TY - JOUR. T1 - The effectiveness of a newly designed toothbrush on dental plaque removal in children. AU - Sasaki, Hidekazu. AU - Matsumura, Mieko. AU - Sakashita, Suguru. AU - Tsuji, Masato. AU - Nakano, Michiyo. AU - Ooshima, Takashi. PY - 2010. Y1 - 2010. N2 - Tooth brushing is accepted as an most effective measure to removal of supragingival plaque. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a newly designed toothbrush both in brushing-simulator in vitro and in children. The newly designed toothbrush had an oval head with 8 tufts in 3 rows and cleaned the tooth surfaces of primary molar on the plastic model of the dentition more effectively in a brushing-simulator than the control toothbrush with 17 tufts in 3 rows. A total of 66 children participated the study to examine the effectiveness of the brush. The newly designed brush could remove the plaque more effectively from the primary tooth surfaces, especially upper buccal and lower lingual surfaces, than the control ...
Dental plaque is a film of bacteria that forms on your teeth and gums after eating foods. Tooth decay occurs when plaque remains on your teeth.
Milk or milk component-based drinks seem to possess many of the biological and physical properties desired for a saliva substitute. Milk contains two primary sources of protein, the caseins and whey.Alpha-Lactalbumin (α-LA) is one of the main proteins found in human and bovine milk whey. Glycomacropeptide is a major component of casein protein .α-La with antimicrobial properties have been reported as α-La yielded bactericidal peptides. Both demonstrate a number of biological activities in medicine not only as milk protein but also as natural antibacterial. Aim of the study: To examine the antibacterial activities of milk proteins glycomacropeptide and alpha lactalbumin compared with chlorhexidine and their effect on Mutans streptococci count in human dental plaque samples from children. Materials and methods: Twenty children patient were sampled as follow six dental plaque samples were taken from each child from the buccal surface of first permanent molars , by sterile dental excavator and stored in
Oral bacteria live in symbiosis with the host. Therefore, when mouthwashes are indicated, selective inhibition of taxa contributing to disease is preferred instead of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The potential selectivity of an oxygenating mouthwash, Ardox-X® (AX), has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial potential of AX and the effects of a twice-daily oral rinse on dental plaque composition. Material and methods: In vitro, 16 oral bacterial strains were tested using agar diffusion susceptibility, minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration tests. A pilot clinical study was performed with 25 healthy volunteers. Clinical assessments and microbiological sampling of supragingival plaque were performed at one month before the experiment (Pre-exp), at the start of the experiment (Baseline) and after the one-week experimental period (Post-exp). During the experiment individuals used AX mouthwash twice daily in absence of other oral hygiene measures.
115 individuals, with mean age 49.6 (±5.8) years, were divided in 4 groups: (A) with gastric diseases and periodontal disease; (B) with gastric diseases and no periodontal disease; (C) without gastric diseases and without periodontal disease, (D) without gastric diseases and with periodontal disease. Supra and subgingival plaque samples were collected from posterior teeth of the individuals with sterile paper points, and prepared for Polymerase Chain Reaction analysis. Fishers exact test was used for detecting statistical differences between groups (p , 0.05 ...
The aim of this study was to determine the predominant supragingival cultivable bacterial flora in Chinese individuals, using the experimental gingivitis model. A total of 11 healthy dental students, mean age 22.5 years (range 20-25) were recruited. All were provided with once-a-week dental prophylaxis and oral hygiene reinforcement for 3 weeks to ensure gingival health. In the fourth week, after prophylaxis, the participants entered a 14- day period without any plaque control. A plaque sample was collected at days 1, 3, 7 and 14 from the buccal surface of the upper right canine, second premolar, first premolar and first molar, respectively. Each sample was then dispensed in tryptic soy-broth transport medium and grown anaerobically to obtain pure cultures, which were subsequently identified. Results showed that Gram-positive cocci and rods were the predominent cultivatable species (51- 61%) in the samples throughout the 14-day period; with time there was a decreasing percentage of cocci and an ...
Periodontal (gum) disease is a serious infection that can damage more than periodontal tissues - supporting bone structure is also at risk. Any bone loss could eventually lead to tooth loss.. To stop it from causing this kind of damage, we must match this diseases aggressiveness with equally aggressive treatment. The various treatment techniques all have the same goal: to remove bacterial plaque, the source of the infection, from all oral surfaces, including below the gum line. Buildup of plaque, a thin film of food particles, after only a few days without adequate brushing and flossing is enough time to trigger gum disease.. The basic removal technique is called scaling, using hand instruments called scalers to manually remove plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) above or just below the gum line. If the disease or infection has advanced to the roots, we may use another technique called root planing in which we shave or "plane" plaque and tartar from the root surfaces.. Advancing gum ...
Perhaps you would like to improve your oral health. Daily toothbrushing and flossing is a sure and simple way to improve your oral health. For successful bacterial plaque removal, it is important to brush at least twice a day using an appropriately sized, soft-bristle, manual or electric toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste. When you brush your teeth, gently position the toothbrush bristles at a 45-degree angle toward the gumline and move the toothbrush across the teeth to effectively remove bacterial plaque. It is also important to floss at least once per day to remove bacterial plaque and food that has accumulated throughout the day. Your toothbrush should be replaced every 3 to 4 months, as well as after you have a cold or flu or if the bristles are frayed. Daily toothbrushing and flossing help to prevent gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay and halitosis (bad breath). The daily use of antimicrobial and fluoride mouthrinses also helps to improve your oral health. ...
Perhaps you would like to improve your oral health. Daily toothbrushing and flossing is a sure and simple way to improve your oral health. For successful bacterial plaque removal, it is important to brush at least twice a day using an appropriately sized, soft-bristle, manual or electric toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste. When you brush your teeth, gently position the toothbrush bristles at a 45-degree angle toward the gumline and move the toothbrush across the teeth to effectively remove bacterial plaque. It is also important to floss at least once per day to remove bacterial plaque and food that has accumulated throughout the day. Your toothbrush should be replaced every 3 to 4 months, as well as after you have a cold or flu or if the bristles are frayed. Daily toothbrushing and flossing help to prevent gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay and halitosis (bad breath). The daily use of antimicrobial and fluoride mouthrinses also helps to improve your oral health. ...
Perhaps you would like to improve your oral health. Daily toothbrushing and flossing is a sure and simple way to improve your oral health. For successful bacterial plaque removal, it is important to brush at least twice a day using an appropriately sized, soft-bristle, manual or electric toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste. When you brush your teeth, gently position the toothbrush bristles at a 45-degree angle toward the gumline and move the toothbrush across the teeth to effectively remove bacterial plaque. It is also important to floss at least once per day to remove bacterial plaque and food that has accumulated throughout the day. Your toothbrush should be replaced every 3 to 4 months, as well as after you have a cold or flu or if the bristles are frayed. Daily toothbrushing and flossing help to prevent gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay and halitosis (bad breath). The daily use of antimicrobial and fluoride mouthrinses also helps to improve your oral health. ...
Published today in the journal Nature, an international team led by the University of Adelaides Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD) and Dental School, with the University of Liverpool in the UK, revealed the complexity of Neandertal behaviour, including dietary differences between Neandertal groups and knowledge of medication.. "Dental plaque traps microorganisms that lived in the mouth and pathogens found in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, as well as bits of food stuck in the teeth - preserving the DNA for thousands of years," says lead author Dr Laura Weyrich, ARC Discovery Early Career Research Fellow with ACAD.. "Genetic analysis of that DNA locked-up in plaque, represents a unique window into Neandertal lifestyle - revealing new details of what they ate, what their health was like and how the environment impacted their behaviour.". The international team analysed and compared dental plaque samples from four Neandertals found at the cave sites of Spy in Belgium and El ...
Dental plaque is a natural biofilm which has been a focus of attention for many years because of its known roles in caries and periodontal diseases. Acid production by plaque bacteria leads to the...
It is not uncommon to come across a colleague, friend, or family member complaining about discomfort on their teeth (or tooth) whenever they consume substances too cold or hot. One among many reasons for the Importance of Visiting the Dentist regularly is to deal with and get advice regarding dental sensitivity. The main reason for sensitivity is in most cases the occurrence of a situation where the anatomy of the particular tooth or teeth is disrupted by a certain cause, especially Dental Plaque or cavity, which leads to exposure of the dental pulp and nerves deep in your teeth.. Dental Plaque - Having a tooth cavity or plaque is one of the most common causes of teeth sensitivity. The mechanism behind dental cavity is that as plaque bacteria produce acidic byproducts on the teeths surfaces of the teeth, decay is what follows. This leads to weakening of the enamel, eventually exposing the dentine, which is composed of tubules leading to the pulp and the root canal where the nerves are located. ...
Biofilms are communities of multiple species of bacteria held together by a polysaccharide matrix. In the case of dental plaque, the polysaccharide is made of glucose links, whereas many other matrix polysaccharides are negatively charged and held together by positively charged metal ions. The bacteria bind to the polysaccharides using protein receptors that exploit the display of hydrophobic binding sites of the polysaccharides. It takes energy to make polysaccharides and the dental plaque bacteria use the energy already expended in the formation of sucrose to produce a polymer of glucose, an alpha-glucan, and free fructose. Thus, sucrose is essential in forming this type of biofilm and without this sugar, the dental plaque cannot form. Milk lactose, or glucose would be a more appropriate sweetener. Unfortunately, high fructose corn syrup would be a poor substitute, because of the high liver toxicity of the fructose (it causes fatty liver, just like alcohol) and very high activity in forming ...
Biofilms are communities of multiple species of bacteria held together by a polysaccharide matrix. In the case of dental plaque, the polysaccharide is made of glucose links, whereas many other matrix polysaccharides are negatively charged and held together by positively charged metal ions. The bacteria bind to the polysaccharides using protein receptors that exploit the display of hydrophobic binding sites of the polysaccharides. It takes energy to make polysaccharides and the dental plaque bacteria use the energy already expended in the formation of sucrose to produce a polymer of glucose, an alpha-glucan, and free fructose. Thus, sucrose is essential in forming this type of biofilm and without this sugar, the dental plaque cannot form. Milk lactose, or glucose would be a more appropriate sweetener. Unfortunately, high fructose corn syrup would be a poor substitute, because of the high liver toxicity of the fructose (it causes fatty liver, just like alcohol) and very high activity in forming ...
Ancient DNA found in the dental plaque of Neandertals - our nearest extinct relative - has provided remarkable new insights into their behaviour, diet and evolutionary history, including their use of plant-based medicine to treat pain and illness.. Published today in the journal Nature, an international team led by the University of Adelaides Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD) and Dental School, with the University of Liverpool in the UK, revealed the complexity of Neandertal behaviour, including dietary differences between Neandertal groups and knowledge of medication.. "Dental plaque traps microorganisms that lived in the mouth and pathogens found in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, as well as bits of food stuck in the teeth - preserving the DNA for thousands of years," says lead author Dr Laura Weyrich, ARC Discovery Early Career Research Fellow with ACAD.. "Genetic analysis of that DNA locked-up in plaque, represents a unique window into Neandertal lifestyle - revealing ...
Three strictly anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, motile bacteria, designated strains ACB1(T), ACB7(T) and ACB8, were isolated from human subgingival dental plaque. All strains required yeast extract for growth. Strains ACB1(T) and ACB8 were able to grow on glucose, lactose, maltose, maltodextrin and raffinose; strain ACB7(T) grew weakly on sucrose only. The growth temperature range was 30-42 °C with optimum growth at 37 °C. Major metabolic fermentation end products of strain ACB1(T) were acetate and lactate; the only product of strains ACB7(T) and ACB8 was acetate. Major fatty acids of strain ACB1(T) were C(14 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)ω7c dimethyl aldehyde (DMA) and C(18 : 1)ω7c DMA. Major fatty acids of strain ACB7(T) were C(12 : 0), C(14 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)ω7c and C(16 : 1)ω7c DMA. The hydrolysate of the peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, indicating peptidoglycan type A1γ. Genomic DNA G+C content varied from 42 to 43.3% between strains. ...
What is the Connection between Anaerobic Metabolism and Dental Plaque?. By, Jill Johnston. Dental Plaque. Bacteria Polysaccharides form sticky colonies Plaque formation Anaerobic metabolism. CAUTION!. High Sugar Diets Carbohydrates : Sugars, Starches Slideshow 2145032 by wallis
Results Of the 1390 participants, 4.2% had died during the follow-up. Women had died at a mean age of 61.0 (±2.6 SD) years and men at the age of 60.2 (±2.9 SD) years. The amount of dental plaque between those who had died versus survived was statistically significant (p,0.001). In multiple logistic regression analysis, dental plaque appeared to be a significant independent predictor associated with 1.79 times the OR of death (p,0.05). Age increased the risk with an OR of 1.98 (p,0.05) and gender (men) with an OR of 1.91 (p,0.05). The malignancies were more widely scattered in men, while breast cancer was the most frequent cause of death in women. ...
Plaque bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of bacteria in plaque from teeth. Dental plaque is a biofilm of bacteria that forms on teeth. It can lead to tooth decay if not removed by regular brushing. Magnification: x5200, when printed 10 centimetres wide. - Stock Image C023/5763
New research reveals that a naturally occurring amino acid found in many foods can actually break down dental plaque, helping millions of people avoid dental decay, cavities, gingivitis and gum disease.. According to a May 8 Futurity article, a University of Michigan study found that L-arginine, an amino acid present in red meat, poultry, fish and dairy, prevents plaque from forming on the teeth.. "This is important, as bacteria like to aggregate on surfaces to form biofilms. Dental plaque is a biofilm," Alexander Rickard, assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan, said of the studys findings.. Rickard explained that dental plaque biofilms contribute to the billions of dollars spent on dental treatments and office visits each year, not to mention the $1.4 billion spent annually on tooth whitening procedures and products.. The consequences of having excess dental plaque can lead to much more serious health complications, like heart disease. Currently, some 24% of ...
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Youve probably brushed your teeth every day since early childhood when your parents handed you your first toothbrush. But do you really know if youre doing it effectively and removing disease causing bacterial plaque or biofilm? Lets take a look at the basics of tooth brushing.. What is the goal of brushing and flossing your teeth? While it is true that brushing your teeth freshens your breath and removes stains from the surfaces of your teeth, the principal goal of tooth brushing is to remove dental bacterial plaque. This biofilm grows in the nooks and crannies of your teeth, and especially at the gum line - regardless of what you eat or drink. If left on your teeth, this bacterial film can cause gingivitis (inflammation of your gums). It can progress to periodontal disease, affecting the supporting bone of your teeth and even result in tooth loss. This means that flossing should also be an important part of your daily dental hygiene routine to remove plaque from the protected areas between ...
The researchers performed full-mouth examinations to assess participants periodontal conditions. Saliva and dental plaque samples were collected to evaluate colonization by several of pathogens - P. gingivalis, T. denticola, T. forsythia, and A. actinomycetemcomitans - and to characterize oral microbial diversity.. Compared with the control group, patients with precancerous lesions experienced higher prevalence of bleeding when probed (31.5 percent versus 22.4 percent), higher levels of two pathogens (T. denticola and A. actinomycetemcomitans), and less bacterial diversity in their saliva.. A further analysis, which took into account sociodemographic factors, oral health behaviors, and periodontal assessments, revealed additional predictors of precancerous lesions: elevated colonization of three pathogens (T. forsythia, T. denticola, and A. actinomycetemcomitans), decreased bacterial diversity in dental plaque, and not flossing regularly.. The researchers concluded that the colonization of ...
Periodontal (gum) disease is a bacterial infection, which if left untreated could cause gum recession, bone loss and eventually tooth loss. Caused mainly by plaque left on tooth surfaces from poor hygiene practices, the deeper the infection spreads below the gum line, the more difficult it is to treat.. One possible scenario involves parts of a tooths root structure known as furcations. These are branching forks formed during the early development of teeth with multiple roots where they take different paths from the base of the crown. As gum disease spreads around the root it may cause different degrees of bone loss at the point of the branch.. Its imperative when treating gum disease to uncover and remove any bacterial plaque or calculus (hardened plaque deposits) found, including below the gum line. To address bacterial plaque at the root level, its important to first determine if bone loss has involved the furcations (where the roots separate, also referred to as a "furcation invasion") ...
All treatments for periodontal (gum) disease focus on one goal - to remove any bacterial plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) that are at the heart of the infection. Plaque is a thin surface film of food particles and bacteria that cause gum disease.. Plaque builds up on tooth surfaces due to inadequate oral hygiene. And as the disease progresses brushing and flossing wont be enough - youll need our services and specialized equipment to fully remove the plaque and calculus. The basic technique is called scaling in which we remove plaque and calculus manually from tooth surfaces above and just a few millimeters below the gum line.. As the disease develops, though, the slight natural gap between teeth and gums may begin to increase to form voids known as periodontal pockets. Filled with infection, these pockets can extend below the gum line onto the roots of the tooth. If the pocket extends more than 4 millimeters, basic scaling may not be able to remove all of the plaque and ...
Poor oral hygiene may be associated with increased risk of cancer and premature death, researchers found.. Among healthy adults in Sweden plaque build-up increased the relative risk of premature death 79 percent, Birgitta Söder, PhD, of the Karolinska Institutet in Huddinge, Sweden, and colleagues reported in BMJ Open.. The finding, the authors wrote, suggests that increased plaque and associated toxins and enzymes, may be released from the built-up biofilm and enter the bloodstream through the gingival crevice, thus increasing the risk of malignancies.. In 1985 Söder and colleagues initiated a longitudinal study of 1,390 randomly selected, healthy Swedish adults ages 30 to 40, who had no signs of periodontitis at baseline. The participants were followed with periodic checkups including smoking habits and oral health through 2009.. Dental plaque measures were taken at baseline and in 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, and 2009.. Over the 24-year study period, 58 patients died, including 35 deaths due to ...
A detailed description of dental plaque including its formation and organization. Various plaque hypothesis including specific plaque hypothesis, non-specific, ecological plaque hypothesis and keystone pathogen plaque hypothesis.
Dental plaque is the main cause of cavities and gum disease, and can harden into tartar if not removed daily. Visit Colgate.com to learn about tooth plaque and all the techniques and products that will help you prevent plaque from causing tooth decay.
Drinking tea may help prevent tooth decay. A study carried out at the University of Illinois, USA has shown that bacteria present in dental plaque stopped growing when people rinsed their mouths with black tea five times for 30 seconds over a 15 minute period. It is the poplyphenol components of the tea that fights dental plaque. A previous Swedish study had also confirmed this finding, showing that people who rinsed their mouths with black tea for one minute, ten times a day, had significantly less bacterial plaque than those who used just water ...
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Question - What is dental plaques & How are they removed ?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Gingivitis, Ask a Dentist
This 3D medical animation shows how dental plaque creates bacteria which can be absorbed into the gums and enter the blood stream. The bacteria invades the endothelium causing inflammation in the vessel. This inflammation can cause the formation or an atherosclerotic plaque which can block the vessel and cause heart tissue to die.
Dental plaque may be a culprit in the development of pneumonia, but better oral health can mitigate that risk both in ventilated hospital patients and in healthy individuals.
Therapeutic agents intended to reduce dental plaque and prevent tooth decay are often removed by saliva and the act of swallowing before they can take effect. But a team of researchers has developed a way to keep the drugs from being washed away.
Molecular biologist Christina Warinner studies calculus, or fossilized dental plaque, which contains a trove of genetic clues to past human diet and disease.
Molecular biologist Christina Warinner studies calculus, or fossilized dental plaque, which contains a trove of genetic clues to past human diet and disease.
Learn how to remove the dental plaque from your teeth, safely and naturally at home. Try to include these tips in your daily routine and see the results!
Semantic Scholar extracted view of Synergistic effects on DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes of mitogens and dental plaque sonicates in man and macaque monkeys. by May J. Reed et al.
Ancient DNA found in the dental plaque of Neandertals - our nearest extinct relative - has provided remarkable new insights into their behaviour, diet and evolutionary history, including their use of plant-based medicine to treat ... Read more
... PLAQUE Dental plaque is defined as a highly specific variable structural entity formed by sequential colonization of microorganism o…
Were all susceptible to gum disease when we fail to practice effective daily brushing and flossing. But you may have a greater risk of gum disease (and more severe forms of it) if any of the following categories pertain to you:. Aging. Gum disease risk naturally increases with age. We can lower the risk with an effective daily hygiene regimen, along with a minimum of two office cleanings and checkups each year. Brushing and flossing removes bacterial plaque and food particles which accumulate on tooth surfaces. The longer plaque remains in contact with gum tissues, the greater the chances of infection.. Pregnancy. Although women tend to take better care of their teeth than men, they still face unique issues that increase their risk. During pregnancy, for example, certain hormone levels rise, which cause the gums to become more responsive to bacteria. Other hormonal fluctuations throughout a womans life, including taking certain drugs for birth control or during menopause, can cause similar ...
These defence mechanisms, which do not affect reproductive ability or longevity (Begg 1964), are still evident today but the teeth do not get as worn because they are used only for chewing and the food consistency is much more soft than it was in the Stone Age. These dental mechanisms are similar to hair or nail growth.. Harry Sicher (1953), speaking about the attrition of teeth, said that it is possible that wear of teeth has a positive function, and questioned whether nature sacrifices tooth substance to achieve an increase in function. Peck and Peck (1972) discovered the relation between tooth size, mesiodistal and labiolingual widths of the inferior incisors, and the degree of crowding (PI index). Betteridge (1981) also found a relationship between tooth size and degree of crowding (BI index).. These facts can be considered an anthropological base for the practice of current techniques of slenderizing.. Influence of Slenderizing on Dental Plaque, Caries and Periodontal Disease. A comparison ...
Bacterial plaque is a deposit of microorganisms that forms a biofilm on the surfaces within the mouth. The dental biofilm is formed by macromolecules that a
Your bodys organ systems are interlinked - what happens in one system may affect another. An example of this is the interrelationship between periodontal (gum) disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD).. Medicine has discovered a common link between these two different conditions - inflammation. A result of the bodys defense mechanisms, chronic inflammation is damaging to both your mouth and your heart. Inflammation can destroy the gums soft tissue and underlying bone and lead to tooth loss. In the cardiovascular system, inflammation can begin and accelerate the buildup of plaque within arterial blood vessels (atherosclerosis). This inhibits the flow of oxygenated blood to both the heart and brain, which sets the stage for a heart attack or stroke.. Gum disease begins with poor oral hygiene. When brushing and flossing arent performed on a regular basis, or not performed adequately, it allows a thin layer of bacterial plaque called biofilm to build up on the teeth. The bacteria cause infection ...
While you may most associate professional dental cleanings with that "squeaky" clean feeling you have afterward, there is a much higher goal. What is also referred to as "non-surgical periodontal therapy," these cleanings seek to remove bacterial plaque and tartar (hard deposits) not only from the visible portions of the tooth but also the root surfaces (scaling), so as to reduce the risk and occurrence of periodontal gum disease.. For generations, this was primarily achieved by dental hygienists using hand-held instruments specially designed to manually remove plaque from tooth surfaces. Since the 1950s, though, a new technology known as ultrasonic or power scaling has become more prevalent in use. Initially only used in the outer most portions of the gum tissue (the supra-gingival area) power scaling is increasingly employed to clean the sub-gingival area, much closer to the tooth roots. As this technology has developed, its been shown to be just as effective, if not superior in some cases, ...
Dental Plaque is a soft but adherent deposit of bacteria and their products, which forms on all tooth surfaces and other objects in the mouth, for example; fillings or dentures. This Plaque formation is a natural, physiological process and is an example of a biofilm, which means it is not a haphazard collection of bacteria but a complex association of many different bacterial species living together in a single environment. For instance, a newborn babys mouth is sterile but within a few hours, microorganisms appear; mainly Streptococcus salivarius. By the time the baby had his/ her first tooth out, a complex flora is established. Basically, Dental Plaque is scarcely visible in thin layers and it can be revealed only by the use of a Plaque-Disclosing Agent. In thick layers, it can be seen as yellowish or grey deposits which cannot be removed with mouthwashes or by irrigation but can be brushed off. It is usual to find it on areas which are difficult to reach by tooth brushing, for example; in ...
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Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease that affects the tissues surrounding the teeth, is a common disease worldwide. It is caused by a dysregulation of the host inflammatory response to bacterial infection, which leads to soft and hard tissue destruction. In particular, it is the excessive inflammation in response to bacterial plaque that leads to the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from neutrophils, which, then play a critical role in the destruction of periodontal tissue.Generally, ROS produced from immune cells exhibit an anti-bacterial effect and play a role in host defense and immune regulation. Excessive ROS, however, can exert cytotoxic effects, cause oxidative damage to proteins and DNA, can interfere with cell growth and cell cycle progression, and induce apoptosis of gingival fibroblasts. Collectively, these effects enable ROS to directly induce periodontal tissue damage. Some ROS also act as intracellular signaling molecules during osteoclastogenesis, and can thus also play an
Dr. Berger earned his dental degree from the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco, after earning his bachelors degree from California Polytechnic State University. He has since taken numerous postgraduate education courses, with recent training in dental implants from the renowned Misch International Implant Institute™ and in occlusion (the contact between teeth) from Frank Spear. This training allows him to incorporate the latest treatments and techniques into his practice to give you a healthy, beautiful smile. Dr. Bergers commitment to lifelong education means he is constantly evaluating emerging dental methods and technologies in order to provide his patients with the best results in the least invasive manner with a high emphasis on comfort. This commitment ensures the highest level of care, both today and tomorrow ...