human emotions from EEG signal. AU - Shashi Kumar, G. S.. AU - Sampathila, Niranjana. AU - Shetty, Harikishan. PY - 2019/1/1. Y1 - 2019/1/1. N2 - Emotions play an important role in human cognition, perception, decision-making, and interaction. In this paper, Neural Network (NN) based system for human emotions classification by extracting features from Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal is proposed. EEG data for the classification of emotions is obtained from the DEAP database. Extracted more than 30 features from EEG and they are used for the emotion classification. Totally, 33 varieties of features are extracted from EEG data. However, there are reports on voice-based, facial-image-based study of expressions to recognize their emotions. However, emotion identification using both methods can be biased as they can be faked. In order to overcome this difficulty, many researchers analyze brain physiological signals to represent the ...
Human Emotions: A Reader brings together a collection of articles which give an approach to the fast-growing field of empirical and theoretical research on emotions. The volume includes classic writings from Darwin, James and Freud chosen to show their current significance, together with articles from contemporary research literature. The articles give a broad coverage of the subject and include selections from cross-cultural, biological, social, developmental and clinical areas of study. Human Emotions: A Reader begins with an overall introduction to both the volume and subject area by the Editors. Each of the six sections of the book, and each article are introduced, contextualizing and relating these articles to comparable research.. The volume is organized to correspond with the structure and coverage of Understanding Emotions written by Keith Oatley and Jennifer M. Jenkins (also published by Blackwell). It can also be used independently allowing instructors to teach courses on emotions with ...
What happens in our brains to make us feel fear, love, hate, anger, joy? do we control our emotions, or do they control us? Do animals have emotions? How can traumatic experiences in early childhood influence adult behavior, even though we have no conscious memory of them? In The Emotional Brain, Joseph LeDoux investigates the origins of human emotions and explains that many exist as part of complex neural systems that evolved to enable us to survive. Unlike conscious feelings, emotions originate in the brain at a much deeper level, says LeDoux, a leading authority in the field of neural science and one of the principal researchers profiled in Daniel Golemans Emotional Intelligence. In this provocative book, LeDoux explores the underlying brain mechanisms responsible for our emotions, mechanisms that are only now being revealed. The Emotional Brain presents some fascinating findings about our familiar yet little understood emotions. For example, our brains can detect danger before we even experience
Background: Psychological factors play an important role in well-being of patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) as well as increasing risk of CVD in normal population. Because of the lack of research on comparing emotion regulation, psychological capital and altruism between CVD patients and healthy population, the aim of this study was to assess these factors in a case-control study. Methods: The 100 non-randomly included participants were categorized into two groups: 50 patients with CVD with age range of 30-60, and 50 paired-matched healthy persons. Three instruments of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ-P), Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ) and Altruistic Behavior Scale were used. Data was analyzed using the paired and independent t-test statistical analysis. Findings: Significant differences were seen between case and control groups with respect to their cognitive emotion regulation (t=-2.27; p,0.025), psychological capital (t=9.03; p,0.001) and altruism (t=7.52; ...
The impact of limbic system morphology on facial emotion recognition in bipolar I disorder and healthy controls Danielle Soares Bio,1 Márcio Gerhardt Soeiro-de-Souza,1 Maria Concepción Garcia Otaduy,2 Rodrigo Machado-Vieira,3 Ricardo Alberto Moreno11Mood Disorders Unit, 2Institute of Radiology, Department and Institute of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch (ETPB), National Institute of Mental Health, NIMH NIH, Bethesda, MD, USAIntroduction: Impairments in facial emotion recognition (FER) have been reported in bipolar disorder (BD) subjects during all mood states. This study aims to investigate the impact of limbic system morphology on FER scores in BD subjects and healthy controls.Material and methods: Thirty-nine euthymic BD I (type I) subjects and 40 healthy controls were subjected to a battery of FER tests and examined with 3D structural imaging of the amygdala and hippocampus
This article introduces the development and validation of a self-report questionnaire: the Childrens Emotion Regulation scale in Mathematics (CERS-M). Results highlighted a) through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, a meaningful six-factor model (emotion expression, task utility self-persuasion, help-seeking, negative self-talk, brief attentional relaxation, and dysfunctional avoidance); b) satisfactory internal reliabilities; c) test-retest reliability scores indicative of a satisfactory stability of the measures over time; d) preliminary evidence of convergent and discriminant validity with CERS-M being very weakly linked to verbal skill and moderately to emotion regulation strategies measured through the Flemish version of the COPE-questionnaire; e) preliminary evidence of criterion validity, with CERS-M scores predicting math anxiety, and to a lesser extent, students performance; f) preliminary evidence of incremental validity, with the CERS-M predicting math anxiety and performance
Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online. A new study published on Wednesday in the journal Psychological Science has found that facial expressions and emotional vocalizations are not universally understood across cultural barriers - contradicting a long-held emotion science belief.. Emotions are not universally perceived, said Lisa Feldman Barrett, professor of psychology Northeastern University. Everything thats predicated on that is a mistake.. In the 1970s, psychologist Paul Ekman traveled to Papua New Guinea to see if emotions were generally experienced and portrayed the same around the world. More specifically, Ekman wanted to see if people perceive the same emotions in facial expressions regardless of cultural upbringing.. In his study, Ekman showed both Americans and isolated indigenous people living in Papua New Guinea a sequence of images showing facial expressions and asked his subjects to match the images to one of six emotion words or stories showing emotional ...
Involvement in relationally aggressive conduct is an important contributor to maladaptive functioning in both childhood and adulthood. Decreased emotional awareness and impairments of self-control are risk factors for relational aggressiveness, while emotional awareness can also be treated as an important prerequisite for proper self-control. The aim of the study was to examine the associations between dimensions of emotional awareness (attention to emotions and emotional clarity), self-control, and relational aggressiveness. Self-control was also examined as a mediating variable between emotional awareness and relational aggressiveness. Self-report measures of trait meta-mood, alexithymia, self-control, and relational aggressiveness were completed by 214 adolescents (129 females), aged 15-23. The confirmatory factor analysis confirmed two factors of emotional awareness: (1) inattention to emotions (reflecting low attention to emotions and externally oriented thinking) and (2) a lack of ...
We report data on the processing of facial emotion in a prosopagnosic patient (H.J.A.). H.J.A. was relatively accurate at discriminating happy from angry upright faces, but he performed at chance when the faces were inverted. Furthermore, with upright faces there was no configural interference effect on emotion judgements, when face parts expressing different emotions were aligned to express a new emergent emotion. We propose that H.J.A.s emotion judgements relied on local rather than on configural information, and this local information was disrupted by inversion. A compensatory strategy, based on processing local face parts, can be sufficient to process at least some facial emotions.
Campellone, T. R., & Kring, A. M. (2013). Who do you trust? The impact of facial emotion and behaviour on decision making. Cognition & Emotion, 27, 603-620. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2012.726608 Clore, G. L., & Huntsinger, J. R. (2007). How emotions inform judgment and regulate thought. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 11, 393-399. doi:10.1016/j.tics.2007.08.005 Dunn, J. R., & Schweitzer, M. E. (2005). Feeling and believing: The influence of emotion on trust. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88, 736-748. doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.88.5.736 Forgas, J. P. (1995). Mood and judgment: The affect infusion model (AIM). Psychological Bulletin, 117(1), 39-66. Joskowicz-Jabloner, L., & Leiser, D. (2013). Varieties of trust‐betrayal: Emotion and relief patterns in different domains. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 43, 1799-1813. doi: 10.1111/jasp.12130 Kausel, E. E., & Connolly, T. (2014). Do people have accurate beliefs about the behavioral consequences of incidental emotions? ...
Healthcare services, particularly in patient-provider interaction, often involve highly emotional situations, and it is important for physicians to understand and respond to their patients emotions to best ensure their well-being. In order to model the emotion domain, we have created the Visualized Emotion Ontology (VEO) to provide a semantic definition of 25 emotions based on established models, as well as visual representations of emotions utilizing shapes, lines, and colors. As determined by ontology evaluation metrics, VEO exhibited better machine-readability (z=1.12), linguistic quality (z=0.61), and domain coverage (z=0.39) compared to a sample of cognitive ontologies. Additionally, a survey of 1082 participants through Amazon Mechanical Turk revealed that a significantly higher proportion of people agree than disagree with 17 out of our 25 emotion images, validating the majority of our visualizations. From the development, evaluation, and serialization of the VEO, we have defined a set of 25
STRESS AND COPING. Emotions. Emotions are states of feelings. There are positive emotions such as joy, happiness, excitement and love. These emotions make life fulfilling. Negative emotions such as hate, rage, anger, sadness and fear can make life problematic if these emotions are continuous.. Emotions have physical, cognitive, and behavioral elements. When someone experiences anxiety, fear or nervousness, for example, the heart can race, body can sweat heavily, mouth can become dry and breathing may become rapid. The cognitive element of these emotions is an idea that something terrible is going to happen and can result in the behavioral element or the person trying to get away from the situation causing the emotion. Behavioral element is the reaction someone can experience with emotion such as violence, screaming and even facial expressions. Several research studies suggest that facial expressions of certain emotions are inborn based on the results of cross-cultural studies. In the studies, ...
Emotions are an organisms specialized mental states, shaped by natural selection, enabling them to increase fitness in certain contexts by facilitating adaptive physiological, cognitive and behavioural responses [1]. Non-linguistic vocal emotional expressions are ancient, evolutionarily conservative, easily recognized by humans [2] and less affected by cultural differences than prosody or linguistic emotional expressions [3]. Most emotional vocalizations consist of calls that are acoustically highly similar in both humans and other species [4]. These calls, as the smallest meaningful units, are the building blocks of vocal emotion expressions and their acoustic properties affect how listeners perceive their emotional content [5].. According to the pre-human origin hypothesis of affective prosody, the acoustic cues of emotions in human vocalizations are innate and have strong evolutionary roots [6]. Furthermore, according to the source-filter framework, the basic mechanisms of sound production ...
The chapter outlines philosophical and prescientific ideas regarding emotion, as well as early physiological and psychological discoveries that formed the basis upon which modern neuropsychology rests. In addition, to elucidate developments throughout the history of the neuropsychological study of emotion, the chapter discusses important theoretical considerations in emotion research. The central focus of the chapter, however, is on neuropsychological studies beginning in the mid-twentieth century. These studies are organized into important areas in the study of emotion, such as laterality, emotional expression, emotional perception, and emotional experience. Finally, the chapter provides information regarding the measurement of emotion via neuropsychological test batteries.
Recent developments and studies in brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies have facilitated emotion detection and classification. Many BCI studies have sought to investigate, detect, and recognize participants emotional affective states. The applied domains for these studies are varied, and include such fields as communication, education, entertainment, and medicine. To understand trends in electroencephalography (EEG)-based emotion recognition system research and to provide practitioners and researchers with insights into and future directions for emotion recognition systems, this study set out to review published articles on emotion detection, recognition, and classification. The study also reviews current and future trends and discusses how these trends may impact researchers and practitioners alike. We reviewed 285 articles, of which 160 were refereed journal articles that were published since the inception of affective computing research. The articles were classified based on a scheme
Emotion analysis (EA) and sentiment analysis are closely related tasks differing in the psychological phenomenon they aim to catch. We address fine-grained models for EA which treat the computation of the emotional status of narrative documents as a regression rather than a classification problem, as performed by coarse-grained approaches. We introduce Ekmans Basic Emotions (BE) and Russell and Mehrabians Valence-Arousal-Dominance (VAD) model-two major schemes of emotion representation following opposing lines of psychological research, i.e., categorical and dimensional models-and discuss problems when BEs are used in a regression approach. We present the first natural language system thoroughly evaluated for fine-grained emotion analysis using the VAD scheme. Although we only employ simple BOW features, we reach correlation values up until r = .65 with human annotations. Furthermore, we show that the prevailing evaluation methodology relying solely on Pearsons correlation coefficient r is ...
There is a growing interest in affective processes in the cognitive and neurosciences. Studies have shown that emotions influence multiple cognitive processes and vice versa. The conference explored interdisciplinary research on emotion and cognition interactions. The conference consisted of addresses by prominent invited speakers from India and abroad. Young scientists presented their work on emotion and cognition.. Topics of Interest. ...
Student teachers learn a lot about how to teach in college, but they dont get much training in how to respond to young childrens emotions, such as frustration, anger, and excitement, according to new research.. When teachers arent trained to respond to emotional outbursts in supportive ways, they often fall back on responses that reflect the way they were raised and whether they feel comfortable with their own emotions, said Rebecca Swartz, a doctoral candidate at the University of Illinois and the studys first author.. For the study, 24 student teachers in the universitys Child Development Laboratory (CDL) filled out self-assessments, rating their responses to hypothetical emotional situations and reporting their beliefs about the best ways to handle childrens emotions.. The students were then observed several times interacting with children in the CDL classrooms over the course of a semester. From these observations, the researchers rated how the student teachers responded to the ...
A study out of the University of Arizona Psychology Department found that a rough nights sleep may impair your ability to read the room when it comes to facial expressions.. Published in Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms, the research reported that participants who were sleep deprived had a harder time recognizing happy and sad facial expressions than those who were well rested.. However, it is notable that sleep-deprived participants did not show any impairment in recognizing other emotional facial expressions like anger, surprise, fear, and disgust. That may be because those expressions and emotions are more primitive, and they are wired differently in our brains to help us survive dangers.. Research was led by the UA professor of psychology, psychiatry, and medical imaging, Dr. William D.S. Killgore.. Social emotions like sadness and happiness do not indicate threat like anger and fear do, so they are emotions that are not as necessary for immediate survival. When we are sleep ...
Language Independent Recognition of Human Emotion using Artificial Neural Networks: 10.4018/jcini.2008070101: This article presents a language-independent emotion recognition system for the identification of human affective state in the speech signal. A group of
Emotions play a pivotal role in guiding our behaviour within society and our environment. In particular, emotions enable interpersonal social interactions through non-verbal communication that may be below conscious awareness. However, when there is some disruption to normal emotional processing, such as in anxiety disorders, quality of life of the individual can be severely disrupted. Anxiety disorders account for nearly a quarter of all mental health diagnoses, however the aetiology and underpinning neural correlates of anxiety are still not fully understood. This thesis sought to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms of emotion processing, specifically in the amygdala, in a healthy sub-clinical cohort. Six different studies are presented using quantitative methodology to explore amygdala activation and connectivity during emotion processing, and structural differences, as modulated by gender and sub-clinical anxiety. Overall results reveal a modulating effect of sub-clinical anxiety on ...
Recognition of Human Emotions in Reasoning Algorithms of Wheelchair Type Robots - This paper analyses the possibilities of integrating different technological and knowledge representation techniques for the development of a framework for the remote control of multiple agents such as wheelchair-type robots. Large-scale multi-dimensional recognitions of emotional diagnoses of disabled persons often generate a large amount of multi-dimensional data with complex recognition mechanisms, based on the integration of different knowledge representation techniques and complex inference models. The problem is to reveal the main components of a diagnosis as well as to construct flexible decision making models. Sensors can help record primary data for monitoring objects. However the recognition of abnormal situations, clustering of emotional stages and resolutions for certain types of diagnoses is an oncoming issue for bio-robot constructors. The prediction criteria of the diagnosis of the emotional situations of
Objective To explore the mediating effect of social support on the relationship between negative emotion and coping style in human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-infected pregnant women.Methods A total of 202 HIV-infected pregnant women were enrolled by a convenient sampling method in this study.Participants completed questionnaires including social support rating scale(SSRS),knowledge,attitudes and practices scale for preventing mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus(KAPS-PMTCT),self-rating anxiety scale(SAS),self-rating depression scale(SDS),Berger HIV stigma scale(BHSS),and simplified coping style questionnaire(SCSQ).The relationships of these variables were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis and structure equation modeling analysis.Results The correlations between negative emotion,social support and coping style were all significant.Social support was negatively correlated with negative emotion(P0.05)and negative coping style(P0.01),and was positively correlated with
Many dog lovers will be surprised to learn that controversy is still swirling in scientific circles about whether and to what extent dogs experience some of the same emotions and feelings that human beings do. As an applied animal behaviorist with a Ph.D. in Zoology, author Patricia McConnell wades into the fray, building her case that dogs do indeed share human emotions, by examining similarities in the anatomy and physiology of canine and human brains. In the process she provides readers with an introduction to how our own brains function, and with some of the recent fascinating developments in the world of neuroscience. The first chapter begins with an exploration of emotions and why some scientists still question whether non-human animals actually experience them. The second chapter, about emotional expressions, discusses how both human and canine emotions and feelings are reflected in facial expressions and body language. A photo section illustrates the distinctive facial features and body ...
The emotional effects of osteoporosis will vary from person to person in Astoria but it is important for a woman to know that she is never alone in the process. In this article I will outline some key emotions that you may feel due to osteoporosis.
When I was first working in this area, I was struck that the basic emotions that we were working with - fear, anger, disgust, sadness, surprise and happiness - were so weighted towards negative emotions. Essentially, of the original six, four are negative, surprise is arguably neutral, or is perhaps a precursor to another emotion, and only one (happiness) is unambiguously positive. Psychology has been criticised by Barbara Fredrickson for having a profound negative bias (Fredrickson, 2003), and the dominance of these negative emotions certainly didnt seem to relate to my everyday experience of emotions - both in terms of my own experience, and the emotions expressed by others.. At a meeting at University College London in the late 1990s I had the opportunity to ask Paul Ekman in person why he thought there was such a negative bias to the basic emotions that we were all working with. Ekman explained that he thought that there would be more positive basic emotions than just happiness, and he ...
Expressions of social emotions communicate cooperation and strategies among sports team members. Research also shows that positive emotions have profound influences on a number of processes, including attentional control, cognition, and interpersonal functioning . The beneficial subcomponents of sharing positive emotions are linked to performance, perception, attention, memory, decision-making and judgment. The expression of an emotional state in one person leads to the experience of similar emotions in a person observing the expression…emotions influence others peoples emotions, feelings, and behaviors, leading to the convergence of emotions and moods, (Pepping & Timmermans, 2012, p. 2). These findings give support to the importance of all team members and how well they interact ...
PhD ceremony: mw. L.M. Hoekert, 13.15 uur, Academiegebouw, Broerstraat 5, Groningen Thesis: Beyond what is being said. Emotional prosody: its neural basis and its relevance for schizophrenia. Promotor(s): prof.dr. A. Aleman, prof.dr. R.S. Kahn Faculty: Medical Sciences Contact: spokesperson UMCG, tel. +31 (0)50-361 2200, e-mail: voorlichting bvl.umcg.nl Recognizing emotions difficult for patients with schizophrenia Emotional prosody is a paralinguistic aspect of language, consisting of features including intonation, stress, pitch, and volume. It is also known as the emotional melody of speech. These cues are crucial for the understanding the intentions and emotional state of the other. The neural basis of emotional prosody has not been elucidated completely. Studies in this thesis have shown that different areas in the right hemisphere but also some areas in the left hemisphere are involved in emotional prosody perception.. ...
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We propose a novel and general framework called the multithreading cascade of Speeded Up Robust Features (McSURF), which is capable of processing multiple classifications simultaneously and accurately. The proposed framework adopts SURF features, but the framework is a multi-class and simultaneous cascade, i.e., a multithreading cascade. McSURF is implemented by configuring an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of the weak SURF classifier for each data category into a real-value lookup list. These non-interfering lists are built into thread channels to train the boosting cascade for each data category. This boosting cascade-based approach can be trained to fit complex distributions and can simultaneously and robustly process multi-class events. The proposed method takes facial expression recognition as a test case and validates its use on three popular and representative public databases: the Extended Cohn-Kanade, MMI Facial Expression Database, and Annotated Facial
Emotion identification skill (EIS) has been correlated with social support, but little research has examined the extent that EIS is a developmental precursor to supportive relationships. The present study investigated the longitudinal relationships between EIS and social support in adolescence. Participants were 903 (464 males; 439 females) Australian high school students, with 314 participating in all four waves. Students completed questionnaires annually from Grade 9 to Grade 12, including self-report measures of (1) EIS, (2) social support network size, and (3) quality of social support. Cross-lagged structural equation modeling supported a reciprocal influence model, with social support and EIS mutually influencing each others development. We discuss the implications of this finding for the positive development of EIS and social support. ...
The relationship between fear and courage has been discussed in terms of opposite though mutually involving notions. However, their link has not been inquired extensively. Recently, new light has been shed on the topic thanks to recent empirical evidence within emotion theories that stress the role played by perception and/or cognition in the experience of fear, as well as the role played by the emotional virtue of courage in fear regulation. Questions arise whether fear has a fundamentally perceptual structure or is a biologically-grounded natural kind, and whether such an emotion-related virtue as courage is intrinsically or extrinsically related to fear. This paper considers the last problem first, then enlarges the picture to fear modeling, finally drives some conclusions which aim at deepening the relationship between fear and courage. As a result, it emerges that the emotion of fear has a conceptual, emotional, situational and subjective dimension. Assuming fear as a possible emotional ...
teach2talks™ Social Skills! series helps teach children appropriate social behaviors through the use of targeted video modeling. Volume 3 of our Social Skills! series, Emotions, Feelings and Empathy, focuses on skills that are difficult to master for many children: recognizing the way others typically demonstrate their internal emotions and feelings, and understanding empathy, which is the capacity to recognize or understand anothers state of mind or emotion, or put oneself into anothers shoes. This two-disk title divides instruction into an introductory program and an advanced program, both contained in the same case. The introductory, first disk focuses identifying how other people show a variety of core emotions, feelings and moods to the outside world, including happy, sad, angry, excited, nervous, frustrated, surprised, scared, hungry, confused, shy, disappointed and embarrassed among others. The second, more advanced, disk helps teach children how to identify situations where other ...
Objective: Intimate partner aggression (IPA) is a serious problem among dating couples. The present study examined dyadic and situational processes that may lead to IPA perpetration among a sample of 59 heterosexual couples (total n = 118), within the framework of Finkels I3 model. Method: IPA was assessed using an in vivo aggression task, in the context of a weak inhibiting factor (self-control depletion) and a strong impellance factor (negative emotion) generated during in vivo verbal conflict between partners (functioning as an instigating trigger). Results: Actor-partner interdependence model analyses demonstrated that negative emotion (prediscussion and reactivity) positively predicted mens aggression and the interaction between emotion reactivity and self-control depletion predicted womens partner aggression. Several partner effects emerged as well. Conclusion: These findings provide support for the I3 model and suggest that during conflictual encounters both partners may recognize and respond
Jonah speaks about the energy of the emotional body and how we physically feed the emotional body with food. What are your positive emotions requesting to be fed? What negative emotions are seeking to be fed? How do we subconsciously empower the negative emotions through food? How does food affect the emotional body?. ...
Emotional - Activity: Identify Emotions Feelings come in a wide variety of types and intensity. Learning to increase awareness to recognize the emotions we are feeling is an important skill to develop our emotional intelligence. [Learn more about emotional intelligence] Emotions in the Body Recognize the physical indicators of emotion. Signs of anger can include:…
Post-hoc tests were conducted on three large randomized controlled trials conducted in the general Dutch population with low or moderate well-being: (1) performing prosocial behavior during 6 weeks versus an active (self-focused behavior) and waitlist control (N=288), (2) a 6-week gratitude intervention versus waitlist control (N=144), and (3) an 8-week multicomponent positive psychology intervention versus waitlist control (N=275). Positive emotions, mental well-being, anxiety and depression were measured at pretest, posttest and up to 6 months follow-up. In study 1 and 2, positive emotions were also measured during the intervention ...
This paper presents a novel optimization technique in image processing for emotion recognition based on facial expression. The method combines two pre-processin
After the many emotions circulated day in and day out, I went numb. I didnt care about much. I didnt want to feel anymore, and I was glad I didnt. I didnt have much to say or give in some moments. The moments of numbness were welcomed, as far as I was concerned, I didnt have to deal.. While many of these emotions to-date come and go, I realize that it is OK. It is okay to be angry, sad, confused, and any other emotion I feel. Its normal, a part of me has left. Ive learned that grief means one day youre good, the next day youre not. And that too is OKAY!. Ive gotten to a place knowing that my grief may not ever go away, but I will find it easier to face. Until then, I honor my loss and embrace each and every emotion that comes along with it.. About Shawanna Allen. Shawanna Allen is a Marketing Professional in Chicago, IL and is a mom to an angel she lost in the first trimester of pregnancy. Although her loss was unexpected and resulted in a hard journey to healing, shes found a new ...
Recently, I witnessed a group of adults telling some teens news they thought was great. From an adult perspective, it was wonderfully exciting news. As the news was shared, I watched as the teens clapped. They probably assumed it was expected, as the adults were cheering. The looks in most of their eyes told a much different story. The news made them uneasy and they doubted that it would indeed be positive for them personally. Yet, the adults around them missed the signals and continued chattering about how exciting it was.. God created people to have emotions. The Bible makes it very clear having and even expressing emotions in godly ways is welcome. Of course, how we act during these emotional states can become sinful, but emotions themselves can help us process and release events that could become harmful to our physical, emotional, mental and even more importantly, spiritual development.. This is what many adults misunderstand. Because we know emotions like anger or sorrow can often result ...
Emotion bridging enables toddlers to learn about emotions and gradually learn simple words to express emotions, needs and wishes, instead of acting out physically.
The first published version of the EAQ is described in: Rieffe, C., Meerum Terwogt, M., Petrides, K.V., Cowan, C., Miers, A.C., Tolland, A. (2007). Psychometric properties of the Emotion Awareness Questionnaire for children. Personality and Individual Differences, 43, 95-105. The updated version of the EAQ is described in: Rieffe, C., Oosterveld, P., Miers, A.C., Meerum Terwogt, M., & Ly, V. (2008). Emotion awareness and internalising symptoms in children and adolescents; the Emotion Awareness Questionnaire revised. Personality and Individual Differences, 45, 756-761.. For validation of the questionnaire in French and Spanish: Lahaye, M., Mikolajczak, M., Rieffe, C., Villanueva, L., Van Broeck, N., Bodart, E., & Luminet, O. (2011). Cross-validation of the Emotion Awareness Questionnaire for children in three populations (2011). Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 29, 5, 418-427.. For validation of the questionnaire in Spanish:. Rieffe, C., Villanueva, L., Adrián, J.E. & Górriz, A.B. ...
The music is in fact able to trigger strong emotions as the language spoken or written at most of the people who enjoy it. In addition the music can trigger these emotions alone, while words are capable as partners in an environment where the emotion. So, it seems that music is connected in a much more intimate way to emotion than words.. The explanation is that music is a language older, more primitive than the words.. The words were preceded by the Cree, the superscripted, songs, choruses, primitive instrument sounds. Among the instruments available, only one belongs to all members of the species: the larynx. The voice is somehow the universal musical instrument in humans. Used permanently as soon as he had to warn its congeners of an event or need any. The reason why how to use has evolved so complex and detailed, to form the multitude of languages spoken today. What we call today music, practice with other instruments, was simpler and closer to the archaic songs, because practiced only by ...