This dataset contains a draft assembly of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) nuclear genome, linkage group information, and gene family counts for Asclepias and related species. The genome assembly is accompanied by annotation of gene models, repeat models, transfer RNAs, and open reading frames, and mapping information of Asclepias transcripts, Calotropis transcripts, and Coffea proteins onto the assembled scaffolds. The linkage group information includes data input into the linkage group analysis, R scripts for processing, and a final list of scaffolds assigned to linkage groups. Additional data includes the coding sequence alignment of P5βR paralogs described in the article and a table of gene family counts in Asclepias, other Apocynaceae, coffee (Coffea), and grape (Vitis ...
Natural order.- Asclepiadaceae.. Common names.- Pleurisy Root. Butterfly Weed.. General Analysis.-. Acts chiefly on the mucous surfaces, especially of the respiratory organs, and intestinal canal ; also upon the serous tissues, especially the pleura and synovial membranes, producing in all these inflammation, which is subacute in its character.. Characteristic symptoms.. Mind.- (Asclepias tuberosa). Weakness of thought and memory ; at first cheerful, then fretful and peevish.. Head.- (Asclepias tuberosa). Confusion, dullness, and heaviness of the head ; swimming of the head.. Dull headache in the forehead and vertex, aggravated by motion, and relieved by lying down.. Headache pressing deeply on the base of the skull. (Ipec.). Pain in the forehead from coughing. (Bry.). Eyes.- (Asclepias tuberosa). Eyes look dull, fatigued, and heavy.. Ophthalmia, with itching and pain in eyes.. Feeling of sand in the eyes.. Vision disturbed ; large dark spots before the eyes.. Nose.- (Asclepias tuberosa). Fluent ...
Abstract: Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, to assist in genet identification and the analysis of spatial genetic structure. • Methods and Results: Using an enrichment cloning protocol, eight microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in a North American population of A. syriaca. The primers amplified di- and tri-nucleotide repeats with 4-13 alleles per locus. • Conclusions: The primers will be useful for studies of clonality and gene flow in natural populations. Abstract: Chapter 3 Spatial genetic structure (SGS) is largely determined by the reproductive strategies of species. Many plant species, including Asclepias syriaca, the common milkweed, reproduce both sexually and asexually and there can be great variation in SGS among species that reproduce by both methods. SGS was assessed within an old field population of A. syriaca in northern Michigan. Strong SGS was detected to 38 m when multiple identical ...
A new cardenolide, 12 beta, 14 beta-dihydroxy-3 beta, 19-epoxy-3 alpha-methoxy-5 alpha-card-20(22)-enolide (6), and a new doubly linked cardenolide glycoside, 12 beta-hydroxycalotropin (13), together with eleven known compounds, coroglaucigenin (1), 12 beta-hydroxycoroglaucigenin (2), calotropagenin (3), desglucouzarin (4), 6-O-feruloyl-desglucouzarin (5), calotropin (7), uscharidin (8), asclepin (9), 16 alpha-hydroxyasclepin (10), 16 alpha-acetoxycalotropin (11), and 16 alpha-acetoxyasclepin (12), were isolated from the aerial part of ornamental milkweed, Asclepias curassavica and chemically elucidated through spectral analyses. All the isolates were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HepG2 and Raji cell lines. The results showed that asclepin (9) had the strongest cytotoxic activity with an IC(50) value of 0.02 mu M against the two cancer cell lines and the new compound 13 had significant cytotoxic activity with IC(50) values of 0.69 and 1.46 mu M, respectively. (C) 2009 Elsevier ...
Support monarch and other butterflies with Asclepias speciosa, the western North American sister species to the eastern common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca).
Members of the genus Asclepias produce some of the most complex flowers in the plant kingdom, comparable to orchids in complexity. Five petals reflex backwards revealing a gynostegium (fused stamen filamens and styles) surrounded by a five-membrane corona. The corona is composed of a five paired hood and horn structure with the hood acting as a sheath for the inner horn. Glands holding pollinia are found between the hoods. The size, shape and color of the horns and hoods are often important identifying characteristics for species in the genus Asclepias.[7]. Pollination in this genus is accomplished in an unusual manner. Pollen is grouped into complex structures called pollinia (or "pollen sacs"), rather than being individual grains or tetrads, as is typical for most plants. The feet or mouthparts of flower-visiting insects such as bees, wasps and butterflies, slip into one of the five slits in each flower formed by adjacent anthers. The bases of the pollinia then mechanically attach to the ...
USDA, ARS, Germplasm Resources Information Network. Asclepias syriaca in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Accessed on 07-Oct-06 ...
A widely distributed North American plant, Asclepias tuberosa is a native of midwest prairies and a favorite garden plant for its ability to attract many butterflies and the profusion of bright orange flowers. The long-lasting flowers combined with a low mounded profile make this the most popular of milkweeds. True to its name Butterflyweed attracts legions of butterflies and is an important host plant for the caterpillars of Monarch, Grey Hairstreak, and Queen butterflies.
Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Weed) milkweed has attractive, bright orange flowers in late spring and is a nectar source for bees and butterflies.
Presented by M di-T Asclepias Tuberosa.. Pleurisy-root. Butterfly-weed. N. O. Asclepiadace . Tincture of fresh root.. Clinical.─Alopecia. Asthma. Bilious fever. Bronchitis. Catarrh. Chancre. Colic. Cough. Diarrh a. Dysentery. Headache. Heart, affections of. Influenza. Ophthalmia. Pericarditis. Pleurisy. Pleurodynia. Rheumatism. Scrofula. Syphilis.. Characteristics.─Asclep. tub. causes sharp, stitching, pricking pains; , by motion. It is of the hydrogenoid type, corresponding to catarrhal complaints from cold and damp weather. Rheumatic pains affect the body diagonally, l. upper and r. lower, or the opposite. Muscular and articular rheumatism with stitching pains, dark red urine and hot, perspiring skin. Sensitive to tobacco. Pain in forehead and abdomen from coughing. Griping and sharp peritoneal pains , by pressure. Dysentery in autumn; and painful diarrh a with griping and tenesmus. Warm feeling in chest. Dyspn a. Cough hard and dry; or hoarse, croupy with tight breathing and constriction ...
Phytochemical investigation of the above-ground biomass of Asclepias sullivantii L. (Asclepiadaceae) afforded six new pregnane glycosides, named sullivantosides A-F (1-6). The structures of 1-6 were elucidated through a variety of spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques (1D and 2D NMR; HRESIMS). To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first phytochemical study of this species ...
Literature References: Dried root of Asclepias tuberosa L., Asclepiadaceae. Habit. Ontario to Minnesota. Constit. Asclepiadin, resins, volatile oil. ...
Asclepias speciosa, or showy Milkweed, is native to the western half of North America. In California, the perennial plant is found in the Sierras and Coast Ranges. The plant is hairy and grows erect to around 1.2m in height. The large, broad leaves are arranged opposite on the stem. The pinkish-purple flowers are star shaped and are arranged in umbels. In the summer months, when the plant is flowering, you can find a number of butterflies tending the flowers, notably the Monarch butterfly. Like all Milkweeds, a white liquid, called latex, is secreted whenever the plant is damaged. Most predators find the liquid very unpalatable, but some caterpillars are able to sequester the latex and become unpalatable themselves.. Click the images above for a larger view. ...
Asclepias ovalifolia is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 1 m (3ft 3in). It is hardy to zone (UK) 6. It is in flower from July to August, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, insects, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). It is noted for attracting wildlife. Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.
Asclepias galioides is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.4 m (1ft 4in). The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, insects, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). Suitable for: light (sandy) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.
Asclepias pedicellata, Stalked Milkweed, Savanna Milkweed. NameThatPlant.net currently features 3816 plants and 23,855 images. For many plants, the website displays maps showing physiographic provinces within the Carolinas and Georgia where the plant has been documented. On NameThatPlant.net, plants are shown in different seasons (not just in flower), and you can hear Latin names spoken, look up botanical terms, get a feel for which plants to expect to see in various natural communities, and discover botanically interesting places to visit.
Asclepias subulata, a dicot, is a perennial herb that is native to California and is also found outside of California, but is confined to western North America. ...
Ethnobotany. Asclepias speciosa has been used as a food or as medicine by the following First Peoples: Acoma, Apache, Cheyenne, Chiricahua, Crow, Flathead, Keres, Hopi, Laguna, Lakota, Miwok, Mescalero, Montana, Navajo, Okanagan-Colville, Paiute, Pomo and Shoshoni. Except the roots and the seeds, all parts of the plant were eaten - raw or cooked depending on the stage…
Description.-"Root large and fusiform, dried in longitudinal or transverse sections, from 2 to 15 Cc. long (3/4 to 6 inches), and about 2 Cc. (3/4 inch) or more in thickness; the head knotty, and slightly but distinctly annulate, the remainder longitudinally wrinkled, externally orange-brown, internally whitish; tough, and having all uneven fracture; bark thin, and in two distinct layers, the inner one whitish; wood yellowish, with large, white, medullary rays. It is inodorous, and has a bitterish, somewhat acrid taste. When long kept it acquires a gray color"-(U. S. P.).. Chemical Composition.-Mr. Elam Rhoads found in this root gum, pectin, starch, albumen, gallic and gallo-tannic acids, lignin, salts, an odorous material of a fatty nature, two resinous bodies-one dissolving in ether, the other refusing to so dissolve-and a fixed oil. Mr. Rhoads also obtained a. peculiar body having the taste of the drug, which may be thrown down from a strong infusion of the root by tannin. By decomposing with ...
Metabolic Rewire Support with NDC 62902-0003 is a a human over the counter drug product labeled by Intentional Nourishment. The generic name of Metabolic Rewire Support is asclepias vincetoxicum, echinacea (angustifolia), hypothalamus (suis), hepar suis, kidney (suis), methylcobalamin, gambogia, graphites, nux vomica, phytolacca decandra, 7-keto (3-acetyl-7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone), adenosinum triphosphoricum dinatrum, glucagon, insulinum (suis), sarcolacticum acidum, proteus (vulgaris).
Wlp40 with NDC 62185-0020 is a a human over the counter drug product labeled by Dr. Donna Restivo Dc. The generic name of Wlp40 is asclepias vincetoxicum, echinacea (angustifolia), hypothalamus (suis), cerebrum suis, hepar suis, kidney suis, methylcobalamin, pancreas suis, stomach (suis), aacg-a, aacg-b, calcarea carbonica, gambogia, gelsemium sempervirens, graphites, nux vomica, phytolacca decandra, 7-keto-dhea (dehydroepiandrosterone), adenosinum triphosphoricum dinatrum, glucagon, insulinum (suis), sarcolacticum acidum, proteus (vulgaris).
Latin Name Common Name Strata Native? Acer negundo box elder Herbaceous YES Ailanthus altissima tree of heaven Herbaceous NO [invasive] Allium cernuum nodding wild onion Herbaceous YES Ambrosia artemisiifolia common ragweed Herbaceous YES Ambrosia trifida giant ragweed Herbaceous YES Anemone virginiana tall anemone; thimbleweed Herbaceous YES Aquilegia canadensis wild columbine Herbaceous YES Arnoglossum atriplicifolium pale indian plantain Herbaceous YES Artemisia vulgaris mugwort Herbaceous NO [invasive] Asclepias Herbaceous ? Asclepias syriaca common milkweed Herbaceous YES Asclepias tuberosa butterfly weed; butterly milkweed Herbaceous YES Aster Herbaceous ? Aster ericoides heath aster Herbaceous YES Aster laevis smooth blue aster Herbaceous YES Aster novae-angliae New England aster Herbaceous YES Aster pilosus hairy aster; frost-weed aster Herbaceous YES Bouteloua curtipendula side-oats grama Herbaceous YES Bromus japonicus Japanese chess Herbaceous NO Capsella bursa-pastoris shepherds ...
Many kinds of insects visit A. syriaca flowers, and some kinds pollinate them, including Apis mellifera (Western honey bees) and Bombus spp. (bumble bees).[3][4] In the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region, the introduced A. mellifera was the most effective and most important diurnal pollinator with regard to both pollen removal and pollen deposition.[5] However, when considering the self-incompatibility of A. syriaca, A. mellifera was not the most important pollinator because of its high self-pollination rate compared to Bombus spp. Additionally, the rate of self-pollination increased more rapidly with the number of flowers per inflorescence in A. mellifera than in native Bombus spp. Many insect species feed on common milkweed, including the red milkweed beetle (Tetraopes tetrophtalmus), large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus), small milkweed bug (Lygaeus kalmii), milkweed aphid (Aphis nerii), milkweed leaf beetle (Labidomera clivicollis), milkweed stem weevil (Rhyssomatus lineaticollis), milkweed tiger ...
Typical plants are evergreen perennial subshrubs that grow up to 1 m (3.3 ft) tall and have pale gray stems. The leaves are arranged oppositely on the stems and are lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate shaped ending in acuminate or acute tips. Like other members of the genus, the sap is milky. The flowers are in cymes with 10-20 flowers each. They have purple or red corollas and corona lobes that are yellow or orange. Flowering occurs nearly year-round.[5] The 5-10 cm (2.0-3.9 in) long, fusiform shaped fruits are called follicles. The follicles contain tan to brown seeds that are ovate in shape and 6-7 mm (0.24-0.28 in) long. The flat seeds have silky hairs that allow the seeds to float on air currents when the pod-like follicles dehisce (split open).[7] ...
This blog was created as an online diary to capture some of the things I love or experience in life. Anyway, I hope we will all learn to appreciate the simple things in life, cherish our loved ones and make the most of our lives ...
References:. Agrawal, A.A. 2005. Natural selection on common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) by a community of specialized insect herbivores. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 7: 651 667.. Agrawal, A.A. & P.A. Van Zandt. 2003. Ecological play in the coevolutionary theater: Genetic and environmental determinants of attack by a specialist weevil on milkweed. Journal of Ecology 91: 1049-1059.. Arnett, R.H., Jr., M.C. Thomas, P. E. Skelley & J.H. Frank. (editors). 2002. American Beetles, Volume II: Polyphaga: Scarabaeoidea through Curculionoidea. CRC Press. 861 pp.. Fordyce, J.A. & S.B. Malcolm. 2000. Specialist weevil, Rhyssomatus lineaticollis, does not spatially avoid cardenolide defenses of common milkweed by ovipositing into pith tissue. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 26: 2857 2874.. Nishio, S., M.S. Blum, S. Takahashi. 1983. Intraplant distribution of cardenolides in Asclepias humistrata (Asclepiadaceae), with additional notes on their fates in Tetraopes melanurus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and ...
FIRST IMPRESSIONS: This elegant plant is upright with slender willow like leaves. In summer plants are topped by clear white flower clusters which attract flocks of butterflies. Plants thrive in sunny sites with moist or saturated soils. The Ice Ballet cultivar differs from the species due to its white flowers, more compact habit and darker green foliage.. HABITAT & HARDINESS: Asclepias incarnata Ice Ballet is a nursery selection of the native Swamp Milkweed so it does not exist in the wild. Plants are hardy from USDA Zones 3-9.. PLANT DESCRIPTION: This Swamp Milkweed cultivar is an erect clump forming perennial that grows from a taproot. Plants have narrow lance shaped leaves with pointed tips and smooth margins. Stems and leaves contain a milky sap that exudes when plants are damaged. Desirable yellow and black Monarch caterpillars feed on the foliage.. Fragrant summer umbels are composed of many tiny star shaped florets. The intricate florets look like freshly extruded white cake ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Extraction and characterization of natural cellulose fibers from common milkweed stems. AU - Reddy, Narendra. AU - Yang, Yiqi. PY - 2009/11/1. Y1 - 2009/11/1. N2 - Natural cellulose fibers with cellulose content, strength, and elongation higher than that of milkweed floss and between that of cotton and linen have been obtained from the stems of common milkweed plants. Although milkweed floss is a unique natural cellulose fiber with low density, the short length and low elongation make milkweed floss unsuitable as a textile fiber. The possibility of using the stems of milkweed plant as a source for natural cellulose fibers was explored in this research. Natural cellulose fibers extracted from milkweed stems have been characterized for their composition, structure, and properties. Fibers obtained from milkweed stems have about 75% cellulose, higher than the cellulose in milkweed floss but lower than that in cotton and linen. Milkweed stem fibers have low % crystallinity when ...
Additional pests and problems that may affect this plant:. No serious insect or disease problems. Caterpillars of Monarch butterfly will feed on this plant.. ...
Butterfly weed serves as an adult nectar source and a larval food source for the Monarch butterfly. Seed of cultivars such as Gay Butterflies may contain pure yellow and bright red individuals, but the typical orange color predominates. Stem does not have a milky sap. This plant is resistant to damage by deer ...
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Allison, C.A, J.L. Turner, and J.C. Wenzel. 2016. Poisonous plants of New Mexico rangelands [Circular 678]. Las Cruces: New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service.. Burrows, G.E., and R.J. Tyrl. 2001. Asclepiadaceae R.Br. In Toxic plants of North America (pp. 125-135). Ames: Iowa State University Press.. Duncan, K.W., and K.C. McDaniel. 2015. Chemical weed and brush control for New Mexico rangelands [Circular 597]. Las Cruces: New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service.. Hart, C.R., T. Garland, A.C. Barr, B.B. Carpenter, and J.C. Reagor. 2003. Toxic plants of Texas (pp. 34-39). College Station: Texas Cooperative Extension Service.. Knight, A.P. 1995. Plant poisoning of horses. In L.D. Lewis, Equine clinical nutrition: Feeding and care (pp. 486-489). Philadelphia: Williams and Wilkins.. Knight, A.P. 2003. Asclepias species. In A guide to poisonous house and garden plants (pp. 38-40). Jackson, WY: Tenton NewMedia. USDA-ARS. 2016. Milkweed (Asclepias spp.). Retrieved ...
Showy Pink milkweed is an essential wildflower for supporting Monarch butterflies by providing food for caterpillars and nectar for the adult butterflies.
Q. Thats Asclepias curassavica, I think? [Photo above from the book, by Forest and Kim Starr.]. A. Right. But because its an evergreen, it means that now there are periods of the year when typically the native milkweeds would die away and disappear, but now youve got this evergreen species. It is allowing monarchs in some places to be breeding for longer. And also because the plant doesnt die away, there is unfortunately a parasite that is affecting monarch caterpillars. What that means is that the caterpillar will complete its growth and will pupate-it will become the chrysalis-but it wont complete metamorphosis, and wont ever appear as an adult.. So thats a problem that seems to be associated with the tropical milkweed because it grows all year and allows the caterpillars to pick up the spores from this parasite.. Q. Its interesting because if one went to the garden center-or I kind of remember when I first saw tropical milkweed in catalogs a number of years ago touted as a butterfly ...
Native: indigenous.. Non-native: introduced (intentionally or unintentionally); has become naturalized.. County documented: documented to exist in the county by evidence (herbarium specimen, photograph). Also covers those considered historical (not seen in 20 years). State documented: documented to exist in the state, but not documented to a county within the state. Also covers those considered historical (not seen in 20 years).. Note: when native and non-native populations both exist in a county, only native status is shown on the map.. ...
Native: indigenous.. Non-native: introduced (intentionally or unintentionally); has become naturalized.. County documented: documented to exist in the county by evidence (herbarium specimen, photograph). Also covers those considered historical (not seen in 20 years). State documented: never been documented from the county, but known from the state. May be present. Or, may be restricted to a small area or a habitat (alpine, marsh, etc.), so unlikely found in some counties.. Note: when native and non-native populations both exist in a county, only native status is shown on the map.. ...
Habit: Annual, perennial herb, shrub, tree, often vine; sap generally milky. Leaf: simple, alternate, opposite, subwhorled to whorled, entire; stipules 0 or small, finger-like. Inflorescence: axillary or terminal, cyme, generally umbel- or raceme-like, or flowers 1--2. Flower: bisexual, radial; perianth parts, especially petals, overlapped, twisted to right or left, at least in bud; sepals generally 5, fused at base, often reflexed, persistent; petals generally 5, fused in basal +- 1/2; stamens generally 5, attached to corolla tube or throat, alternate lobes, free or fused to form filament column and anther head, filament column then generally with 5 free or fused, +- elaborate appendages abaxially, pollen +- free or removed in pairs of pollinia; nectaries 0 or near ovaries, then 2 or 5[10], or in stigmatic chambers; ovaries 2, superior or +- so, free [fused]; style tips, stigmas generally fused into massive pistil head. Fruit: 1--2 follicles, (capsule), [berry, drupe]. Seed: many, often with ...
cerastium, hardy ice plant, snow-in-summer, delosperma, gaillardia, blanket flower, laurentia, blue star creeper, belamcanda, blackberry lily
Ethnobotany. The Isleta People used the ground leaf and stem powder to be inhaled for catarrhs as mentioned in The Ethnobotany of the Isleta Indians. Jones, Volney H. 1931, University of New Mexico. Description. Plant: perennial herb; stems erect or ascending, unbranched, 20-80 cm tall, short woolly to more or less glabrate; milky sap Leaves: opposite, subsessile…
Erect herbaceous perennials; roots often fleshy. Leaves usually with conspicuous transverse veins. Flowers in simple terminal or extra-axillary umbels. Lobes of the corolla long and narrow, reflexed. ...
Erect, perennial herbs with milky juice; leaves simple, alternate, opposite, or whorled, narrow; flowers 5-parted, in rounded clusters, white, greenish, yellow, orange, or red; fruit dry and inflated, erect, and with many hair-tufted ...
Flower bisexual, radial; sepals 5, generally reflexed; petals 5, generally reflexed or spreading; stamens 5, fused to form filament column and anther head, generally with 5 elaborate appendages on outside of filament column, pollen removed in pairs of massive sacs; ovaries 2, superior, free, style tips generally fused into massive pistil head surrounded by anther ...
Two new species of the spider genus Enna O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1897 from Costa Rica and Peru are described and illustrated: Enna… Expand ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Characterisation of potential health promoting lipids in the co-products of de-flossed milkweed. AU - Schlegel, Vicki. AU - Zbasnik, Richard. AU - Gries, Tammy. AU - Lee, Bo Hyun. AU - Carr, Timothy. AU - Lee, Ji Young. AU - Weller, Curtis. AU - Cuppett, Susan. PY - 2011/5/1. Y1 - 2011/5/1. N2 - The floss and oil of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) seeds are currently used to produce comforters/pillows and skin care products, respectively. As an outcome of these products, copious quantities co-products (pressed seed meal and pod biomass) are disposed of each year despite the presence of potential health benefitting lipids. The objective of this project was to determine the feasibility of developing the lipid fraction from of these co-products for the fast growing dietary human health market. Although certain types of lipids were affected by the extraction solvent used (hexane and diethyl ether) as were overall amounts, analysis of the each extract showed novel lipid ...
Historically, ecologists have debated the relative importance of dispersal and local species interactions (such as competition and predation) in structuring biodiversity. Recent advances have shown that these two processes often work in conjunction to produce surprising results, yet most research has remained focused on local interactions. This is particularly true in the case of global change studies, where scientists have focused on how changes to temperature or rainfall alter competitive dynamics. In this study we use common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) and its community of specialist herbivores to understand how temperature change will alter insect communities through effects on both local dynamics and dispersal among milkweed patches. We accomplish this by creating milkweed patches with known abundances of herbivores that are adjacent to unoccupied patches at various distances. Both the focal and unoccupied patches are surrounded by an insect net enclosure, and both are either warmed ...
Its always a happy day in the garden when I spy a butterfly, especially a Monarch! Sunny Hello Yellow Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) attracts lots of butterflies. It also supplies us with volunteer plants that germinate in the spring from drifting seeds. Milkweed is the only host plant for Monarchs as the caterpillars feed exclusively on…
MILKWEED FAMILY - Aselepiadaceae: Butterfly-weed; Pleurisy-root; Orange-root; Orange Milkweed Asclepias tuberosa Flowers--Bright reddish orange, in many- ...
Milkweed is crucial to the life-cycle of the monarch butterfly. Female monarchs search for milkweed to lay their eggs. Monarch larvae (caterpillars) will only feed on milkweeds in the Asclepias family. There are 108 species of milkweed in North America. Monarchs are only known to use 30 of them, but they may use any or all of them. Below is a list of milkweeds that Monarchs favor in Arizona. We hope to expand the list to the entire southwest. They are labeled whether they are more likely to grow in the low or high desert areas of the state ...
Asclepias tuberosa or pleurisy root is a species of milkweed native to eastern North America. It is a perennial plant with clustered orange or yellow flowers.
This is a perennial weed, reproducing by seeds and underground rootstocks. The stems are erect, 9-24 cm tall, greyish-green, unbranched, and contain a milky latex sap. The leaves are opposite, large, 10-18 cm long, oval shaped, covered with fine soft hairs, and prominently veined. Flowers in umbels are purplish-pink and occur at the tips of stems and axils of upper leaves. Seeds are flat, 8 mm long, reddish-brown, and have a pappus of silky hair at one end. The seeds are borne in narrow pods, 37-12 cm long. The leaves of this weed provide food for monarch butterfly larvae.. Common milkweed does not tolerate excessive moisture. Distribution is also limited by 18 and 30° mean July temperatures in the north and south respectively. ...