Booktopia has Implicit Cognition, Oxford Science Publications by Geoffrey Underwood. Buy a discounted Paperback of Implicit Cognition online from Australias leading online bookstore.
CheckPoint: Implicit Association Test By: Jessica Dodd Jessica Dodd December 27, 2010 ETH/ 125 The results for my IAT were: (1) 35% strong automatic
4. CheckPoint: Implicit Association Test · Resource: The Harvard-Hosted Implicit Association Test (IAT) · Due Date: Day 5 [Individual] forum · Complete the Harvard-Hosted Implicit Association Test (IAT) using the instructions below ...
DESCRIPTION: Recent government sponsored research is working to produce a new line of flexible physiological and behavioral sensor technologies that are to be available for homeland security applications. These sensors, which must be non-invasive in nature and protect the privacy of the individual(s) involved, will be used to support human centered/behavioral screening processes in a variety of high and low volume venues. Security screening is conducted to evaluate the risk of individuals entering transportation and other critical infrastructure and requires efficient, rapid and accurate examination of a person. Persons involved in or planning to be involved in possible malicious or deceitful acts will show various behavioral or physiological abnormalities. Much of the technology and publications to date have focused on detection of guilty individuals using electrodermal measures. Research into other psychophysiological measures or the mechanisms underlying deception is still in its early ...
ANTHONY GREENWALD: In 1900, mathematician David Hilbert made a list of 23 recognized questions that the field of mathematics should regard as important unanswered questions and, lo and behold, many mathematicians decided to work on those questions. We psychologists do not have such widely agreed-upon lists of questions, but we do have a continuing good source of questions-the questions often come to us from society.. Our study of prejudice, for example, comes out of trying to deal with policy questions that leaders deal with and that we think need to be informed by science. Prejudice was a topic I discovered relatively late in my career. My dissertation advisor, Gordon Allport, may be best known for his 1954 book on prejudice, The Nature of Prejudice. However, when Allport was my advisor, in the early 1960s, he was no longer interested in the topic. I eventually came to an interest in prejudice because the work on attitudes that Mahzarin and I were doing in the mid 1990s produced a technique ...
Synaesthesia is a hereditary, neurological condition in which common stimuli trigger unexpected secondary sensations. For example, reading letters may result in the visualisation of colour, a variant known as grapheme-colour synaesthesia. While synaesthesia is thought to confer a range of benefits such as improved memory, empathy, visual search and creativity to the synaesthete, there is a small, yet growing, body of evidence that suggests synaesthesia may also be associated with more clinical conditions. This thesis investigates potential associations between synaesthesia and a range of clinical conditions, identifying a set of cormorbidities, and exploring the possible genetic roots of these associations. First, I identified an increased prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and its clinical precursor, radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) in synaesthetes self-referring for participation in scientific studies. Furthermore, I identified an increased occurrence of anxiety disorder in randomly ...
Both implicit and explicit cognitions play an important role in the development of addictive behavior. This study investigated the influence of a single-session motivational interview (MI) on implicit and explicit alcohol-related cognition and whether this intervention was successful in consequently decreasing alcohol use in at-risk adolescents. Implicit and explicit alcohol-related cognitions were assessed at pretest and one month posttest in 125 Dutch at-risk adolescents ranging in age from 15 to 23 (51 males) with adapted versions of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and an expectancy questionnaire. Motivation to change, alcohol use and alcohol-related problems were measured with self-report questionnaires, at pretest, at posttest after one month, and at the six-month follow-up. Although the quality of the intervention was rated positively, the results did not yield support for any differential effects of the intervention on drinking behavior or readiness to change at posttest and six-month ...
I imagine many of us are familiar with Implicit Association Tests, and have probably taken the Skin-tone IAT on this list. Somewhat less familiar is the advent of a blood pressure drug with the purported side effect of abolishing this particular form of racism. Studies of the drug, propranolol, shed light on the little-understood underlying neurobiology of "implicit racism." As law professor Adam Kolber explains, "one possibility is that propranolol reduces certain fear responses in the amygdala, and these fear responses affect performance on the test of implicit racial bias." Intriguing legal implications abound... We are all vividly aware of the conviction and sentencing biases juries display based on the race of the defendant. What if your next jury summons came with instructions to take an enclosed pill with a glass of OJ before reporting for duty? Another legal debate revolves around the admissibility of neuroscience evidence in the courtroom. Suppose a neurologist is able to map a ...
Author(s): Keech, Jacob J; Hagger, Martin S; OCallaghan, Frances V; Hamilton, Kyra | Abstract: Background:Emerging evidence indicates that holding particular stress mindsets has favorable implications for peoples health and performance under stress. Purpose:The aim of the current study was to examine the processes by which implicit and explicit stress mindsets relate to health- and performance-related outcomes. Specifically, we propose a stress beliefs model in which somatic responses to stress and coping behaviors mediate the effect of stress mindsets on outcomes. Methods:Undergraduate university students (N = 218, n = 144 females) aged 17- 25 years completed measures of stress mindset, physical and psychological wellbeing, perceived stress, perceived somatic responses to stress, proactive behaviors under stress, and an implicit association test assessing an implicit stress mindset. At the end of the semester, students academic performance was collected from university records. Results:Path analysis
Schnabel, K. Asendorpf, J. B., & Greenwald, A. G. (2008). Implicit Association Tests: A landmark for the assessment of implicit personality self-concept. In G. J. Boyle, G. Matthews and D. H. Saklofske (Eds.), Handbook of Personality Theory and Testing (Pp. 508-528). London: Sage. [PDF - 355KB]. Perkins, A., Forehand, M., Greenwald, A. G., & Maison, D. (2008). The influence of implicit social cognition on consumer behavior: Measuring the non-conscious. In C. Haugtvedt, P. Herr, & F. Kardes (Eds.), Handbook of Consumer Psychology (Pp. 461 475). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. [PDF - 1.0MB]. Klauer, K. C., Eder, A. B., Greenwald, A. G., & Abrams, R. L. (2007). Priming of semantic classifications by novel subliminal prime words. Consciousness and Cognition, 16, 63-83. [PDF - 326KB]. Yamaguchi, S., Greenwald, A. G., Banaji, M. R., Murakami, F., Chen, D., Shiomura, K., Kobayashi, C., Cai, H., & Krendl, A. (2007). Apparent universality of positive implicit self-esteem. Psychological ...
Ask 150-plus leaders what was the most memorable part of the 2015 School of Medicine Leadership Retreat and many will say "the stories" - stories told by medical students, by residents and postdocs and by their own peers vividly illustrated how racism is still tainting our environment - even at a progressive institution like UCSF.. Jeff Critchfield, MD, remembers the story of a third-year black medical student who was called to the Emergency Department to admit a patient and the nurse assumed that he was the janitor. Kevin Grumbach, MD, recalls how profoundly he was moved when faculty member Neil Powe, MD, MPH, MBA, recounted getting pulled over in North Carolina for "driving while black.". Everyone had prepared for the retreat by taking the Implicit Association Test, a tool for uncovering unconscious bias. Some of the most honest and sobering discussions at the retreat centered around the impact of finding out about hidden preferences and biases which "we carry around from having grown up in ...
What clinicians need is some other measure beyond external evidence that could assess whether someone like Eric is capable of suicide in the near future. Four years after my brothers death, Harvard researchers at MGH are experimenting with a test they think could help clinicians determine just that. It focuses on a patients subconscious thoughts, and if it can be perfected, these researchers say it could give hospitals more of a legal basis for admitting suicidal patients.. Of course, I cant help thinking about whether such a test could have saved my brother. But I also wonder: Would it have been ethically right - or even possible - to save him even if he didnt want to save himself?. THIS MISSING PIECE in the suicidal puzzle is what prompted the innovative research study now in its final phase at MGH. The study, led by Dr. Matthew Nock, an associate professor in the psychology department at Harvard University, is called the Suicide Implicit Association Test. Its a variation of the Implicit ...
What clinicians need is some other measure beyond external evidence that could assess whether someone like Eric is capable of suicide in the near future. Four years after my brothers death, Harvard researchers at MGH are experimenting with a test they think could help clinicians determine just that. It focuses on a patients subconscious thoughts, and if it can be perfected, these researchers say it could give hospitals more of a legal basis for admitting suicidal patients.. Of course, I cant help thinking about whether such a test could have saved my brother. But I also wonder: Would it have been ethically right - or even possible - to save him even if he didnt want to save himself?. THIS MISSING PIECE in the suicidal puzzle is what prompted the innovative research study now in its final phase at MGH. The study, led by Dr. Matthew Nock, an associate professor in the psychology department at Harvard University, is called the Suicide Implicit Association Test. Its a variation of the Implicit ...
One recent development in the field of synaesthesia includes the amendment to Cytowics original criteria which stated that precepts are always spatially extended into the outside world. Over the past few years, researches have come to distinguish two broad forms of synaesthesia which render the spatial expansion principle correct for only one of the two forms. Today, synaesthetes are recognized as either lower synaesthetes termed projectors or higher synaesthetes termed associators . The terms higher and lower refer to the level of processing at which the sense-perceptions are crossed while the terms projector and associator refer to where the percept is sensed i.e. out in the world versus in the minds eye. Dixon et al.[10] came up with a method for differentiating between these two types of synaesthetes which does not depend on purely descriptive measures. They used third-person objective testing in addition to self-report in order to develop standardized performance measures for ...
Brain Spatial Representation Models and Patterns; EEG-based Neural Decoding of Intelligence; Clinical Applications of Brain Informatics; 3-D Brain Computing; Cognition and Behavior; Genetic and Circuit Mechanisms; Interactive Neuroimaging; Implicit Cognition and Learning; Mechanisms of Neural Regeneration; Sensory and Motor Systems; Mental Strategies. Cognitive Information ...
Nicole Fritz has a nice article summarizing research of Patricia Devine, a University of Wisconsin-Madison psychology professor. Heres a sample. * * * It is a question on many Americans minds: Is the United States ready for a black president, or will deep-rooted and even unconscious prejudices show at the polls? For Patricia Devine, .…
Despite the great amount of knowledge produced by the neuroscientific literature affective phenomena, current models tackling non-cognitive aspects of behavior are often bio-inspired but rarely bio-constrained. This paper presents a theoretical account of affective systems centered on the amygdala. This account aims to furnish a general framework and specific pathways to implement models that are more closely related to biological evidence. The amygdala, which receives input from brain areas encoding internal states, innately relevant stimuli, and innately neutral stimuli, plays a fundamental role in motivational and emotional processes of organisms. This role is based on the fact that amygdala implements the two associative processes at the core of Pavlovian learning (CS-US and CS-UR associations), and that it has the capacity of modulating these associations on the basis of internal states. These functionalities allow the amygdala to play an important role in the regulation of the three ...
Objective: To develop a new scale aimed at evaluating smoking motivation by incorporating questions and domains from the 68-item Wisconsin Inventory of Smoking Dependence Motives (WISDM-68) into the Modified Reasons for Smoking Scale (MRSS). Methods: Nine WISDM-68 questions regarding affiliative attachment, cue exposure/associative processes, and weight control were added to the 21 questions of the MRSS. The new scale, together with the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), was administered to 311 smokers (214 males; mean age = 37.6 ± 10.8 years; mean number of cigarettes smoked per day = 15.0 ± 9.2), who also provided additional information. We used exploratory factor analysis in order to determine the factor structure of the scale. The influence that certain clinical features had on the scores of the final factor solution was also analyzed. Results: The factor analysis revealed a 21-question solution grouped into nine factors: addiction, pleasure from smoking, tension ...
Background: The obesity pandemic is causing premature mortality, increasing morbidity and escalating healthcare costs. It is globally acknowledged that current obesity management strategies are failing. It is also accepted that clinicians may hold an Anti-fat bias. To-date it has not been established if there is a relationship between strategy failures and clinicians attitudes. This uncharted territory was the driving impetus to undertaken a study investigating possible links and consequences. Aims: To establish healthcare clinicians attitudes towards patients with obesity and test the extent to which their attitudes influenced obesity management. Methods: Online vignettes were generated via Factorial Survey Design methods to assess obesity management by clinicians. The obesity Implicit Association Test (IAT) was used to assess subconscious Anti-fat bias. Data were collected anonymously from a multi-professional convenience sample in a virtual research site managed by Project Implicit®. ...
University of Washington psychology professor Anthony Greenwald is one of two researchers chosen to receive the most prestigious award of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.. Greenwald and Mahzarin Banaji, a social psychologist at Harvard University, recently were named joint recipients of the 2016 Kurt Lewin Award for distinguished research on social issues. The pair is best known for their work on implicit social cognition, the unconscious attitudes and beliefs that humans bring to their social interactions. They helped create the Implicit Association Test, which is widely used in social psychology research, and co-authored the book "Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People.". Named for the late Kurt Lewin, a founder of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and a pioneer in the science of group dynamics, the award recognizes "outstanding contributions to the development and integration of psychological research and social action," according to the ...
The December edition of The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology has been published. This issue includes articles on the impact of collaborative case formulation with high risk offenders with personality disorder and predicting daily-life antisocial behaviour in institutionalized adolescents with Transgression-related Implicit Association Tests. Click here to view the table of contents. Click here…
Suicide is the 15th most common cause of death worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in the general population, suicide rates are much higher in people with mental health problems. Clinicians often have to assess and manage suicide risk. Risk assessment is challenging for several reasons, not least because conventional approaches to risk assessment rely on patient self reporting and suicidal patients may wish to conceal their plans. Accurate methods of predicting suicide therefore remain elusive and are actively being studied. Novel approaches to risk assessment have shown promise, including empirically derived tools and implicit association tests. Service provision for suicidal patients is often substandard, particularly at times of highest need, such as after discharge from hospital or the emergency department. Although several drug based and psychotherapy based treatments exist, the best approaches to reducing the risk of suicide are still unclear. Some of the most compelling evidence ...
Stephanie Ortigue, Ph.D., is assistant professor, department of psychology, and director, laboratory of brain electrodynamics and action, intention, and relationships at Syracuse University (New York) and the University of Geneva (Switzerland). Dr. Ortigues work focuses on social neuroscience, implicit cognition, neurology, and the consciousness of the interacting brain in social settings. Her research aims to develop predictive models of automatic cognitive information processing of body language in social settings to improve performance and optimize therapeutic interventions in patients with acute and chronic social disorders. She received the Association for Psychological Science Rising Star nomination (2011), the Tom Slick Award from the Mind Science Foundation (2010), the University Maurice Chalumeau Award (2007), and the Annual ESSM award for best oral presentation (2007). Ortigue serves on the editorial board of NeuroImage and is the past editor-in-chief of Psyche. She also serves on ...
Your spelling is wrong. But here is a medical article abstract about it: 1: Eur Neurol. 2007;57(2):120-4. Epub 2006 Dec 18. Synaesthesia. Pearce JM. Department of Neurology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, UK. Synaesthesia is the intriguing, involuntary experience of feeling one sensationin response to a different sensory stimulus. Recognised since described in 1890by John Locke and clarified by Galton in the 1880s, it has been analysed in thelast 50 years. Grapheme-colour synaesthesia is the commonest form, but many othersensory linkages are reported. Experiments show that it is a genuine immediateperception, not merely a memory or learned association. Many of the mechanismsposited are based on indirect methods, and we know little of theneurophysiological mechanisms. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID: 17179720 This is not very scientific information, but this persons blog offers a pretty good explanatiom of it: http://nyquister.blogspot.com ...
Consider joining our study.. Synaesthesia is an unusual and intriguing condition sometimes described as a mixing of the senses. People with synaesthesia have experiences in which their senses appear to be connected. While some synaesthetes associate letters, days of the week, or months of the year with colours, others feel a taste on their tongue when they say a word, or experience vivid sensations that incorporate colours, shapes, textures and movement in response to hearing music. Synaesthesia is different from normal memories or associations because the sensations experienced are automatic and involuntary, and are largely consistent over time. The current estimates are that 2-5% of people have synaesthetic experiences. Synaesthesia is a neurodevelopmental condition, which means that it results from events during brain development, leading to unusual patterns of neural connectivity. Brain imaging studies show that something different is happening in the brains of synaesthetes compared to ...
This paper intends to offer guidance for designing and conducting qualitative research projects of high quality. It subscribes to the view that it is essential to locate any research project within a philosophical tradition to enable cogent justification and evaluation of the knowledge elaborated in the research project. It builds upon the view that the diversity of guidelines for rigorous qualitative research offered in the literature stems from their explicit or implicit association with different epistemological frameworks. It revisits, refines and extends in several ways extant typologies of criteria for conducting and evaluating qualitative research. We provide an overview of epistemological paradigms frequently mobilized in contemporary research in management, explicitly taking into account the epistemological frameworks of critical realism and pragmatic constructivism for three main reasons: these frameworks are solidly-grounded, increasingly mobilized in management research, and stand in an
Previous findings imply that synaesthetic experience may have consequences for sensory processing of stimuli that do not themselves trigger synaesthesia. For example, synaesthetes who experience colou
Whether administered separately or together, the CLo values of (R)- and (S)-gallopamil are high and not different. Thus, the substantial first-pass metabolism of gallopamil is not stereoselective.. Relative to administration of the separate enantiomers, coadministration decreases the CLo values and increases the F values of both (R)- and (S)-gallopamil. This can be attributed to a saturation of first-pass metabolism as the gallopamil dose was twice as high when administered as racemate compared with the dose of the gallopamil enantiomers administered separately. This is further supported by the results after the administration of 100 mg of (R)-gallopamil; a nonlinear increase of the AUC was observed compared with 25 mg of (R)-gallopamil. From the F values that were estimated using the equation given above (1/F = 0.89 × Clo + 0.42), the extraction ratios of (R)- and (S)-gallopamil were calculated (ER = 1 − F) and are high for both (R)- [25 mg (R) = 0.90, 50 mg (RS) = 0.76] and (S)- [25 mg (S) ...
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My SSHRC grant continues to support my research on commitment in close relationships. We have found that a key motivational basis of commitment is identification-that is, the extent to which the relationship becomes part of ones identity. Our work on identification is advancing on two fronts. First, we are developing implicit measures of identification that will reveal how relationship motives can influence relationship processes in effortless, efficient ways, which is particularly relevant in real world contexts when individuals are tired, distracted or under time pressure-all contextual factors that inhibit the ability of explicit, consciously controlled processes to operate effectively. Second, we are examining identification in conjunction with intrinsic motivation-being in a relationship for the sheer enjoyment of it. The long term goal is to develop a dual-process model of relationship regulation whereby intrinsic and identified motives work in tandem to fuel satisfying and lasting ...
the best set of actions at that moment to achieve the desired outcome (getting high). This allows you to be very flexible with how you achieve the outcome and is known as an Action-Outcome association4. However, this processing takes up a lot of mental resources, which could be used for more important things like finding a mate, locating food or reciting Taylor Swift lyrics. If the prefrontal cortex notices that the Action-Outcome association is always the same, it decides there is no use in always performing the same calculations and teaches a more primitive part of the brain in which situations (stimuli) a pre-calculated set of actions (responses) should be performed. This more primitive part of the brain is known as the dorsal striatum, and is involved with habits or Stimulus-Response associations4.. A habit allows quick and easy initiation of a response but does not allow flexibility in the actions performed nor consideration of whether the outcome is still desired. Usually, the prefrontal ...
About the Editors. List of Contributors.. Series Editors Preface.. Introduction (David Thornton and D. Richard Laws).. 1 Penile Plethysmography: Strengths, Limitations, Innovations (D. Richard Laws).. 2 The Abel Assessment for Sexual Interests - 2: A Critical Review (Susan J. Sachsenmaier and Carmen L.Z. Gress).. 3 Affinity: The Development of a Self-Report Assessment of Paedophile Sexual Interest Incorporating a Viewing Time Validity Measure (David V. Glasgow).. 4 Cognitive Modelling of Sexual Arousal and Interest: Choice Reaction Time Measures (Carmen L.Z. Gress and D. Richard Laws).. 5 The Implicit Association Test as a Measure of Sexual Interest (Nicola S. Gray and Robert J. Snowden).. 6 Measuring Child Molesters Implicit Cognitions about Self and Children (Kevin L. Nunes).. 7 The Rapid Serial Visual Presentation Test of Sexual Interest in Child Molesters (Vanja E. Flak, Anthony R. Beech and Glyn W. Humphreys).. 8 Assessing Sexual Interest with the Emotional Stroop Test (Paul ...
Synesthesia is a perceptual phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. People who report a lifelong history of such experiences are known as synesthetes. In one common form of synesthesia, known as grapheme-color synesthesia or color-graphemic synesthesia, letters or numbers are perceived as inherently colored. In spatial-sequence, or number form synesthesia, numbers, months of the year, or days of the week elicit precise locations in space (for example, 1980 may be "farther away" than 1990), or may appear as a three-dimensional map (clockwise or counterclockwise). Synesthetic associations can occur in any combination and any number of senses or cognitive pathways. Little is known about how synesthesia develops. It has been suggested that synesthesia develops during childhood when children are intensively engaged with abstract concepts for the first time. This hypothesis - referred to ...
Learning is often understood as an organisms gradual acquisition of the association between a given sensory stimulus and the correct motor response. Mathematically, this corresponds to regressing a mapping between the set of observations and the set of actions. Recently, however, it has been shown both in cognitive and motor neuroscience that humans are not only able to learn particular stimulus-response mappings, but are also able to extract abstract structural invariants that facilitate generalization to novel tasks. Here we show how such structure learning can enhance facilitation in a sensorimotor association task performed by human subjects. Using regression and reinforcement learning models we show that the observed facilitation cannot be explained by these basic models of learning stimulus-response associations. We show, however, that the observed data can be explained by a hierarchical Bayesian model that performs structure learning. In line with previous results from cognitive tasks, ...
Research has shown that lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth have increased rates of physical and mental health problems primarily due to the chronic stress incurred by the levels of prejudice and isolation experienced in their environment, especially in Southern States. Teachers are the most available and sought after adults by sexual minority students, helping them to mitigate such toxic environments. In this study, the aim was to examine the relationship between implicit and explicit attitudes of homonegativity and the moderating role of motivation to control prejudiced reactions among teachers in Southern states. Additional information was gathered about the teachers school environment in regard to protective factors that were or were not in place for sexual minority students and possible resources that they perceived would be helpful in establishing a more positive environment for these students. Correlations were found between the Implicit Association Test (IAT), Modern Homonegativity Scale (MHS),
Im a bit torn. Racism and sexism (like other -isms, capitalism, socialism, etc.) are societal structures that have, over our lifetimes, been cultivated in every one of us (try the Harvard Implicit Association Tests if you havent already). Im not convinced that labeling individuals as "racists" (so that you can then peace out on them) is productive: it implies that racism is something that can be isolated, and exists in some individuals, and not others, and all we have to do to solve racism is to stay away from those bad people. Im not the only person who thinks this: Ive even heard the hypothesis that a good deal of the racial problems we continue to have in America today can be traced to the fact that Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (a book I love, by the way), which trades in the only-bad-people-are-racists view, is considered the definitive Great American Novel about race and is required reading in many schools, while Uncle Toms Cabin (a book I havent read, but this is how the ...
Synesthesia is a neurological condition in which two or more bodily senses are coupled. For example, in a form of synesthesia known as grapheme-color synesthesia, letters or numbers may be perceived as inherently colored. Historically, the most commonly described form of synesthesia (or synesthesia-like mappings) has been between sound and vision, e.g. the hearing of colors in music. The interest in colored hearing, i.e. the co-perception of colour in hearing sounds or music, dates back to Greek antiquity, when philosophers were investigating whether the colour (chroia, what we now call timbre) of music was a physical quality that could be quantified. The seventeenth-century physicist Isaac Newton tried to solve the problem by assuming that musical tones and colour tones have frequencies in common. The age-old quest for colour-pitch correspondences in order to evoke perceptions of coloured music finally resulted in the construction of color organs and performances of colored music in concert ...
Colorblindness vs. mindfulness. It might sound counterintuitive to some, but both insight and analysis suggests that implicit bias may actually be heightened by the societal emphasis on colorblindness, a notion that dates at least to the Plessy v. Ferguson case in the late 19th century (Justice Harlan, dissenting), and played an important role in the civil rights movement of the mid-20th.. When embraced by conservatives in the late 20th century, however, it became a basis for largely shutting down effective understanding of race and its impact in our lives.. As most of us know from simple, everyday experience, none of us is actually blind to race or color. In fact, research confirms common disconnects between explicit and implicit cognition around race and color. Even if we try to act adopt a colorblind view in the world, it doesnt work because our brains dont actually work that way.. Indeed, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral dissonance results from implicit and explicit efforts to comply ...
Read "Does education influence visuo-spatial and verbal immediate serial recall in healthy older adults?, Quality & Quantity" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
However, a new study has identified 11 synesthetes whose grapheme-color mappings appear to be based on the Fisher Price plastic letter set made between 1972-1990 (Witthoft & Winawer, 2013). 2 Letter-color mapping data were obtained from the participants using either The Synesthesia Battery Web site (synesthete.org) or in-house software. This required that the subjects use a color picker to identify the hue of 26 upper case letters and 10 numerals three times each (presented in random order). They did this in two separate sessions, and then the consistency within and across sessions was evaluated. The participants also completed a speeded Stroop-like task, where they had to identify whether the color font was congruent (A) or incongruent (A) relative to their synesthetic mapping ...
This paper proposed a method of polarity analysis of stock comments in Chinese based on word clustering, to avoid effect of noisy information without emotional tendency. This method mines semantic association between words to construct the concept dictionary in specific areas dynamically and describes the text feature with the concept constructed. The experimental results show that this method can not only reduces dimensionality of feature space, speed up the process of sentiment classification, but also improve the performance of sentiment classification to a certain extent.
A method and system for aiding users in visualizing the relatedness of retrieved text documents and the topics to which they relate comprises training a classifier by semantically analyzing an initial group of manually-classified documents, positioning the classes and documents in two-dimensional space in response to semantic associations between the classes, and displaying the classes and documents. The displayed documents may be retrieved by an information storage and retrieval subsystem in any suitable manner.
What would it be like if numbers and musical tones had colours? People with synaesthesia experience the world in this way - and scientists are trying to find out why.
In this last section, I will briefly review what is known about the genetics of synaesthesia and the implications for understanding individual differences in perceptual experience. A discussion on synaesthesia art and creativity will follow (Is there a link? Synaesthesia as a tool for artistic experimentation. Synaesthetic experience as a source for art - some challenges to the way we think about art). The workshop will conclude with an open discussion. Some of the open questions in synaesthesia research will likely be addressed: Are we all synaesthetes? Should our definition of synaesthesia be more inclusive? What is so special about colour (that it is rated as the most common synaesthetic experience)? FURTHER READING. Lynn C. Robertson & Noam Sagiv (Eds). Synesthesia: Perspectives from Cognitive Neuroscience. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.. Mattingley, J.B. and Ward, J.(Eds.). Cognitive neuroscience perspectives on synaesthesia. Special issue of Cortex, in press.. Cytowic, R. E. ...
Over a vigorous dissent, which seems to me entirely correct, the court here holds that even without any evidence of actual consumer impact, a "semantic association" between a famous mark and a mark used to sell "sexual toys, videos, and similar soft-core pornographic products" is sufficient to establish tarnishment. Because Congress intended to reduce the burden of proof on the trademark holder, there is "a kind of rebuttable presumption, or at least a very strong inference, that a new mark used to sell sex-related products is likely to tarnish a famous mark if there is a clear semantic association between the two." The majority suggested that this "res ipsa loquitur-like effect … places on the owner of the new mark the burden of coming forward with evidence that there is no likelihood or probability of tarnishment," which could be surveys or consumer testimony-even though, as the dissent pointed out, the only consumer perception evidence in the case was pretty clear that the consumer at issue ...
Description: Kimberly Papillon is a nationally recognized expert on the subject of judicial and legal decision-making. She is an attorney and a Senior Education Specialist at the California Judicial Councils Administrative Office of the Courts in the Education Division. She serves as the statewide Project Manager for fairness education for judges and court personnel in California. She has delivered over 100 lectures nationwide on the implications of neuroscience, psychology and implicit association in the analysis of judicial fairness to multiple audiences including judges and appellate justices throughout California, the Council of Chief Judges of the State Courts of Appeal, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District, the D.C. Court of Appeals, national judicial organizations and the California State Bar. In the past several months she has delivered lectures to the Los Angeles and San Francisco County District Attorneys Offices, the United States Department of Justice, and the ...
A mixed 3 between (Gaze Restriction: Gaze-Fixed, Head-Fixed, and Head Free) × 2 within (viewing distance: 5 and 15 m) factor ANOVA was conducted on the individual participants gain data at each distance. The effect of Viewing Distance on angular gain differed as a function of Gaze Restriction, F(2, 32) = 7.90, p = 0.0016. This interaction is shown in Figure 5 (left). Posthoc tests, with Bonferroni correction (α = 0.017), confirmed that the gain was reliably higher when the target was nearer (i.e., 5 m), when either eye movements were allowed (Head-Fixed), t(10) = 2.92, p = 0.015, or when both head and eye movements were allowed (Head Free), t(11) = 5.05, p , 0.001; but that there was no effect of viewing distance when gaze was required to be fixed on the reference disk throughout each trial, t(11) = 1.27, p = 0.23. Recall that the reference point, to which targets were compared, was at 15 m. Because the angular gain was unaffected by viewing distance when gaze refixation on the targets was ...
TY - ABST. T1 - Using performance discontinuities to estimate individual Working-Memory Capacities in serial recall tasks. AU - Lindeløv, Jonas Kristoffer. PY - 2018/9/1. Y1 - 2018/9/1. N2 - Although formal models are frequently used to infer working-memory capacity (C) from visual array tasks (Cowan, 2001, Table 2; Luck & Vogel, 2013), Complex Span tasks, on the other hand, are typically scored using variants of the mean number- or the mean proportion of correctly recalled items (e.g. Redick et al, 2012; Conway, 2005). Though useful as indices, they are not interpretable as C, partially because they are confounded by the range of spans presented to the subjects. I propose the "rate change" score of working-memory capacity which has just three parameters: (1) C, the subjects capacity which marks a shift from (2) PC , a high Bernoulli-proportion of correctly recalled items, to (3) Pother, a lower Bernoulli-proportion of recall for further presented items. A Bayesian rate-change model was ...
In response to my previous blog post on synesthesia, Gary Skaleski (MA, LPC, currently working as an EAP case manager) wrote the following:. "About 1976-77 John Grinder was teaching about modalities, and at one point came up with a technique which I had not heard anyone else talk about, not written up as far as I know, but which I found helpful. We started talking about synesthesia, and while discussing overlap, John suggested we spend time every day mapping from one modality to another, but at such a small level that we would never get overwhelmed. Example: take a sound. Not a word (big scope: "Amen") but part of that word (Ah) and turn that into a feeling (not emotion, but how and where that sound feels physically in or on your body), then take that feeling and turn it into a visual image (again, not a scene but a simple shape, color, etc.).. "The order is not important, and could start with a feeling, to visual to auditory, etc. Just keep overlapping at this small level. After a few weeks ...
This might not just strike you as "creepy" but as simply unethical just as it did one commentator cited in the article who called these tactics "extremely disturbing and quite sinister". Here, I want to investigate where this intuition comes from.. We can distinguish different ways one can go about changing someone elses mind:. (1) by providing arguments,. (2) by appealing to epistemic trust (i.e. claims to expertise and epistemic authority),. and. (3) by exploiting how our cognitive mechanisms have evolved/developed to process information in general. For example, by directing attention in a certain way or by creating/triggering semantic associations between different contents (e.g. pairing an image of a happy family with a specific brand of car or by using terms such as flood to describe migratory movements of people).. While in (1) and (2) one interacts with ones audiences cognitive machinery charged with evaluating critically what information to endorse (so-called epistemic vigilance ...