Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be clinically effective for some forms of treatment-resistant chronic pain, but the precise mechanisms of action are not well understood. Here, we present an analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) data from a patient with whole-body chronic pain, in order to investigate changes in neural activity induced by DBS for pain relief over both short- and long-term. This patient is one of the few cases treated using DBS of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). We demonstrate that a novel method, null-beamforming, can be used to localise accurately brain activity despite the artefacts caused by the presence of DBS electrodes and stimulus pulses. The accuracy of our source localisation was verified by correlating the predicted DBS electrode positions with their actual positions. Using this beamforming method, we examined changes in whole-brain activity comparing pain relief achieved with deep brain stimulation (DBS ON) and compared with pain experienced with no
According to a new market report published by Transparency Market Research "Deep Brain Stimulation Devices Market for Parkinsons Disease (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Latin America)- Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 - 2019," the global deep brain stimulation devices market was valued at USD 4.5 billion in 2012 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 11.0% from 2013 to 2019, to reach an estimated value of USD 9.4 billion in 2019.. Browse Global Deep Brain Stimulation Devices Market Report with Full TOC at http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/deep-brain-stimulator-market.html. Rising number of neurological disorders such ischemic stroke, Alzheimers disease, essential tremors, trauma and especially Parkinsonism are primary factors responsible for the growth of deep brain stimulation devices market. Parkinsons disease is the second most common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by postural instability, ...
Deep brain stimulation may have a beneficial effect on driving ability for people with Parkinsons disease, according to a new study published in the December 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Deep brain stimulation uses a surgical implant similar to a pacemaker to send electrical impulses to the brain.. "Up until now, we werent sure how deep brain stimulation would affect driving," said study author Carsten Buhmann, MD, of University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf in Hamburg, Germany. "On the one hand, it might enhance driving ability by improving the motor problems which occur with Parkinsons disease, but on the other hand, it might hamper driving because it potentially causes a decline in executive cognitive skills.". The study involved 23 people who had deep brain stimulators, 21 people with Parkinsons disease who did not have stimulators and 21 people who did not have Parkinsons disease. All of the participants had been ...
Results Comparison of the two DBS targets revealed few significant group differences. STN DBS was associated with greater mean reductions on some measures of processing speed, only one of which was statistically significant in comparison with stimulation of GPi. GPi DBS was associated with lower mean performance on one measure of learning and memory that requires mental control and cognitive flexibility. Compared to the group receiving BMT, the combined DBS group had significantly greater mean reductions at 6-month follow-up in performance on multiple measures of processing speed and working memory. After calculating thresholds for statistically reliable change from data obtained from the BMT group, the combined DBS group also displayed higher rates of decline in neuropsychological test performance. Among study completers, 18 (11%) study participants receiving DBS displayed reliable decline by multiple indicators in two or more cognitive domains, a significantly higher rate than in the BMT group ...
Objective:. The objective of this pilot study is to characterize the abnormal neuronal firing patterns of basal ganglia and thalamic neurons and those in the premotor cortex in patients with treatment-resistant movement disorders undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Neuronal activity will be studied in a decision-making task guided by reward. Secondary objectives will involve study of how activity in the brain is modulated in such a task and how DBS can influence the cerebral activity related to decision-making.. Study population:. Fifteen adult patients with treatment-resistant movement disorders (Essential tremor or Parkinson s disease) who are undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery at Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland, will be studied.. Design:. This is a physiology study of medically refractory patients who have been scheduled for implantation of a deep brain stimulation device into basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Prior to surgery, patients will learn a rewarded ...
Objective:. The objective of this pilot study is to characterize the abnormal neuronal firing patterns of basal ganglia and thalamic neurons and those in the premotor cortex in patients with treatment-resistant movement disorders undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Neuronal activity will be studied in a decision-making task guided by reward. Secondary objectives will involve study of how activity in the brain is modulated in such a task and how DBS can influence the cerebral activity related to decision-making.. Study population:. Fifteen adult patients with treatment-resistant movement disorders (Essential tremor or Parkinson s disease) who are undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery at Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland, will be studied.. Design:. This is a physiology study of medically refractory patients who have been scheduled for implantation of a deep brain stimulation device into basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Prior to surgery, patients will learn a rewarded ...
Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus alleviates involuntary movements in patients with dystonia. However, the mechanism is still not entirely understood. One hypothesis is that deep brain stimulation suppresses abnormally enhanced synchronized oscillatory activity within the motor cortico-basal ganglia network. Here, we explore deep brain stimulation-induced modulation of pathological low frequency (4-12 Hz) pallidal activity that has been described in local field potential recordings in patients with dystonia. Therefore, local field potentials were recorded from 16 hemispheres in 12 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for severe dystonia using a specially designed amplifier allowing simultaneous high frequency stimulation at therapeutic parameter settings and local field potential recordings. For coherence analysis electroencephalographic activity (EEG) over motor areas and electromyographic activity (EMG) from affected neck muscles were recorded before and immediately after
Parkinsons Disease is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies related to the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, genetics, cellular, molecular and neurophysiology, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinsons disease.
During the last 25 years, more than 100,000 patients have been treated with Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). While human clinical and animal preclinical research has shed light on the complex brain-signaling disturbances that underpin e.g., Parkinsons disease (PD), less information is available when it comes to complex psychosocial changes following DBS interventions. In this contribution, we propose to more thoroughly investigate complex personality-related changes following deep brain stimulation through refined and reliable instruments in order to help patients and their relatives in the post-surgery phase. By pursuing this goal, we first outline the clinical importance DBS has attained followed by discussing problematic and undesired non-motor problems that accompany some DBS interventions. After providing a brief definition of complex changes, we move on by outlining the measurement problem complex changes relating to non-motor symptoms currently are associated with. The latter circumstance
The study, whose co-authors included George Mandybur, MD, an associate professor of neurosurgery at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine and Mayfield Clinic neurosurgeon, and Fredy Revilla, MD, an associate professor of neurology and UC Health neurologist, was published Jan. 11, 2012, in the online edition of Lancet Neurology. Mandybur and Revilla are members of the James J. and Joan A. Gardner Center for Parkinsons Disease and Movement Disorders at the UC Neuroscience Institute, a specialty center within UC Health. Principal investigator of the study was Michael Okun, MD, a neurologist and co-director of the Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration at the University of Florida College of Medicine. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices stimulate the subthalamic nucleus deep within the brain. Deep brain stimulation surgery has been shown to reduce symptoms of Parkinsons and to improve quality of life. The Lancet Neurology study examined the new Libra and LibraXP ...
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BACKGROUND: Accuracy of electrode placement is an important determinant of outcome following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Data on accuracy of electrode placement into the globus pallidum interna (GPi) in paediatric patients is limited, particularly those with non-primary dystonia who often have smaller GPi. Pallidal DBS is known to be more effective in the treatment of primary dystonia compared with secondary dystonia.
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the technique of neurostimulation of deep brain structures for the treatment of conditions such as essential tremor, dystonia, Parkinsons disease and chronic pain syndromes. The procedure uses implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes connected to extension leads and an implantable pulse generator (IPG). Hardware failure related to the DBS procedure is not infrequent, and includes electrode migration and disconnection. We describe a patient who received bilateral globus pallidus internus DBS for dystonia with initially good clinical response, but the device eventually failed. Radiographs showed multiple twisting of the extension leads with disconnection from the brain electrodes and a diagnosis of Twiddlers syndrome was made. Twiddlers syndrome was first described in patients with cardiac pacemakers. Patients with mental disability, elderly and obese patients are at increased risk. Twiddlers syndrome should be suspected whenever there is a failure of the DBS device
Deep brain stimulation provides benefits for people with Parkinson disease by managing some of their complications. None of the few reports in the current literature establishes the functionality of deep brain stimulation when activated during phacoemulsification.A 70-year-old woman with subthalamic deep brain stimulator (DBS) for advanced Parkinson disease was referred to our center for cataract surgery. To evaluate any possible interference between ultrasounds and the DBS, we registered the impedance of the electrodes before and after surgery.The patient underwent uneventful phacoemulsification of her right eye under topical anesthesia with her internal pulse generator device activated. During the surgical procedure, all potential variations of the impedance of the electrodes were recorded.This report demonstrates that phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia is a feasible procedure in patients with DBS, showing no interference between the ultrasounds and the internal pulse ...
Patients with Parkinson disease who experienced pain before undergoing subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) had that pain improved or eliminated at eight years after surgery...
Results The PPFG patient exhibited a robust improvement in gait and posture following PPN-DBS. When PPN stimulation was deactivated, postural stability and gait skills declined to pre-DBS levels, and fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography revealed hypoactive cerebellar and brainstem regions, which significantly normalised when PPN stimulation was reactivated. ...
Steel, David Anthony and Basu, Surajit (2017) Does trajectory matter? A study looking into the relationship of trajectory with target engagement and error accommodation in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Acta Neurochirurgica . ISSN 0942-0940 Fletcher, Kimberley J. and das Nair, Roshan and Macniven, Jamie A. and Basu, Surajit and Byrne, Paul (2012) An interpretative phenomenological analysis of the patient experience of awake craniotomy: brain tumour diagnosis to discharge. British Journal of Health Psychology, 17 (4). pp. 828-842. ISSN 2044-8287 ...
A 38-year old man in a minimally conscious state (MCS) from a closed head injury experienced improvement following deep brain stimulation of the midline and
Purpose: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been the mainstream surgical procedure for advanced Parkinsons disease (PD) during the last decade. Reports from a few individual centres have hinted that women who receive STN DBS are under-represented. We aimed to evaluate the gender distribution of patients with PD who had received STN DBS during the last ten years, and to discuss the findings in relation to studies on gender prevalence of PD.. Methods: A search of the PubMed database of clinical papers in English language related to STN DBS between 2000 and 2009 was conducted. Care was taken to minimize redundancies in reporting of published patients. The proportion of men and women were expressed in total and according to pre-defined geographic regions.. Results: One hundred and thirty five papers were eligible for review. The gender of the patients was specified in 119 papers on a total of 3880 patients, of which 63% were men. According to geographic origin of ...
BACKGROUND: Innovative neurosurgical treatments present a number of known risks, the natures and probabilities of which can be adequately communicated to patients via the standard procedures governing obtaining informed consent. However, due to their novelty, these treatments also come with unknown risks, which require an augmented approach to obtaining informed consent. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to discuss and provide concrete procedural guidance on the ethical issues raised by serious unexpected complications of novel deep brain stimulation treatments. APPROACH: We illustrate our analysis using a case study of the unexpected development of recurrent stereotyped events in patients following the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat severe chronic pain. Examining these unexpected complications in light of medical ethical principles, we argue that serious complications of novel DBS treatments do not necessarily make it unethical to offer the intervention to eligible patients. However, the
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The goal of deep brain stimulation, which is generally referred to as DBS, is to improve function and quality of life. That is best achieved by being
malaysian experience in deep brain stimulation for parkinson s disease long term results pdfView more ebooks on ebookbrowse.com |/div|
Researchers have found that deep brain stimulation reduces binge eating in mice, suggesting that this surgery, which is approved for treatment of certain neurologic and psychiatric disorders, may also be an effective therapy for obesity.
BACKGROUND: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established treatment to reduce tremor, notably in Parkinson disease. DBS may also be effective in post-traumatic tremor, one of the most common movement disorders caused by head injury. However, the cohorts of patients often have multiple lesions that may impact the outcome depending on which fiber tracts are affected. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 20-year-old man presented after road traffic accident with severe closed head injury and polytrauma. Computed tomography scan showed left frontal and basal ganglia hemorrhagic contusions and intraventricular hemorrhage. A disabling tremor evolved in step with motor recovery. Despite high-intensity signals in the intended thalamic target, a visual analysis of the preoperative diffusion tensor imaging revealed preservation of connectivity of the intended target, ventralis oralis posterior thalamic nucleus (VOP). This was confirmed by the postoperative tractography study presented here. DBS of the VOP/zona incerta was
Abstract1. Background Successful deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinsons disease (PD) requires optimal electrode placement. One technique of intraoperative electrode testing is determination of stimulation thresholds inducing corticospinal/corticobulbar tracts (CSBT) motor contractions. 2. ObjectiveThis study aims to analyze correlations between DBS electrode distance to CSBT and contraction thresholds, with either visual or electromyographic (EMG) detection, to establish an intraoperative tool devoted to ensure safe distance of the electrode to the CSBT. 3. MethodsTwelve PD patients with subthalamic nucleus DBS participated. Thresholds of muscular contractions were assessed clinically and with EMG, for 3 different sets of stimulation parameters, all monopolar: 130Hz high frequency stimulation (HFS); 2Hz low frequency stimulation with either 60 or 210µs (LFS-60, LFS-210). The anatomical distance of electrode contacts to CSBT was measured from fused CT-MRI. 4. ResultsThe best linear correlation was
Background. In advanced Parkinsons disease (PD) the motor symptoms can be treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). Subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been the most common target and caudal zona incerta (cZi) is a more recent target for stimulation. Stimulation in both of these targets has proved to be positive for the motor symptoms but there is no consensus about how DBS affects the speech and the articulation.. Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate how fricatives are realized within patients suffering from PD treated with DBS in STN or cZi.. Method. 9 patients stimulated in STN and 10 patients stimulated in cZi were recorded reading a shorter text. The recordings were made preoperatively (Pre) and 12 months after surgery with the stimulation switched off (sOff) and on (sOn). From the recordings the fricatives were extracted and assessed in a blinded and randomized procedure.. Results. For the patients stimulated in cZi the target fricative /s/ had significant lower correct realizations ...
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a clinically effective neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson disease. Tissue reaction to chronic DBS therapy and the definitive location of active stimulation contacts are best studied on a postmortem basis in patients who have undergone DBS. The authors report the postmortem analysis of STN DBS following 5 years and 11 months of effective chronic stimulation including the histologically verified location of the active contacts associated with bilateral implants. They also describe tissue response to intraoperative test passes with recording microelectrodes and stimulating semimacroelectrodes. The results indicated that 1) the neural tissue surrounding active and nonactive contacts responds similarly, with a thin glial capsule and foreign-body giant cell reaction surrounding the leads as well as piloid gliosis, hemosiderin-laden macrophages, scattered lymphocytes, and Rosenthal fibers; 2) there was evidence of separate tracts in ...
article{664720, abstract = {Since the development of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for Parkinsons Disease, DBS has been suggested as a treatment option for various other neurological disorders. Stimulation of deep brain structures for refractory epilepsy appears to be a safe treatment option with promising results. As research on the evaluation and optimization of DBS for refractory epilepsy may be difficult and unethical in patients, studies on animal models of epilepsy are indispensable. Various brain structures and specific nuclei such as the basal ganglia, the cerebellum, the locus coeruleus and temporal lobe structures have been investigated as target areas for DBS. Additionally, a wide variety of stimulation parameters are available, with a range of stimulation frequencies, pulse widths and stimulation intensities. This review provides an overview of the relevant literature on experimental animal studies of DBS for epilepsy. Knowledge gained from animal studies can be used to answer ...
Subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) alleviates common appendicular PD symptoms, such as: tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, the effect STN-DBS has on modulating axial gait features has not been properly quantified objectively. The purpose of the present thesis was to investigate the role STN-DBS plays in modulating specific gait features such as pace, asymmetry, variability, rhythm and postural control. It is hypothesized that axial gait function is regulated predominantly by non-dopaminergic control systems. In the acute immediate post-operative phase a surgical effect, named the microlesion effect (MLE), is thought to produce a transient improvement of appendicular and axial symptoms. It was hypothesized the MLE is a surgical effect, having a non-specific influence on both appendicular and axial symptoms. Following surgical recovery and 6 months of clinically optimized STN-DBS, it was expected that the true STN-DBS effects would be presented. It was hypothesized that STN-DBS plays
Researchers will present findings at the AANS Annual Scientific meeting of their studying testing if Intralaminar thalamic deep brain stimulation (ILN-DBS) could have an effect on dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases that cause severe cognitive dysfunction.
Recently, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be critically involved in decision-making, action selection, and motor control. Here we investigate the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN on reward-based decision-learning in patients diagnosed with Parkinsons disease (PD). We determined computational measures of outcome evaluation and reward prediction from PD patients who performed a probabilistic reward-based decision-learning task. In previous work, these measures covaried with activation in the nucleus caudatus (outcome evaluation during the early phases of learning) and the putamen (reward prediction during later phases of learning). We observed that stimulation of the STN motor regions in PD patients served to improve reward-based decision-learning, probably through its effect on activity in frontostriatal motor loops (prominently involving the putamen and, hence, reward prediction). In a subset of relatively younger patients with relatively shorter disease duration, the
Doctors in Toronto, Canada have proved that the use of Deep Brain Stimulation on patients with early signs of Alzheimers is safe and it may help in improving their memory.
Abstract. Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ventralis intermedius nucleus of thalamus (VIM) or caudala zona incerta (cZi) have been shown to be efficient in supressing tremor symptoms in patients with essential tremor. Patients who has been treated with DBS may acquire certain side effects of which in some cases results in an impact on the patients speech, known as stimulation- induced dysarthria. There is a lack of studies that investigate if there is a risk of side effects that is affecting voice functioning in patients with essential tremor. Previous studies have claimed that the disease itself may have an effect on the voice acoustics and that some patients develop voice tremor. The occurrence of a side effect caused by DBS may have an impact on the patients subjective experience of the treatment result.. Aim: To investigate whether patients with essential tremor treated with DBS are subjectively experiencing any form of voice or speech disability compared to a healthy, age and sex ...
Nilsson MH, Rehncrona S, Jarnlo G-B. Fear of falling and falls in people with Parkinsons disease treated with deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nuclei. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 123: 424-429. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background - N
|b||i|Background:|/i||/b| In this reported case, 7 years after the start of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN), glioblastoma multiforme (GB
Anatomical connectivity networks derived from DTI data. The pre- and post-operative structural networks (left and right columns, respectively) are shown superimposed on a rendered brain (A/B) and as connectivity matrices, Cpre and Cpost (C/D). In both representations, the full 90-node networks are highlighted in green, while the left and right hemispheres are highlighted in blue and red, correspondingly.. What is the procedure about?. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical procedure that is increasingly used to alleviate the symptoms of a number of otherwise intractable disorders including Parkinsons Disease (PD), essential tremor, dystonia and chronic pain. DBS for PD has become well established since the 1990s with two main surgical targets, namely the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus internal (GPi) .. Recently, another target in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has also shown promise. The PPN is a relatively new target in treating primarily gait and posture ...
The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of various types of intractable head and facial pains. Seven patients underwent the insertion of DBS electrodes into the periventricular/periaqueductal grey region and/or the ventroposteromedial nucleus of the thalamus. We have shown statistically significant improvement in pain scores (visual analogue and McGills) as well as health-related quality of life (SF-36v2) following surgery. There is wide variability in patient outcomes but, overall, DBS can be an effective treatment. Our results are compared with the published literature and electrode position for effective analgesia is discussed.
By stimulating the brains of Parkinsons patients using electrodes, neurologists at Frances CHU Saint-Étienne University Hospital found that this surgical technique could improve motor performance by 70% and reduce medication-based treatment by 40 to 60%.. When medication is no longer sufficient to control tremors, deep brain stimulation is a new alternative available to patients suffering from Parkinsons disease.. Practiced since May 2015 at Frances CHU Saint-Étienne University Hospital, the technique appears to have proven results. Successfully operated patients saw motor performance improve by 70% and medication-based treatments reduce by 40 to 60%. The benefits of the operation were also found to remain for at least five years, with clear effects on patients quality of life.. The operation is carried out under general anesthetic. It involves inserting two temporary electrodes into a patients brain through a tiny opening in the cranium, targeting the subthalamic nucleus, which plays a ...
Patients suffering from severe, treatment-resistant depression can experience long-term relief through deep brain stimulation, according to research conducted at Emory University.
We have investigated the scattering of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) radiofrequency (RF) field by implants for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) and the resultant heating of the tissue surrounding the DBS electrodes. The finite element method has been used to perform full 3-D realistic simulations. The near field has been computed for varying distances of the connecting portion of the lead from the air-tissue interface. Dissipated powers and induced temperature rise distributions have been obtained in the region surrounding the electrodes. It is shown that the near proximity of the air-tissue interface results in a reduction in the induced temperature rise ...
Acta Neurochir (2017) 159:771-778. Only 10% of the up to 15% of patients with advanced Parkinsons disease (PD) eligible for deep brain stimulation (DBS) are referred to specialized centers. This survey evaluated the reasons for the reluctance of patients and referring physicians regarding DBS.. Methods: Two different questionnaires containing multiple choice and open verbalized questions were developed, one for neurologists and one for patients with PD. The first questionnaire was sent to 87 neurologists in private practice in the catchment area of the authors medical center, the second to patient support groups in the same region with the help of the German Parkinson Association.. Results: Of the addressed neurologists, 56.3% completed the questionnaire; 61.2% of themestimated the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage as the most severe complication at 4.3% on average; 30.6% were concerned about patients developing mood changes or depression after DBS. Only 16.3% felt unable to care for patients ...
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical procedure involving the implantation of a medical device called a neurostimulator (sometimes referred to as a brain pacemaker), which sends electrical impulses, through implanted electrodes, to specific targets in the brain (brain nuclei) for the treatment of movement and neuropsychiatric disorders. DBS in select brain regions has provided therapeutic benefits for otherwise-treatment-resistant disorders such as Parkinsons disease, essential tremor, dystonia, chronic pain, major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Despite the long history of DBS, its underlying principles and mechanisms are still not clear. DBS directly changes brain activity in a controlled manner, its effects are reversible (unlike those of lesioning techniques), and it is one of only a few neurosurgical methods that allow blinded studies. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved DBS as a treatment for essential tremor and Parkinsons disease in 1997, ...
The cerebellum and the motor thalamus, connected by cerebellothalamic pathways, are traditionally considered part of the motor-control system. Yet, functional imaging studies and clinical studies including patients with cerebellar disease suggest an involvement of the cerebellum in olfaction. Additionally, there are anecdotal clinical reports of olfactory disturbances elicited by electrical stimulation of the motor thalamus and its neighbouring subthalamic region. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the cerebellothalamic pathways is an effective treatment for essential tremor (ET), which also offers the possibility to explore the involvement of cerebellothalamic pathways in the sense of smell. This may be important for patient care given the increased use of DBS for the treatment of tremor disorders. Therefore, 21 none-medicated patients with ET treated with DBS (13 bilateral, 8 unilateral) were examined with "Sniffin Sticks," an established and reliable method for olfactory testing. ...
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Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become the surgical procedure of choice for Parkinson disease for the following reasons: It does not involve destruction of brain tissue It is reversible It can be ... more
Epilepsy (seizures) | Deep brain stimulation (DBS) with implanted neurostimulator. Neurosurgery: Treatment in Heidelberg, Germany ✈. Prices on BookingHealth.com - booking treatment online!
Evidence-based recommendations on deep brain stimulation (permanent electrodes planted in brain) for tremor and dystonia (excluding Parkinsons disease)
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for Parkinsons disease (PD); however, numerous questions remain on the therapeutic mechanisms of the technology. The goal of this project is to use detailed computer modeling techniques to augment neurophysiological investigation on the mechanisms of DBS. These models will be assembled within the SCIRun/BioPSE environment. We hypothesize that therapeutic DBS induces basal ganglia (BG) network activity consistent with activation of axonal processes near the stimulating electrode, resulting in a regularization of BG input to the thalamus. In turn, thalamocortical processing can occur with reduced pathological interference from the BG during DBS. We propose to address this hypothesis with the integration of complementary data from three research modalities (experimental electrophysiology, computational modeling, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)). First, we will parameterize a large scale neural network model to coincide with ...