Based on automated MP annotations supported by experiments on knockout mouse models. Click on icons to go to all Timp3 data for that phenotype. ...
In order to identify the function of genes, the consortium uses a series of response (ABR) test conducted at 14 weeks of age. Hearing is assessed at five frequencies - 6kHz, 12kHz, 18kHz, 24kHz and 30kHz - as well as a broadband click stimulus. Increased thresholds are indicative of abnormal hearing. Abnormalities in adult ear morphology are recorded as part of the Combined SHIRPA and Dysmorphology (CSD) protocol, which includes a response to a click box test (absence is indicative of a strong hearing deficit) and visual inspection for behavioural signs that may indicate vestibular dysfunction e.g. head bobbing or circling. ...
0.83% of tested genes with null mutations on a B6N genetic background have a phenotype association to abnormal dental arch morphology (48/5811) 0.35% females (20/5789) 0.47% males (27/5796) ...
Human Phenotype Ontology:HP:0000212,MedGen:C0017567,Human Phenotype Ontology:HP:0000316,MedGen:CN000296,Human Phenotype Ontology:HP:0000821,MedGen:C0020676,Human Phenotype Ontology:HP:0001382,MedGen:C1844820,Human Phenotype Ontology:HP:0001636,MedGen:CN001489,Human Phenotype Ontology:HP:0002019,MedGen:C0009806,Human Phenotype Ontology:HP:0004322,MedGen:C0349588,Human Phenotype Ontology:HP:0012471,MedGen:C1836543,MeSH:C536914,MedGen:C0238462,Orphanet:ORPHA1332,SNOMED CT:255032005,MeSH:D013964,MedGen:C0040136,MeSH:D018761,MedGen:C0025267,OMIM:131100,Orphanet:ORPHA652,SNOMED CT:30664006,MeSH:D018813,MedGen:C0025268,OMIM:171400,Orphanet:ORPHA247698,SNOMED CT:61808009,MeSH:D018814,MedGen:C0025269,OMIM:162300,Orphanet:ORPHA247709,SNOMED CT:6153000,SNOMED CT:61530001,MedGen:C0031511,OMIM:171300,MedGen:C1833929,MedGen:C1970712,OMIM:610755,Orphanet:ORPHA276152,MedGen:CN073359,Orphanet:ORPHA653,SNOMED CT:61808009,MedGen:CN169374,MedGen: ...
FYPO is a formal ontology of phenotypes observed in fission yeast. FYPO is being developed to support the comprehensive and detailed representation of phenotypes in PomBase, the new online fission yeast resource (www.pombaes.org). Its scope is similar to that of the Ascomycete Phenotype Ontology (APO), but FYPO includes more detailed pre-composed terms as well as computable definitions ...
Infectious Disease Ontology Kick-off Workshop (September 19 - 20, 2007) and Meeting (September 21, 2007) The Infectious Disease Ontology Workshop and Meeting (see link below under "Past Meetings") were intended to serve as both a training workshop for participants and a forum through which to establish a community for development, maintenance, and use of the Infectious Disease Ontology (IDO). The workshop and meeting were supported by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. September 21, 2007 ...
At the 2007 Infectious Disease Ontology Workshop (see below), we began preliminary work on a draft infectious disease ontology. OBO edit and Protege OWL versions of the ontology are available for download. More recent files and information about the email list can be found via the link above. ...
The achievements and ongoing efforts of C-Paths Critical Path to TB Drug Regimens (CPTR) initiatives work on the Hollow Fiber System Model for Tuberculosis (HFS-TB) are detailed in a new supplement published in the Clinical Infectious Diseases journal. The supplement includes an editorial by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on its qualification of this tool to reliably assess the potential efficacy of new drugs and combination regimens, an editorial by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) supporting the use of this tool in drug development, and articles co-authored by members of CPTRs Preclinical and Clinical Sciences Workgroup. Read it online at http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/61/suppl_1.toc.. The HFS-TB provides a deep understanding of how drugs move through the body and exert their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effect on mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Recognition of this tool as a significant advancement in the development of effective treatments for MTB led to an ...
GLIMP Investigators, Di Pasquale, M. F., Sotgiu, G., Gramegna, A., Radovanovic, D., Terraneo, S., Reyes, L. F., Rupp, J., del Castillo, J. G., Blasi, F., Aliberti, S. & Restrepo, M. I., 1-May-2019, In : Clinical Infectious Diseases. 68, 9, p. 1482-1493 12 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › Academic › peer-review ...
Clinical Infectious Diseases 2006 free download. Get the latest version now. A medical reference text with detailed step-by-step procedures, work-ups and treatments.
The 1st Area Medical Laboratory (1st AML) recently hosted a three-day course in Operational Clinical Infectious Disease (OCID) management.
J:228563 Koscielny G, Yaikhom G, Iyer V, Meehan TF, Morgan H, Atienza-Herrero J, Blake A, Chen CK, Easty R, Di Fenza A, Fiegel T, Grifiths M, Horne A, Karp NA, Kurbatova N, Mason JC, Matthews P, Oakley DJ, Qazi A, Regnart J, Retha A, Santos LA, Sneddon DJ, Warren J, Westerberg H, Wilson RJ, Melvin DG, Smedley D, Brown SD, Flicek P, Skarnes WC, Mallon AM, Parkinson H, The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium Web Portal, a unified point of access for knockout mice and related phenotyping data. Nucleic Acids Res. 2014 Jan;42(Database issue):D802-9 ...
J:228563 Koscielny G, Yaikhom G, Iyer V, Meehan TF, Morgan H, Atienza-Herrero J, Blake A, Chen CK, Easty R, Di Fenza A, Fiegel T, Grifiths M, Horne A, Karp NA, Kurbatova N, Mason JC, Matthews P, Oakley DJ, Qazi A, Regnart J, Retha A, Santos LA, Sneddon DJ, Warren J, Westerberg H, Wilson RJ, Melvin DG, Smedley D, Brown SD, Flicek P, Skarnes WC, Mallon AM, Parkinson H, The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium Web Portal, a unified point of access for knockout mice and related phenotyping data. Nucleic Acids Res. 2014 Jan;42(Database issue):D802-9 ...
There is an increasing accumulation of data on disease-related mutations and associated phenotypes in a wide variety of databases worldwide. Exploiting these data in the context of whole genome sequencing is inhibited because the phenotype information in these databases is often difficult to search meaningfully or relate between data sets, and automated computational integration is not possible. Key to this integration is the development of ontology-based methods for describing diseases in terms of their component phenotypes. This would allow analysis of variation in disease manifestation, relationships between diseases and phenotypes in model organisms, and linking diseases to gene mutations, pathways, and phenotypes. Building a systematic link to phenotypes manifested in model organisms will be of particular importance with the advent of new, large-scale phenotyping projects such as the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium. In addition to improved semantic description, funding and ...
Identifying genes that are important for embryo development is a crucial first step towards understanding their many functions in driving the ordered growth, differentiation and organogenesis of embryos. It can also shed light on the origins of developmental disease and congenital abnormalities. Current international efforts to examine gene function in the mouse provide a unique opportunity to pinpoint genes that are involved in embryogenesis, owing to the emergence of embryonic lethal knockout mutants. Through internationally coordinated efforts, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) has generated a public resource of mouse knockout strains and, in April 2012, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC), supported by the EU InfraCoMP programme, convened a workshop to discuss developing a phenotyping pipeline for the investigation of embryonic lethal knockout lines. This workshop brought together over 100 scientists, from 13 countries, who are working in the academic and
Approximately one-third of all mammalian genes are essential for life. Phenotypes resulting from knockouts of these genes in mice have provided tremendous insight into gene function and congenital disorders. As part of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium effort to generate and phenotypically characterize 5,000 knockout mouse lines, here we identify 410 lethal genes during the production of the first 1,751 unique gene knockouts. Using a standardized phenotyping platform that incorporates high-resolution 3D imaging, we identify phenotypes at multiple time points for previously uncharacterized genes and additional phenotypes for genes with previously reported mutant phenotypes. Unexpectedly, our analysis reveals that incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity are common even on a defined genetic background. In addition, we show that human disease genes are enriched for essential genes, thus providing a dataset that facilitates the prioritization and validation of mutations identified in
Flow cytometry (FCM) bioinformatics is a sub-field of bioinformatics, aimed at developing effective and efficient computational tools to store, organize, and analyze high-throughput/dimensional FCM data. Flow cytometers are capable of analyzing thousands of cells per second for up to 40 features. These features primarily signal the presence of different proteins on cells in the bloodstream. Hence contributing large amounts of data towards the big biological data paradigm. The data that a flow cytometer outputs from a biological sample, is called a FCS file.The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) is a collaboration between 23 international institutions and funding organizations. Its aim is to decipher the function of 20,000 mouse genes. IMPC is doing so by breeding mice with a certain gene knocked out (KO), cancelling the function of that gene. In turn, FCM is used to measure the immunological changes correlated to this knockout. Many tools exist to classify FCS files. However, ...
Fifty-two newly discovered genes that are critical for hearing have been found by testing gene-modified knockout mice. The newly identifed genes will provide insights into the causes of hearing loss in humans. The study published Oct. 12 in Nature Communications was carried out by the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC), which includes the Mouse Biology Program at the University of California, Davis.. ...
Ontological concepts are useful for many different biomedical tasks. Concepts are difficult to recognize in text due to a disconnect between what is captured in an ontology and how the concepts are expressed in text. There are many recognizers for specific ontologies, but a general approach for concept recognition is an open problem. Three dictionary-based systems (MetaMap, NCBO Annotator, and ConceptMapper) are evaluated on eight biomedical ontologies in the Colorado Richly Annotated Full-Text (CRAFT) Corpus. Over 1,000 parameter combinations are examined, and best-performing parameters for each system-ontology pair are presented. Baselines for concept recognition by three systems on eight biomedical ontologies are established (F-measures range from 0.14-0.83). Out of the three systems we tested, ConceptMapper is generally the best-performing system; it produces the highest F-measure of seven out of eight ontologies. Default parameters are not ideal for most systems on most ontologies; by changing
... , a standardized vocabulary of phenotypic abnormalities encountered in human disease. With unmatched depth it enables clinicians to record and analyse data with extremely accurate computer interpretable ontology terms. Developed by The Monarch Initiative.
... , a standardized vocabulary of phenotypic abnormalities encountered in human disease. With unmatched depth it enables clinicians to record and analyse data with extremely accurate computer interpretable ontology terms. Developed by The Monarch Initiative.
TY - JOUR. T1 - The human phenotype ontology in 2017. AU - Köhler, Sebastian. AU - Vasilevsky, Nicole A.. AU - Engelstad, Mark. AU - Foster, Erin. AU - McMurry, Julie. AU - Aymé, Ségolène. AU - Baynam, Gareth. AU - Bello, Susan M.. AU - Boerkoel, Cornelius F.. AU - Boycott, Kym M.. AU - Brudno, Michael. AU - Buske, Orion J.. AU - Chinnery, Patrick F.. AU - Cipriani, Valentina. AU - Connell, Laureen E.. AU - Dawkins, Hugh J.S.. AU - DeMare, Laura E.. AU - Devereau, Andrew D.. AU - De Vries, Bert B.A.. AU - Firth, Helen V.. AU - Freson, Kathleen. AU - Greene, Daniel. AU - Hamosh, Ada. AU - Helbig, Ingo. AU - Hum, Courtney. AU - Jähn, Johanna A.. AU - James, Roger. AU - Krause, Roland. AU - Laulederkind, Stanley J.F.. AU - Lochmüller, Hanns. AU - Lyon, Gholson J.. AU - Ogishima, Soichi. AU - Olry, Annie. AU - Ouwehand, Willem H.. AU - Pontikos, Nikolas. AU - Rath, Ana. AU - Schaefer, Franz. AU - Scott, Richard H.. AU - Segal, Michael. AU - Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.. AU - Sever, ...
Apologies for multiple copies.] **** FOIS 2008 CALL FOR PAPERS **** **** The 5th International Conference **** on Formal Ontology in Information Systems **** **** http://fois08.dfki.de **** **** October 31st November 3rd, 2008 **** Saarbr cken, Germany **** DFKI, Competence Center Semantic Web Conference Description ---------------------- Since its inception ten years ago, the International Conference on Formal Ontology in Information Systems has explored the multiple perspectives on the notion of ontology that have arisen from such diverse research communities as philosophy, logic, computer science, cognitive science, linguistics, and various scientific domains. As ontologies have been applied in new and exciting domains such as the World Wide Web, bioinformatics, and geographical information systems, it has become evident that there is a need for ontologies that have been developed with solid theoretical foundations based on philosophical, linguistic, and logical analysis. Similarly, there is ...
Chye, J.K.; Lim, C.T.; Ng, K.B.; Lim, J.M.; George, R.; Lam, S.K. (1997) Vertical transmission of dengue. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 25 (6). pp. 1374-7. ISSN 1058-4838. Cox-Singh, J.; Davis, T.M.E.; Lee, K.; Shamsul, S.S.G.; Matusop, A.; Ratnam, S.; Rahman, H.A.; Conway, D.J.; Singh, B. (2008) Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in humans is widely distributed and potentially life threatening. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 46 (2). pp. 165-71. ISSN 1537-6591. Lam, Sai Kit; Chua, Kaw Bing (2002) Nipah virus encephalitis outbreak in Malaysia. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 34 Sup. S48-51. ISSN 1537-6591. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Measurement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 RNA load distinguishes progressive infection from nonprogressive HIV-1 infection in men and women. AU - Burger, Harold. AU - Fang, Guowei. AU - Siegal, Frederick P.. AU - Weiser, Barbara. AU - Grimson, Roger. AU - Anastos, Kathryn. AU - Back, Sara. PY - 1997. Y1 - 1997. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=16944367451&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=16944367451&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. C2 - 9332540. AN - SCOPUS:16944367451. VL - 25. SP - 332. EP - 333. JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases. JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases. SN - 1058-4838. IS - 2. ER - ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - A man with AIDS and gastric ulcers. AU - Brown, Jennifer. AU - Brown, William R.. AU - Storfa, Amy H.. AU - Tayal, Shalini. PY - 2012/8/15. Y1 - 2012/8/15. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864463375&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84864463375&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1093/cid/cis416. DO - 10.1093/cid/cis416. M3 - Comment/debate. C2 - 22821572. AN - SCOPUS:84864463375. VL - 55. JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases. JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases. SN - 1058-4838. IS - 4. ER - ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - IDSA/AASLD Response to Cochrane Review on Direct-Acting Antivirals for Hepatitis C. AU - Powderly, William G.. AU - Naggie, Susanna. AU - Kim, Arthur Y.. AU - Vargas, Hugo E. AU - Chung, Raymond T.. AU - Lok, Anna S.. PY - 2017/12/1. Y1 - 2017/12/1. KW - antivirals. KW - hepatitis C. KW - treatment. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85034833455&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85034833455&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1093/cid/cix620. DO - 10.1093/cid/cix620. M3 - Comment/debate. C2 - 29020156. AN - SCOPUS:85034833455. VL - 65. SP - 1773. EP - 1775. JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases. JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases. SN - 1058-4838. IS - 11. ER - ...
Background. Although a considerable amount of research has gone into the study of the role of bactericidal versus bacteriostatic antimicrobial agents in the treatment of different infectious diseases, there is no accepted standard of practice.. Methods. A panel of infectious diseases specialists reviewed the available literature to try to define specific recommendations for clinical practice.. Results. In infections of the central nervous system, the rapidity with which the organism is killed may be an important determinant, because of the serious damage that may occur during these clinical situations. The failure of bacteriostatic antibiotics to adequately treat endocarditis is well documented, both in human studies and in animal models.. Conclusion. The bulk of the evidence supports the concept that, in treating endocarditis and meningitis, it is important to use antibacterial agents with in vitro bactericidal activity. This conclusion is based on both human and animal data. The data to ...
Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)is a member of the TLR family, which plays a central role in the innate immune response to a wide variety of microorganisms. Animal studies have shown thatTLR2-knockout mice are more susceptible to septicemia due to Staphylococcus sure us and Listeria monocyto genes,meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae,and infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis,suggesting that functional TLR2polymorphisms may impair host response to a certain spectrum of microbial pathogens. In humans, 2 polymorphisms in the exon part of TLR2, which attenuatereceptor signaling, enhance the risk of acute severe infections, tuberculosis, and leprosy. Because gram-positive bacteria have became the first cause of severe infections, including septic shock, knowledge of the role that alteration or lack of TLR2function plays in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases could contribute to the design of new the rapeuticstrategies, including prevention, pharmacologicalintervention, and vaccine ...
2. Simon DW, Da Silva YS, Zuccoli G, Clark RSB. Acute encephalitis. Crit Care Clin 2013;29:259-77. 1 Keratitis is the clinical term describing inflammation of the cornea and one of its causes includes infectious pathogens. Corneal infections often occur when there is a breach in the integrity of the corneal epithelium due to contact lenses, trauma, surgery, or existing ulcerations from other etiologies (ie, nutritional, lagophtalmos associated with leprosy). 1). However, some of the herpes viruses may also affect the cornea leading to viral keratitis. Anatomy and physiology of cerebrospinal fluid. Eur Ann Otorhinolaryn Head Neck Dis 2011;128:309-16. 2. Simon DW, Da Silva YS, Zuccoli G, Clark RSB. Acute encephalitis. Crit Care Clin 2013;29:259-77. 1 Keratitis is the clinical term describing inflammation of the cornea and one of its causes includes infectious pathogens. Corneal infections often occur when there is a breach in the integrity of the corneal epithelium due to contact lenses, trauma, ...
Wei Wang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Doctor, (E-mail: [email protected]) Jiangsu Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Key Laboratory on Technology for Parasitic Disease Prevention and Control, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory on Molecular Biology of Parasites, Wuxi 214064, Jiangsu Province, China. ...
The most important educational exercise for the fellows, beyond the vast amount of bedside teaching in the inpatient and outpatient settings, is the weekly ID Case Conference. Fellows are responsible for organization of this conference, where an unknown case is presented to the attending physicians who then discuss differential diagnosis, diagnostic evaluation, and initial treatment recommendations. Following this discussion, the findings and outcome are presented by the fellow, after which he/she presents an in-depth review of the literature pertaining to the case.
With the improvement of hygiene and income level, the prevalence of TB is decreasing in developed countries although it still considers a challenge in developing countries such as Iran. The peak age of disseminated TB were children, frequently affected under the age of three, nevertheless this trend has changed over the last decade (5). Therefore, increase in the rate of HIV infection and the number of adults with impairment in cellular immunity have led to an additional peak of TB among young adults (6) Hepatic granulomas are present in more than 90% of patients with TB, approximately 70% of them have extra-pulmonary TB and about 25% of them again have isolated pulmonary infections (7)., It should be borne in mind that chest radiograph allows the possibility of identifying 59 to 69% of miliary tuberculosis with high specificity and good interobserver agreement (8). In our patient there was no sign of other organs involvement and also her chest x-ray had non-specific findings. Liver involvement ...
Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age distribution and clinical signs/symptoms during the baseline visit. There was no significant difference between clinical or bacteriological responses between the two groups. Three-day regimen of ciprofloxacin showed high microbiological eradication rate for E. coli (66.7%) which was similar to the eradication rate observed for 7-day regimen (64.8%). No statistically significant difference was found in adverse effects between the groups, except for nausea (p=0.041). ...
BFO 2 Reference: In all areas of empirical inquiry we encounter general terms of two sorts. First are general terms which refer to universals or types:animaltuberculosissurgical procedurediseaseSecond, are general terms used to refer to groups of entities which instantiate a given universal but do not correspond to the extension of any subuniversal of that universal because there is nothing intrinsic to the entities in question by virtue of which they - and only they - are counted as belonging to the given group. Examples are: animal purchased by the Emperortuberculosis diagnosed on a Wednesdaysurgical procedure performed on a patient from Stockholmperson identified as candidate for clinical trial #2056-555person who is signatory of Form 656-PPVpainting by Leonardo da VinciSuch terms, which represent what are called specializations in [81. Entity doesnt have a closure axiom because the subclasses dont necessarily exhaust all possibilites. For example Werner Ceusters portions of reality ...
TTY = "ET" is assigned to the value of tag = "synonym" where the scope identifier is "BROAD," "NARROW," or "RELATED" in records where there is no "is_obsolete" tag ...
In this paper we introduce various vocabularies and definitions used for defining Protein Ontology. Protein Ontology provides the technical and scientific infrastructure and knowledge to allow description and analysis of relationships between various proteins. Protein Ontology uses relevant protein data sources of information like PDB, SCOP, and OMIM. Protein Ontology describes: Protein Sequence and Structure Information, Protein Folding Process, Cellular Functions of Proteins, Molecular Bindings internal and external to Proteins, and Constraints affecting the Final Protein Conformation.. ...
Institutions: National Center for Biotechnology Information. Genomic resources for the mouse genome have increased greatly. A Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS) assembly generated by the Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium (MGSC) was released and published. During the past year, sequencing resources for mouse have shifted towards clone based (HTGS) sequence. As of July 25, 2003, 1.03 Gb of non-redundant finished sequence and 2.28 Gb of redundant draft sequence were available. Greater than 95% of the HTGS sequence generated is from the reference strain (C57BL/6J). To leverage all available sequence data, NCBI has been performing composite assemblies that integrate HTGS sequence from C57BL/6J into the MGSCv3. NCBI Build 30 (based on data from Jan. 27, 2003) integrated 0.736 Gb of HTGS phase 3 (finished) sequence. It is anticipated that future builds will utilize all C57BL/6J HTGS. In addition to producing the reference assembly, NCBI has been producing alternate assemblies in a strain specific manner. In ...
Institutions: Medical Research Council Mammalaian Genetics Unit. FESA provides a secure and economical means of storing the enormous number of new mutations and genetically manipulated lines generated during contemporary genetic and ENU mutagenesis programmes. This explosion of new lines necessitates the provision of central, securely funded archives to ensure these resources are not lost to future researchers.. At Harwell, FESA already contains ,300,000 frozen embryos from ,1000 stocks. We offer a free service for cryopreservation, storage and promotion of mouse embryos and spermatozoa. Charges are levied for withdrawals from the archive.. FESA is one of six nodes that constitute EMMA (European Mouse Mutant Archive) and acts as the central UK repository for deposition and distribution of mouse mutants and stocks that are essential to todays research.. Contact [email protected] The MGU Harwell web site can be accessed at: http://www.mgu.har.mrc.ac.uk. ...
first in the germ cell lineage sharing many features with the embryonic stem cells Unlike differentiated somatic cells the PGCs possess ability to erase epigenetic modifications on the genome accumulated during development Thus PGCs can be regarded as the cells programmed to rejuvenate the genomic status Despite of this biological importance molecular nature of the PGCs remains largely unknown We have established systematic methodologies to analyze PGCs and related embryonic cells PGCs were purified from transgenic mouse embryos in which the PGCs were marked by GFP reporter expression and cDNA libraries were made with the purified PGCs transcriptome of the PGCs were explored by EST analyses and microarray ESTs were classified according to the NIA Mouse Gene Index the analyzed 18 293 ESTs were clustered into 6 159 transcripts and 4 833 genes of which 435 were unknown genes Analysis of EST frequency suggested expression level of each gene and identified signature genes for PGCs Principal component ...
BFO 2 Reference: In all areas of empirical inquiry we encounter general terms of two sorts. First are general terms which refer to universals or types:animaltuberculosissurgical procedurediseaseSecond, are general terms used to refer to groups of entities which instantiate a given universal but do not correspond to the extension of any subuniversal of that universal because there is nothing intrinsic to the entities in question by virtue of which they - and only they - are counted as belonging to the given group. Examples are: animal purchased by the Emperortuberculosis diagnosed on a Wednesdaysurgical procedure performed on a patient from Stockholmperson identified as candidate for clinical trial #2056-555person who is signatory of Form 656-PPVpainting by Leonardo da VinciSuch terms, which represent what are called specializations in [81. Entity doesnt have a closure axiom because the subclasses dont necessarily exhaust all possibilites. For example Werner Ceusters portions of reality ...
It is a challenge to perform artificial intelligence without Matlab tools ? Yes it is possible if we understand correctly what we do. Do we use determinic mathematical link to do this ? Yes and … not. Why ? Because in fact we lay the « logical » or rules as « prolog » can do. That is we have to find some algorithms to find bad and right solutions after passing through rules. Then there are not parallelism nor so much « codelets » [HOFSTADTER-MITCHELL-1995] to perform our 256 possibilities. We just choose to run randomly them and to stop after 10, 20 100 tries. There we have a small « Coderack » as somebody can memorize and visualize in subconscient some inputs with eyes. Then we construct as a « prolog » heart ! Is it a good exercice for scientist ? « Who can do more can do less !« ...
1999 US Public Health Service (USPHS)/Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections (OIs) in Persons Infected with HIV, published in this issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases [1], provide disease-specific recommendations for the prevention of the most common serious OIs in HIV-infected persons in the United States [2]. This article synthesizes these recommendations and offers health care providers an organized approach for preventing OIs in patients infected with HIV. We recognize that preservation or reconstitution of immune function by instituting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can now provide the most potent protection against OIs in persons with advanced HIV disease, including many OIs for which specific prevention measures are not available [3, 4]. However, HAART is effective only for persons who have access to therapy, who are willing to accept therapy, who are able to adhere to it, and in whom viral suppression is achieved ...
Chow EPF; Callander D; Fairley CK; Zhang L; Donovan B; Guy R; Lewis DA; Hellard M; Read P; Ward A, 2017, Increased Syphilis Testing of Men Who Have Sex With Men: Greater Detection of Asymptomatic Early Syphilis and Relative Reduction in Secondary Syphilis, Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 65, pp. 389 - 395, http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix326. Stoové M; Asselin J; Pedrana A; Lea T; Hellard M; Wilson D; Prestage G; de Wit J; Holt M, 2017, Declining prevalence of undiagnosed HIV in Melbourne: Results from community-based bio-behavioural studies of gay and bisexual men, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12708. Quinn B; Seed C; Keller A; Maher L; Wilson D; Farrell M; Caris S; Williams J; Madden A; Thompson A, 2017, Re-examining blood donor deferral criteria relating to injecting drug use, International Journal of Drug Policy, vol. 48, pp. 9 - 17, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2017.05.058. Taaffe JE; Longosz AF; Wilson D, 2017, ...
Vekemans, J., Gouvea-Reis, F., Kim, J. H., Excler, J. L., Smeesters, P. R., Obrien, K. L., Van Beneden, C. A., Steer, A. C., Carapetis, J. R. & Kaslow, D. C., 1 Sep 2019, In : Clinical Infectious Diseases. 69, 5, p. 877-883 7 p., ciy1143.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Review article ...
Stockdale AJ; Saunders MJ; Boyd MA; Bonnett LJ; Johnston V; Wandeler G; Schoffelen AF; Ciaffi L; Stafford K; Collier AC, 2018, Effectiveness of Protease Inhibitor/Nucleos(t)ide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Second-line Antiretroviral Therapy for the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in Sub-Sah, Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 66, pp. 1846 - 1857, http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix1108. Yao AH; Moore CL; Lim PL; Molina JM; Madero JS; Kerr S; Mallon PWG; Emery S; Cooper DA; Boyd MA, 2018, Metabolic profiles of individuals switched to second-line antiretroviral therapy after failing standard first-line therapy for treatment of HIV-1 infection in a randomized, controlled trial, Antiviral Therapy, vol. 23, pp. 21 - 32, http://dx.doi.org/10.3851/IMP3171. Mwasakifwa GE; Moore C; Carey D; Amin J; Penteado P; Losso M; Lim PL; Mohapi L; Molina JM; Gazzard B, 2018, Relationship between untimed plasma lopinavir concentrations and virological outcome on second-line ...
Mandell, L., Wunderink, R., Anzueto, A., Bartlett, J., Campbell, D., Dean, N., Dowell, S., File, T., Musher, D., Niederman, M., Torres, A., Whitney, C. (2007). Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society Consensus Guidelines on the Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 44(2), s27-72. doi:10.1086/511159. Retrieved March 22, 2018, from: https://www.thoracic.org/statements/resources/mtpi/idsaats-cap. ...
Kalsdorf, Barbara, Division of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Medical Clinic Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany; Germany German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Clinical Tuberculosis Center, Borstel, Germany; International Health/Infectious Diseases, University o (Germany ...
Salim S. Abdool Karim is a clinical infectious diseases epidemiologist who is widely recognised for his research contributions in HIV prevention and treatment. He is CAPRISA Professor for Global Health in the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. He is also Director of the Centre for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research) at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa and Adjunct Professor of Medicine at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. His contributions to microbicides for HIV prevention spans two decades and culminated in the CAPRISA 004 tenofovir gel trial which provided proof-of-concept that antiretroviral drugs can prevent sexually transmitted HIV infection and herpes simplex virus type 2 in women. He is co-inventor on patents which have been used in several HIV vaccine candidates and his clinical research on TB-HIV treatment has shaped international guidelines on the clinical
Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, May 1, 2010, Vol.50(9), pp.1300- ...