TY - JOUR. T1 - Central venous catheter salvage in children with Staphylococcus aureus central line-associated bloodstream infection. AU - Corkum, Kristine S.. AU - Jones, Rachel E.. AU - Reuter, Caroline H.. AU - Kociolek, Larry K.. AU - Morgan, Elaine. AU - Lautz, Timothy B.. PY - 2017/11/1. Y1 - 2017/11/1. N2 - Background: Prompt central venous catheter (CVC) removal is currently recommended in children with Staphylococcus aureus central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Our objective was to examine the outcome of attempted line salvage in children with S. aureus CLABSI and assess predictors of success. Methods: A single-institution, retrospective cohort study was performed of all children with S. aureus CLABSI between 2012 and 2015. Patients with and without immediate CVC removal (≤ 2 days after first positive culture) were compared. The primary outcome was failed CVC salvage (removal after 3+ days). Results: Seventy-seven children met criteria for S. aureus CLABSI. Immediate ...
IVTEAM #Intravenous literature: Kubiak, D.W., Gilmore, E.T., Buckley, M.W., Lynch, R., Marty, F.M. and Koo, S. (2014) Adjunctive management of central line-associated bloodstream infections with 70% ethanol-lock therapy. The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. February 12th. [epub ahead of print].. Abstract:. OBJECTIVES: Ethanol is bactericidal against most pathogens implicated in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and biofilms. Current Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines cite insufficient evidence to support adjunctive ethanol-lock therapy (ELT) for central venous catheter (CVC) salvage in patients with CLABSI in combination with systemic antimicrobial treatment. We evaluated the safety and potential efficacy of 70% ELT for CLABSI at our institution after implementation of a hospital ELT protocol.. METHODS: We collected data on all patients treated with adjunctive 70% ELT for catheter salvage from September 2009 to September 2011 and assessed clinical ...
1] NHSN overview -- [2] Identifying Healthcare-associated Infections (HAI) for NHSN Surveillance -- [3] Patient Safety Monthly Reporting Plan and Annual Surveys -- [4] Bloodstream Infection Event (Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection and Non-central line-associated Bloodstream Infection) -- [5] Central Line Insertion Practices (CLIP) Adherence Monitoring -- [6] Pneumonia (Ventilator-associated [VAP] and non-ventilator-associated Pneumonia [PNEU]) Event -- [7] Urinary Tract Infection (Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection [CAUTI] and Non-Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection [UTI]) and Other Urinary System Infection [USI]) Events -- [9] Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Event -- [10] Ventilator-Associated Event (VAE) -- [11] Antimicrobial Use and Resistance (AUR) Module -- [12] Multidrug-Resistant Organism & Clostridium difficile Infection (MDRO/CDI) Module -- [15] Instructions for Mapping Patient Care Locations in NHSN -- [16] General Key Terms -- CDC/NHSN Surveillance ...
Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) fell by more than 90 percent during the past three years at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania due to a multi-pronged approach combining leadership initiatives, electronic infection surveillance, checklists to guide line insertion and maintenance, and implementation of the Toyota Production System to encourage best practices in line care. The findings, which Penn physicians say provide a road map for cutting the deadly, costly toll of hospital-acquired infections nationwide, were presented on Friday, March 20 at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).
Chlorhexidine Gluconate for the Prevention of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections - Current Science Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) is an...
As part of the National Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections that was established in 2008, HHS has set goals for reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and surgical site infections by December 2013. The data included in this report indicate that steady progress is occurring towards the goal of a 50 percent reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infections and a 25 percent reduction goal for surgical site infections over the course of five years. Although progress towards the 25 percent reduction goal for catheter-associated urinary tract infections is moving more slowly, with sustained prevention efforts, the 2013 goal remains attainable ...
At the Johns Hopkins Hospital, we perform CAUTI surveillance in all of our adult intensive care units (ICUs). We utilize surveillance definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). Surveillance began in July 2011. CAUTI rates are expressed as the number of infections per 1000 urinary catheter-days. Our CAUTI prevention program is currently being implemented and includes efforts and programs to reduce the number of urinary catheter days by prompting catheter removal, improve urine sample collection procedures for urine cultures, and monitor and sustain evidence-based best practices for urinary catheter insertion and maintenance.. Tools and Resources. ...
The article about CLABSIs in neonates [7] provides the definition, etiology, and pathogenesis of bloodstream infections as well as strategies for preventing them. The authors defined 2 different types of bloodstream infections that were associated with central venous catheters: catheter-related bloodstream infection and CLABSIs. However, a definition specific to neonates is still needed and requires further research. Regarding preventive strategies, adequate patient-to-staff ratios should be guaranteed as part of the governments continued attention and support. Medical personnel should be educated and trained accordingly ...
Abstract:. Background: This study aimed to assess the impact implementation of the basic Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America/Infectious Diseases Society of America (SHEA/IDSA) practice recommendations in reducing central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in intensive care units (ICUs).. Methods: The prospective study was conducted from January 2011-December 2012 at the 23-bed trauma ICU in Saudi Arabia. The basic SHEA/IDSA practice recommendations were introduced and implemented during the year 2012. Laboratory-confirmed CLABSIs were identified, and the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was determined. Data were collected and analyzed for benchmarking with the National Healthcare Safety Network.. Results: There was a 58% decline in the CLABSI incidence rate from 3.87 to 1.5 per 1,000 central line days in 2011 and 2012, respectively (standardized infection ratio, 0.42; P = .043). Three institutional risk factors were identified and resolved: health care personnel ...
Background: Regulatory agencies in the United States require hospitals use of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) definitions for central line associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) surveillance. In 2015, there were several modifications to the NHSN definition of CLABSI. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of these modifications on reported CLABSI rates.. Methods: We gathered intensive care unit (ICU) CLABSI data from 8 hospitals within a healthcare system and used data from 2014 as a baseline. Both the 2014 and 2015 NHSN CLABSI definitions were applied to the ICU patients in 2015. Infection rates were determined using both definitions for the 2015 patients, and compared to 2014 data using chi square analysis (Epi Info 7).. Results: There were 28 CLABSI identified in 2014 baseline data (42,230 central line (cl) days, 0.65 CLABSI per 1000 cl days). In 2015 there were 52 CLABSI cases under the 2015 NHSN definition (43,599 cl days, 1.19 CLABSI per 1000 cl days), but ...
Results Residents scored a mean IJ pretest of 35.5% (10.29/29, SD=8.30) compared with a post-test mean of 93.0% (26.96/29, SD=1.50; p,0.001). Their mean SC pretest score was 23.0% (6.68/29; SD=9.58) and increased to 96.1% (27.88/29, SD=1.41) at post-test (p,0.001). Patients experienced 3.82 infections per 1000 catheter-days (20 infections in 5235 catheter-days) in the ICU in the 23 months before the educational intervention. During the 21 months after the intervention, there were 1.29 infections per 1000 catheter-days (six infections in 4670 catheter-days (p=0.019)). The incidence rate ratio derived from the Poisson regression was 0.26 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.74) after controlling for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score indicating that there was a 74% reduction in the incidence of CLABSI in the medical ICU after the intervention.. ...
A central line (also known as a central venous catheter) is a catheter (tube) that doctors often place in a large vein in the neck, chest, or groin to give medication or fluids or to collect blood for medical tests. You may be familiar with intravenous catheters (also known as IVs) that are used frequently to give medicine or fluids into a vein near the skins surface (usually on the arm or hand), for short periods of time. Central lines are different from IVs because central lines access a major vein that is close to the heart and can remain in place for weeks or months and be much more likely to cause serious infection. Central lines are commonly used in intensive care units.. ...
Risk for infection when bacteria grow in the line and travel to the bloodstream, called a Central Line Associated-Bloodstream Infection.
ContextConcerns about rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) health care-associated infections have prompted calls for mandatory screening
The NHSN is a secure, Internet-based surveillance system that expands and integrates patient and healthcare personnel safety surveillance systems managed by the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion (DHQP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, facilities that participate in certain reporting programs operated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) can do so through use of NHSN. Furthermore, some U.S. states use NHSN as a means for healthcare facilities to submit data on healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) mandated through their specific state legislation ...
Register today for ICU: CLABSI/CAUTI Boot Camp, which will take place on Saturday, February 20, 2016.. Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are among the most common preventable causes of mortality in the United States, affecting one out of every 25 hospitalized patients. They are a significant cause of illness, death and excess cost in all healthcare settings. Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are common types of healthcare-associated infection.. This afternoon session will review clinical interventions to reduce CLABSI and CAUTI in the intensive care unit (ICU), present strategies for organizational change and discuss ICUs that have successfully implemented quality improvement programs.. The ICU: CLABSI/CAUTI Boot Camp will be held before the Society of Critical Care Medicines 45th Critical Care Congress on February 20, 2016, from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Orlando, Florida, USA. ...
Objective: To examine the extent to which acute care hospitals in the Netherlands have adopted recommended practices to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI). Methods: Between 18 July 2017 and 31 October 2017, we surveyed the infection prevention teams of all acute care hospitals in the Netherlands. The survey instrument was based on the Translating Healthcare-Associated Infection Prevention Research into Practice (TRIP) questionnaire and adapted to the Dutch context. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the reported regular use of CAUTI, CLABSI, VAP, and CDI prevention practices as well as the hospital characteristics. Results: Out of 72 eligible hospitals, 47 (65.3%) responded. Surveillance systems for monitoring CAUTI, CLABSI, VAP, and CDI were present in 17.8, 95.4, 26.2, and 77.3% of hospitals, respectively. Antimicrobial ...
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently announced ambitious new targets for reducing healthcare-acquired infections (HAI) by 2020. The goals apply to acute care hospitals, long-term care facilities, and ambulatory surgical centers. If achieved, these goals could save billions of dollars and numerous lives. That said, on its last reduction attempt, HHS wasnt able to meet its 2013 HAI targets. Between 2009 and 2014, the only goal that was fully achieved was reducing the central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) rate by 50%. Other goals saw minor or partial successes, with the exception of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) and C. diff hospitalizations (HCUP). Over the course of five years, CAUTI rates havent changed, while HCUP rates have actually increased by 18%. Sue Dill Calloway RN, Esq., AD, BA, BSN, MSN, JD, CPHRM, CCMSCP, president of Patient Safety and Healthcare Consulting and Education, says the new HHS goals are pretty ambitious,
Antimicrobial-Resistant Pathogens Associated with Healthcare-Associated Infections Summary of Data Reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009-2010 - Volume 34 Issue 1 - Dawn M. Sievert, Philip Ricks, Jonathan R. Edwards, Amy Schneider, Jean Patel, Arjun Srinivasan, Alex Kallen, Brandi Limbago, Scott Fridkin, National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Team and Participating NHSN Facilities
CRBSIs (catheter-related bloodstream infection) continue to be associated with considerable morbidity and mortality and cause high treatment costs.
Device-associated infections (i.e., central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and ventilator-associated pneumonia) accounted for about one-quarter (26%) of all HAIs in 2011.. It is important to understand the different types of HAIs and how they are spread to be able to effectively prevent them.. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur when germs enter the urinary system and affect the bladder (which stores the urine) and/or the kidneys (which filter the blood to make urine). These infections are often associated with the use of a catheter, which is a tube placed into the bladder to drain urine.. Surgical site infections (SSIs) occur after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place. These infections may involve only the skin, or may be more serious and involve tissue under the skin, organs, or implanted material. SSIs sometimes take days or months after surgery to develop.. Respiratory or lung infections (such as pneumonia) can ...
Enterococci bacteria are a frequent cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. Treatment has become increasingly challenging because of the emergence of multiantibiotic-resistant enterococcal strains and their ability to form biofilms on catheters. We identified and targeted a critical step in biofilm formation and developed a vaccine that prevents catheter-associated urinary tract infections in mice. In the murine model, formation of catheter-associated biofilms by Enterococcus faecalis depends on EbpA, which is the minor subunit at the tip of a heteropolymeric surface fiber known as the endocarditis- and biofilm-associated pilus (Ebp). We show that EbpA is an adhesin that mediates bacterial attachment to host fibrinogen, which is released and deposited on catheters after introduction of the catheter into the mouse bladder. Fibrinogen-binding activity resides in the amino-terminal domain of EbpA (EbpANTD), and vaccination with ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
The author comments on the capability of the hospitals of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections throughout the country. He cited the survey conducted by S. L. Krein and colleagues, which is published within the issue, as an interesting backdrop demonstrating the inadequacy of VA hospitals to use to appropriate quality measures to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections ...
Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in the management of critically ill patients. This study aimed to determine whether an educational program could reduce the rate of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in intensive care units (ICUs). All patients admitted to a medical ICU at a college affiliated with the Japan Society of Intensive Care Medicine between January 2008 and December 2014 were surveyed prospectively for the development of CRBSIs. A mandatory educational program (the intervention) targeting an infection control committee consisting of physicians was developed by a multidisciplinary task force to highlight correct practices for preventing CRBSIs. The program included a 30-min video-based introduction, 120-min lectures with a number of hands-on training sessions, a post-test, posters, safety check sheets, and feedback from the infection control committee. Lectures based on the education program were held every 3 months, and participants were free to choose when they
Improved life expectancy of the global population plays a major role in the rising demand for all medical catheters. Over a 100 different types of catheters are available on the market at the moment; involved amongst others in infusion, cardiovascular, renal, haemodynamic monitoring and neurological contexts. Catheters, specifically central venous catheters (CVCs), are responsible for more device-related infections than any other "internal" medical device. As an illustration, catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSIs) are both common and costly. Approximately 3 million central lines are placed in the United States each year; resulting in 150,000 cases of CRBSIs annually. In addition, 90% of all CRBSIs occur in clinical situations in which a temporary central venous catheter was used. The cost of treating CRBSIs annually in the United States ranges from $300 million to $2 billion a year ...
This prospective observational study measured idle central venous catheter (CVC)-days (no medical indication), and ward clinicians adherence to evidence-based practices for preventing short-term central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). In 340 patients discharged from ICU over a 1-year period, 208 of 794 CVC-days (26.2%) were idle. Interventions to prevent CLABSIs were poorly implemented. Ward clinicians need education regarding risk management strategies to prevent CLABSIs, and clear accountability processes for prompt catheter removal are recommended ...
Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) continues to be one of the most deadly and costly hospital-associated infections in the US. Many lives have been saved in the past decade due to improvements that resulted in a 58 percent reduction of CLABSI in intensive care patients from 2001 to 2009. However, these infections continue to occur and more occur in other areas of the hospital outside the ICU.. Strategies to prevent these infections include the IHI Central Line Bundle, implemented by many hospitals in the US and UK and resulting in dozens achieving more than one year of no CLABSI in their ICU patients. Additional strategies have been identified by clinical experts at SHEA and CDC, adding to the growing evidence base as we strive to eliminate all of these deadly infections. ...
A central line-associated bloodstream infection is a serious infection that occurs when bacteria enter the bloodstream through a central line. A central line is a catheter (tube) that healthcare providers place in a large vein in the neck, chest, or arm to provide fluids, blood, or medications. Commonly found in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting, central lines are different from short-term intravenous catheters (IVs) because they terminate in major veins close to the heart. They can remain in place for weeks or even months, and are much more likely to cause a serious infection.. CLABSIs result in thousands of deaths each year and billions of dollars in added costs to the U.S. healthcare system, yet these infections are preventable. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 250,000 CLABSI cases occur each year in U.S. hospitals, resulting in a range of 30,000 to 62,000 deaths. It is estimated that U.S. hospitals spend up to 2.68 billion dollars ...
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have just recently upgraded their 2017 Recommendations on the Use of Chlorhexidine-Impregnated Dressings for Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections 1.1 Recommendations 1. For patients aged 18 years and older: a. Chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings with an FDA-cleared label that specifies a clinical indication for reducing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) or catheter-associated…
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of antifungal lock therapy with liposomal amphotericin B (Ambisome), in combination with systemic antifungal(s), in patients with catheter-related blood stream infections with fungal organisms, whose catheter has not been removed because of the continuing critical need for central line access. The primary group of potential patients will be those with intestinal insufficiency, including post-op small bowel transplant recipients.. The recommendation of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) is to remove all catheters with fungal infections and treat systemically for 14 days after the last positive culture. However, in certain intestinal failure patients, removal of an infected line might significantly reduce or eliminate intravenous (IV) access and create a life threatening situation. Thus, the investigators aim is to determine the usefulness of antifungal lock therapy in intestinal failure patients whose catheter has not been ...
The blood culture test market is categorized on the basis of methods, products, applications, end users, and regions. Factors such as increasing demand for rapid diagnostic techniques, high prevalence of infectious diseases, increase in healthcare expenditure and rising aging population are driving the growth of this market. Moreover, increasing blood stream infections (BSI) is another major factor propelling the growth of this market. According to the U.S. CDC (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention), catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) is the most common cause for healthcare-associated blood stream infection. Around 12% to 25% of patients who acquire BSI die every year while some of them have to prolong their hospital stay leading to increase in the overall treatment cost. A treatment of CRBSI can cost up to $56,000, once the cost of pharmacy increases, the cost of catheter and additional diagnostic tests also increases which leads to the increase in the overall healthcare cost ...
The application of chlorhexidine dressings may reduce the incidence of definite or probable catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI).
Recommendation Update [July 2017] For patients aged 18 years and older: Chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings with an FDA-cleared label that specifies a clinical indication for reducing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) or catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI) are recommended to protect the insertion site of short-term, non-tunneled central venous catheters.8-12. (See Updated Recommendations on Chlorhexidine-Impregnated (C-I) Dressings Implementation Considerations for Patients Aged 18 Years and Older).. [Superseded 2011 Recommendation] Use a chlorhexidine-impregnated sponge dressing for temporary short-term catheters in patients older than 2 months of age if the CLABSI rate is not decreasing despite adherence to basic prevention measures, including education and training, appropriate use of chlorhexidine for skin antisepsis, and MSB. (Category IB). ...
You are invited to participate in an international survey on the prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in intensive care units.. This survey was created by a team from the Healthcare Associated Infections Unit, Scientific Institute of Public Health, Belgium, in collaboration with the European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training, part of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. The Society of Critical Care Medicine joins the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, and the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine in distributing this survey.. This survey seeks to document knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding CLABSI prevention in intensive care units worldwide. The team conducting this survey recently carried out a similar survey on prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia, which gathered replies from 61 countries.. The ...
Infection Prevention Supplies: Find head-to-toe protective apparel, protection kits, exam gloves, hand hygiene products and more.. Products that Support Practice: Our infection prevention portfolio includes products that address: catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI), surgical site infections (SSI), pneumonia prevention (HAP and VAP) and surface disinfection. We also provide advanced solutions through programs that combine evidence-based products, education and outcomes reporting. - Read less. ...
Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) fell by more than 90 percent during the past three years at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania...
Antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs have shown to reduce the emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and health-care-associated infections (HAIs), and save health-care costs associated with an inappropriate antimicrobial use. The primary objective of this study was to compare the consumption and cost of antimicrobial agents using defined daily dose (DDD) and direct cost of antibiotics before and after the AMS program implementation. Secondary objective was to determine the rate of HAIs [Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) before and after the AMS program implementation. This is a pre-post quasi-experimental study. Adult inpatients were enrolled in a prospective fashion under the active AMS arm and compared with historical inpatients who were admitted to the same units before the AMS implementation. Study was conducted at four tertiary private hospitals located in two cities in Saudi Arabia. Adult
This weeks issue includes items on central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), integrated care, nursing, genomic medicine, deteriorating patients, shared decision making, hip and knee surgery, and more.. Also covered are new issues of the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the Journal of Patient Experience and the Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, along with the latest online papers from BMJ Quality & Safety and latest from the UKs NICE.. ...
This weeks issue includes items on central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), integrated care, nursing, genomic medicine, deteriorating patients, shared decision making, hip and knee surgery, and more.. Also covered are new issues of the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the Journal of Patient Experience and the Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, along with the latest online papers from BMJ Quality & Safety and latest from the UKs NICE.. ...
The Pittsburgh Regional Health Initiative wants to build a safer, more reliable health system. The organization, under the umbrella of the Jewish Healthcare Foundation, has made progress, but theres a long way to go, says Karen Wolk Feinstein, Ph.D., president and CEO of the foundation and its two operating arms.. She helped create the PRHI in 1997 with then-CEO Paul ONeill of Alcoa, who made the corporation a safety leader.. The groups first effort was to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections. Feinstein says they ultimately convinced 32 hospitals to sign on. Within four years, working with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, these deadly infections went down 68 percent.. "That was pretty exciting because that launched us," she says. "It was when people believed that the initiative could really make a difference.". Over the years, the PRHI has moved from reducing medical errors and less than ideal hospitals practices, to a focus on keeping people out of hospitals, keeping ...
The long-term impact of a program to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections in a surgical intensive care unit ...
This data is pivotal for emergency medicine and the overall impact it can have on patient safety and cost reductions in the hospital. - Bon Ku, MD, MPP, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Study finds that ultrasound-guided peripheral IVs are a viable alternative to high-risk CVCs in 85% of Patients More than five million central venous catheter (CVC) lines are placed in U.S. hospitals each year, making it one of the most common invasive emergency room procedures.1 CVC placement involves the insertion of a large catheter into a patients major vessel. It is often used for those who have poor venous access where veins cannot be visualized, making it difficult to place an IV without multiple sticks. Due to its high-risk nature, CVC procedures can have a complication rate near 15%, which includes susceptibility to catheter-related blood stream infection or even death.2
OBJECTIVES: The National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) replaced its old definition for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) with ventilator-associated events (VAEs) in 2013. Little data is available comparing the two definitions in burn patients. METHODS: Data from 2011 to 2014 were collected on burn patients mechanically ventilated for at least 2 days. VAP was determined using two methods: (1) pneumonia as defined by the previous more clinical CDC (NHSN) definition captured in the burn registry; (2) pneumonia as defined by the recent CDC (NHSN) standard of VAEs where patients meeting the criteria for possible VAP were considered having a pneumonia ...
Where I work it is already best practice to use chlorhexidine, does any one know if a similar study has been done or if this study has been repeated?. ...
Denver Health (DH) sought to extend the algorithm application to additional procedure areas and to actively implement the detection tool into routine practice. Below we provide a case study exemplar of that application.. The infection control team sought to further adapt, tailor, and validate the electronic detection algorithm for use in everyday SSI surveillance at DH in order to reduce the burden of chart review while also identifying a high percentage of SSIs for detailed investigation and prevention activities.. DHs Infection Prevention Data Manager generated a retrospective cohort of procedures, including associated SSI as defined by the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN)4 definitions, using DH surveillance data from 2007-2010. Procedures included hip and knee arthroplasty, abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy, spinal fusion, craniotomy, and herniorrhaphy.. The suggested algorithm components were re-evaluated in a DH-specific context in order to determine which variables were most ...
Participate in discussion about the Inpatient ED measures (ED-1 and ED-2) new to MBQIP. Understand the basics, review currently available CAH data and discuss best practices for quality improvement. Also hear updates on antibiotic stewardship measures, National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) enrollment and upcoming changes to the MBQIP Data Reports.. ...
Participate in discussion about the Inpatient ED measures (ED-1 and ED-2) new to MBQIP. Understand the basics, review currently available CAH data and discuss best practices for quality improvement. Also hear updates on antibiotic stewardship measures, National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) enrollment and upcoming changes to the MBQIP Data Reports.. ...
PART II CATHETER RELATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTION (CR-BSI) ... The pathogenesis of catheter-related infections is multifactorial and complex ), ... - A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) on PowerShow.com - id: 3cedd4-M2VkN
Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are infections that patients may experience while receiving medical treatment, very often within a healthcare facility. Working toward the elimination of HAIs is a CDC priority. The standardized infection ratio (SIR) is a summary measure used to track HAIs. This number is calculated by dividing the number of observed infections by the number of predicted infections. The number of predicted infections is based upon facility and location-level characteristics. For example, if one hospital only had five infections within the course of a year, and yet had ten HAIs predicted, its SIR would then be .50. For this reason, healthcare facilities aim for their SIRs to be as far below 1 as possible. For more information, visit the CDC National Healthcare Safety Network SIR Guide. Explore CDCs investments and activities. ...