A study of twins shows that even with genes that put them at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, eating a Mediterranean-style diet can improve heart function, according to research reported in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.. Using data from the Emory Twins Heart Study, researchers found that men eating a Mediterranean-style diet had greater heart rate variability (HRV) than those eating a Western-type diet. Heart rate variability refers to variation in the time interval between heart beats during everyday life "" reduced HRV is a risk factor for coronary artery disease and sudden death.. "This means that the autonomic system controlling someones heart rate works better in people who eat a diet similar to a Mediterranean diet," said Jun Dai, M.D., Ph.D., study author and assistant professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Indiana University in Bloomington.. Eating a Mediterranean-style diet "" one characterized by low saturated fats ...
... HealthDay (6/15, Edelson) reported that eating a Mediterranean-style diet might improve an important measure of heart function, according to a study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. The researchers found that higher Mediterranean diet scores were related to greater variability in heart rate. On a…
Results:. After 4 years, 44% of patients in the Mediterranean-style diet group and 70% in the low-fat diet group required treatment (absolute difference, âˆ26.0 percentage points [95% CI, âˆ31.1 to âˆ20.1 percentage points]; hazard ratio, 0.63 [CI, 0.51 to 0.86]; hazard ratio adjusted for weight change, 0.70 [CI, 0.59 to 0.90]; P , 0.001). Participants assigned to the Mediterranean-style diet lost more weight and experienced greater improvements in some glycemic control and coronary risk measures than did those assigned to the low-fat diet. ...
The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) involves substantial intake of fruits, vegetables, and fish, and a lower consumption of dairy, red meat, and sugars. Over the past 15 years much empirical evidence supports the suggestion that a MedDiet may be beneficial with respect to reducing the incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. A number of cross-sectional studies that have examined the impact of MedDiet on cognition have yielded largely positive results. The objective of this review is to evaluate longitudinal and prospective trials to gain an understanding of how a MedDiet may impact cognitive processes over time. The included studies were aimed at improving cognition or minimizing of cognitive decline. Studies reviewed included assessments of dietary status using either a food frequency questionnaire or a food diary assessment. Eighteen articles meeting our inclusion criteria were subjected to systematic review. These revealed that higher adherence to a MedDiet
There are many studies which have found that following a Mediterranean style diet is associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases e.g. heart disease, dementia, diabetes. A recent study (1) published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has concluded that "promoting the MDP [Mediterranean Dietary Pattern] as a model of healthy eating may help to prevent weight gain and the development of obesity". The study involved over 370,000 individuals aged between 25-70 years old from 10 European countries. Measurements were taken from the individuals at the start of the study and after about 5 years. A score between 0 and 18 was used to assess adherence to the Mediterranean Dietary Pattern and then the association between the socre and 5 year with change was assessed. Results showed that individuals who had high adherence to the Mediterranean Dietary Pattern (11-18 points) had significantly less weight change over 5 years and were less likely to develop overweight or obesity than ...
The obesity epidemic worldwide is fast increasing and affecting individuals of all ages, races and both genders. It is related with a series of other issues including diabetes, hypertension, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Obesity is caused by genetic and environmental factors such as over-consumption of energy and sedentary lifestyle. Of genetic variants, fat mass and the obesity associated gene (FTO) have been found to be consistently associated with obesity traits in several populations. However there is increasing interest in finding out whether lifestyle factors modify the association of FTO variants and obesity as this could better provide insight into the role of diet/environmental factors in obesity. The Mediterranean diet is a diet that is high in vegetables, olive oil and fish (lean sources of protein). A higher adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern (Med Diet) using Mediterranean diet scores (MDS) has been associated with a decrease in obesity, regardless of genetic risk. ...
We did not find a significant decrease in depression risk among participants at high risk of CVD assigned to MD supplemented with either nuts or EVOO in this randomized controlled primary prevention trial. However, when the analysis was restricted to subjects with DM2, participants assigned to MD-nuts had a 40% reduction in depression risk compared with the control group, which was significant.. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized field trial that has ascertained the effect of an intervention with an overall dietary pattern on depression risk in adults. Only a few prospective observational studies have inversely related healthy dietary patterns to the risk of developing adult depression [7-15]. Although some of these studies were based only on cross-sectional assessments [8, 9, 11-13], their results were consistent with those obtained after several years of follow-up in prospective cohorts [7, 10].. Regarding the MD, a very recent cohort study, the Australian Longitudinal Study on ...
To investigate associations between preconception dietary patterns and IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes validated by biomarkers of the homocysteine pathway. Observational prospective study. A tertiary referral fertilit
The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventional studies assessing the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes control and the management of diabetes-related complications. The above mentioned data are explored on the basis of evaluating the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than focusing on the effect of its individual components. Possible protective mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet against diabetes are also briefly discussed.
Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was defined through scores that estimated the conformity of the dietary pattern of the studied population with the traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern. Values of zero or one were assigned to each dietary component by using as cut offs the overall sex specific medians among the study participants. Specifically, people whose consumption of components considered to be part of a Mediterranean diet (vegetables, fruits, legumes, cereals, fish, and a moderate intake of red wine during meals) was above the median consumption of the population were assigned a value of one, whereas a value of zero was given to those with consumptions below the median. By contrast, people whose consumption of components presumed not to form part of a Mediterranean diet (red and processed meats, dairy products) was above the median consumption of the population had a value of zero assigned, and the others had a value of one. However, some differences among the studies existed, ...
We thank Dr. Samaha for his comments and appreciate the point raised about the fairness of comparisons between the Mediterranean diets and a less intensively promoted low-fat diet. We think that it is fair to compare interventions with different grades of intensity as far as their context can be appropriately conceptualized. Our intervention was not designed as a tightly controlled, feeding trial. Instead, the PREDIMED study is a demonstration project conducted among free-living individuals that is similar to health-promoting lifestyle recommendations in the primary care setting (1). We conceptualized our intervention as the combination of enabling factors, such as providing healthy foods, and education plus counseling to achieve behavior change. The comparison group was given written instructions to follow a low-fat diet, which is common practice in primary care. However, we realize that the intervention in participants in the low fat-diet was indeed less intensive, and, because the study is ...
This is the first study to show that low adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with odds of an ADHD diagnosis in children and adolescents. This association remained significant after adjusting for confounding variables. Among the habits that characterize a Mediterranean dietary pattern, individuals with ADHD more often missed having a second serving of fruit daily and showed reduced intakes of vegetables, pasta, and rice almost every day when compared with controls. Moreover, subjects with ADHD ate at fast-food restaurants and skipped breakfast more often than controls. In addition, a high consumption of sugar and candy, cola beverages, and noncola soft drinks and a low consumption of fatty fish were also associated with a higher prevalence of ADHD diagnosis.. Several advantages supporting the study of dietary pattern versus single nutrients in health promotion, including mental health, have previously been discussed.2,23 It seems that in addition to analyzing the impact that a ...
Higher intakes of extra virgin olive oil (as the principal source of fat), vegetables (like leafy green vegetables), fresh fruits (consumed as desserts or snacks), cereals (mainly wholegrains), nuts and legumes. Analysis research clearly show that the standard Mediterranean diet plan is an incredibly healthy consuming and life-style strategy. If you just add spice to an unhealthy diet regime - NO, but spices do have mild effects when combined with a nicely-balanced, healthy diet regime.. By the time of our 15th Anniversary Mediterranean Diet regime Conference in November 2008, we decided it was crucial to make a major assessment of the latest study findings connected to the Mediterranean Diet, and revisit the science. Possibly, this is due to the meals pyramid that is at the base of the Mediterranean dietary pattern.. As you move forward and begin looking at what sort of diet regime program or regimen is healthy to your heart, you will want to take a appear at the benefits I got from my wonder ...
Mediterranean alcohol-drinking pattern and mortality in the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra) Project: a prospective cohort study - Volume 111 Issue 10 - Alfredo Gea, Maira Bes-Rastrollo, Estefania Toledo, Martin Garcia-Lopez, Juan J. Beunza, Ramon Estruch, Miguel A. Martinez-Gonzalez
Roughly one-third of Americans have metabolic syndrome and need to be following a metabolic syndrome diet. But whats the best one?
|b||i|Background/Aims:|/i||/b| The objective of this preliminary study was to examine the impact of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) on the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) prote
In another article, a population-based cohort from Bordeaux, France, Feart and colleagues5 attempted to replicate the association of Mediterranean-type diet and cognitive decline previously described by Scarmeas et al.2 The authors used 4 neuropsychological tests to evaluate cognitive decline. Individualswho had high adherence to the Mediterranean-type diet in this study had higher Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores at the end of the 5-year follow-up period in some of the analytic models, but there were no statistically significant associations with changes in other cognitive assessments with only one exception (the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test) among the several models. Moreover, there was no reduction in incident dementia in those with high adherence to the Mediterranean-type diet, although the study was underpowered for this outcome. In addition, the neuropsychological tests used in the study may not have been ideal; while the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test used by ...
The last week in February (2013) saw headlines all over the world: "Mediterranean diet shown to ward off heart attack and stroke." The Guardian ran with "Mediterranean diet cuts strokes and heart attacks in at-risk groups." The Sydney Morning Herald announced "Mediterranean diet cuts risk of first heart attack by 30%".. The world headlines were all based on this article in the highly respected New England Medical Journal. The researchers own headline was "Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease with a Mediterranean Diet". The study is known as PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea).. Someone I follow on twitter - Rob Lyons (@robspiked) captured it beautifully when I was having my usual rant about people not knowing what the real Mediterranean diet is. Rob replied: "@zoeharcombe no, thats the diet Mediterraneans eat. This is the Mediterranean Diet, a mythological diet invented by US researchers." How true!. The study. Lets get the facts on the table first. The study involved ...
Britons eating a Mediterranean diet could lower their risk of developing cardiovascular disease including conditions such as heart attack and stroke, according to research published in the open access journal BMC Medicine.. In this study, the first of its kind carried out in a UK population, the researchers found that healthy individuals with greater adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet had 6 to 16% lower risk of future cardiovascular disease compared to individuals who had poor adherence.. Dr Nita Forouhi, lead author from the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge, UK, said: "We estimate that 3.9% of all new cardiovascular disease cases or 12.5% of cardiovascular deaths in our UK based study population could potentially be avoided if this population increased their adherence to the Mediterranean diet.". The Mediterranean diet is typically high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and olive oil, while low in red meats and moderate in dairy, fish, ...
Individuals who follow the Mediterranean dietary pattern -- rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains and fish -- appear less likely to develop depression, according to a report in the October issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Adhering to a Mediterranean diet may help kidney transplant recipients preserve their graft function, Antonio W. Gomes-Neto, MD, of University Medical Center, Groningen, the Netherlands, and colleagues reported in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. In their study of 632 Dutch kidney transplant recipients with a functioning graft for more than 1 year, 76 patients experienced graft failure, 119 kidney function decline (doubling of serum creatinine or graft failure), and 181 graft loss over a median 5.4 years. At baseline, all patients completed a 177-item validated questionnaire of foods eaten within the past month. A Mediterranean diet score was calculated according to whether an individual consumed higher than a median (sex-specific) intake of fish, fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and olive oil, or a lower than median intake of dairy and meat products. One point was also given for moderate alcohol consumption (men: 10 to 50 g/d; women: 5 to 25 g/d). The highest ...
Employees lacked necessary training to prevent needless and avoidable loss of life BRAINTREE, Mass. The U.S. Department of Labors Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Tribe Mediterranean Foods, a subsidiary of Nestle SA that manufactures Tribe brand hummus products, for 18 alleged violations of workplace safety standards following the death of a worker at its Taunton production plant. OSHAs South Boston Area Office opened an inspection on Dec. 16, 2011, after a contract employee who was cleaning and sanitizing a machine used in the hummus manufacturing process was caught, pulled into the machine and crushed to death between two rotating augers.. OSHAs investigation found that Tribe Mediterranean Foods had not trained the deceased worker and six other workers who cleaned plant machinery on hazardous energy control or "lockout/tagout" procedures. These are the procedures employers must put into effect and train workers to follow to shut down machines and lock out their power ...
July 7, 2004. BETHESDA, MD Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet is associated with a reduction in the concentrations of inflammation and coagulation markers. A study by Christina Chrysohoou, MD, PhD et al. from University of Athens, Athens, Greece which was published in the July 7, 2004 issue of the Journal of American College of Cardiology, used data from the ATTICA Study to evaluate the effect of the Mediterranean diet on plasma levels of C-reactive protein, white blood cell counts, interleuikin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, amyloid A, fibrinogen, and homocysteine. These levels are considered to be markers of inflammation and coagulation. ...
9. Mediterranean-style diet details Juntos Editorial Consultant Lucas Restrepo, M.D., Ph. D., explains the traditional Mediterranean diet. ?Lately, the so-called Mediterranean style diet has received a lot of attention because of its potential cardiovascular health benefits. A Mediterranean diet consists of eating salads and fruits twice per day, nuts servings every day, sofrito (see below) and drinking wine in moderation. White meat is used instead of red meat, while fish is served three times per week ...
Researchers looked back at medical records of people diagnosed with GORD between 2010 and 2015 in the US. They compared two cohorts, one being treated with PPI medication and the other with a Mediterranean diet and alkaline water to determine differences in the improvement of acid reflux.. The first cohort of 85 participants, on average aged 60, were treated between 2010 and 2012 with one of two PPI drugs (esomeprazole or dexlansoprazole [not used in the UK]) and asked to follow standard advice to cut out coffee, tea, chocolate, fizzy drinks, greasy, fried, fatty and spicy foods, and alcohol from their diet.. The second cohort of 99 participants, on average aged 57, were treated between 2013 and 2015 with alkaline water (pH ,8.0) and a plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and also cut out the same things from their diet as the first group. Participants of the second cohort were asked to replace all drinks with alkaline water and eat 90-95% of their diet as a plant-based diet with vegetables, ...
In a new study looking at the effects of a Mediterranean diet on people with poor heart health, the popular diet appeared to help heart patients more than statin drugs.. What the Research has to Say. Researchers detailed the findings of the observational study at the European Society of Cardiology conference in Rome last weekend. [1]. For the study, leading heart disease expert Professor Giovanni de Gaetano and his colleagues followed 1,200 people with a history of heart attacks, strokes, and blocked arteries over 7 years. Over the duration of the study, 208 participants died. [2]. The researchers found that the more participants adhered to a Mediterranean diet, the less likely they were to die over the course of the study.. Specifically, patients who ate a mainly Mediterranean diet were 37% less likely to die during the study than those whose dietary patterns were furthest from the Omega-3 fatty acid-rich diet. That did not change, even after researchers adjusted for age, sex, class, exercise ...
ObjectiveTo examine the association between a Mediterranean-style diet (MeDi) and brain magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV).Des
17440 17540 17640 17740 17840 17940. Determination: A mediterranean eating regimen supplemented with Omega-3s might be viable at anticipating heart assaults in individuals who have just had heart assaults (optional counteractive action). 3. Esposito K, et al. Impact of a Mediterranean-Style Diet on Endothelial Dysfunction and Markers of Vascular Inflammation in the Metabolic Syndrome. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 2004. Points of interest: 180 patients with metabolic disorder were randomized to take after either a Mediterranean eating regimen or a "judicious" low-fat eating routine for a long time. Results: At the finish of the investigation, 44% of patients in the Mediterranean eating routine gathering still had metabolic disorder, contrasted with 86% in the control gathering. The Mediterranean eating regimen aggregate likewise had changes in a few hazard factors. Katherine E et al,2004 Some more points of interest: Weight reduction: Body weight diminished by 4.0 kg (8.8 lbs) ...
For all of us nearing middle age, or slogging through it, yes, there is a benefit in eating a Mediterranean-style diet rich in fish, nuts, vegetables and
Ancel Keys, Minnesota physiologist, who put saturated fat on map as major cause of heart disease and was first scientist to champion health value of Mediterranean-style diet, dies at age 100; photo (M)
Following a Mediterranean-style diet for just 12 weeks helped patients with rheumatoid arthritis decrease pain scores and improve quality of life. Read more about the research here at DrGourmet.com.
MONDAY, June 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Sticking with a healthy diet can lower your risk for stroke and heart attack, a new study suggests. "Although each healthy eating pattern represents a different combination of dietary constituents, our study indicates that greater adherence to any of the four healthy eating patterns we looked at is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and the health benefits persist across racial and ethnic groups," said study author Zhilei Shan. He is a research associate in the department of nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston. For the study, Shans group focused on dietary scores for four healthy eating patterns: Healthy Eating Index-2015; Alternate Mediterranean Diet Score; Healthful Plant-Based Diet Index; and Alternate Healthy Eating Index. Although each diet was different, they all stressed eating whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes and nuts, while eating less red and processed meat and sugar-sweetened drinks. ...
The synergies and cumulative effects among different foods and nutrients are what produce the benefits of a healthy dietary pattern. Diets and dietary patterns are a major environmental factor that we are exposed to several times a day. People can learn how to control this behavior in order to promote healthy living and aging, and to prevent diet-related diseases. To date, the traditional Mediterranean diet has been the only well-studied pattern. Stroke incidence, a number of classical risk factors including lipid profile and glycaemia, emergent risk factors such as the length of telomeres, and emotional eating behavior can be affected by genetic predisposition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet could exert beneficial effects on these risk factors. Our individual genetic make-up should be taken into account to better prevent these traits and their subsequent consequences in cardiovascular disease development. In the present work, we review the results of nutritional genomics explaining the role of the
... Recognized as one of the healthiest diets in the world, the Mediterranean diet is not a creation of some doctor or nutritionist, nor is it a passing fad, it s a centuries-old...
High-fat diet and Mediterranean diet. In the first stage, for five weeks, the men followed what could be a standard diet of North America, that is high in fat, carbohydrates, refined sugars and red meat. In the second part of the study were another five weeks, but this time the participants ate a Mediterranean diet, which is rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, unrefined cereals and whole grains, moderate to high consumption of fish, dairy and moderate low in red meat consumption. Also included olive oil and moderate wine consumption. In a third stage of the study participants were subjected to a weight loss regimen for 20 weeks and finally in the last phase of the study were provided with a Mediterranean diet again for another five weeks.. Research findings in relation to cholesterol. The results of the study confirmed that, regardless of whether patients lost weight, decreased 9 percent levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL), known as "bad" cholesterol . Similarly, blood levels of the protein ...
Eating a Mediterranean diet cuts deadly breast cancer risk by 40% in postmenopausal women," says the Mail Online of a widely reported study carried out by researchers in the Netherlands.. The researchers looked at data from a study involving more than 60,000 women aged 55-69 over a 20-year period.. At the start of the study, details of the womens diet, physical activity and other cancer-related risk factors were collected.. The researchers then compared the diets of more than 2,000 women who went on to develop breast cancer with a selected group of similar women who didnt develop the cancer.. Overall, there was no link between a Mediterranean diet and breast cancer risk.. However, the researchers found women whose diet was most like a Mediterranean diet were 40% less likely to develop one particular type of breast cancer: oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.. As with all studies of this type, its difficult to separate out the effects of diet and other lifestyle factors, such as ...
BISAC: HEA006000. Diet is considered one of the most important lifestyle factors than can affect health. Although Mediterranean diets have long been celebrated for its beneficial effects against cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity), the past few years of research in the field suggest a favorable impact on metabolic parameters and type 2 diabetes as well. It has also shown signs of benefiting children with asthma. This book discusses the effects of the Mediterranean diet on health, and also examines dietary therapies on obesity and metabolic syndrome in adolescents. (Imprint: Nova). ...
Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet - There benefits of the Mediterranean diet include improved heart health. Take a look at the benefits of the Mediterranean diet at Discovery Fit & Health.
The only 2 randomized trials that tested the whole-diet approach in secondary prevention of CHD with hard clinical end points were conducted using Mediterranean-style diets. In the Lyon Diet Heart Study (90), the most frequent nonfatal events were new acute myocardial infarction and episodes of unstable angina that are commonly due to rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque. The risk of these 2 end points was reduced by about 70% by the Mediterranean diet, leading to the hypothesis that biologic changes associated with it resulted in a significant local anti-inflammatory effect. Singh et al. (91) tested an "Indo-Mediterranean diet" in 1,000 patients in India with existing coronary disease or at high risk for coronary disease. Compared with the control diet, the intervention diet-characterized by increased intake of mustard or soybean oil, nuts, vegetables, fruits, and whole grains-reduced the rate of fatal myocardial infarction by one-third and the rate of sudden death from cardiac causes by ...
All 41 study participants - 28 females and 13 males - completed three study phases. The phases included a five-week period of consuming a Mediterranean-style eating pattern containing three ounces per day of lean, unprocessed red meat, an amount of red meat the typical United States resident consumes; a five-week return to their regular eating pattern; and a five-week period of consuming a Mediterranean-style eating pattern with less red meat, three ounces twice weekly, which is commonly recommended for heart health. The order of the typical and lower red meat interventions were randomly assigned among participants ...
Time for me to go find those cookery books on Mediterranean food. After 12 years and 43,000 men, French researchers have found that eating a Mediterranean diet halves the risk of serious lung disease such as emphysema and bronchitis. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is expected to become the worlds third leading cause of death by 2020. Anyway, you dont have to cook your food Mediterranean-style, but just remember to eat more fruit, vegetables, grains and fish as they are rich in anti-oxidants, which cut the risk of tissue inflammation. Other advantages of following a Mediterranean diet for your family is that it reduces the chances of the development of asthma and respiratory allergies in children as well as the risk of developing Alzheimers.. - Kids shunning healthy foods ...
The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) consists of consumption of vegetables and healthy oils and have beneficial effects on metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Our goal here is to discuss the role of fatty acid content in MedDiet, mostly omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 on malaria. Malaria affects millions of people around the globe. The parasite Plasmodium causes the disease. The metabolic and inflammatory alterations in the severe forms have damaging consequences to the host. The lipid content in the MedDiet holds anti-inflammatory and pro-resolutive features in the host and have detrimental effects on the Plasmodium. The lipids from the diet impact the balance of pro- and anti-inflammation, thus, lipids intake from the diet is critical to parasite elimination and host tissue damage caused by an immune response. Herein, we go into the cellular and molecular mechanisms and targets of the MedDiet fatty acids in the host and the parasite, reviewing potential benefits of the MedDiet, on inflammation, ...
All information about the latest scientific publications of the Clínica Universidad de Navarra. TPS in prostate cancer. Scientific publications. Clínica Universidad de Navarra
Shereen Lehman wrote . . . . . . Eating foods high in fiber, such as those found in a Mediterranean diet, was tied to a lower risk of gallbladder surgery in a recent French study. Compared to people who didnt follow a Mediterranean diet pattern, those who adhered to it most closely had a…
BACKGROUND: Specific nutrients or foods have been inconsistently associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohns disease (CD) risks. Thus, we investigated associations between diet as a whole, as dietary patterns, and UC and CD risks. METHODS: Within the prospective EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer) study, we set up a nested matched case-control study among 366,351 participants with inflammatory bowel disease data, including 256 incident cases of UC and 117 of CD, and 4 matched controls per case. Dietary intake was recorded at baseline from validated food frequency questionnaires. Incidence rate ratios of developing UC and CD were calculated for quintiles of the Mediterranean diet score and a posteriori dietary patterns produced by factor analysis. RESULTS: No dietary pattern was associated with either UC or CD risks. However, when excluding cases occurring within the first 2 years after dietary assessment, there was a positive association between a high sugar and soft drinks
Or Martinez-Lapiscina et al report results of a clinical trial of two different versions of a Mediterranean type diet (MedDiet)1 versus a standard low fat diet. The parent trial (PREDIMED) was focused on prevention of cardiovascular disease but cognitive outcomes (using the MMSE and the Clock Drawing Test) were the focus of this report. After a mean of 6½ years, cognitive differences (∼half a point in MMSE) in favour of MedDiet plus olive oil and trends of cognitive differences in favour of MedDiet plus nuts were noted. The associations were present (or even strengthened) after adjusting for multiple potential confounders.. The exploration of the relation of MedDiet with neurological diseases has started only very recently and … ...
I just wanted to give you a little idea of all the books in the series because Im a "Learning Junkie" and book publishers like this make my life easier.. I have to say, Ive always been fascinated by the Mediterranean Diet and the Mediterranean way of cooking and eating. What some people may not realize is that when we talk about the Mediterranean Diet, we arent talking about a stifling, 1/2 a grapefruit and 1/2 wheat toast for breakfast, broth and 1 boiled egg for lunch… type of restricted diet. No, no, a thousand times no. Believe me, I love food so much, I wouldnt give anything like that the time of day!. The Mediterranean Diet is all about eating fresh, colorful, healthy, magnificent food. Part of my fascination with this type of eating lies in what it can do for you. I have written at length about the benefits of The Mediterranean Diet on my Self Help Blog (Self Help Daily) and my Mental Fitness Blog (Out of Bounds). The foods featured in The Mediterranean Diet are beneficial for your ...
Adolescence represents an important period for the development of executive functions, which are a set of important cognitive processes including attentional control. However, very little is known regarding the associations of nutrition with components of executive functions in adolescence. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate associations of dietary patterns and macronutrient composition with attention capacity in European adolescents. This cross-sectional study included 384 (165 boys and 219 girls) adolescents, aged 12·5-17·5 years, from five European countries in the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study. Attention capacity was examined using the d2 Test of Attention. Dietary intake was assessed through two non-consecutive 24 h recalls using a computer-based self-administered tool. Three dietary patterns (diet quality index, ideal diet score and Mediterranean diet score) and macronutrient/fibre intakes were calculated. Linear regression analysis was conducted
Olive Oil: More Potential Health Benefits Revealed. Olives at the "Heart" of a Heart-Healthy Diet. A wealth of studies on the Mediterranean-style diet suggests that it has great potential to fight against many chronic diseases of aging. People in the Mediterranean region who eat this traditional diet have a low incidence of cardiovascular disease and high life-expectancy rates. Olive oil is a key component of this diet, and researchers are delving into the chemical make-up of this oil to unravel just how it may contribute to a long and healthy life. The fatty acids found in olive oil - called mono-unsaturated fats - are thought to be responsible for much of its heart benefits. Olive oil is abundant in beneficial oleic acid, and low in less healthy saturated fats. But researchers are finding that its not just the fatty acid composition of this oil thats healthful. Other components may be just as important. And not just for the heart, but for colon and bone protection too.. Olive Polyphenols: ...
From a health promotion perspective, the use of dietary indices is preferred above single nutrients and foods to evaluate diet quality. Longitudinal research about the association between dietary indices and respectively anthropometric parameters and blood lipids is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal association between three dietary indices (Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI), Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) and Diet Quality Index (DQI)) and respectively anthropometric parameters and blood lipids. A three day diet record was completed by 373 men and 197 women in 2002-2004 and 2012-2014. HEI, MDS and DQI were calculated. Waist circumference (WC) and Body Mass Index (BMI) were used as anthropometric parameters. A linear regression analysis was performed to investigate associations between changes in dietary indices and changes in respectively anthropometric parameters and blood lipids, adjusted for potential confounders. Only in men an increase in all three dietary indices was