We sampled 7,511 black-headed gulls for influenza virus in the Netherlands during 2006-2010 and found that subtypes H13 and H16 caused annual epidemics in fledglings on colony sites. Our findings validate targeted surveillance of wild waterbirds and clarify underlying factors for influenza virus emergence in other species ...
charadriiformes: large diverse order of aquatic birds found along seacoasts and inland waters; shorebirds and coastal diving birds; most feed on animal life.
We provide evidence of a positive correlation between North Sea SST, the abundance of swimming crabs and changes in the abundance of lesser black-backed gulls at 21 major North Sea breeding colonies. In particular, the cross-correlation analyses (table 1) revealed a propagation of a climate signal from SST through decapod larvae, adult crabs and lesser black-backed gulls with lags that match the biology of each trophic group. Many biological changes have been observed among different trophic levels of the North Sea from phytoplankton to fish, as the North Sea has warmed [1]. Here, we suggest that climate-induced changes in the marine fauna extend to the avian fauna, and so also to the terrestrial food web around seabird colonies.. Seabird breeding success is controlled partially by the abundance, composition and nutritional quality of the prey the parents feed to their chicks on the nest [18]. Pelagic swimming crabs are an important component of the diet of seabirds such as the related ...
In recent years, a number of zoonotic flaviviruses have emerged worldwide, and wild birds serve as their major reservoirs. Epidemiological surveys of bird populations at various geographical scales can clarify key aspects of the eco-epidemiology of these viruses. In this study, we aimed at exploring the presence of flaviviruses in the western Mediterranean by sampling breeding populations of the yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis), a widely distributed, anthropophilic, and abundant seabird species. For 3 years, we sampled eggs from 19 breeding colonies in Spain, France, Algeria, and Tunisia. First, ELISAs were used to determine if the eggs contained antibodies against flaviviruses. Second, neutralization assays were used to identify the specific flaviviruses present. Finally, for colonies in which ELISA-positive eggs had been found, chick serum samples and potential vectors, culicid mosquitoes and soft ticks (Ornithodoros maritimus), were collected and analyzed using serology and PCR, ...
Black-legged Kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) species account - latest update of status, international importance, population size and trends in breeding abundance, productivity, survival rates, phenology and diet in the UK, Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.
Egg composition varies both within and between clutches, and mothers are expected to alter their deposition of resources to the egg depending on environmental conditions and breeding strategies. Within-clutch variation in egg composition has been proposed to reflect an adaptive maternal strategy influencing sibling competition. In species with brood reduction, mothers should reinforce brood hierarchies due to hatching asynchrony and favour senior chicks by making first-laid eggs larger, richer in nutrients, with higher testosterone and carotenoid levels and lower corticosterone concentrations than last-laid eggs [parental favouritism hypothesis (PFH)]. Moreover, mothers that are of better quality and/or experience better feeding conditions during laying are expected to increase their deposition of resources to the egg, resulting in differences between clutches [investment hypothesis (IH)]. Several components may act together to provide an optimal reproductive strategy, but studies of variation ...
Binds to sialic acid-containing receptors on the cell surface, bringing about the attachment of the virus particle to the cell. This attachment induces virion internalization either through clathrin-dependent endocytosis or through clathrin- and caveolin-independent pathway. Plays a major role in the determination of host range restriction and virulence. Class I viral fusion protein. Responsible for penetration of the virus into the cell cytoplasm by mediating the fusion of the membrane of the endocytosed virus particle with the endosomal membrane. Low pH in endosomes induces an irreversible conformational change in HA2, releasing the fusion hydrophobic peptide. Several trimers are required to form a competent fusion pore.
Oystercatchers (Haematopus sp.) are shorebirds that inhabit most continental sea coasts. There are thirteen species of Oystercatcher worldwide and nine of these species occur in the Southern Hemisphere. The Northern Hemisphere species have been recorded to fly great distances between breeding and non-breeding areas whereas the African Black Oystercatcher is largely resident, migrating only short distances to nursary areas in Namibia after fledging and then returning to their natal sites to breed.. The African Black Oystercatcher is the largest of all the species. Adults have jet black plumage, pinkish legs and a long, dagger-like orange-red bill. In addition its eye and eye ring are red. There is sexual dimorphism, females being larger and heavier with longer bills; a male weighing an average of about 660g and a female about 720g when fully grown.. African Black Oystercatchers can be found on both rocky and sandy shores throughout the year and they attempt to breed in varied habitat types. They ...
The royal tern belongs to the class Aves and the order Charadriiformes. Charadriiformes are mainly seabirds of small to medium-large size. The royal tern is also in the family Sternidae because of its white plumage, black cap on its head, long bill, webbed feet, and bodies that are more streamlined than those of gulls.. The taxonomy of the royal tern has been debated, whether the correct scientific name was Thalasseus maximus or Sterna maxima. It is presently classified as Thalasseus maximus, which places it with five other seabirds from the tern family. The royal tern was originally placed in the genus Sterna; however, a 2005 study suggest that it is actually part of the genus Thalasseus.[3] Before 2017 the royal tern was divided into two subspecies: Thalasseus maximus maximus and Thalasseus maximus albididorsalis. T. m. maximus is found on the east coast of North America and is referred to as the "New World" species. T. m. albidorsalis, referred to as the "Old World" species, is found on the ...
Word Scramble - English word OYSTERCATCHERS: words that start with oystercatchers, words that end with oystercatchers, anagrams of oystercatchers, how to spell oystercatchers!, Words with Friends, Scrabble
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In southern California, USFWS (2006) concluded that Rana muscosa requires the following habitat elements: (1) Water source(s) found between 1,214 to 7,546 feet (370 to 2,300 meter) in elevation that are permanent. Water sources include, but are not limited to, streams, rivers, perennial creeks (or permanent plunge pools within intermittent creeks), pools (i.e., a body of impounded water that is contained above a natural dam) and other forms of aquatic habitat. The water source should maintain a natural flow pattern including periodic natural flooding. Aquatic habitats that are used by mountain yellow-legged frog for breeding purposes must maintain water during the entire tadpole growth phase, which can last for up to 2 years. During periods of drought, or less than average rainfall, these breeding sites may not hold water long enough for individuals to complete metamorphosis, but they would still be considered essential breeding habitat in wetter years. Further, the aquatic includes: a. Bank and ...
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Curlew sandpipers in remnants of coastal habitat, being destroyed for development - View amazing Curlew sandpiper photos - Calidris ferruginea - on Arkive
Common Guillemot (Uria aalge) species account - latest update of status, international importance, population size and trends in breeding abundance, productivity, survival rates, phenology and diet in the UK, Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.
The family Laridae was introduced (as Laridia) by the French polymath Constantine Samuel Rafinesque in 1815.[2][3] Historically, Laridae were restricted to the gulls, while the terns were placed in a separate family, Sternidae, and the skimmers in a third family, Rynchopidae.[4] The noddies were traditionally included in Sternidae. In 1990 Charles Sibley and Jon Ahlquist included auks and skuas in a broader family Laridae.[5] A molecular phylogenetic study by Baker and colleagues published in 2007 found that the noddies in the genus Anous formed a sister group to a clade containing the gulls, skimmers and the other terns.[1] To create a monophyletic family group, Laridae was expanded to include the genera that had previously been in Sternidae and Rynchopidae.[6][7] Baker and colleagues found that the Laridae lineage diverged from a lineage that gave rise to both the skuas (Stercorariidae) and auks (Alcidae) before the end of the Cretaceous in the age of dinosaurs. They also found that the ...
23-26 (58-66 cm). Adult white with light gray back and wings; wing tip black with white spots; bill yellow with red spot on lower mandible; feet pink or flesh colored. First-year birds brownish. Acquires adult plumage in 4 years. See California Gull.
There are several terns of a similar size and general appearance to the common tern. A traditionally difficult species to separate is the Arctic tern, and until the key characteristics were clarified, distant or flying birds of the two species were often jointly recorded as "commic terns". Although similar in size, the two terns differ in structure and flight. The common tern has a larger head, thicker neck, longer legs, and more triangular and stiffer wings than its relative, and has a more powerful, direct flight.[25] The Arctic tern has greyer underparts than the common, which make its white cheeks more obvious, whereas the rump of the common tern can be greyish in non-breeding plumage, compared to the white of its relative. The common tern develops a dark wedge on the wings as the breeding season progresses, but the wings of Arctic stay white throughout the northern summer. All the flight feathers of the Arctic tern are translucent against a bright sky, only the four innermost wing feathers ...
We used 8 years of live recapture data (1998-2005) to estimate apparent annual survival for male (n = 237) and female (n = 296) Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) breeding on a 36-ha plot on the Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta, western Alaska. Apparent annual survival (Φ) is the product of true survival and site fidelity, and estimates of Φ were corrected for the probability of encounter. Overall return rates (individual returned to the study site in a subsequent season) were lower for females (40%) than males (65%), as was Φ (± SE, females = 0.65 ± 0.05, males = 0.78 ± 0.03), and encounter rate (females = 0.51 ± 0.07, males = 0.74 ± 0.04). Results differed from previous estimates of Φ for this species as our estimates of Φ were higher for both males and females compared to estimates from another breeding site and two nonbreeding locations. Disparity among Φ estimates from breeding and nonbreeding areas highlights the need to delineate site-specific factors throughout the annual cycle that
It has been suggested that I may like contribute to the blogs on this site, which is surprising as this year I have been learning How to be a Bad Bird Watcher by following the advice of Simon Barnes in his book of that title. Ive kept no lists and just concentrated on watching and enjoying the birds I happen to see. For instance, consider gulls. I live in a wee house in a cul-de-sac in Alnwick with a very small back garden half of which is garage. On 5th December I was cooking a chicken casserole and threw the cut up chicken skin on to the roof of the garage into the snow. Within a couple of minutes the black-headed gulls were there swooping and calling and picking up the courage to dive down to gobble up their lunch. A brave carrion crow managed to sneak one piece while a magpie fluttered between the gulls but in no time at all the food was gone and so were the gulls. How do they discover the skins in the snow in the first place? On two occasions recently Ive heard gulls crying above our ...
Order: CHARADRIIFORMES - Plovers, Sandpipers, and Allies Family: LARIDAE - Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers Generally absent December through February
Camouflage may enable snipe to remain undetected by hunters in marshland. If the snipe flies, hunters have difficulty wing-shooting due to the birds erratic flight pattern. The difficulties involved in hunting snipes gave rise to the term sniper, meaning a hunter highly skilled in marksmanship and camouflaging, which later evolved to mean a sharpshooter or someone who shoots from a concealed location.[3][4] "Going on a snipe hunt" is a phrase suggesting a fools errand, or an impossible task.[citation needed] As an American rite of passage, it is often associated with summer camps and groups such as the Boy Scouts.[5] ...
The Black Hills population of black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) was petitioned, but deemed not warranted, to be listed as a threatened or endangered species under the Endangered Species Act and more information on their population size in the region is needed. Our objective was to map abundance and provide a population estimate of black-backed woodpeckers in the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains of South Dakota and Wyoming, USA ...
tr, ,td,Kingdom:,/td, ,td,Animalia,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Phylum:,/td, ,td,Chordata,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Class:,/td, ,td,Aves,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Order:,/td, ,td,Charadriiformes,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Family:,/td, ,td,Scolopacidae,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Genus:,/td, ,td,Limosa,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Species:,/td, ,td,L. limosa,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,th,binominal name,/th, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Limosa limosa,/i, ,td,(Linnaeus, 1758),/td, ,/tr ...
tr, ,td,Kingdom:,/td, ,td,Animalia,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Phylum:,/td, ,td,Chordata,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Class:,/td, ,td,Aves,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Order:,/td, ,td,Charadriiformes,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Family:,/td, ,td,Scolopacidae,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Genus:,/td, ,td,Limosa,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Species:,/td, ,td,L. limosa,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,th,binominal name,/th, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Limosa limosa,/i, ,td,(Linnaeus, 1758),/td, ,/tr ...
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Imagine a world with no frogs. No longer would you hear frog melodies in the evening, algae would flourish, and entire ecosystems could change dramatically. This is a possibility in the Sierra Nevada because 90 percent of the Mountain yellow-legged frogs have been disappearing due to an amphibian pathogen and loss of habitat from fish introductions in our lakes. An ambitious and promising effort is underway to recover these frogs, and this approach may be applied to conserving other threatened amphibians globally. Join Dr. Roland Knapp from the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory to learn more about the recovery effort ...
ID A0A0A0A5L2_CHAVO Unreviewed; 873 AA. AC A0A0A0A5L2; DT 07-JAN-2015, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 07-JAN-2015, sequence version 1. DT 20-DEC-2017, entry version 13. DE SubName: Full=Bifunctional heparan sulfate N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 4 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1}; GN ORFNames=N301_01195 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1}; OS Charadrius vociferus (Killdeer) (Aegialitis vocifera). OC Eukaryota; Metazoa; Chordata; Craniata; Vertebrata; Euteleostomi; OC Archelosauria; Archosauria; Dinosauria; Saurischia; Theropoda; OC Coelurosauria; Aves; Neognathae; Charadriiformes; Charadriidae; OC Charadrius. OX NCBI_TaxID=50402 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000053858}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000053858} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=BGI_N301 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1}; RA Zhang G., Li C.; RT "Genome evolution of avian class."; RL Submitted (JUN-2014) to the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. CC ...
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Status Assessment and Conservation Action Plan for the Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) Biological Technical Publication BTP-R6012-2009 Bob Gress© U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Status Assessment and Conservation Action Plan for the Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) Biological Technical Publication BTP-R6012-2009 Suzanne D. Fellows Stephanie L. Jones U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 6, Nongame Migratory Bird Coordinators Office, Denver, CO Cover image: Long-billed Curlew Photo credit: Bob Gress© ii Status Assessment and Conservation Action Plan for the Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) Author contact information: Suzanne D. Fellows U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 6 Nongame Migratory Birds P. O. Box 25486 DFC Denver, CO 80225-0486 Phone: 303-236-4417 Email: [email protected] Stephanie L. Jones U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 6 Nongame Migratory Birds P. O. Box 25486 DFC Denver, CO 80225-0486 Phone: 303-236-4409 Email: ...
Adults occur in caves and other dimly lit biotopes. Active during daytime. They feed mainly on small sessile invertebrates and algae, to a lesser extent on harpacticoids (Ref. 5981). Oviparous. Eggs are demersal and adhesive (Ref. 205), and are attached to the substrate via a filamentous, adhesive pad or pedestal (Ref. 94114). Larvae are planktonic, often found in shallow, coastal waters (Ref. 94114). ...
Murrelet: Murrelet, any of six species of small diving birds belonging to the auk family, Alcidae (order Charadriiformes). Murrelets are about 20 cm (8 inches) long, thin billed and,
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Image by George C. West Copyright ©1995 Birds from left to right: Black Turnstone, Surfbird, Short-billed Dowitcher, Dunlin, Western Sandpiper All materials contained within this guide are for educational purposes only. Illustrations contained within this volume are copyrighted by the respective artist and may not be reproduced without written permission unless otherwise noted. Permission to use these images within this guide was granted to the Shorebird Sister Schools Program to encourage shorebird habitat protection in our nations school children. Explore the World with Shorebirds! 3 SHOREBIRDSISTER SCHOOLSPROGRAM Introduction Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Why Teach About Shorebirds? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 How to Use This Education Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Thumbing Through Explore the World ...
IOC Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • Regnum: Animalia • Phylum: Chordata • Subphylum: Vertebrata • Infraphylum: Gnathostomata • Superclassis: Tetrapoda • Classis: Aves • Superordo: Neognathae • Ordo: Charadriiformes • Familia: Scolopacidae • Genus: Arenaria (Scolopacidae) (Brisson, 1760) ...
The expression on the Oystercatchers face is a clear indication that he has seen his Ladys suggestion and we can all predict how he will likely respond... so the one part that is still a bit of question mark to me is if this is what is meant by "Love on the Brain"? :) Hope you all have a great weekend! |a href=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kCldPbOrBw rel=noreferrer nofollow|www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kCldPbOrBw|/a|
skimmer: Any of three species of water birds that constitute the family Rynchopidae in the order Charadriiformes. The skimmer is distinguished by a unique bladelike bill, the lower mandible...
The default color of vertebrate eggs is the white of the calcium carbonate from which the shells are made, but some birds, mainly passerines, produce colored eggs. The pigment biliverdin and its zinc chelate give a green or blue ground color, and protoporphyrin produces reds and browns as a ground color or as spotting. Non-passerines typically have white eggs, except in some ground-nesting groups such as the Charadriiformes, sandgrouse and nightjars, where camouflage is necessary, and some parasitic cuckoos which have to match the passerine hosts egg. Most passerines, in contrast, lay colored eggs, even if there is no need of cryptic colors. However some have suggested that the protoporphyrin markings on passerine eggs actually act to reduce brittleness by acting as a solid state lubricant.[10] If there is insufficient calcium available in the local soil, the egg shell may be thin, especially in a circle around the broad end. Protoporphyrin speckling compensates for this, and increases ...
IOC Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • Regnum: Animalia • Phylum: Chordata • Subphylum: Vertebrata • Infraphylum: Gnathostomata • Superclassis: Tetrapoda • Classis: Aves • Superordo: Neognathae • Ordo: Charadriiformes • Familia: Glareolidae • Genus: Cursorius • Species: Cursorius cursor (Latham, 1787) ...
After an excited chase, the falcon departed the hot waters sans kittiwake, and rocketed out towards the gulls roosting further out on the ice. Its progressive was marked by clouds of gulls swirling aloft, and eventually the falcon singled out one of the few Bonapartes Gulls in the area. The raptor harried the small gull and eventually snatched it and headed back to shore. Through our optics, we watched as the gull struggled valiantly, its wings flapping wildly. The wildly struggling gull eventually proved too much for the falcon to grasp, and it dropped it. As if upset by this failure, the falcon raced around the gulls like a fighter jet, creating a massive uproar, before eventually soaring back to its lofty perch atop the power plants tower ...
The pool by the visitor centre had around 50 Red-crested Pochard each morning but most left the pool during the day. There were plenty of Coot but I didnt managed to find any Crested Coots. Yellow-legged Gulls were regular visitors to the pool but the only terns I saw were Sandwich Terns feeding along the estuary channels ...
The last week of our holiday in the north ended up with one good bird. On a trip to visit relatives we passed the very bird rich fjord west of Fauske. Armed with only bins many of the birds had to remain unidentified but I did clock up Slavonian Grebe (horndykker), Red-throated Diver (smålom), Velvet Scoter (sjøorre) and Long-tailed Duck (havelle). When we got to the vast mudflats at the end of the fjord I was hoping for some waders especially as it was close to high tide which would make my job in locating them easier. I was very disappointed to only find Oystercatcher (tjeld) and a single Redshank (rødstilk) but kept searching and finally found a couple of roosting Ringed Plovers (sandlot) together with a calidris wader. I assumed it was going to be a juvenile Dunlin (myrsnipe) but something didnt click and I moved in closer and was very happy to find an adult Broad-billed Sandpiper (fjellmyrløper). This species is recorded less than annually in Nordland county although it most likely ...
In the next hour and a half apart from a few Lesser Black-backed Gulls (sildemåke) making their way south I had 2 Guillemots (lomvi), a single Black Guillemot (teist) and a single Velvet Scoter (sjøorre) for my troubles and was thinking that it was time to be sensible and move on. Then at 11am I picked up a bird at distance to the north of Bastøy island. It was a bit smaller than a Common Gull with brown upperparts and head and a clearly visible pale belly. It was flying low over the water on stiff wings with a few flaps and then gliding and occasionally banking when it showed it underparts. It was making its way slowly but purposefully south and landed for a short period of time during which I lost sight of it before picking it up again in flight. Although the views were (very) distant, the light was good and there was no doubt this was a Balearic Shearwater (balearlire). This is a real rarity in Norway but a bird was seen further south in the Oslofjord at the end of July and it was high on ...
The Inca Tern (Larosterna inca) is a seabird in the family Sternidae and the only member of the genus Larosterna.. This unique bird breeds on the coasts of Peru and Chile, and is restricted to the Humboldt Current.. The Inca Tern breeds on rocky cliffs, nesting in a hollow or burrow or sometimes the old nest of a Humboldt Penguin. The female lays one or two eggs which are incubated for about 4 weeks. Chicks leave the nest after approximately 7 weeks.. This is a large tern, 41cm long and the sexes are similar; the adult is mostly slate-grey with white restricted to the facial plumes and the trailing edges of the wings. The large bill and legs are dark red. Juvenile birds are purple-brown, and gradually develop the facial plumes.. The Inca Tern feeds by plunge diving for fish like a Sterna tern. Its call is a cat-like mew.. ...
Rick Wright, Managing Director of WINGS Birding Tours Worldwide, writes:. A pretty picture, and well composed; with the birds head turned haughtily towards the observer, we cant see the exact length and shape of the bill or the precise pattern of dark feathers on the head. So lets start with what we can see.. Compare the overall shape of this Forsters Tern with that of a Common Tern. Theyre both "classic" Sterna terns, but Forsters is noticeably more attenuated - not just the foreshortened bill, but the tail and legs are longer than those of Common Tern. In this view, note that the tail, just barely visible beneath the folded primaries, nearly reaches their tips; Im not certain whether I can truly see a white outer vane or not, but if I could, that would distinguish this bird from Common with its dark-margined tail. What strikes me most of all in this image is the length of the tarsus. Just for fun, take this photo and the photo of Common Tern, and ask yourself which bird could straddle ...
The purple sandpiper (Calidris maritima) is a stocky wader that breeds in the northeastern parts of Arctic Canada, in Greenland, Iceland, the Faroes, Svalbard, in Northern Scandinavia and the western parts of the Russian Arctic. It has a dark brown plumage and an elongate, slightly downcurved, bill. It is a very hardy bird that does not migrate as far south during winter as most of the other small waders.
In the aviary study, from 14 May to 23 June 2004, we witnessed 25 copulatory attempts involving faeders, in 13 of which faeders were mounted by independent males (including the single case with clear cloacal contact). In seven cases, a faeder mounted an independent male, in four cases a satellite and once a female was mounted. Females never mounted males. The feminine behavioural ploys of female mimics were confirmed in the field, with observations in northern Norway of an individually colour-banded faeder (molecularly sexed as male; figure 1a,c). This bird visited a lek from 16 to 19 June 2004, and was mounted by an independent male on 17 June and by a satellite on 19 June (figure 1c; J. Champion and T. Champion 2005, personal communication).. That faeders were as often on top in homosexual mountings as true males, suggests that their identity is known by the other males; they may appear to be female mimics to us, but not necessarily to the ruffs themselves. The present observations may ...
There were 28 species of wader present last week in Mai Po.. 3 of them were lifers for me: Greater Sand Plover, Nordmanns Greenshank and Asian Dowitcher. The latter 2 are of course pretty rare and were my 2 target species for the trip. I could only get decent views of them through a scope and neither species came close enough to photograph. Most of the common species of east Asian shorebirds were present. The above photo shows mainly Black-tailed Godwit and Curlew Sandpiper with a few Marsh Sandpiper and Common Redshank mixed in.. Curlew Sandpiper were especially common. Ive only ever seen 3 lone individuals in Hokkaido but in Mai Po they were abundant. Some were in summer plumage as you can see.. ...
Brown thrashers, grackles, robins, cardinals, sparrows, scrub jays and pinyon jays are known to feed on monarchs. Some of these birds avoid the body parts with higher concentrations of cardenolides by eating only the abdomens or by eating this kind of food in moderation. When monarchs arrive in their wintering grounds in Mexico they are plump with stored fats that will keep them through the winter. A whole new set of predators is eagerly awaiting them. Mice feast mostly on dead and dying butterflies that have fallen to the ground. Several species of birds, especially black-backed orioles and black-headed grosbeaks take a heavy toll on the millions of wintering butterflies. A few months after their arrival in Mexico, the monarchs may have lost a fair amount of toxins, making them more appetizing. It is estimated that between 7 and 40% of them fall victims to predation in their roosting grounds ...
Looking for guillemot? Find out information about guillemot. northern sea bird, genus Cephas, of the auk auk , common name for a member of the family Alcidae , swimming and diving birds of the N Atlantic and Pacific,... Explanation of guillemot