The Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE) provides a comprehensive exploration of a range of communicative abilities. The results of the BDAE are used to classify patients language profiles into one of the localization based classifications of aphasia: Brocas, Wernickes, anomic, conduction, transcortical, transcortical motor, transcortical sensory, and global aphasia syndromes, although the test does not always provide a diagnosis or a therapeutic approach. The assessment does provide you with a severity rating.[3] The Examination is designed to go beyond simple functional definitions of aphasia into the components of language dysfunctions (symptoms) that have been shown to underlie the various aphasic syndromes. Thus, this test evaluates various perceptual modalities (e.g., auditory, visual, and gestural), processing functions (e.g., comprehension, analysis, problem-solving), and response modalities (e.g., writing, articulation, and manipulation). This approach allows for the ...
Enabling fluent speech in non-fluent aphasia is a TedX talk about a treatment for non-fluent aphasia. This is one of the treatments that we use at SpeechWorks Inc.. An Aphasiologist Has a Stroke is another extremely interesting TedX talk.. Association International Aphasie: learn about Aphasia in many languages, including French.. National Aphasia Association (U.S.A.): information about Aphasia for people with aphasia, caregivers, and professionals. The NAA has an Aphasia Quiz, a good tool for educating people about aphasia.. Aphasia Institute (Canada): information about aphasia from a community-based centre. Aphasia Corner: aphasia simulations - helping family and friends, and people working with people with aphasia, to understand how aphasia feels; Aphasia Corner also has a community-written blog. Aphasia Recovery Connection: online support group connecting people with aphasia, caregivers, and professionals - their FaceBook page quickly addresses questions about aphasia from lots of ...
Aphasia Registry - Opportunities to take part in Aphasia research.. Aphasia & Stroke Caregivers Guide - A range of US articles on Aphasia related topics.. Atrial Fibrillation Association (Australia) - Provides information, support and access to established, new or innovative treatments for Atrial Fibrillation. Australian Aphasia Association - Their official website.. Australian Aphasia Guide - 2011 Version available through the National Library of Australia. Books on Aphasia - Books available on line for purchase at The Book Depository (Free Shipping).. Build Your Own Aphasia Talk: Increasing Community Awareness of Aphasia - This resource was developed by Latrobe University in conjunction with the Australian Aphasia Association, it aims to address the poor community awareness of the condition aphasia.. Centre for Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE) in Aphasia Rehabilitation - A new Australia-wide research program on Aphasia.. Communication Problems Following a Stroke - Fact Sheet from Speech ...
Background: Individuals with aphasia are often excluded from studies exploring post-stroke cognition because so many of the standard cognitive assessments rely on language ability. Our primary objective was to examine the association between performance on cognitive tests and performance on comprehension and naming tests in post-stroke aphasia. Second, we aimed to determine the association between language performance and a real-life measure of cognition (Kettle Test). Third, we explored the feasibility of administering cognitive tests in aphasia.Methods: Thirty-six participants with post-stroke aphasia and 32 controls were assessed on a battery of pen-and-paper cognitive tests recommended in stroke. Auditory comprehension was measured using the Comprehensive Aphasia Test and naming was measured using the Boston Naming Test. Twenty-two community dwelling participants with aphasia and controls were also asked to complete the Kettle Test. Multiple linear regressions were used to explore the relationship
Aphasia after stroke is associated with high mortality, significant motor impairment, and severe limitations in social participation. During the past decade, therapies administered by stroke teams have made great strides to limit the motor impairments caused by stroke. Unfortunately, progress in aphasia rehabilitation has not experienced the same rapid advancement. This proposal is based on preliminary evidence from our recently completed pilot study which showed that navigated excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (nerTMS) targeted to residual activity in the affected hemisphere has a significant beneficial effect on post-stroke aphasia recovery.1 The main aim of this study is to conduct a double-blind, sham-controlled, dose-response nerTMS treatment trial in subjects with chronic aphasia. By conducting this comparative trial, we will provide clinical (qualitative and quantitative) and imaging evidence that nerTMS improves language function after stroke when compared to ...
This chapter reviews the broad literature on approaches to treatment of aphasia. Behavioral interventions for aphasia are influenced by perspectives from neuroscience that emphasize that neuroplasticity in rehabilitation is experience-dependent and potent. Several principles of neuroplasticity are reviewed, and examples are described from the aphasia treatment literature. Additional principles are considered regarding influences of error production and feedback in aphasia rehabilitation outcomes. Adjuvant treatments then are described that are meant to enhance behavioral treatment outcomes through pharmacologic and neuromodulatory interventions. Finally, life participation approaches are highlighted that encourage use of multi-modality communication for daily life activities along with training of communication partners. An interdisciplinary process is emphasized in which many professionals work together to provide individuals with aphasia the maximum benefits in language recovery, communication skills,
PURPOSE: In this article, the authors encapsulate discussions of the Language Work Group that took place as part of the Workshop in Plasticity/NeuroRehabilitation Research at the University of Florida in April 2005. METHOD: In this narrative review, they define neuroplasticity and review studies that demonstrate neural changes associated with aphasia recovery and treatment. The authors then summarize basic science evidence from animals, human cognition, and computational neuroscience that is relevant to aphasia treatment research. They then turn to the aphasia treatment literature in which evidence exists to support several of the neuroscience principles. CONCLUSION: Despite the extant aphasia treatment literature, many questions remain regarding how neuroscience principles can be manipulated to maximize aphasia recovery and treatment. They propose a framework, incorporating some of these principles, that may serve as a potential roadmap for future investigations of aphasia treatment and ...
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Background: We previously developed the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39) and tested it with people with chronic aphasia. A scale allowing comparisons of quality of life between people with versus without aphasia post-stroke would be of value to clinicians.. Objectives: To evaluate the psychometrics of the SAQOL-39 in a generic stroke sample. Should this process result in a generic-stroke version of the scale (SAQOL-39g), a further aim is to compare the latter and the SAQOL-39 as tested in chronic aphasia.. Design and subjects: Repeated measures psychometric study, evaluating internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity and responsiveness to change. People admitted to hospital with a first stroke were assessed two weeks, three months and six months post stroke.. Measures: SAQOL-39, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel, Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test, General Health Questionnaire-12 and Frenchay Activities Index.. Results: Of 126 eligible ...
A recent newsletter from The Aphasia Center contemplated the "4 reasons that your doctor may tell you there is no hope" for your aphasia recovery. Dr Lori Bartels-Tobin, the CEO at The Aphasia Center , an intensive aphasia program located in St Petersburg, discussed why doctors may say that: 1/ Your doctor forms an opinion about you and your recovery potential during a very short visit.. 2/ Your doctors and other medical professionals may have a different view of progress and quality of life.. 3/ Medical professionals are not necessarily up on the latest aphasia research.. 4/ Some medical professionals still believe that aphasia recovery is limited.. I have first-hand experience for comment # 4. When I had my stroke in October 2010, my neurologist and speech language pathologist told me and my family that I should not expect to get any better. They both restated the comment that aphasia recovery is limited, that if youre not better with the first 6 to 9 months, then there is no hope for ...
Speech Therapy Aphasia Rehabilitation Workbook (STAR), Amanda Anderson. A perfect workbook full of exercises created for clients with aphasia to make stronger expressive language. These can be utilized in therapy or in carryover activities by a caregiver at home. It includes straightforward and detailed instructions for somebody so that you can use the exercises with the client. The reproducible pages can be utilized to succeed in more than one goals for fumctional naming and descriptive language. Appropriate for clients with severe expressive aphasia in addition to more advanced exercises Includes 70 full color photographs of functional objects to extend naming ability and full color photographs of scenes to extend descriptive language skills. Sections also include: carrier phrases, rote naming, divergent naming, convergent naming, functional writing exercises, reading exercises, "wh" questions, melodic intonation exercises and conversation exercises. 150 pages, softcover ...
Aphasia is a serious acquired communication disability, that affects approximately 30% of stroke survivors.1 It is chronic in nature: 50% of people diagnosed with aphasia have persistent communication problems 1 year after stroke.2 Aphasia compromises an individuals ability to undertake many activities of daily living, resulting in reduced mood and quality of life.3,4 In addition to the personal cost of aphasia, health-care costs for people with aphasia are the highest in stroke care.5 Therefore, the recent identification of recovery from aphasia as one of the top ten research priorities related to life after stroke is unsurprising.. ...
The present study demonstrates that improvement of language performance in chronic aphasia after stroke can be achieved by intensive CI aphasia therapy in only a few days. After ∼32 hours of treatment given over 10 days, substantial improvement occurred in language performance on a standard test for aphasia and an increase of the patients verbal communication in everyday life. That significant language improvements were obtained over such a short period of time in patients with chronic aphasia (average, 8.3 years after onset) is noteworthy.. Most earlier studies found either no effect of aphasia therapy18 or significant effects if treatment began within 6 months after onset of the disease and was administered several hours a week for several months.19 20 21 22 23 24 It is generally agreed that a plateau in language function is reached within the first year after stroke.1 Scattered reports indicate that therapy can produce improvements in linguistic ability after the first year after stroke, ...
Background: Communication outcomes following stroke are improved when treatments for aphasia are administered early, within the first 3 months after stroke, and provided for more than 2 hours per week. However, uncertainty remains about the optimal type of aphasia therapy. Aims: We compared constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) with individual, impairment-based intervention, both administered early and daily after acute stroke. Methods & Procedures: This prospective, single-blinded, randomised, controlled trial recruited participants with mild to severe aphasia within 10 days of an acute stroke from acute/subacute Perth metropolitan hospitals (n = 20). Participants were allocated by computer-generated block randomisation method to either the CIAT (n = 12) or individual, impairment-based intervention group (n = 8) delivered at the same intensity (45-60 min, 5 days a week) for 20 sessions over 5 weeks (15-20 hours total). The primary outcome, measured after completing the intervention, was the Aphasia
The role of the right hemisphere in recovery of language function after left hemisphere stroke remains unclear. This prospective study aimed to determine the relationship between bilateral hemispheric changes and severity of aphasia in patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke. Twenty-three patients with left hemisphere stroke with aphasia and 10 healthy control patients underwent high-resolution T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. Patients with aphasia were assessed using the Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery, and severity of aphasia was quantified in terms of aphasia quotient; patients were classified into two groups - the mild-to-moderate and severe groups - on the basis of severity of aphasia ...
Background: Performance stability is an implicit assumption within theoretical explanations of aphasia. The assumption being that when completing language processing tasks, performance will be stable from moment to moment and day to day. Theoretically, aphasia is most commonly viewed within a modular framework. that is, language processing is carried out by specific, specialised language processing modules. Aphasia is thought to result when one of these modules is dammed leading to a unique pattern of performance results. Implicit to this view of aphasia is stability, once damaged, the module will no longer be accessed and any process using the module will be impaired. This theory of aphasia is widely held within both research and clinical communities and underlies many of our approaches to the assessment and treatment of aphasia. However more recently researchers have been expressing doubts about the validity of assuming stability in aphasia performance. Instead variability in performance is ...
2011 (English)In: 3rd Nordic Aphasia Conference, 2011, Helsinki, Finland: Aphasia rehabilitation today and in the future, Helsinki, Finland, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) ...
Aphasia, commonly defined as impairment or loss of language functions, is a frequent and often chronic consequence of stroke, with detrimental effects on patient autonomy and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Although beneficial in some cases, the effectiveness of behavioral therapy is often limited, and therefore new complementary treatments must be developed in order to improve rehabilitation of post-stroke aphasia.. In most individuals, language areas in the brain are localized in the left hemisphere. After stroke, there is evidence that the brain reorganizes such that either areas close to damaged language areas in the Left Hemisphere, or anatomically similar areas in the Right Hemisphere, are recruited to perform language tasks.. Recently, studies have begun to examine the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on aphasia rehabilitation. One such technique is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), which involves administering weak electrical currents through surface ...
Synonyms for amnesic aphasia in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for amnesic aphasia. 4 synonyms for amnesic aphasia: amnestic aphasia, anomia, anomic aphasia, nominal aphasia. What are synonyms for amnesic aphasia?
Comparative research on aphasia and aphasia rehabilitation is challenged by the lack of comparable assessment tools across different languages. In English, a large array of tools is available, while in most other languages, the selection is more limited. Importantly, assessment tools are often simple translations and do not take into consideration specific linguistic and psycholinguistic parameters of the target languages. As a first step in meeting the needs for comparable assessment tools, the Comprehensive Aphasia Test is currently being adapted into a number of languages spoken in Europe. In this article, some key challenges encountered in the adaptation process and the solutions to ensure that the resulting assessment tools are linguistically and culturally equivalent, are proposed. Specifically, we focus on challenges and solutions related to the use of imageability, frequency, word length, spelling-to-sound regularity and sentence length and complexity as underlying properties in the ...
Purpose: Treatment for aphasia, a communication disorder resulting from damage to speech and language areas of the brain, has often been guided by clinical intuition and pragmatism. This manuscript aimed to identify predictors of effective aphasia treatment that could better indicate a patients prognosis. Method: This retrospective study analyzed behavioral and neurophysiological data collected from 26 individuals with chronic aphasia who had undergone intensive semantic and phonological treatment for anomia, a naming impairment common among all aphasic patients. Using trained and untrained items as measures of correct naming improvement, the following analyses were performed: 1) a partial correlation examined whether participants who began the semantic treatment first improved to a greater degree than participants who began the phonological treatment first; 2) a simple linear regression tested whether the average number of paradigm completions (APC) predicted an individuals change in correct naming;
Aphasia usually results from lesions to the language-relevant areas of the temporal and parietal cortex of the brain, such as Brocas area, Wernickes area, and the neural pathways between them. These areas are almost always located in the left hemisphere, and in most people this is where the ability to produce and comprehendlanguage is found. However, in a very small number of people, language ability is found in the right hemisphere. In either case, damage to these language areas can be caused by a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other brain injury. Aphasia may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor or progressive neurological disease, e.g., Alzheimers or Parkinsons disease. It may also be caused by a sudden hemorrhagic event within the brain. Certain chronic neurological disorders, such as epilepsy or migraine, can also include transient aphasia as a prodromal or episodic symptom. Aphasia is also listed as a rare side effect of the fentanyl patch, an opioid used to control ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - An acoustic measure of lexical stress differentiates aphasia and aphasia plus apraxia of speech after stroke. AU - Vergis, Marianne K.. AU - Ballard, Kirrie J.. AU - Duffy, Joseph R.. AU - McNeil, Malcolm R.. AU - Scholl, Dominique. AU - Layfield, Claire. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - Background: Apraxia of Speech (AOS) is partly characterised by impaired production of prosody in words and sentences. Identification of dysprosody is based on perceptual judgements of clinicians, with limited literature on potential quantitative objective measures.Aims: This study investigated whether an acoustic measure quantifying degree of lexical stress contrastiveness in three syllable words, produced in isolation and in a carrier sentence, differentiated individuals with AOS with/without aphasia (AOS), aphasia only (APH), and healthy controls (CTL).Methods & Procedures: Eight individuals with aphasia, nine with AOS plus aphasia and 8 age-matched control participants named pictures of strong-weak ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Tapping into neural resources of communication. T2 - Formulaic language in aphasia therapy. AU - Stahl, Benjamin. AU - Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana. PY - 2015. Y1 - 2015. KW - Aphasia. KW - Apraxia of speech. KW - Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy. KW - Formulaic language. KW - Intensive Language-Action Therapy. KW - Left-hemisphere stroke. KW - Melodic Intonation Therapy. KW - Post-stroke depression and anxiety. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947207116&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84947207116&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01526. DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01526. M3 - Comment/debate. AN - SCOPUS:84947207116. VL - 6. JO - Frontiers in Psychology. JF - Frontiers in Psychology. SN - 1664-1078. IS - OCT. M1 - 1526. ER - ...
In a study designed to differentiate why some stroke patients recover from aphasia and others do not, investigators have found that a compensatory reorganization of language function to right hemispheric brain regions bodes ...
... On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms or a full patient history. A similarity measure between symptoms and diseases is provided.
... brings you the latest aphasia resources, tips and a-ha moments from Life Participation professionals who deliver way more than stroke and aphasia facts. Topics include: aphasia group treatment ideas, communication access strategies, plus ways for growing awareness and funds for your group aphasia therapy program. ​This podcast is produced by Aphasia Access.
TY - GEN. T1 - Diagnosis of aphasia using neural and fuzzy techniques. AU - Jantzen, Jan. AU - Axer, H.. AU - Keyserlingk, D. Graf von. PY - 2000. Y1 - 2000. N2 - The language disability Aphasia has several sub-diagnoses such as Amnestic, Broca, Global, and Wernicke. Data concerning 265 patients is available in the form of test scores and diagnoses, made by physicians according to the Aachen Aphasia Test. A neural network model has been built, which is available for consultation on the World Wide Web. The neural network model is in this paper compared with a fuzzy model. Rather than concluding which method provides the best approximation, the paper acts as an example solution useful for other benchmark studies.. AB - The language disability Aphasia has several sub-diagnoses such as Amnestic, Broca, Global, and Wernicke. Data concerning 265 patients is available in the form of test scores and diagnoses, made by physicians according to the Aachen Aphasia Test. A neural network model has been ...
There are many types of aphasia, which are usually diagnosed by which area of the language-dominant side of the brain is affected and the extent of the damage.. People with Brocas aphasia, for example, have damage to the front portion of the language-dominant side of the brain. They may eliminate the articles "and" and "the" from their language, and speak in short, but meaningful, sentences. They usually can understand some speech of others.. Those with Wernickes aphasia have damage to the side portion of the language-dominant part of the brain. They may speak in long confusing sentences, add unnecessary words, or create new words. They usually have difficulty understanding the speech of others.. Global aphasia is the result of damage to a large portion of the language-dominant side of the brain. People with global aphasia have difficulties with speaking or comprehending language.. ...
Speech therapy software for stroke, aphasia, apraxia, articulation, speech production and word retrieval - traumatic brain injury, reading comprehension.
Most people undergo speech and language therapy to rehabilitate their language skills and supplement their communication experiences.. At senior living rehabilitation communities such as ours, speech-language pathologists work with individuals to determine the particular variety of aphasia and the amount of function available. There is no medical cure for aphasia, but people can improve over time, particularly if speech therapy is provided. Aphasia can be helped even 10 years after the initial onset if the individuals are provided access to intensive treatment. New imaging studies reveal that with time, the brain can make new networks and heal.. Our communitys speech and language therapy for aphasia helps improve the persons ability to communicate by restoring as much language as possible, teaching how to make up for lost language skills and working with a variety of methods to communicate. We have access to vital resources, and our professionals work one-on-one with seniors with aphasia to ...
The severity and scope of the problems depend on the extent of damage and the area of the brain affected. Some people may comprehend what others speak relatively well but struggle to find words to speak. Other people may speak more clearly than they can write. Your doctor may refer to one of three broad categories of aphasia nonfluent, fluent and global that describes what region of the brain was damaged and how communication is usually affected. The two primary language networks for most people are located in the brains left hemisphere.. Nonfluent aphasia. Damage to the language network near the left frontal area of the brain usually results in Broca aphasia. Its also called nonfluent aphasia. People with this disorder struggle to get words out, speak in very short sentences and leave out words. A person might say, Want food or Walk park today. Although the sentences arent complete, a listener can usually decipher the meaning. A person with Broca aphasia may comprehend what other people ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Interaction-focussed therapy for aphasia. T2 - effects on communication and quality of life. AU - Barnes, Scott. AU - Nickels, Lyndsey. PY - 2018. Y1 - 2018. N2 - Purpose: This study examined the effects of an interaction-focussed therapy for aphasia, which involved both people with aphasia and their familiar conversation partners. It was hypothesised the interaction-focussed therapy would lead to positive changes in targeted conversation behaviours, and improved quality of life for participants with aphasia. Method: Three people with chronic aphasia and three of their familiar conversation partners completed an 8-week interaction-focussed therapy programme. A series of single case multiple-baseline ABA experiments were conducted. Outcome measures focussed on changes in targeted behaviours between pre- and post-therapy conversation samples, and changes in quality of life. Result: All participant dyads improved their conversations. Familiar conversation partners demonstrated ...
... : The disorder that makes you lose your words - Susan Wortman-Jutt, Fluent Aphasia (Wernickes Aphasia), Pinegrove- Aphasia (Acoustic), Expressive Aphasia - Sarah Scott - Teenage Stroke Survivor, Pinegrove - Aphasia (Official Audio)
Recovery of language function after aphasic stroke is the product of activity in domain-general and domain-specific distributed brain networks. These may include left and right fronto-temporo-parietal, cingulo-opercular, and default mode networks.. This functional MRI study investigated the effects of a previous left hemisphere stroke on brain activity during speech production in fifty-three patients. The results were related to twenty-four healthy participants. The analyses investigated not only local activity, but also functional connectivity both within and between distributed networks.. Although activity within individual networks was not predictive of speech production, the relative activity between networks was a predictor of both within-scanner and out-of-scanner performance, over and above that predicted from lesion volume and various demographic factors. The specific imaging predictors were the differential activity between the default mode network and both the left and right ...
Aphasia primarily affects the individuals ability to speak. Also, this condition can affect the patients understanding of language. Aphasia affects over 1 million people across the world. The level of severity and impairment varies. However, one must understand that this condition does not make an affected individual less intelligent. No cure has yet been discovered, although speech therapy can help. Speech-language therapists help the patient to relearn language skills. Also, they offer advice for improving communication. Read on to know how to identify aphasia.. Aphasia - Points to Identify. ...
Aphasia is a language disorder caused by damage to the area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension often the result of a stroke. If you have been diagnosed with aphasia, we invite you to join our weekly Aphasia Conversation Group. Here people with Aphasia and their caregivers can find a place to share thoughts, frustrations and successes with others facing similar challenges. These interactions also offer you the chance to gain the confidence and support necessary to move forward with recovery.. Aphasia Support Group Flyer. ...
Village residents Bill and Barbara Grundy will be the hosts of a "Bach and Brunch" fundraiser Sunday for the Adler Aphasia Center.. Bill Grundy, a former Ridgewood High School football coach and gym teacher in Demarest, suffered a stroke at age 50 that caused him to develop aphasia. The communication disorder can impair the expression and understanding of spoken language, reading and writing.. The stroke and aphasia forced Grundy to end his career working with young people. Previously, he had also been Bergen Countys director of summer recreation.. The condition, which does not affect intellect, is nevertheless frustrating and isolating for sufferers and their friends and families.. At the Adler Aphasia Center in Maywood, Grundy received therapy and learned to use an iPad with personalized software to help him communicate. The center has a variety of programs that address the long-term needs of stroke and brain injury survivors and their families.. ...
Description of disease Aphasia, amnesic. Treatment Aphasia, amnesic. Symptoms and causes Aphasia, amnesic Prophylaxis Aphasia, amnesic
The Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp Committee is made up of members from UBC, Douglas College, March of Dimes and the community. The Committee is represented by both healthcare professionals and people with aphasia to ensure that the Sea to Sky Aphasia Camp meets the needs of those living with aphasia in the community.
Aphasia Toolbox revolutionized the treatment & recovery of aphasia, Dysphasia Speech, and Stroke Aphasia recovery; helping hundreds of people recover since 1976.
Aphasia Toolbox revolutionized the treatment & recovery of aphasia, Dysphasia Speech, and Stroke Aphasia recovery; helping hundreds of people recover since 1976.
Aphasia & Dysphasia & Loss of Vision Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Transient Ischemic Attack. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
Todays theme at the Nordic Aphasia Conference is multilingualism (i.e. people speaking two or more languages). Treating people with aphasia who are multilingual is a real challenge!. The presenters, Mira Goral and Monica Norvik, raised some truly intriguing questions. How does the multilingual brain actually work? How do you know what to assess? If you need an interpreter during therapy, does the interpreter know enough about aphasia (and aphasia therapy) not to correct what the person is saying?. Since I am focused on issues of social media use, I found it particularly interesting that Monica said that social media may be used to get a picture of the persons pre-onset use of the different language. The videos we make and post online thus become a tool for therapy, long after they were created.. ...
This blog stands for faith in God and better stroke awareness. Everyone should be aware of stroke signs and know what to do. The life you save may be your own. Toward that end, stroke survivors and families are invited to share comments or stories. This is not designed to give anyone medical advice - we might talk about stroke care in general but always, always seek appropriate medical advice ...
Aphasia is an acquired disorder of language due to brain damage. Aphasia does not include (1) developmental disorders of language, often called dysphasia in the United States; (2) purely motor speech disorders, limited to articulation of speech via the oral-motor apparatus, referred to as stuttering, dysarthria, and apraxia of speech; or (3) ...
Background and Purpose-In a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, it was investigated whether piracetam improves language recovery in poststroke aphasia assessed by neuropsychological tests and activation PET measurement of cerebral blood flow.. Methods-Twenty-four stroke patients with aphasia were randomly allocated to 2 groups: 12 patients received 2400 mg piracetam twice daily, 12 placebo. Before and at the end of the 6-week treatment period in which both groups received intensive speech therapy, the patients were examined neuropsychologically and studied with H215O PET at rest and during activation with a word-repetition task. Blood flow was analyzed in 14 language-activated brain regions defined on reconstructed surface views from MRI coregistered to the PET images.. Results-Before treatment, both groups were comparable with respect to performance in language tasks and to type and severity of aphasia. In the piracetam group, increase of activation effect was significantly ...
Aphasia is an acquired language disorder subsequent to brain damage in the left hemisphere. It is characterized by diminished abilities to produce and understand both spoken and written language compared with the speakers presumed ability pre-cerebral damage. The type and severity of the aphasia depends not only on the location and extent of the cerebral damage but also the effect the lesion has on connecting areas of the brain. Type and severity of aphasia is diagnosed in comparison with assumed normal adult language. Language changes associated with normal aging are not classed as aphasia. The diagnosis and assessment of aphasia in children, which is unusual, takes account of age norms.. The most common cause of aphasia is a cerebral vascular accident (CVA) commonly referred to as a stroke, but brain damage following traumatic head injury such as road accidents or gunshot wounds can also cause aphasia. Aphasia following such traumatic events is non-progressive in contrast to aphasia arising ...
Aphasia is a common and often devastating consequence of stroke, affecting approximately 1 million patients in the US, including 80,000 new patients annually. The course of recovery from aphasia is highly variable, and it is now understood that functional recovery after brain injury depends largely on the adaptive plasticity of neural systems. Although it has been recognized that individual variability may account for differences in functional resilience after neurologic insult, no validated neurophysiologic indicators of neuroplasticity are currently being used clinically to predict cognitive recovery from aphasia or other cognitive deficits after brain injury. Evidence indicates that variability in response to the application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may index differences in cortical plasticity, both within the motor system and in other domains. Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is an effective TMS method for inducing persistent changes in motor physiology, and converging ...
I found this article very interesting. It discussed how certain people suffering from aphasia are able to sing songs that are familiar to them, and how music can help in aphasia recovery. There were three experiments performed. In experiment one, each subject was asked to complete the words to familiar songs which they identified as having heard before prior to the experiment, both with and without the melodies. In experiment two, each subject listened to twenty unfamiliar songs with randomly assigned syntactic phrases and the subjects were asked to repeat the phrases with and without the melodies. In the third experiment, each subject listened to a simple melody. The melody was the combined with 32 excerpts from the unfamiliar songs in experiment two, then the excerpts were asked to be sung and spoken. ...