Data from 1.1 million young Swedish men (conscription information taken at age 18) has shown that those with poorer cardiovascular fitness were 2.5 times more likely to develop early-onset dementia later in life and 3.5 times more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment, while those with a lower IQ had a 4 times greater risk of early dementia and a threefold greater risk of MCI. A combination of both poor cardiovascular fitness and low IQ entailed a more than 7 times greater risk of early-onset dementia, and more than 8 times greater risk of MCI.. The increased risk remained even when controlled for other risk factors, such as heredity, medical history, and social-economic circumstances.. The development of early-onset dementia was taken from national disease registries. During the study period, a total of 660 men were diagnosed with early-onset dementia.. A further study of this database, taken from 488,484 men, of whom 487 developed early-onset dementia (at a median age of 54), found nine ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Neuropsychiatric symptoms as predictors of progression to severe Alzheimers dementia and death. T2 - The cache county dementia progression study. AU - Peters, Matthew E.. AU - Schwartz, Sarah. AU - Han, Dingfen. AU - Rabins, Peter V.. AU - Steinberg, Martin. AU - Tschanz, Joann T.. AU - Lyketsos, Constantine G.. PY - 2015/5/1. Y1 - 2015/5/1. N2 - Objective: Little is known about factors influencing the rate of progression of Alzheimers dementia. Using data from the Cache County Dementia Progression Study, the authors examined the link between clinically significant neuropsychiatric symptoms in mild Alzheimers dementia and progression to severe dementia or death. Method: The Cache County Dementia Progression Study is a longitudinal study of dementia progression in incident cases of this condition. Survival analyses included unadjusted Kaplan-Meier plots and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Hazard ratio estimates controlled for age at dementia onset, dementia ...
This study investigates the impact of a weekly group providing sport and physical activities for men with early onset dementia established by Notts County Football in the Community (NCFC). There were three aims: investigate the effect of early onset dementia on individuals with the condition and their carers; examine perceptions of current levels of service provision for people with early onset dementia; and analyse the impact of the group. Men with dementia (n=5) attending the sessions, their carers (n=5), NCFC coaching staff (n=5) and people organising/facilitating the sessions (n=5), were interviewed. Semi-structured interviews explored the participants experiences of dementia, their opinions on current service provisions and on the sessions. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Four main themes were found: loss related to the condition of dementia and its impact on relationships (Loss); lack of age-appropriate services for people with early onset dementia (Lack of Resources); ...
Dementia prevalence calculator The dementia prevalence calculator, available below, can be used to estimate the number of people in the population of a town, city, or community who may have dementia.
Many age-related health problems have been associated with dementia, leading to the hypothesis that late-life dementia may be determined less by specific risk factors, and more by the operation of multiple health deficits in the aggregate. Our study addressed (a) how the predictive value of dementia risk varies by the number of deficits considered and (b) how traditional (for example. vascular risks) and nontraditional risk factors (for example, foot problems, nasal congestion) compare in their predictive effects. Older adults in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging who were cognitively healthy at baseline were analyzed (men, 2,902; women, 4,337). Over a 10-year period, 44.8% of men and 33.4% of women died; 7.4% of men and 9.1% of women without baseline cognitive impairment developed dementia. Self-rated health problems, including, but not restricted to, dementia risk factors, were coded as deficit present/absent. Different numbers of randomly selected variables were used to calculate various
Doctoral student Jennifer OBrien, of QUTs School of Psychology and Counselling, said a dementia diagnosis might affect the way partners interacted and viewed their future.. "Receiving a diagnosis of dementia can be a challenging experience for the person and those closest to them," Ms OBrien said.. "We know a dementia diagnosis can prompt significant life changes like moving house, while for others it motivates them to keep to routines and familiar environments.". "For many people, their relationship with their spouse is the most important relationship in their life but we do not know much about how this relationship is affected by a significant life event like a dementia diagnosis.". She said a lot of research had been done on how family members responded to diagnoses but it was relatively rare to ask the person who had just been diagnosed.. "We are seeking the views of both the person diagnosed and their partner because we know that just because you receive a diagnosis doesnt mean you are ...
The project RHAPSODY analyzes European health and social care systems for the underserved group of people with young onset dementia. Results will be used to build and probe an educational, interactive e-learning programme for carers.. A multidisciplinary team of investigators from academia, industry and patient and carer organisations are joining their efforts in the RHAPSODY project (Research to Assess Policies and Strategies for Dementia in the Young). While dementia is commonly viewed as a health and social problem of old age, young onset dementia is defined by symptoms occurring before the age of 65 years.. Professor Alexander Kurz, project coordinator, mentions: When dementia strikes at a young age it is associated with specific and particularly severe problems for patients, family carers, and healthcare professionals. Young onset dementia has a profound impact on marital relationships and family structures, often involving children. Typically it leads to premature retirement and reduced ...
en] Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the consistency of neuropsychiatric subsyndromes of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory across several clinical and demographic subgroups ( e. g. dementia subtypes, dementia severity, medication use, age and gender) in a large sample of outpatients with dementia. Methods: Cross-sectional data of 2,808 patients with dementia from 12 centres from the European Alzheimers Disease Consortium were collected. Principal component analysis was used for factor analysis. Subanalyses were performed for dementia subtypes, dementia severity, medication use, age and gender. Results: The results showed the relatively consistent presence of the 4 neuropsychiatric subsyndromes `hyperactivity, `psychosis, `affective symptoms and `apathy across the subanalyses. The factor structure was not dependent on dementia subtypes, age and gender but was dependent on dementia severity and cholinesterase use. The factors hyperactivity and affective symptoms were ...
Presentation Objectives 1. Recognize and assess significant cognitive impairment in older individuals The anatomy of memory - Normal versus Pathological memory changes with aging - Bedside or office testing of cognitive function 2. Understand the clinical presentation and nature of common dementia syndromes Common dementia clinical syndromes - Alzheimers disease - Vascular cognitive impairment - Frontotemporal dementia - behavioural, semantic and progressive aphasia types - Dementia with Lewy bodies - Subcortical dementias - Parkinsons disease dementia - Alcohol, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, Huntingtonsdisease, AIDS and other dementias - Routine investigations in dementia 3. Determine which patients might benefit from anti-dementia drugs and other psychotropics Target symptoms for medications - Alertness and attention/concentration - Memory - Motivation - Improve speech - Improve mood - Reduce anxiety - Reduce psychotic symptoms - Reduce agitation and
A new study will look at the relationship between dementia and high blood pressure, and how blood flow is regulated in the brain. The findings may help researchers identify if some drugs already used for other human conditions may be useful for the treatment of diseases such as stroke and Alzheimers disease (AD). Academics at Bristol Universitys Dementia Research Group, based at Frenchay Hospital, have been awarded a grant of over £266,000 from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) to assess whether drugs that block a small naturally produced molecule called endothelin-1 can improve blood flow through the brain.. In animal models of AD a reduction in blood flow occurs well before the onset of Alzheimer-like damaging changes to brain tissue. The most potent cause of the narrowing of blood vessels is a small molecule called endothelin-1 (ET-1). This molecule is produced by the action of endothelin-converting enzymes (ECEs).. The Bristol-based academics recently found that ECE-2 in the brain of AD ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Wisconsin card sorting test and brain perfusion imaging in early dementia. AU - Takeda, Naoya. AU - Terada, Seishi. AU - Sato, Shuhei. AU - Honda, Hajime. AU - Yoshida, Hidenori. AU - Kishimoto, Yuki. AU - Kamata, Gosuke. AU - Oshima, Etsuko. AU - Ishihara, Takeshi. AU - Kuroda, Shigetoshi. PY - 2010/2. Y1 - 2010/2. N2 - Background/Aims: The presence of frontal or executive deficits in patients even at early stages of dementia is now widely recognized. We investigated the relationship between the scores of the Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) and brain perfusion in patients with early dementia. Methods: A total of 77 subjects participated in this study. They underwent the WCST and brain single photon emission computed tomography with 99mTc-ethylcisteinate dimer. We analyzed the data using a regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantification software program, 3DSRT. Results: The number of categories achieved (CA) scores of the WCST had a weakly positive correlation with regional ...
Get the facts about moderate dementia at Caring.com. Read articles and get answers to questions about moderate dementia, tips on caring for dementia patients, and other resources.
Introduction: Epidemiological data show that in France only half of patients with Alzheimer disease are currently diagnosed in the general population. The absence of early diagnosis of dementia reduces the opportunities of patients to receive optimal care. One of the consequences of undiagnosed dementia is inadequate use of emergency care units.. The main objective: The main aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a systematic case-finding procedure of dementia cases in nursing homes through a MDTM on the rate of hospitalization in emergency care units.. Secondary objectives:. To assess the impact of systematic tracking of dementia cases on the:. ...
Alzheimers disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia. Research into environmental factors is currently focused on cerebrovascular risk factors.1 Treatment of vascular risk factors has been associated with slower cognitive decline and reduced risk of AD in older populations.2 Genetics are important in rare genetically determined autosomal dominant familial patients with AD or frontotemporal dementia (FTD).3 Apolipoprotein E (APOE) is a risk factor for familial late-onset sporadic AD, but its role as a risk factor in younger populations is unclear. The role of APOE as a risk factor for FTD is controversial.. Early-onset dementia is dementia that develops in individuals prior to the age of 65 years, and some studies suggest it is associated with a higher mortality. AD and FTD are the most common causes of dementia in this population.4 The onset of FTD may be characterised by behavioural change and speech disturbance, whereas AD is usually characterised by defective episodic memory. It is ...
Dementia is a major cause of disability and suffering among older people [1]. Being a partner of an individual with a chronic, degenerative illness like dementia can be highly stressful and challenging. The literature clearly documents that caring for a person with dementia can be associated with loss of mental health and subjective wellbeing [2-15]. Studies have reported that 20-50% of dementia caregivers develop depression or high levels of depressive symptoms [4, 6], and that these rates are stable or increasing over time [2, 16]. A recent prospective cohort study estimated the incidence of depression among spouses of persons with dementia to be more than fourfold higher than among spouses of persons without dementia [7]. Caregivers of dementia patients also experience higher levels of depressive symptoms compared with caregivers of physically impaired older adults [17]. The manifestation of anxiety among caregivers has received less attention [18]. Some studies have reported that clinically ...
A brain disease characterised by more than one cognitive disorder (e.g. reduced memory, mental capacity or recognition of objects or faces). Without further specifications, the diagnosis is demential syndrome (ICD-10 code: F03), which accounted for nearlyy 65 percent of dementia-related deaths in 2014 and is classified under mental disorders (Chapter F of the ICD-10 Codes). Alzheimers disease (ICD-10 code G30) is the most common form of dementia accounting for around 25 percent of dementia-related deaths in 2014, followed by vascular dementia (ICD-10 code F01), which accounted for around 9 percent of dementia-related deaths in 2014. For the purpose of tabulation of dementia as a cause of death, the ICD-10 codes F01-F03, F05 and G30 are combined together. This is because on death certificates, the term used to specify cause of death is often just dementia rather than the specific form; in addition, more mixed forms of dementia have been observed over time, e.g. vascular dementia combined with ...
Regardless of which type of dementia is diagnosed and what part of the brain is affected, each person will experience dementia in their own unique way.. Dementia can affect a person at any age but it is more commonly diagnosed in people over the age of 65 years. A person developing dementia before age 65 is said to have young onset dementia.. There are over 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK and this is set to rise to over one million by 2021.. St Oswalds Hospice acknowledges that dementia is a life limiting condition and that a person with dementia has palliative care needs. We recognise the challenges faced by families living with dementia and our aim is to support them to live well and at the end of life, to die well. ...
On 26 September, Ole Christensen, MEP (Denmark) provided the following statement on the launch of the new Danish national action plan on dementia:. "As the living age of Europeans continue to rise to a yet unknown stage, the number of dementia patients is increasing as well. Sadly, we know that this disease has severe implications, not only on the lives of the persons diagnosed with dementia, but also on their families. In order to combat and prevent this disease we have to act and we have to act now.. Therefore, I am pleased that a majority of the Danish political parties are earmarking EUR 60 million over a 3-year period through the national dementia strategy.. With the help of the national dementia strategy, support will be provided to families, money will be earmarked for improving research on Alzheimer and other forms of dementia, and a stronger focus on prevention will be provided. These are major improvements.. I sincerely hope that the Danish dementia strategy will show capable of ...
Dementia, including Alzheimers disease (AD), is one of the most burdensome medical conditions. In order to better understand the epidemiology of dementia in Italy, we conducted a systematic search of studies published between 1980 and April 2014 investigating the prevalence of dementia and AD in Italy and then evaluated the quality of the selected studies. A systematic search was performed using PubMed/Medline and Embase to identify Italian population-based studies on the prevalence of dementia among people aged ≥60 years. The quality of the studies was scored according to Alzheimers Disease International (ADI) criteria. Sixteen articles on the prevalence of dementia and AD in Italy were eligible and 75 % of them were published before the year 2000. Only one study was a national survey, whereas most of the studies were locally based (Northern Italy and Tuscany). Overall, the 16 studies were attributed a mean ADI quality score of 7.6 (median 7.75). Available studies on the prevalence of dementia and
... is a term used to define a wide range of brain diseases that can result in an array of symptoms. The changes taking place in the brain disrupt the function of the brains nerve cells (neurons), leading to cell death or damage. Alzheimers dementia is the most common type of dementia in the Western world, accounting for 60-80% of dementias. The overall incidence of dementia increases with age. Approximately 10% of persons over the age of 65 have been diagnosed with dementia. The number of people with dementia is estimated to double every five years beyond the age of 65.. There are several tests that may aid in determining the diagnosis of dementia. Imaging of brain anatomy with CAT scan or MRI will assess for areas of brain injury and loss of brain tissue as can be seen with widespread loss of the brains nerve cells. Brain PET scans are sometimes used in the detection of different types of cortical dementias such as Alzheimers or frontotemporal dementias. As appropriate, other tests ...
The rate of progression depends on the underlying causes. The duration of history helps establish the cause of dementia; Alzheimers disease is slowly progressive over years, whereas encephalitis may be rapid over weeks. Dementia due to cerebrovascular disease appears to occur "stroke by stroke". As a rule, all types of dementia display a tendency to be accelerated by any changes in the environment, intercurrent infections or surgical procedures.. Alzheimers disease is one of the most common consequences of dementia, which can be established during life by the early memory failure and slow progression. Unfortunately, no effective treatment is known. Metabolic dementia can be caused by excessive alcohol consumption or chronic subdural haematoma. Improving the quality of life, there is some evidence that the herbal remedy can delay the progression of dementia and that long-term use of vitamin E may reduce the chances of developing dementia in old age. However, more research is needed.. There are ...
At the beginning of the 1980s the establishment view in the English speaking world was that there were two primary causes of dementia: Alzheimers disease and vascular disease. Picks disease was an acknowledged pathological entity but considered sufficiently rare to have little clinical relevance for dementia patients presenting to neurology or psychiatry clinics. In any case it could not be distinguished from Alzheimers disease in life. It was against this prevailing background that I set up our early onset dementia clinic with Julie Snowden as principal neuropsychologist. My early interest in cognitive neurology and dementia had been consolidated during a sabbatical in Boston in 1976, where I acquired an analytical approach to cognitive assessment and saw firsthand the value of the multidisciplinary clinic. In our own clinic, what rapidly became clear was that patients exhibited very different patterns of difficulty. Far from the global impairment of intellect that had hitherto defined ...
An acetylcholinesterase inhibitor such as donepezil (oral, funded), rivastigmine (transdermal patches funded with Special Authority approval - see: "Rivastigmine patch brand change", oral not funded) or galantamine (oral, not funded) may be considered in people with Alzheimers-type dementia, vascular dementia where subcortical ischaemic changes are prominent and dementia associated with Parkinsons disease/Dementia with Lewy Bodies (unapproved indication). Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors should not be prescribed to people with mild cognitive impairment.2. The treatment effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are generally modest; not all patients will respond to treatment and it is not possible to predict response. There is no evidence that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors prevent the progression of dementia, however, some people may have a temporary improvement in cognition and functionality. A meta-analysis of 43 RCTs including over 16,000 people with Alzheimers disease reported that ...
Alcohol-related dementia presents as a global deterioration in intellectual function with memory not being specifically affected, but it may occur with other forms of dementia, resulting in a wide range of symptoms.[3] Certain individuals with alcohol-related dementia present with damage to the frontal lobes of their brain causing disinhibition, loss of planning and executive functions, and a disregard for the consequences of their behavior. Other types of alcohol-related dementia such as Korsakoffs Syndrome cause the destruction of certain areas of the brain, where changes in memory, primarily a loss of short term memory,[4] are the main symptom. Most presentations of alcohol dementia are somewhere along the spectrum between a global dementia and Korsakoffs Psychosis, and may include symptoms of both.[3]. Individuals affected by alcohol-related dementia may develop memory problems, language impairment, and an inability to perform complex motor tasks such as getting dressed. Heavy alcohol ...
Dementia is one of the major causes of personal, societal and financial dependence in older people and in todays ageing society there is a pressing need for early and accurate markers of cognitive decline. There are several subtypes of dementia but the four most common are Alzheimers disease, Lewy body dementia, vascular dementia and frontotemporal dementia. These disorders can only be diagnosed at autopsy, and ante-mortem assessments of probable dementia (e.g. of Alzheimer type) are traditionally driven by clinical symptoms of cognitive or behavioural deficits. However, owing to the overlapping nature of symptoms and age of onset, a significant proportion of dementia cases remain incorrectly diagnosed. Misdiagnosis can have an extensive impact, both at the level of the individual, who may not be offered the appropriate treatment, and on a wider scale, by influencing the entry of patients into relevant clinical trials. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to improve diagnosis by providing non
Background. Dementia is a national priority and this research addresses the Prime Ministers commitment to dementia research as demonstrated by his 2020 challenge and the new UK Dementia Research Institute. In the UK , 800,000 older people have dementia. It has a major impact on the lives of people with dementia themselves, on the lives of their family carers and on services, and costs the nation £26B per year. Pharmacological cures for dementias such as Alzheimers disease are not expected before 2025. If no cure can be found, the ageing demographic will result in 2 million people living with dementia by 2050. People with dementia lose much more than just their memory and their daily living skills; they can also lose their independence, their dignity and status, their confidence and morale, and their roles both within the family and beyond. They can be seen as a burden by society, by their families and even by themselves, and may feel unable to contribute to society. This programme of research ...
There is a paucity of data on the prevalence and correlates of Alzheimers disease and related dementias in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of Alzheimers disease and related dementias in rural Uganda. We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study in a rural region of southwestern Uganda. The Brief Community Screening Instrument for Dementia was administered to a multi-stage area probability sample of 400 people aged 60 years and over. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate correlates of probable dementia. Overall, 80 (20%) of the sample screened positive for dementia. On multivariable regression, we estimated the following correlates of probable dementia: age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.02 per year; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.03, p|0.001), having some formal education (AOR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.41-0.81, p = 0.001), exercise (AOR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.27-0.72, p = 0.001), and having a ventilated kitchen (AOR, 0.43; (95% CI
Personal accounts of living with dementia can be an invaluable support to people with dementia and give insight to all who work in this area. The Dementia in Europe magazine runs a regular feature about peoples experiences from different countries around Europe.. In this section we have contributions from and/or summaries of literature about peoples experiences of living with dementia.. To read news articles written by people living with dementia, please also see our news section called Living with dementia.. ...
Many people confuse frontal lobe dementia with Alzheimers disease however frontal lobe dementia is not the same as Alzheimers at all. Frontal lobe dementia affects people between the ages of 40-65 and the frontal lobe does not affect memory. Alzheimers does not start until after the age of 65 and affects your memory. The frontal […]. ...
The rate of progression depends on the underlying causes. The duration of history helps establish the cause of dementia; Alzheimers disease is slowly progressive over years, whereas encephalitis may be rapid over weeks. Dementia due to cerebrovascular disease appears to occur "stroke by stroke". As a rule, all types of dementia display a tendency to be accelerated by any changes in the environment, intercurrent infections or surgical procedures.. Alzheimers disease is one of the most common consequences of dementia, which can be established during life by the early memory failure and slow progression. Unfortunately, no effective treatment is known. Metabolic dementia can be caused by excessive alcohol consumption or chronic subdural haematoma. Improving the quality of life, there is some evidence that the herbal remedy can delay the progression of dementia and that long-term use of vitamin E may reduce the chances of developing dementia in old age. However, more research is needed.. There are ...
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The event is being organised by members of the Alzheimers Research UK Bristol and Bath Network Centre, a community of dementia researchers from the universities of Bath, Bristol, and the West of England. Alzheimers Research UK is the UKs leading dementia research charity, funding research into the causes of dementia, diagnosis, preventions and treatments. The charity funds more than £33 million of dementia research across the UK, allowing scientists to uncover more about the diseases that cause dementia and contribute to the global effort to put a stop to the heartbreak the condition brings.. Speakers on the day include Dr Nancy Zook, who will talk about the memory and thinking tests used to diagnose dementia; Dr Praminda Caleb-Solly, who will speak about the potential of robotics to support people living with dementia; and Sara Desforges a solicitor who will discuss some of the legal issues that can be important for people with dementia and their families to consider.. Professor Pat Kehoe, ...
Dementia is defined as a decline in cognitive function from baseline. It is a syndrome caused by a variety of disorders, the most common of which are Alzheimer disease, vascular dementia, Lewy body dementia, and frontotemporal dementia. The incidence and prevalence of dementia increase with age. It is estimated that by the year 2047, more than 9 million Americans will have some form of it (1). Institutionalization is ultimately required for many patients with dementia, and 67% die in nursing homes (2). Although there is currently no cure for most forms of dementia, research findings and accumulated clinical experience support a set of practices that serve to maximize the function and overall well-being of patients with dementia and their caregivers ...
A collection of disease information resources and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists for Presenile dementia, Kraepelin type
In addition to Alzheimers disease, the most serious and the most common of the progressive dementias, there are a number of other diseases that may cause senile dementia, or in laymans terms, confusion that is beyond the normal for aging adults. While it is common for some minor confusion or memory problems to develop in older adults, senile dementia goes beyond what is considered to be normal. Four to five percent of Americans of both genders, over the age of 65 have some degree of mental and intellectual impairment (Source: MacLean, ed. 1993).. Besides Alzheimers disease which is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, (behind heart disease, cancer and stroke) there are a number of curable or treatable causes for senile dementia including over medication, often seen in patients in long term care facilities, malnutrition and dehydration. Other causes that can cause the symptoms that mimic the dementia related to Alzheimers disease include: depression, chronic alcoholism, ...
Excessive alcohol use could increase your risk for all types of dementia, particularly early-onset dementia, according to a new study.
Eventbrite - Jillian Jeffery - GM Operations, Alzheimers Australia QLD presents Dementia and Sensory Challenges - Dementia can be more than memory - Tuesday, 8 August 2017 at Alzheimers Australia QLD, Brisbane, Queensland. Find event and ticket information.
The Nantz National Alzheimer Center at the Methodist Neurological Institute in Houston, TX, issued the following news release:. Know Your Risk Factors to Help Prevent Dementia. Research shows that managing and treating vascular disease risk factors are not only beneficial to preventing heart disease and stroke, but also common forms of dementia.. Dr. Gustavo C. Roman, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center at the Methodist Neurological Institute in Houston, summed up decades of dementia-related research in a review paper in Alzheimers Disease and Associated Disorders.. Roman said although more definitive research is needed, focusing on the following risk factors can go a long way to helping reduce the risk of vascular dementia and mixed dementia (the combination of vascular dementia and Alzheimers disease).. By 2050, 11 to 16 million Americans will suffer some form of dementia.. Hypertension: Controlling blood pressure reduces the risk of stroke and heart disease. Studies are also ...
The Nantz National Alzheimer Center at the Methodist Neurological Institute in Houston, TX, issued the following news release:. Know Your Risk Factors to Help Prevent Dementia. Research shows that managing and treating vascular disease risk factors are not only beneficial to preventing heart disease and stroke, but also common forms of dementia.. Dr. Gustavo C. Roman, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center at the Methodist Neurological Institute in Houston, summed up decades of dementia-related research in a review paper in Alzheimers Disease and Associated Disorders.. Roman said although more definitive research is needed, focusing on the following risk factors can go a long way to helping reduce the risk of vascular dementia and mixed dementia (the combination of vascular dementia and Alzheimers disease).. By 2050, 11 to 16 million Americans will suffer some form of dementia.. Hypertension: Controlling blood pressure reduces the risk of stroke and heart disease. Studies are also ...
Professor Peter Crome - Chair of the reports Steering Committee, Professor of Geriatric Medicine at Keele University and Consultant Geriatrician at North Staffordshire NHS Trust - said: "Yet again a report has found marked deficiencies in the care of older people with dementia in general hospitals. There is still reluctance by clinicians and managers to accept that the care of this most vulnerable group of patients is a core function of acute hospitals. This must change. Assessing and treating dementia patients properly and supporting their carers will not only improve the patients health and quality of life but will also result in shortened hospital stays and reduce both NHS and social care costs.". 750,000 people in the UK have dementia and up to one in four hospital beds are occupied by an older person who has dementia (see key facts on dementia in the UK below). The Interim Report from the first annual National Audit of Dementia examined the care provided by 206 hospitals across England ...
Across the OECD, nearly 19 million people are living with dementia. Millions of family members and friends provide care and support to loved ones with dementia throughout their lives. Globally, dementia costs over USD 1 trillion per year and represents one of the leading causes of disability for elderly adults. These numbers will continue to rise as populations age. Until a cure or disease-modifying treatment for dementia is developed, the progress of the disease cannot be stopped. This report presents the most up-to-date and comprehensive cross-country assessment of the state of dementia care in OECD countries. In recent years, OECD countries have enhanced their efforts to provide high-quality dementia care during diagnosis, early and advanced dementia, but improving measurement is necessary for enhancements in care quality and outcomes for people with dementia. The report advises a set of policies that can help countries to improve diagnosis, strengthen access to care services, improve the quality of
A collection of resources which bring together information to help those working and caring for people living with dementia. The contents covers six main themes: Signs of dementia; After diagnosis of dementia; Living with dementia; Supporting people with dementia; Carers of people with dementia; and Advanced dementia and end of life care. Sections offer practical tips, learning activities, links to videos and additional resources. The site also contains an A-Z of terminology and links to the Open Dementia e-learning Programme.
The numbers of people with dementia are expected to more than double in 30 years and outpace both heart disease and cancer in terms of cost. Because dementia can take root in the brain years or decades before symptoms appear, you can take action now to avoid becoming part of this skyrocketing statistic. Correctly managing Hashimotos hypothyroidism, an autoimmune disease, is one important facet to lowering dementia risk.. Today, nearly 15 percent of people aged 71 or older have dementia-almost 4 million people. Experts predict that number will more than double to 9 million people by 2040, costing the country more than $500 billion.. Whats worse is these statistics do not include mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or "pre-dementia," which accounts for another 22 percent of people over 71.. ...
An essential guide for everyone who provides care for a person with Alzheimers disease or other dementias

Practical. Easy to read. Comprehensive. Encouraging. Accurate. All of these words describe this indispensable book that belongs in the hands of all family members and other caretakers of people who have been diagnosed with Alzheimers disease or other dementias.

Dr. Eric Pfeiffer, a physician who has devoted thirty years to patients suffering from all forms of dementia, here distills the wisdom of those years for the benefit of caregivers confronting some of lifes most challenging days. Dr. Pfeiffers genuine compassion and wise advice are certain not only to reduce caregiver stress but also to improve the patients quality of life.

In these pages are specific tips for all stages of caregiving, from the initial realization of the problem through mild, moderate, and severe stages of dementia, and even beyond, when a caregiver begins to resume a full
In general, most dementias are neurodegenerative in nature. The disease pathology may start in the brain 10 to 20 years before onset of dementia symptoms. With increasing dementia severity over the years, loss of self-care ability and eventually the ability to eat will occur in the final stage of the dementia illness. Feeding problems lead to weight loss, malnutrition, impaired immunity to infection, and poor wound healing. In the current issue of this Journal, Luk et al14 reviewed the clinical and ethical issues related to feeding problems in advanced dementia patients in Hong Kong. As emphasised by the authors, the key issue was the high prevalence of tube feeding: 53% among advanced dementia persons living in old-age homes.14 15 The reasons for giving tube feeding included dysphagia, inadequate eating, and malnutrition. Tube feeding, however, did not prevent aspiration pneumonia, nor did it yield any benefit for survival. Nasogastric tube feeding also induced nasal discomfort in these ...
The worlds leading researchers will work together to tackle dementia after The University of Queenslands Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) joined with the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Biophysics (IBP) to create a research centre.. The Australia-China research centre builds on the established Clem Jones Centre for Ageing and Dementia Research (CJCADR), supported by State and Federal governments and research will focus on understanding the causes and treatment of dementia.. QBI founding director Professor Perry Bartlett said a memorandum of understanding has been signed between QBI and IBP to announce the partnership.. "Following the success of the CJCADR, we are expanding our capacity and international leadership in dementia research to create the largest international centre focussed on dementia research," he said.. "The worlds leading researchers will unite under the centre to understand the mechanisms that lead to cognitive decline and dementia in the ageing population and ...
Alzheimers disease is the most common cause of dementia. It accounts for about 50-80% of dementia diagnoses. People with Alzheimers tend to experience a gradual decline in their ability to remember, understand, communicate and reason. Some medications may be of use for some people to support the quality of day to day living in the early stages of the disease. However, these medications do not halt the disease process. Other kinds of dementia include vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy Bodies and Fronto-temporal dementia:
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Poststroke cognitive assessment can be performed using standardized questionnaires designed for family or care givers. We sought to describe the test accuracy of such informant-based assessments for diagnosis of dementia/multidomain cognitive impairment in stroke. METHODS: We performed a systematic review using a sensitive search strategy across multidisciplinary electronic databases. We created summary test accuracy metrics and described reporting and quality using STARDdem and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) tools, respectively. RESULTS: From 1432 titles, we included 11 studies. Ten papers used the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Four studies described IQCODE for diagnosis of poststroke dementia (n=1197); summary sensitivity: 0.81 (95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.93); summary specificty: 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.93). Five studies described IQCODE as tool for predicting future dementia (n=837); summary
Conference notes that whilst dementia can apply to people of all ages it primarily affects older people. Conference further notes that the level of funding for dementia research is considerably lower than that for other illnesses. Conference believes that there is an urgent need to increase the amount of money needed for research into the cause and possible cure of dementia. Conference instructs the National Retired Members Committee and calls upon the National Executive Council to campaign for the allocation of additional resources for dementia research.. ...
Dementia is an illness in which brain cells die more quickly than normal. As the condition progresses, memory loss and confusion increase.. There are likely to be personality changes and, eventually, the affected person will be unable to care for themselves. Dementia is permanent and irreversible.. The two main kinds of dementia are Alzheimers Disease and Arteriosclerotic (or multi-infarct) dementia. Dementia affects nearly 2% of people aged 65 to 70, 9% of those aged 70 to 80, and 20% of those over 80. Do remember though, this means that there is more chance that you will not develop dementia than that you will!. Dementia is likely to have an impact on the persons sexual activity. Some degree of sexual difficulties, described elsewhere on the site, are likely to have developed earlier in life with people who suffer from Vascular disease.. You might consider talking about these things now when you are well. In this way, should the worst ever happen, your partner(s) will be aware of your wishes ...